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Anthony Frank

Anthony Frank

People who used the internet to get political news before the General Election were more likely to vote Labour, but people with a higher level of political knowledge were more likely to vote Conservative, according to new research on the dynamics of the 2017 vote.

Professors Harold Clarke, Matt Goodwin, Paul Whiteley and Marianne Stewart, election experts from the UK and the US, were commissioned by the BBC to analyze how online activity helped the Labour Party.

They found that, across the electorate and all age groups, “those who used the internet to get news about the general election were far more likely to have voted Labour”, while “those who used the internet less often to gather political news and information were much more likely to vote Conservative”.

Of those who used the internet “a great deal” to gather news about the general election, 61 percent voted for Labour and 21 percent voted Conservative. Conversely, 56 percent who said they used the internet “not at all” voted Conservative and 30 percent voted for Labour.

The researchers found this trend was true even after factors such as age, gender, social class, party identification, how people voted in the referendum and levels of education were taken into account. The internet election The researchers said: “The 2017 general election was the moment when the internet finally delivered on its long-awaited promise of having a big effect, both on how individual people voted and the overall outcome of the election.

“A flood of young voters, many of whom had relatively low levels of political knowledge, used the internet to get news about the general election. This was crucial for boosting support for Labour and Jeremy Corbyn, according to new research on the dynamics of the 2017 vote. “In recent years, there has been talk about the power of the internet to affect elections. Ahead of the 2017 general election, some pointed to a growth of pro-Labour websites and online forums as a potentially powerful weapon in Labour’s arsenal.”

“In recent years, there has been talked about the power of the internet to affect elections. Ahead of the 2017 general election, some pointed to a growth of pro-Labour websites and online forums as a potentially powerful weapon in Labour’s arsenal.” They added: “Turnout among people aged 18-29 was up by an estimated 19% on the previous general election in 2015.

“Our data show that both the decision to vote and the choices these young people made at the polls were associated with the volume of news about the election that they consumed online.”

Political knowledge makes people more likely to vote Conservative

The researchers also tested respondents’ political knowledge asking them to verify eight statements, such as “The minimum voting age for UK general elections is now 16 years of age”, “The chancellor of the Exchequer is responsible for setting interest rates in the UK”, and “The unemployment rate in the UK is currently less than 5 percent”.

The found that voters’ understanding of politics affected how they voted.

“If survey respondents were frequent internet users but did not know much about politics they tended to vote Labour,” the researchers said. “In contrast, if they weren’t internet savvy but knew a fair bit about politics, they tended to vote Conservative.”

“If survey respondents were frequent internet users but did not know much about politics they tended to vote Labour,” the researchers said. “In contrast, if they weren’t internet savvy but knew a fair bit about politics, they tended to vote Conservative.”

“These effects held across all age groups for both Labour and the Conservatives, with the exception of pensioners in the case of the Tories.

“This means that those effects weren’t caused by the age of the respondent, which at first sight is the obvious explanation for differences in internet usage among the voters.”              

Voters’ views on party leaders were strongly affected by internet use and political knowledge, the research found.

“Even after we take account of a whole host of other things, like age and income, people with low political knowledge who used the internet to get their election news tended to like Jeremy Corbyn and dislike Theresa May,” they said.

“For example, among those who said they used the internet “a great deal”, the average score for Jeremy Corbyn on a 0 (“really dislike”) to 10 (“really like”) scale is 6.4, whereas among those who said they did not use the internet at all, his average score is much lower, only 3.4.

“The pattern for Theresa May is the opposite: her average score among those who used the internet a great deal is 2.9, whereas, among those who did not use the net, her average is considerably higher, at 5.3.”

Of the 25 most-shared web articles about the UK election, almost all were in support of Labour and Jeremy Corbyn, separate research conducted in June by the web analytics company Kaleida found.

Source: This article was published inews.co.uk By Pascale Hughes

The photo suggests website selling IT products "on consignment" for international joint ventures.

A North Korean agency has launched an updated search engine for the country’s intranet, equipped with an online store selling specialized goods for scientists and technicians, state-run outlet DPRK Today reported on Tuesday.

