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Logan Hochstetler

Logan Hochstetler

Short Bytes: The internet is vast, yet an enormous chunk of it is still untouched by the ordinary world. We address that part by the names Deep Web, Darknet, and Dark Web. Darknet is a type of network not accessible using normal modes. Deep Web – which includes dark web as a subset – is the part of the world wide web not indexed by the search engines like Google, Bing, DuckDuckGo.

For most of us, the web is limited to ten twenty or maybe fifty websites. Most of this limited collection is in the form of Google sites and services. In reality, the internet is enormous, and it has around one billion websites existing on servers around the globe.

Even with those billion websites, the web isn’t complete. Many believe the world wide web we see is only the tip of an iceberg. Two terms Darknet and Deep Web, in some sense, justify the presence of this hidden web about which most people are unaware. And those who know about the darknet often confuse it with deep web. Whereas, both are completely separate.

What is Deep Web?

Over the centuries, when the technology became advanced, humans built machines capable of diving to the depths of the oceans. That’s how we were able to discover the remains of RMS Titanic. The search engine crawlers do the same work as done by the explorer submarines. They dive into the internet and take a note of whatever they find.

We might have found Titanic, but there is a lot to discover in the bottomless oceans. Similar is the case of the search engine crawlers, they haven’t identified various parts of the World Wide Web, and we call it the Deep Web.

For instance, the search engines won’t be able to access the servers and websites hosting data about some government-led secret alien mission. But the deep web isn’t as mysterious as it sounds. A private network, tagged as deep web, can be right next to your house. It’s just the internet that isn’t within reach of standard search engine crawlers. For instance, the network maintained by some paid streaming service. It is a type of deep web or hidden web. Obviously, the search engines won’t be opting for a monthly subscription to index the catalog of such websites.

What is Darknet?

Contrary to deep web, Darknet is better known to the people. It is an encrypted network built on top of the existing internet, and specific software or tools are required to access the darknet. It is possible, conventional protocols used on the internet might not work on the darknet.

Darknet provides anonymity to the users. One such darknet is Tor or The Onion Router. You require the Tor browser to enter into the Tor’s network.

Tor can be used to visit everyday internet websites, but it also has numerous hidden websites and services which we can’t be accessed on the regular internet. Tor powers them using its protocol known as Tor Hidden Service Protocol. And the websites limited to the Tor network have a special .onion address. Due to this, Tor’s darknet is also known as onionland.

Friend-to-Friend (F2F) networks are another kind of darknet. In this case, two familiar people communicate with each other directly over the internet. They might want to share some file over a P2P connection. Such networks, not accessible by other people, can be encrypted or password protected. So, only the concerned people have the access.

Increasing the confusion…..

What Is Dark Web

Deep Web Dark Web

 


 

There is another thing you would like to be aware of, the dark web. You can think of the dark web as a subset of the deep web. You need to understand the distinction between deep web and darknet, and the fact that the internet and WWW (World Wide Web) aren’t the same things.

The darknet is a network, and the deep web constitutes the chunk of the World Wide Web that is beyond the reach of the search engines. So, we can decipher dark web as the World Wide Web of the darknets like Tor, Freenet, etc. That is, the services and websites running on the darknet is the dark web.

Did you find this helpful? Drop your thoughts and feedback.

Source: This article was published on fossbytes.com by Aditya Tiwari

Facebook is by far and away the largest social network on the Internet, bringing together friends, family, and colleagues to discuss in text, images, and video form whatever they feel like every day. But Facebook is apparently changing, and within 5 years the entire social network will consist of video content.

That’s not the prediction of this writer or some social network researcher, it’s the view of Nicola Mendelsohn, Facebook’s vice president for Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. She also believes that Facebook “will be definitely mobile,” which we can only assume means accessed almost exclusively on mobile devices.

nicola_mendelsohn

Mendelsohn’s claim that most people will be using mobile devices to access Facebook in the near future is the much more believable prediction of the two. Facebook being 100% videos by 2021? I don’t think so.

Video is still a relatively new addition to Facebook, but most certainly a feature that is growing in popularity. Zuckerberg thinks it is important, meaning it’s going to get a lot of attention and resources put behind it. So it will grow rapidly, but I can’t see it replacing images and text. In fact, I doubt Facebook’s management would want that to happen seeing as it owns image sharing service Instagram (although it can also handle video).

facebook_laptop

Not everything works as a video, and not everyone is comfortable making videos. Sometimes you just want to write, or have a text chat, or post an image of a cat. Video takes longer to create unless we’re talking Vine-length captures, and is much easier to create poorly ultimately meaning it doesn’t get posted.

Mendelsohn says the amount of text appearing on Facebook is declining every year while video grows and virtual reality is coming. On those points I’m sure she’s correct, but by 2021 I expect plenty of the billion+ people using Facebook to still be tapping out sentences of text and sharing them with their little community of followers.

Source: This article was published geek.com By MATTHEW HUMPHRIES

Don't be a know-it-all. Be this instead.