The Central Information Agency for Science and Technology reportedly developed the “information retrieval and management system ‘Kwangmyong’” — which can be translated into light or bright future — to meet the demands of the country’s growing knowledge economy.

“Kwangmyong is greatly favorably received from scientists and technicians due to the abundance of data, speed of search, and accuracy rate of searching literature,” the DPRK Today reported.

“The project of providing technical information for science research institutes, factories, and industrial establishments through Kwangmyong substantially.”

The website features “hundreds of millions” of scientific and technological articles translated from various languages, according to the report, in fields including basic and applied science, biotechnology, and medical science.

A photo of the homepage provided by DPRK Today suggested that membership is required to use the website

The navigation bars are comprised of eight sections: homepage, new technology news, periodicals, “distribution of science and technology,” a database, the online shop, and the Kwangmyong card.

A photo obtained by NK News in September 2017, which appears to be taken before the website redesign, suggested that visitors can purchase IT products on the website.

The photo particularly suggested that website could be selling IT products on behalf of international joint ventures and other companies.

“We inform about the sale of the information technology by an agent and on consignment,” one notice, published on July 13, 2016, read.

Joint ventures — which included the Korea Kwangmyong Joint Venture (JV) Company and the Achim Computer JV Company  — were listed in the section “introducing new products.”

Products from an “agent branch” of the company from Hong Kong were also on sale at the website, thought the name of the corporation was unclear.

New IT goods developed by the Central Information Agency for Science and Technology are also promoted in the same section, with another part of the website suggesting that customers could purchase products online using the “Kwangmyong” card.

Photo of Kwangmyong website before redesign

Among the IT products visible in the photo is software including a “handbook of healthy food, picture encyclopedia on science and technology,” a Chinese – Korean language translation program, and various sports games.

It also provides “new tech news” including updates on “techniques for cultivating papaya tree… in a greenhouse.”

Information on scientific techniques such as “development trends in recent machine manufacturing technology” and “techniques for breeding mudfish” is also offered to users.

The DPRK Today reported on Tuesday that a scientific institute was able to complete the research on the protection and proliferation of forest resources “within a short period of time without using a large amount of reagent and expensive equipment” thanks to the resources.

The photo was taken at an e-library in Chongjin city last year, with a North Korean who used the library “at least twice a week” telling the photographer that it features “books from all over the world.”

The source reported being unable to find any publications by Indian authors, however. 

The two-story library —  used by both students and military personnel —  is open to the public during on weekdays between 10 am and 5 pm.

“I was told that it is connected via the intranet to Pyongyang, so what is available there is also available in this library,” the photographer, who asked to remain anonymous, told NK News.

“Long distance learning opportunities with Pyongyang is also available,” they added. “In one classroom, students attended a CAD / Photoshop course.”

They also said there are “approximately 300 computers in the library” using the Windows platform, adding some computers are manufactured by the U.S. corporation Dell and others were produced by the AOC  headquartered in Taipei.

North Korea’s e-commerce industry has visibly grown in the past year. December saw the Arirang-Mearireport on the online store “Abnal” (앞날), which can reportedly deliver goods within 24 hours.

The Manmulsang website also provides the platform for the North’s businesspersons so that they can promote their products online to customers.

Source: This article was published nknews.org By Dagyum Ji

Friday, 12 January 2018 11:18

The Best Search Engines of 2018

Google might be the biggest but there are other search engines, too

Most people don't want three dozen search engines, especially people who are not trained internet users. Most people want a single search engine that delivers three key features:

  1. Relevant results (results you are actually interested in)
  2. Uncluttered, easy to read interface
  3. Helpful options to broaden or tighten a search

With this criteria, several of our reader favorites come to mind. These search sites should meet 99 percent of the searching needs of a regular everyday user.

Google Search

Google Search Google Search. screenshot

Google is the reigning king of 'spartan searching', and is the single most used search engine in the world. While it doesn't offer all the shopping center features of Yahoo! or the human curation of Mahalo, Google is fast, relevant, and the largest single catalogue of web pages available today. The search giant also tracks an incredible amount of information that many people don't even know they are giving out.

Make sure you try the Google 'images', 'maps' and 'news' features... they are outstanding services for locating photos, geographic directions, and news headlines. P.S. If you don't want Google to spy on you, protect yourself.

Duck Duck Go Search

DuckDuckGo search results DuckDuckGo search results. DuckDuckGo

At first, DuckDuckGo.com looks like Google. However, there are many subtleties that make this spartan search engine different.

DuckDuckGo has some slick features, like 'zero-click' information (all your answers are found on the first results page). DuckDuckgo offers disambiguation prompts (helps to clarify what question you are really asking). Plus, the ad spam is much less than Google.

Give DuckDuckGo.com a try... you might really like this clean and simple search engine.

Bing Search

Bing Search
 Bing Search. screenshot

Bing is Microsoft's attempt at unseating Google, and arguably the second-most-popular search engine today. Bing used to be MSN search until it was updated in summer of 2009.

Touted as a decision engine, Bing tries to support your researching by offering suggestions in the leftmost column, while also giving you various search options across the top of the screen. Things like 'wiki' suggestions, 'visual search', and 'related searches' might be very useful to you. Bing is not dethroning Google in the near future, no, but it is definitely worth trying.  

Dogpile Search

Dogpile Search Dogpile Search. screenshot

Years ago, Dogpile preceded Google as the fast and efficient choice for web searching. Things changed in the late 1990's, Dogpile faded into obscurity, and Google became king.

Today, however, Dogpile is coming back, with a growing index and a clean and quick presentation that is a testimony to its halcyon days. If you want to try a search tool with pleasant presentation and helpful crosslink results, definitely try Dogpile!

Yippy Search

Yippy Search Results
 Yippy Search Results. Yippy

Yippy is a Deep Web engine that searches other search engines for you. Unlike the regular Web, which is indexed by robot spider programs, Deep Web pages are usually harder to locate by conventional search.

That's where Yippy becomes very useful. If you are searching for obscure hobby interest blogs, obscure government information, tough-to-find obscure news, academic research and otherwise-obscure content, then Yippy is your tool. 

Google Scholar Search

Google Scholar SearchGoogle Scholar Search. screenshot

Google Scholar is a special version of Google. This search engine will help you win debates.

Google Scholar focuses on scientific and hard-research academic material that has been subjected to scrutiny by scientists and scholars. Example content includes graduate theses, legal and court opinions, academic publications, medical research reports, physics research papers, and economics and world politics explanations.

If you are looking for serious information that can stand up in a heated debate with educated people, then forget regular Google... Google Scholar is where you want to go to arm yourself with high powered sources!

Webopedia Search

Webopedia Search
 Webopedia Search. screenshot

Webopedia is one of the most useful websites on the web. Webopedia is an encyclopedic resource dedicated to searching technology terminology and computer definitions.

Teach yourself what 'domain name system' is, or what 'DDRAM' means on your computer. Webopedia is absolutely a perfect resource for non-technical people to make more sense of the computers around them.

Yahoo! Search (and More)

Yahoo! Search
 Yahoo! Search. screenshot

Yahoo! is several things: it is a search engine, a news aggregator, a shopping center, an email box, a travel directory, a horoscope and games center, and more.

This 'web portal' breadth of choice makes this a very helpful site for Internet beginners. Searching the Web should also be about discovery and exploration, and Yahoo! delivers that in wholesale quantities. (By the way, here's what happened to Yahoo! avatars and Yahoo! 360 in case you were wondering.)

The Internet Archive Search

The Internet Archive SearchInternet Archive Search. screenshot

The Internet Archive is a favorite destination for longtime Web lovers. The Archive has been taking snapshots of the entire World Wide Web for years now, allowing you and me to travel back in time to see what a web page looked like in 1999, or what the news was like around Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

You won't visit the Archive daily like you would Google or Yahoo or Bing, but when you do have a need to travel back in time, use this search site.

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Paul Gil

Thursday, 11 January 2018 15:42

How to Search Mail in Gmail

Including Clever Search Operators

If you're good at collecting emails, the Archive button in Gmail is really helpful. Fortunately, most of these archived emails are never to be seen or searched again. But others we need to get back to later. Using easy search and clever operators, Gmail lets you find emails precisely and fast.

Usually, the big search field that runs across Gmail's top border works. Sometimes, however, the number of emails returned is just too large.