I'm a big fan of Microsoft's Satya Nadella. Since taking over as CEO just three years ago, he's used a combination of effective leadership and brilliant business moves to return the tech company to relevance.

In a recent interview with Business Insider, Nadella credits Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck's best-selling book, Mindset, as the inspiration for the culture he's trying to build at Microsoft.

Here's Satya:

"I was reading it not in the context of business or work culture, but in the context of my children's education. The author describes the simple metaphor of kids at school. One of them is a 'know-it-all' and the other is a 'learn-it-all,' and the 'learn-it-all' always will do better than the other one even if the 'know-it-all' kid starts with much more innate capability."

"Going back to business: If that applies to boys and girls at school, I think it also applies to CEOs like me, and entire organizations, like Microsoft."

We could summarize this brilliant strategy in one sentence:

"Don't be a know-it-all; be a learn-it-all."

Why this is great advice.

There's no shortage of self-proclaimed experts, authorities, and gurus out there. But self-proclaimed titles aren't only useless, they're dangerous.

My colleague Mandy Antoniacci explained why in a past column:

"For me, referring to yourself as an 'expert' in any field assumes the position that you have reached your fullest potential. It implies you have attained a thrilling pinnacle in your career and that your thirst for knowledge in a particular subject has been quenched."

In other words, experts consider themselves "know-it-alls."

But instead of considering yourself an expert, what if you think of yourself as a student?

Now, you've switched your focus. Instead of limiting yourself or becoming overly concerned with how you are viewed by others, your primary concern is one of growth. Mistakes are no longer "failures"; rather, they're learning opportunities.

And that influences your entire approach to work and life.

For example, notice how Nadella has implemented this mindset at Microsoft:

"Some people can call it rapid experimentation, but more importantly, we call it 'hypothesis testing.' Instead of saying 'I have an idea,' what if you said 'I have a new hypothesis, let's go test it, see if it's valid, ask how quickly can we validate it.' And if it's not valid, move on to the next one."

"There's no harm in claiming failure, if the hypothesis doesn't work. To me, being able to come up with the new ways of doing things, new ways of framing what is a failure and what is a success, how does one achieve success--it's through a series of failures, a series of hypothesis testing. That's in some sense the real pursuit."

Nadella certainly practices what he preaches. (For example, check out the extraordinary email he sent employees after what many considered an "epic fail.") And when the leader sets the example, it sets the tone for everyone else.

So, whether you're a CEO, an employee, a parent, a child, or all of the above, try it out today:

Test the hypothesis. If it works, figure out how to make it better. If it doesn't, move on to the next idea.

But no matter what, remember:

Don't be a know-it-all. Be a learn-it-all.

Source: This article was published inc.com By Justin Bariso

The new A.I. system could soon make its way onto your smartphone.

Your phone might someday save your skin.

Stanford researchers say they've created a new artificial intelligence system that can identify skin cancer as well as trained doctors can. According to a study they published in science journal Nature, the program was able to distinguish between cancerous moles and harmless ones with more than 90 percent accuracy.

The researchers trained the system by feeding it nearly 130,000 images of moles and lesions, with some of them being cancerous. The system scanned the images pixel by pixel, identifying characteristics that helped it make each diagnosis. Using machine learning, the A.I. grew more accurate as it studied more samples.

It then went head to head with 21 trained dermatologists. The result: The A.I. software achieved "performance on par with all tested experts." The system correctly identified 96 percent of the malignant samples, and 90 percent of the (generally harmless) benign ones. For the doctors in the study, those numbers were 95 percent and 76 percent, respectively.

This could have huge implications: The study points out that 5.4 million new cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year in the U.S. alone. If installed in smartphones, the authors say, this technology could provide a simple, low cost form of early detection.

Identifying melanoma early on is critical. The five-year survival rate when the cancer is caught in its earliest stages is 99 percent. That number drops to 14 percent when detected in its late stages. Having the equivalent of a dermatologist--as far as diagnosing goes--in your pocket could help patients keep a closer watch on their own skin and seek medical treatment sooner.

That's not to say dermatologists will be replaced--they'd still be the ones to perform any procedures necessary. And in a blog post on Stanford's website, the authors suggest doctors might use the tool for in-office diagnoses.

Before the system can achieve its potential, though, it will have to be able to detect cancer from images captured by smartphones. While phone cameras are rapidly improving, the A.I. is currently trained to work only with high quality medical images.

Still, the technology is moving in that direction. Being able to detect early could have an impact on the 10,000 people who die from skin cancer each year in the U.S. alone.

The Stanford researchers developed the framework for the A.I. system using an image classification algorithm that had previously been built by Google.

Source: This article was published inc.com By Kevin J. Ryan

 

  • Google Android will power new cars from Volvo and Audi
  • The operating system will enable more functions than Android Auto, such as more integrated voice control and Google Assistant.
  • Google will discuss the launch more during Google I/O this week.