Maybe you can add a further term or the name of the sender? That's possible but do it wisely. Using some clever search operators, you can narrow your search significantly and precisely. You can search in the Subject line only, for example, or combine that with a date range, a particular sender, and exclude all messages with attachments.

Search Mail in Gmail

To find messages in Gmail:

  • Type search terms in Gmail's search field.
  • Hit Enter or click the magnifying glass button.

Gmail Search Options

To specify some search criteria for narrowing results in your Gmail search:

  • Click the Show search options down arrow in the Gmail search field.
  • Search senders' email addresses and names using the From field.
  • Search direct (To: field) recipients' names and addresses using the To field.
  • Search email subjects using the Subject field.
  • Search emails' body text using the Has the words field.
    • Search for a phrase with quotation marks.
    • Search for emails that contain one word (or phrase) or another, use "OR".
      '"shepherd macaroni"' (excluding the outer quotation marks) finds all emails that contain the phrase "shepherd macaroni", for instance;
      'shepherd macaroni' (again excluding the quotation marks) finds all emails that contain both words, but not necessarily in that form;'shepherd OR macaroni' (without the quotation marks), finally, finds all emails that contain either "shepherd" or "macaroni" (or both).
  • Search for emails that do not contain certain words in their text using the Doesn't have fielded.
  • Make sure Has attachment is checked to find only emails that contain attached files.
  • Search emails' sent date using the Date within fields.
  • Click the Search Mail button below the search fields.
    • You can now narrow your search further in the main search field using the operators below.
    • Of course, multiple search options can be combined to find, say, emails from a certain sender that contain attachments and were sent during the past year.

    Gmail Search Operators

    In the Search Mail field, you can use the following operators:

    • subject: - Search the Subject line.
      Example: "subject:bahamas" finds all messages with "Bahamas" in the Subject.
    • from: - Search Gmail for sender name and email address. Partial addresses are okay.
      Examples: "from:heinz" finds all messages from "heinz@example.com", but also all messages from "This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it."; "from:me" finds all messages sent by yourself (using any address set up for use in Gmail).
    • to: - Search the To line for names and addresses.
      Example: "to:quertyuiop@gmail.com" finds all messages sent directly (not via Cc: or Bcc:) to quertyuiop@gmail.com.
    • cc: - Search recipients in the Cc field.
      Example: "cc:quertyuiop@gmail.com" finds all messages that were sent to quertyuiop@gmail.com as a carbon copy.
    • bcc: - Search Gmail for addresses and names in the Bcc field. Note this only works with emails you sent to Bcc recipients from Gmail.
      Example: "bcc:heinz" finds all messages that you sent with, for example, "hein@example.com" in the Bcc field.
    • label: - Search Gmail for messages assigned a label. (Replace whitespace characters in label names with hyphens.)
      Example: "label:toodoo-doll" finds all messages labeled "toodoo doll".
    • has:userlabels - Search Gmail for emails that have any labels except those used by default (i.e. not including labels such as "inbox", "trash" and "spam" but including Smart Labels).
    • has:nouserlabels - Search for messages that have not been labeled with any labels except those that Gmail uses by default.
    • is:starred - Search Gmail for messages that are starred.
    • Further stars:
      • has:yellow-star - Search Gmail for messages with a yellow star.
      • has:red-star - Search Gmail for messages with a red star.
      • has:orange-star - Search Gmail for messages with an orange star.
      • has:green-star - Search Gmail for messages with a green star.
      • has:blue-star - Search Gmail for messages with a blue star.
      • has:purple-star - Search Gmail for messages with a purple star.
      • has:yellow-bang - Search Gmail for messages with a yellow exclamation mark.
      • has:red-bang - Search Gmail for messages with a red exclamation mark.
      • has:purple-question - Search Gmail for messages with a purple question mark.
      • has:orange-guillemet - Search Gmail for messages with two orange forward arrows.
      • has:blue-info - Search Gmail for messages with a blue i.
    • is:unread - Search Gmail for new and unread messages.
    • is:read - Search Gmail for messages that have already been opened.
    • is:important - Search Gmail for messages that are marked important for Priority Inbox.
    • has:attachment - Search Gmail for messages that have files attached to them.
    • filename: - Search within file names of attachments. You can also search for file name extensions to restrict your search to certain file types.
      Example: "filename:.doc" finds all messages with word processing attachments.
    • is:buzz - Search Gmail for Google Buzz posts.
    • is:chat - Search Gmail for chat logs.
    • in: - Search in a standard "folder". You can search in DraftsInboxChatsSentSpamTrash and anywhere (for everything, including Spam and Trash).
      Example: "in:drafts" finds all messages in your Drafts folder.
    • circle: - Search mail sent to you from people in the given Google+ circle. (Use quotation marks to specify Google+ circles that include a whitespace in their name; escape quotation marks in the name with a backslash (\) immediately preceding each quotation mark.)
      Example: 'circle:"my \"sailing\" circle" turns up all emails from people in your 'my "sailing" circle" Google+ circle.
    • has:circle - Search Gmail for messages from somebody in any of your Google+ circles.
    • after: - Search for messages sent on or after a date. The date must be given in YYYY/MM/DD format.
      Example: "after:2005/05/05" finds all messages sent or received on or after (i.e. including) May 5, 2005.
    • before: - Search Gmail for messages sent before a date.
      Example: "before:2005/05/05" finds all messages sent or received on May 4, 2005 and earlier.
    • larger: (or larger_than:) - Search for emails exceeding the given size. (Specify the size in bytes without suffix or using "k" for kilobytes (as 1,000 bytes) and "m" for megabytes (as 1,000,000 bytes.)
      Example: "larger_than:200k" finds all messages that exceed 200,000 bytes in size.
    • size: - Search for messages exceeding the given size in bytes.
      Example: "size:500000" finds emails bigger than 500,000 bytes or half a megabyte.
    • smaller: (or smaller_than:) - Search for messages smaller than the specified size. (Specify the size in bytes (no suffix) or using "k" for 1,000 bytes and "m" for 1,000,000 bytes.)
    • deliveredto: - Search Gmail for email with a certain email address in a "Delivered-To:" header line.
      Example: "deliveredto:me@example.com" finds messages that have "me@example.com" in a "Delivered-To: header, because it has been forwarded from that address, for example.
    • rfc822msgid: - Search for the message with the — just about certainly unique — message ID. Gmail will not search for messages that refer to the message ID (replies, for example). Example: "rfc822msgid:wW28fb6uf@mail.example.com" finds the message with "wW28fb6uf@mail.example.com" in the "Message-ID:" header field.

    How to Combine Operators and Search Terms

    Operators and search terms can be combined with the following modifiers:

    • By default, Gmail combines terms with (an invisible) "AND".
      Examples: "shepherd macaroni" finds all messages that contain both "shepherd" and "macaroni"; "before:2005/05/05 AND after:2005/05/04" finds all messages sent or received on May 4, 2005.
    • "" - Search for a phrase. Case does not matter.
      Examples: "shepherd's macaroni" finds all messages containing the phrase "shepherd's macaroni"; 'subject:"shepherd's macaroni' finds all messages that have "shepherd's macaroni" in the Subject field.
    • + - Search for a term exactly as typed.
      Example: "+shepherds" finds all emails that contain "shepherds", but not those containing just "shepherd" or "shehperds" alone.
    • OR - Search Gmail for messages containing at least one of two terms or expressions.
      Examples: "shepherd OR macaroni" finds messages that contain either "shepherd" or "macaroni" or both; "from:heinz or label:toodoo-doll" finds messages that either come from a sender that contains "email.guide" or appear under the label "toodoo doll".
    • - - Search Gmail for messages that do not contain a term or expression.
      Examples: "-macaroni" finds all messages that do not contain the word "macaroni"; "shepherd -macaroni" finds all messages that contain the word "shepherd" but not "macaroni"; 'subject:"shepherd's macaroni" -from:heinz' finds all messages with "shepherd's macaroni" in the subject that were not sent from an email address or name containing "heinz".
    • () - Group search terms or expressions.
      Examples: "subject:(shepherd macaroni)" finds messages that have both "shepherd" and "macaroni" somewhere in the Subject line (but not necessarily as a phrase); "from:heinz (subject:(shepherd OR macaroni) OR label:toodoo-doll)" finds all messages from a sender who has "email.guide" in their name that either have "shepherd" or "macaroni" (or both) in the Subject line or appear under the label "toodoo doll".