Google announced on Monday that new cars from Audi and Volvo will have a version of its Android operating system built in, allowing drivers to use their voice to control things like the cabin temperature and opening the sunroof, even if they don't have an Android phone.

This is a big step from Android Auto, Google's software that allows users with Android phones to control some functions, like playing music.

"Your car's built-in infotainment system could allow you to control your air conditioning, sunroof, and windows, find the nearest restaurant with Google Maps, listen to Spotify or NPR, or just ask your Google Assistant for help—even when you leave your phone behind," Google Android product manager Haris Ramic wrote in a blog post.

Volvo's new cars will launch with Android within two years, the company said. Volvo currently offers its own proprietary system which allows drivers to choose between Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, two similar pieces of software.

Google said it will demonstrate the software and provide more information on Android for cars during the Google I/O developer conference, which begins on Wednesday.

Source: This article was published cnbc.com By Todd Haselton

No one likes to find bugs in their home, but a particular type of creepy-crawler poses an extra danger, new research finds.

"Kissing bugs" spread Chagas disease, one of five parasitic infections the Centers for Disease Control is currently targeting for public health action. Over 300,000 people in the U.S. currently live with it, and most don't even know.

Chagas can present itself with mild or even no symptoms, but the effects can be life-threatening. The infection can increase risk of death by two or three times, a new study published in Plos shows. Brazilian researchers linked Chagas with an increased risk of heart disease - 17 times more to be exact.

The infection poses the greatest risk in Latin and South America, and most people with Chagas in the U.S. acquired it abroad. However, kissing bugs live 25 states from coast to coast, mostly in the South.

Photo credit: Centers for Disease Control
Photo credit: Centers for Disease Control

Triatomine bugs - also called kissing, assassin or vampire bugs - hide indoors or sometimes in the cracks and holes of substandard housing. They also make their homes beneath porches, in dog houses and under rocks and wood.

While they look fairly tame, the blood-sucking pests spread Chagas by biting humans, usually while they're sleeping. After feeding, parasites in bugs' feces can enter the body through breaks in the skin. Sleeping people can also accidently scratch or rub the feces into the eyes or mouth.

The first few weeks after infection mark the acute phase, when people may show mild symptoms like fever, aches or fatigue. The most noticeable marker is called Romaña's sign - when the eyelids near the point of infection start to swell. The chronic phase of the disease is when cardiac or intestinal complications can develop.

While antiparasitic drugs can treat Chagas if caught early, the best way to prevent it controlling the bugs that spread it, according to CNN. To prevent infestation, seal cracks and gaps, remove wood or rock piles near your home and have pets sleep indoors. Roach hotels and other "bait" won't work against triatomine bugs, the CDC notes.

While it's important to note the likelihood of getting Chagas in the U.S. is relatively low, the disease shouldn't go ignored. If you suspect you might have Chagas, talk to your doctor right away.

Source: This article was published Good Housekeeping By Caroline Picar

Wednesday, 24 May 2017 12:33

Google is doing deep surgery on Android

The search giant's mobile software runs on 2 billion devices. Its next job: Getting those devices on the latest version -- and trying to reach a billion more.

n 2006, Andy Rubin -- who created Google's Android software -- showed an early demo of his mobile operating system to Hiroshi Lockheimer, then a 31-year-old college dropout he hoped to hire at Google. It was two years before Android's official debut, and that first demo was crude.

It was on a candybar of a phone, the HTC Tornado, with a small screen and a physical keypad.

"It didn't look anything like Android does today," Lockheimer, now Android's chief, tells me in a conference room with a glass wall overlooking Google's campus in Mountain View, California. "It was nowhere near [version] 1.0 ... but it just felt so tantalizing."

Android has since become the most popular mobile OS on the planet. On Wednesday, at Google's annual I/O developer conference, the company announced Android now runs on 2 billion devices, up from 1.4 billion in 2015. (By comparison, Apple's iOS software runs on nearly 1.7 billion iPhones and iPads.)

 
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Hiroshi Lockheimer, Android's chief, is trying to fight off fragmentation.
James Martin/CNET

Android isn't just on phones. It's also in cars, watches, TVs and, in the age of internet-connected everything, random devices like security cameras, fridges and routers.

That's why Google is touting new figures about each of its Android offshoots. Android Autos, its in-car dashboard software, runs on 300 models, including cars from Volvo and Audi. Android Wear, software tailored for wearable tech, is in almost 50 watches, from brands like Movado and Emporio Armani. Android TV boasts 1 million activations every two months and has more than 3,000 TV apps. And Android Things, Google's platform for the burgeoning "internet of things" has "thousands" of developers in 60 countries.

Spreading the gospel of Android is crucial for Lockheimer and Google CEO Sundar Pichai because the OS is the gateway drug to the company's services, including Google Maps, Gmail, YouTube and its iconic search engine. To broaden Android's scope, Google set its sights on everything -- from staking a place in your living room to reaching people in remote countries, where entire populations are just coming online.

But even with Android's polished resume, Lockheimer has a problem -- especially as Google and Apple keep jostling for supremacy. Asked what the 10th anniversary of the iPhone means to him, he says, "Nothing. It's great to have really capable competitors." That milestone doesn't matter because, he says, "Every year we're competing with Apple."

 
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David Burke, vice president of engineering for Android, says Project Treble is a "profound change" for Android.
James Martin/CNET

I buy that in part because it's not about getting Android on phones. Google already dominates in that department. Almost nine out of every 10 smartphones shipped worldwide run on Android.

The problem is getting the newest version of Android in people's hands. Literally.

If you have an Android phone, it's a mathematical likelihood you're using an old version of the software. Only about 7 percent of all Android users currently have the most recent version, called Nougat, installed on their devices. A whopping 82 percent of Android owners are on three older versions: Marshmallow, Lollipop and KitKat. The oldest of those, KitKat, was released in 2013. (By comparison, Apple's most recent version of its mobile software, iOS 10, has found its way onto 79 percent of all iPhones and iPads.)

For the uninitiated, Google's got a sweet tooth when it comes to naming major Android releases. They're in alphabetical order, and all have a confectionary namesake (KitKat is Lockheimer's favorite candy). Now Google is sharing new details about the next version, which for now is nicknamed "Android O." The goal: Getting more people to adopt the software so it doesn't end up being more like "Android Ohhh yeah I remember when they announced it, but what happened?"

Part of Google's plan is something called Project Treble, which tries to clear away some of the roadblocks between consumers and new versions of Android.

"Treble is literally the deepest surgery we've done on Android to date," says David Burke, vice president of engineering for Android. "It's a pretty profound change."

Operation Android

To understand the solution, you first have to understand the problem. Android suffers from a pesky condition the industry calls "fragmentation." (Bear with me. This is going to get a little wonky.)

Though Google develops the software, it's up to device makers and wireless carriers to sign off on it before it gets to you. That's because they usually add their own apps and flourishes then have to test everything before putting it on phones and other gadgets.

But even before the software gets to handset makers such as Samsung and LG, or carriers such as Verizon and AT&T, it makes a pit stop with chipmakers.

"Treble is literally the deepest surgery we've done on Android to date."

David Burke, vice president of engineering for Android

One of the targets of Project Treble is those chipmakers, which include companies like Qualcomm. The chipmakers customize bits of Android code to make sure the software works well with their processors. This can be tricky because the code is interspersed throughout Android's framework.

At least, it used to be. With Project Treble, Google separated out the particular code that chipmakers care about to make it easier for them to find everything in one place. That should cut the amount of time it takes for updates to flow down the pipeline from chipmakers to device makers.

"The goal here is, can we cut down the number of months it takes from when there's a new version of Android to the time it gets to users?" says Burke. "Ultimately it's trying to make it easier -- grease the wheels of the whole ecosystem."

Still, it's not a silver bullet. While Project Treble addresses the first part of the pipeline, handset makers and carriers can still take as much time as they want before pushing out Android updates. That's because hardware manufacturers might not find it profitable to update your phone, says Jan Dawson, principal analyst at JackDaw Research. If you get fed up with your outdated software, you could end up buying a whole new phone. "They have mixed incentives," he says.

Lockheimer thinks Project Treble is a big deal, but he also takes a tempered view of its impact. "It doesn't mean automatic updates are going to happen," he says. "It's still work. And someone needs to do that work."

Vital signs

With Android O, officially released later this summer, Google focused on the "fundamentals," Lockheimer tells me. That's things like speed, performance and battery life. Google calls these "vitals," which is especially apt given all its talk about "deep surgery" for Android.

One thing Google did to conserve your phone's battery life is limit what developers can do with apps running in the background. As an example, it's put more restrictions on what an app can do with location services or launching into specific tasks.

"If your battery goes out at 4 p.m., it doesn't matter what features your phone has," says Stephanie Saad Cuthbertson, director of product management for Android.

Google said it worked closely with app developers to strike a balance between what was good for the app and what was good for users.

The company is also introducing a new feature on Wednesday called Google Play Protect, which will let people see how Google uses machine learning to scan apps to make sure they won't harm your phone with viruses or malware.

But Google is trying to fix more than just the plumbing. Android O will show off a bunch of new features to the 7,200 developers expected to attend I/O over the next three days.

There's a new smart copy-and-paste feature that seems particularly interesting. When you highlight text in an article or text message, for instance, Android will automatically detect if it's an address or a proper noun. If it's an address, the software will highlight the entire address, so you don't have to. And instead of merely suggesting actions such as "copy" or "select all," it may suggest a map. If you select a phone number, expect to see the phone dialer.

Google is also bringing autofill features to Android, similar to how they work on browsers. If you enter your login information in an app, your phone will ask if you want to save your password or username. The next time you try logging into an app, you'll be given the choice to autofill the information. (The text box will turn yellow, just like it does on Google's Chrome browser.)