    Historical Gmail Search Operators

    Gmail once included support for the following search operates that, sadly, no longer work:

    • lang: - Search Gmail for messages in a particular language. (Specify the language in English; "Chinese" worked, but "中文", "Putonghua" or "Mandarin" do not, for example.)
      Example: "lang:French" returned all emails that contain at least un peu de Français.

    Saved Searches

    You can also bookmark Gmail searches easily for later repetition.

    Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Heinz Tschabitscher

    Internet marketing is the most inexpensive way to reach your target market, regardless of the size of your business.

    But what is internet marketing, really?

    Defining Internet Marketing

    Also called online marketing, internet marketing is the process of promoting a business or brand and its products or services over the internet using tools that help drive traffic, leads, and sales.

    Internet marketing a pretty broad term that encompasses a range of marketing tactics and strategies – including content, email, search, paid media, and more.

    These days, though, internet marketing is often used interchangeably with “content marketing.”

    Why?

    Because content marketing is the internet marketing of the present and future.

    Content Marketing Institute defines content marketing as:

    “A strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.”

    Think of it like this: content marketing (or inbound marketing) is in direct opposition to traditional advertising (outbound marketing), and in direct integration with the patterns and habits of today’s generation.

    We don’t like to be sold to, we have our ad-blockers on, and we barely watch cable anymore.

    Content marketing serves up content that addresses our pain points, and is there when we want it.

    Here’s a great illustration of that from Voltier Digital:

    Content Marketing vs. Traditional Advertising

    Here’s the evolutional pathway behind the modernized form of marketing that is most successful today.

    Selling no longer works (a.k.a., traditional advertising).

    Why?

    Traditional advertising focuses on pushing messages at the consumer to get them to buy.

    It’s interruptive, obstructive, and intrusive.

    It shouts, “Hey, look at me!” while waving its arms.

    You may try to avoid eye contact, but traditional ads are persistent.

    You know what traditional ads look like because you’re bombarded with them every single day.

    Think TV commercials, billboards, magazine ads, radio ads, and web banner ads.

    Ads have been around for a long time, as evidenced by this traditional ad for “honest-to-goodness” coffee from the 1950s.

    Ads may still work in some strategic places.

    But Internet users can just click away from ads if they don’t want to see them.

    Which is exactly what happens.

    According to a PageFair report, 615 million devices in use today employ ad blockers. Additionally, ad blocker use increased by 30 percent in 2016 alone.

    You know it, I know it, everybody knows it.

    Ads are annoying.

    And, they aren’t the way consumers prefer to learn about new products anymore.

    Instead of businesses shoving themselves in consumers’ faces, they need to take a different, gentler approach.

    Content marketing is exactly that.

    Brands and marketers who use it publish content that teaches, inspires, guides, or solves a problem for their target audience.

    With some handy tricks, the targets can find that content on the web without it being pushed at them.

    If the prospects gain something useful from the content, they’ll keep coming back for more.

    Finally, consumers can interact with the brand organically and share their content on social media.

    Trust is forged.

    Authority is established.

    Connections happen.

    These loyal followers can then be converted into leads and sales – naturally.

    All of the above happens with a focus on giving value to the user.

    Help users – offer them value and they’ll reward you in return.

    That is what internet marketing/content marketing is all about at its core.

    Why Internet Marketing?

    Now that you know what internet marketing is, you still may be wondering why there’s so much hype around it.

    Well, the hype is totally founded.

    Internet marketing has shown proven success over and over again.

    Here are some stats gathered from around the web to help give you an idea of why internet/content marketing stands tall:

    And there’s more.

    From my own content marketing endeavors, I have seen my small business take off.

    With 99 percent of our focus on content marketing, we managed to grow our worth to millions of dollars.

    Bottom line: This stuff works.

    5 Content Examples: Providing Value for Big Returns

    Reading about great content marketing is not enough to truly understand how it works. Instead, you have to see it in action to grasp its fundamental value.

    Because when content is really good, it can do amazing things.