[moduleplant id="535"]

Another feature is picture-in-picture, which had been available for Android TV but not on phones. It's not just for videos. Burke says the company is also working on a version for Google Maps. That means you can see a small map at the corner of your screen if you want to switch apps to, say, play a song or look up a restaurant on Yelp.

Living room dreams

"Can we turn off those lights?"

We're in a tiny room at Google's sprawling headquarters that has been set up to look like a living room. There's a TV, a couch, a coffee table and some floor lamps. As CNET's video crew sets up for a shot, one of our cameramen worries the room is too bright. When he asks to kill the lights, Sascha Prueter, director of Android TV, says, "Actually, that's a good demo."

"Turn out the lights," he says, speaking into a video game controller. The lights go out. The crew cheers.

 
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Android TV has a new interface that puts movies and shows front and center.
James Martin/CNET

It's part of the the newest updates to Android TV, Google's software for powering set-top boxes and other TV devices, including the Nvidia Shield, which Prueter is using for the demo.

It may seem a little odd to ask your TV to turn off the lights, but the company wants interactions like this to become second nature to you. Pichai unveiled Google's digital helper, called the Assistant, at last year's I/O. It's designed to compete with Amazon's Alexa, Apple's Siri and Microsoft's Cortana. The Assistant can do things like play songs, give you flight information or tell you the weather.

With the Assistant on Android TV, you'll be able to check on things like an internet-connected security camera or use your voice to search for a particular actor on YouTube.

smarttext500px.gif

 

When you highlight text in Android, a new feature gives you more options than just "copy" and "paste."
Google

 

 


The user interface for Android TV is getting a revamp too. Content will be front and center now, while you previously had to open up an app first. You'll also see a preview or snippet of a show or movie as you're scrolling through a list of options and rest the selector over a particular title.

 

This is only the latest phase in the company's assault on your living room. Google already has Chromecasts for streaming video and audio, Google Wi-Fi routers for creating a strong home network and Google Home, a smart speaker with the Assistant built in. Home is meant to take on the Amazon Echo, which was a surprise hit when it was released two years ago.

Your home is fast becoming one of the fiercest battlegrounds in Silicon Valley. Besides the brawl between Google and Amazon, Apple offers its HomeKit software for iOS and is rumored to be readying its own smart speaker. Microsoft just announced it will build Cortana into speakers with the help of outside device makers.

And while Facebook hasn't announced any plans to enter the market, CEO Mark Zuckerberg spent all of last year building his own digital butler, named Jarvis.

Adding the Assistant to Android TV is another Trojan horse for Google's digital helper. Prueter said the company is even working on versions of the service that work when the TV is off. That way, you might buy a Google Home for your kitchen, but use your Android TV in the living room.

If Google gets its way, you'll eventually have multiple devices in your home, all equipped with the Assistant. It could get confusing -- and annoying -- if you try to talk to one device by saying the "OK Google" command and trigger every other Assistant-enabled device.

Google is working on a fix for that problem, but it's not ready yet. Prueter says software will be able to deduce which device you're talking to by measuring things like voice clarity and distance.

Go, Android, Go

Google also has big plans in emerging markets to help it extend Android's reach. With a new initiative, internally nicknamed Android Go, it's working to make the mobile software cater to people with entry-level phones.

That's not the first time it's tried to appeal to the wider market. Two years ago, it had a similar effort called Android One. But that focused on the device instead of the software. Android One initially launched in countries including India, Indonesia and the Philippines, where Google partnered with local manufacturers to build quality phones that were also affordable.

 
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Sameer Samat , vice president of product management, said 'Android Go' is about making Android work better for entry-level phones.
James Martin/CNET

But the focus has since shifted to address issues such as making sure Android phones get regular security updates, says Sameer Samat, vice president of product management for Android and Google Play. And the program focuses on the entire range of the market now, not just the low end.

"While hardware is half the story, the software also has to be tuned for the needs of users that have limited data connectivity," Samat says.

Most of the people who will use Android Go will probably be on prepaid data plans. So the software has a dashboard front and center where you can track all the data you've used and see what you still have available. It also has a special version of the Google Play store that prominently features apps that work better with entry-level phones.

Of everything Android is announcing this year, Lockheimer says Android Go is his favorite because of what it represents: bringing computing to everyone.

"To introduce a lot of new people to smartphones in a good way is something that's pretty exciting," he says.

Kind of like when he first saw Android on that bulky phone 11 years ago.

Read More...

Source: This article was published cnet.com By Richard Nieva

Initially used to improve the experience for visually impaired members of the Facebook community, the company’s Lumos computer vision platform is now powering image content search for all users. This means you can now search for images on Facebook with key words that describe the contents of a photo, rather than being limited by tags and captions.

To accomplish the task, Facebook trained an ever-fashionable deep neural network on tens of millions of photos. Facebook’s fortunate in this respect because its platform is already host to billions of captioned images. The model essentially matches search descriptors to features pulled from photos with some degree of probability.

After matching terms to images, the model ranks its output using information from both the images and the original search. Facebook also added in weights to prioritize diversity in photo results so you don’t end up with 50 pics of the same thing with small changes in zoom and angle. In practice, all of this should produce more satisfying and relevant results.

Eventually Facebook will apply this technology to its growing video corpus. This could be used both in the personal context of searching a friend’s video to find the exact moment she blew out the candles on her birthday cake, or in a commercial context. The later could help raise the ceiling on Facebook’s potential ad revenue from News Feed.

Pulling content from photos and videos provides an original vector to improve targeting. Eventually it would be nice to see a fully integrated system where one could pull information, say searching a dress you really liked in a video, and relate it back to something on Marketplace or even connect you directly with an ad-partner to improve customer experiences while keeping revenue growth afloat.

photo-search-nn-diagram.png

Basic structure of how object recognition works

Applying Lumos to help the visually impaired

Along with today’s new image content search feature, Facebook is updating its original Automatic Alternative Text tool. When Facebook released the tool last April, visually impaired users could leverage existing text-to-speech tools to understand the contents of photos for the first time. The system could tell you that a photo involved a stage and lights, but it wasn’t very good at relating actions to objects.

A Facebook team fixed that problem by painstakingly labeling 130,000 photos pulled from the platform. The company was able to train a computer vision model to identify actions happening in photos. Now you might now hear “people dancing on stage,” a much better, contextualized, description.

The applied computer vision race

Facebook isn’t the only one racing to apply recent computer vision advances to existing products. Pinterest’s visual search feature has been continuously improved to let users search images by the objects within them. This makes photos interactive and more importantly it makes them commercializable.

Google on the other hand open sourced its own image captioning model last fall that can both identify objects and classify actions with accuracy over 90 percent. The open source activity around TensorFlow has helped the framework gain prominence and become very popular with machine learning developers.

Facebook is focused on making machine learning easy for teams across the company to integrate into their projects.  This means improving the use of the company’s general purpose FBLearner Flow.

“We’re currently running 1.2 million AI experiments per month on FBLearner Flow, which is six times greater than what we were running a year ago,” said Joaquin Quiñonero Candela, Facebook’s director of applied machine learning.

Lumos was built on top of FBLearner Flow. It has already been used for over 200 visual models. Aside from image content search, engineers have used the tool for fighting spam.

Source: This article was published techcrunch.com By John Mannes

Global Research Library Inc., announces the launch of www.edu.global, a revolutionary research optimized search engine, programmed to maximize efficiency for the education sector and beyond.

Designed for organizations including libraries, colleges and universities that realize the importance of providing their community a technological advantage, the edu.global search engine has been developed by a team of professional researchers to automatically refine search criteria. This refinement accelerates and streamlines access to its over 52 million eResources in one location.

One subscription to edu.global is the gateway for your organization to economically retrieve and/or download millions of books, maps and journal articles in 200 languages from 196 countries. Accessibility to new information increases daily as the platform expands.

Global Research Library Inc.’s founder Noel Montgomery Elliot commented “edu.global’s key advantage is enabled by re-indexing topics, tags, subjects and sub-categories, increasing our user’s ability to search at speeds never before possible while gaining access to materials that may be impossible to locate using traditional search engines.”

The Re-indexing Advantage:
Many resources online are indexed incorrectly, while others have no index at all, or don’t have a title to enable it to be categorized - rendering old classification systems ineffective.

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The last day of summer is here and Google kept its promise of launching its messaging app – Google Allo. The rumors, it turns out, were true after all. I’ve spent a good portion of the last few years on WhatsApp and only in the past few months started using Telegram. I don’t like how Facebook apps tend to consume a lot of battery, so I’ve stayed away from their Messenger app. Where does Allo fit in this equation?

To be blunt, it’s nowhere. It doesn’t have the first mover advantage of WhatsApp, lacks the creative approach of Telegram and might not get as many daily active users as Facebook. But, this is Google that we’re talking about. And even though they appear to be late to the game, they have a nice chatbot already talking back to users and helping them out. But, let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

1. Predictive Replies

Firstly, like WhatsApp and other messaging apps, Allo needs your phone number. That’s what you use to sign-up and get started.

Once you’ve done that, you get to the main chat screen. Here’s where things might get a little confusing. Starting with ‘suggestions’ of what you might reply to certain questions. From the notification shade, you might only get 2 most common options, but inside the chat window there might be more.

screenshot_20160921-103801.png

I was also surprised at how ‘smart’ these replies can be. My colleague here at Guiding Media, Ashish, shared the pic of an Audi car he rode in earlier today, and the 2 suggestions from Google Allo had the word ‘Audi’ or ‘car’ in them. Amaze!

2. Contacts List be Messy, So..

In WhatsApp, as well as Telegram, when you click on the ‘chat’ icon, it will take you to your contact list. Here, these apps will only show those contacts which have the app installed. Allo doesn’t do that, but instead shows all your contacts regardless of them being on the platform.

I’d suggest ‘searching’ for the person you want to message on Allo, and if you see an INVITE tag at the end of their name, you should know they aren’t on Allo yet.

skitch.png

Since these users are not on Allo, they will receive an SMS of whatever message you send. Thankfully, those SMS’ will be sent over data/Wi-Fi and hence won’t cost you extra, at least here in India. Also, you won’t be able to see these SMS’ in your standard messaging app, they will only be visible on Allo.

3. Don’t Start and Then Quit

Another strange thing is, if you start typing a message for any contact, but later decide to change your mind and not send anything; this action alone opens a chat window for that contact. An empty chat window. The more contacts you do this for, the more empty windows you will get on your main chat screen.

So, beware.

4. There are Tick Marks, but..

Just like WhatsAapp and Telegram, there are ticks and double-ticks for sent and delivered messages respectively. These are supposed to turn green when your contact reads them, but at the time of writing, I could not verify this feature.

The tick marks mean the same thing they do on WhatsApp and Telegram.

Also, since Google Allo doesn’t have a ‘Last Seen’ feature, you are pretty blinded to the fact when your friend was last online.

5. Encrypt Your Chats

All your chats will be stored on Google’s servers, unless you delete them from your device. But, there is an option to enable end-to-encryption. Google Allo calls this ‘Incognito’ mode, where messages are not only encrypted but can also self-destruct.

600px-incognito

You can choose the duration of self-destruction from the timer icon on the top. Once sent, you can even change the duration to a different one.

6. Text (and Emoji) Size Can be Changed

Another cool feature in Allo is changing the size of the text before you send it. To do that, simply long-press the arrow (send) icon and then adjust the slider up or down to make the text larger or smaller, respectively. The same trick works with Emojis too.

This action changes the size of the entire text but formatting options (i.e. bold, italics) for individual words, like the ones available on WhatsApp and Telegram, aren’t yet available on Allo.

7. Up Your Game with Stickers

When there are emojis, stickers can’t be far behind. They are found in the same place you’d expect them to be (muscle memory from WhatsApp will work just fine on Allo) and there are new ones that you can download too.

allo-stickers

From the sticker store, keep an eye out on the packs with a ‘play’ icon. These are animated stickers, but not GIFs. Currently, there is no support for GIFs on Allo.

8. Doodling & More

Before sharing any image, why not personalize it with some doodling? It’s easy to do that via Allo. You can either doodle on images from your existing media or click one instantly and then start doodling. The customization set may be as extensive as the ones found on Snapchat etc., but for basic use it’s good.

allo-doodle

Yes, you can also send voice notes and videos and your location, but documents aren’t supported yet.

9. Google Assistant

The whole idea of any app by Google is to utilize the fabulous ‘search’ capability it can provide. Google Assistant is a chatbot which will help you with queries like movies playing in theaters near you and restaurants serving Chinese food. Or how to cook Sushi!

Tap the ‘@’ symbol and select Google Assistant from the list in any chat, individual or group. You can even add your favorite sports team and the AI will show you upcoming matches or the latest scores. The Assistant will also answer the questions you throw at it, although its scope seems pretty limited as of now.

Some Gripes

So those were the 9 tips to get anyone started. Here are some shortcomings that Google should work on.

1. No Sync Between Devices

You can use your phone number with Allo only on one device. You can’t sync it with any other device at any given time. Even WhatsApp doesn’t support this feature yet, but Telegram does.

2. No Web Client

WhatsApp was a little late to the desktop client party, but Telegram has been the king here. Google should work quick to make a desktop client, making it easier to chat without removing your eyes from your primary screen – your computer.

3. Google Account?

There is very little clarity on what syncing your Google account does. Other than perhaps assigning your Google account’s display pic to your Allo account.

4. UI/UX Needs Polish

Lastly, the animation effects of Allo seem a bit jerky. Google will do well to make their UI/UX even more fluid, especially when invoking the keyboard and then hiding it. I’m on a OnePlus 3 with Android 6.0 on it, so I can’t imagine how these will feel on budget devices.

The animation effects on Allo could do with some tweaking.

Allo or Au Revoir?

Whereas Apple users might be comfortable with iMessage, most Android users seem to enjoy WhatsApp and Telegram. So, are you going to try Google Allo and stick with it? Let us know what you make of it.

Source: This article was published guidingtech.com

To be blunt, it’s nowhere. It doesn’t have the first mover advantage of WhatsApp, lacks the creative approach of Telegram and might not get as many daily active users as Facebook. But, this is Google that we’re talking about. And even though they appear to be late to the game, they have a nice chatbot already talking back to users and helping them out. But, let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

1. Predictive Replies

Firstly, like WhatsApp and other messaging apps, Allo needs your phone number. That’s what you use to sign-up and get started.

Once you’ve done that, you get to the main chat screen. Here’s where things might get a little confusing. Starting with ‘suggestions’ of what you might reply to certain questions. From the notification shade, you might only get 2 most common options, but inside the chat window there might be more.

screenshot_20160921-103801.png

I was also surprised at how ‘smart’ these replies can be. My colleague here at Guiding Media, Ashish, shared the pic of an Audi car he rode in earlier today, and the 2 suggestions from Google Allo had the word ‘Audi’ or ‘car’ in them. Amaze!

2. Contacts List be Messy, So..

In WhatsApp, as well as Telegram, when you click on the ‘chat’ icon, it will take you to your contact list. Here, these apps will only show those contacts which have the app installed. Allo doesn’t do that, but instead shows all your contacts regardless of them being on the platform.

I’d suggest ‘searching’ for the person you want to message on Allo, and if you see an INVITE tag at the end of their name, you should know they aren’t on Allo yet.

skitch.png

Since these users are not on Allo, they will receive an SMS of whatever message you send. Thankfully, those SMS’ will be sent over data/Wi-Fi and hence won’t cost you extra, at least here in India. Also, you won’t be able to see these SMS’ in your standard messaging app, they will only be visible on Allo.

3. Don’t Start and Then Quit

Another strange thing is, if you start typing a message for any contact, but later decide to change your mind and not send anything; this action alone opens a chat window for that contact. An empty chat window. The more contacts you do this for, the more empty windows you will get on your main chat screen.

So, beware.

4. There are Tick Marks, but..

Just like WhatsAapp and Telegram, there are ticks and double-ticks for sent and delivered messages respectively. These are supposed to turn green when your contact reads them, but at the time of writing, I could not verify this feature.

The tick marks mean the same thing they do on WhatsApp and Telegram.

Also, since Google Allo doesn’t have a ‘Last Seen’ feature, you are pretty blinded to the fact when your friend was last online.

5. Encrypt Your Chats

All your chats will be stored on Google’s servers, unless you delete them from your device. But, there is an option to enable end-to-encryption. Google Allo calls this ‘Incognito’ mode, where messages are not only encrypted but can also self-destruct.

600px-incognito

You can choose the duration of self-destruction from the timer icon on the top. Once sent, you can even change the duration to a different one.

6. Text (and Emoji) Size Can be Changed

Another cool feature in Allo is changing the size of the text before you send it. To do that, simply long-press the arrow (send) icon and then adjust the slider up or down to make the text larger or smaller, respectively. The same trick works with Emojis too.

This action changes the size of the entire text but formatting options (i.e. bold, italics) for individual words, like the ones available on WhatsApp and Telegram, aren’t yet available on Allo.

7. Up Your Game with Stickers

When there are emojis, stickers can’t be far behind. They are found in the same place you’d expect them to be (muscle memory from WhatsApp will work just fine on Allo) and there are new ones that you can download too.

allo-stickers

From the sticker store, keep an eye out on the packs with a ‘play’ icon. These are animated stickers, but not GIFs. Currently, there is no support for GIFs on Allo.

8. Doodling & More

Before sharing any image, why not personalize it with some doodling? It’s easy to do that via Allo. You can either doodle on images from your existing media or click one instantly and then start doodling. The customization set may be as extensive as the ones found on Snapchat etc., but for basic use it’s good.

allo-doodle

Yes, you can also send voice notes and videos and your location, but documents aren’t supported yet.

9. Google Assistant

The whole idea of any app by Google is to utilize the fabulous ‘search’ capability it can provide. Google Assistant is a chatbot which will help you with queries like movies playing in theaters near you and restaurants serving Chinese food. Or how to cook Sushi!

Tap the ‘@’ symbol and select Google Assistant from the list in any chat, individual or group. You can even add your favorite sports team and the AI will show you upcoming matches or the latest scores. The Assistant will also answer the questions you throw at it, although its scope seems pretty limited as of now.

Some Gripes

So those were the 9 tips to get anyone started. Here are some shortcomings that Google should work on.

1. No Sync Between Devices

You can use your phone number with Allo only on one device. You can’t sync it with any other device at any given time. Even WhatsApp doesn’t support this feature yet, but Telegram does.

2. No Web Client

WhatsApp was a little late to the desktop client party, but Telegram has been the king here. Google should work quick to make a desktop client, making it easier to chat without removing your eyes from your primary screen – your computer.

3. Google Account?

There is very little clarity on what syncing your Google account does. Other than perhaps assigning your Google account’s display pic to your Allo account.

4. UI/UX Needs Polish

Lastly, the animation effects of Allo seem a bit jerky. Google will do well to make their UI/UX even more fluid, especially when invoking the keyboard and then hiding it. I’m on a OnePlus 3 with Android 6.0 on it, so I can’t imagine how these will feel on budget devices.

The animation effects on Allo could do with some tweaking.

Allo or Au Revoir?

Whereas Apple users might be comfortable with iMessage, most Android users seem to enjoy WhatsApp and Telegram. So, are you going to try Google Allo and stick with it? Let us know what you make of it.

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