    Here are some top examples of content types from brands who knocked content creation out of the park.

    1. Blog Posts & Articles

    CMI Article - How to Take an Audience-First Approach to Your Content

    One of the most common content types is blog posts and articles.

    A blog, in particular, is a great content platform because it gives you a foundation for lots of posts, pages, and content that all point back to your site.

    Think of a blog as a tree trunk. Your individual blog posts are the branches that reach out into the corners of the internet and search engines. Users can find your branches and follow them back to your core site. That gives you a greater shot at leads and sales.

    For a great example of blogging content, look to Content Marketing Institute. They create troves of valuable, useful content for content marketers in order to teach, instruct, guide, or inspire.

    The result?

    Devoted fans, followers, and customers for their events, training, and consulting.

    2. Infographics

    Infographics are fun, visual ways to present valuable information.

    They use charts, graphs, pictures, and illustration to explain concepts. This type of content is easily digestible and totally shareable.

    Here’s a fantastic example of an infographic about baking bread from RJ Zaworski:

    Baking Starter Breads Infographic

    And here’s another highly-shared infographic from Curata about the anatomy of a content marketer:

    curata - the anatomy of a content marketer

    3. Case Studies

    Another popular and effective form of content is a case study.

    In general, a case study is an in-depth look at some action your brand or business completed that had measurable results for success.

    Usually, this translates into something you accomplished for a client.

    Here’s a great example of a case study by Fractl:

    Fractl Case Study

    In it, the agency showcases how they executed a successful content campaign for a real estate brand. They talk about how it came together, the “whys” of the project, and the results (presented in measurable stats).

    This type of content is an awesome trust-builder for obvious reasons.

    4. Podcasts

    For those of you who shudder at the thought of writing a blog post or in-depth article or case study, there are content mediums out there for you.

    Podcasts are huge.

    They’re similar to the storytelling and news radio shows of yore, except people can download them and listen to episodes however and whenever they want.

    If you are a good speaker or interviewer, this content format can be a great one for sharing valuable information with your audience.

    For an example, check out Search Engine Journal’s Search Engine Nerds, about SEO, paid search, social media, and content marketing.

    5. Videos

    Videos are the hottest content type right now.

    The stats are staggering. According to Social Media Today:

    It’s easy to see why videos dominate.

    Videos are simple to consume, they’re entertaining, and they appeal to the current attention-span deficit that we suffer from when we surf the web.

    For a great example of a marketer making the most of video content, check out Neil Patel’s YouTube channel:

    What You Need for Internet Marketing

    So, you’re totally on-board for this internet marketing thing.

    You love the idea of getting creative, sharing value with your prospects/audience, and building brand loyalty and customer relationships organically.

    Hold on a second, though.

    You can’t just jump into this blindly.

    You need to understand the key pieces of successful internet marketing, first.

    They include:

    A Content Marketing Strategy

    Content marketing without a strategy will ultimately fail – it’s just the sad truth.

    You must have a direction, a plan, the right tools, and ways to measure your progress if you expect to get anywhere.

    Here are the key content marketing strategy fundamentals involved:

    • Goals. This is vital. You have to know where you want to go, and what success will look like for you (and you alone), before you can head down the road to get there.
    • Your Brand Persona and Target Audience. When you eventually start creating content, you have to know who you’re talking to and tailor your brand voice to appeal to them uniquely. If you aren’t targeting the right audience (those people who will lean in to hear what you’re saying), you won’t find success. And, if you can’t find a way to stand out, you’ll blend into the hordes of other brands competing for attention in your industry.
    • Keywords and Research. Once you know the why and the who, you have to address the how. How will you reach your audience? What do they want to learn, what problems do they need to solve? Research keywords to target to get found in search engine results, and find topics that have an inherent interest for your audience before you create any content.
    • Content Focus and Commitments. What types of content will you create? How often will you post? Where will you post? You have to nail down these foundations so you can create content with consistency and quality.
    • Content Creation. Once you have topics, keywords, a distinct voice, and a target audience, you can create content. However, if your content isn’t really good, you’re wasting your time. Get help if you need it, spend the time to tweak and perfect your output, and always put out the best content you can.
    • Content Promotion. Your content will go much farther if you promote it the right ways. Promotion is even more effective if you plan when you publish your pieces, strategize about publishing on your blog and sharing on social media, and build up a community of followers who can help push your engagement over the top.

    Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

    When you use SEO with content marketing, it can take you farther, longer.

    These two pieces together help power-up your organic (read: free) reach and visibility on the internet.

    SEO encompasses a variety of techniques that help get you into prime spots on search engine results pages (SERPs). This means people can find you just by looking up some topic they’re interested in or need help with.

    The overarching goal of good SEO is to get your site pages ranked on the first page of Google. (After all, most people rarely, if ever, click to Page 2 on their quest for information.)

    Here are some basic SEO techniques that will help your content get indexed and ranked in search results:

    • Strategically-placed keywords – You should place your target keyword in the headline, in subheaders, in the content, and in the meta description to help Google immediately pinpoint what it’s about.
    • A well-designed, well-organized site – Google looks at how usable your site is, or how easy it is for people to click around, find what they’re looking for, and read your content.
    • Clean page URLs – The URL structure for your pages shouldn’t be gibberish (i.e. http://yourdomain.com/blog/content123xyz-asdfkla). They should be simple and easy to read (i.e. http://yourdomain.com/blog/how-to-do-seo).

    Of course, this is just bare-bones SEO. To get a better, in-depth look, check out SEJ’s ebook SEO 101: Learn the Basics of Search Engine Optimization.

    A Boost from Paid Methods

    Organic search can give you great click-through rates. It also gives you the benefit of the inherent trust people have in Google results.

    However, sometimes investing in paid search can give you a boost.

    Here are some good examples 

    • Use paid search to remarket to visitors who found your site through organic search, and tailor ads for them based on their experience.
    • Test different versions of ad copy (A/B testing) to see which performs better – then use what you learned for your landing pages on your site.
    • Paid search can increase your visibility in ways that organic search cannot, such as giving you air-time for high-volume keywords for which you’d have a hard time organically ranking.

    The combination of paid search and content marketing gives you a cohesive internet marketing whole.

    Organic and paid traffic can merge to net you higher visibility and better results for driving traffic, which can increase your leads and sales.

    Patience & Fortitude

    Content marketing requires some pieces that are far less tangible than strategy or SEO but are perhaps the most important.

    When it’s truly successful, content marketing is a long-term strategy.

    It takes time to start seeing the ROI from your content efforts.

    The blog post you publish today will not pay off by tomorrow, next week, or even next month.

    Instead, you must have the patience and fortitude to wait months – maybe even up to a year or longer – to start seeing the returns.

    The good news?

    Content marketing is internet marketing that builds momentum over time. HubSpot calls this phenomenon “compounding.”

    High-quality content gets increased visits over time. This helps build the page’s authority and can increase its reach through the ways people interact with the content as they discover it.

    Think linking, sharing, engaging, and more.

    Defining compounding and decaying posts

    Most importantly, all of these compounding returns can help your content climb the Google ranks, which in turn helps it reach more people organically.

    Pretty soon, your hard work on that post starts paying off in spades.

    It doesn’t happen right away, but it will happen if you set up your content for success, with strategy.

    It just takes patience and fortitude to see it through, and to keep putting out content with the months ahead in mind.

    What Now? How to Dive into Internet Marketing

    By now, you may be hopping with excitement about this thing called content marketing.

    You want to dive in, like right now.

    If you’re ready and raring to go, here’s what to do next:

    1. Pace Yourself & Set Goals

    Remember, this is a marathon, not a sprint.

    Pacing yourself is essential to doing it right – otherwise, you’ll start spinning your wheels, and burnout will be inevitable.

    Instead, take stock of where you are in your business.

    Think ahead to where you want to go in the next year.

    • Do you already have customers?
    • Do you have a website?
    • Are you starting from square one?

    Pick up a pen and paper, or settle yourself in front of your computer, and start formulating some goals for content marketing.

    Make your goals achievable (but not too easy), and make them measurable.

    Need some guidance about goals?

    Here are some tips from CMI on setting goals, including how to tie them to key performance indicators (KPIs).

    For ideas about goals to reach for, read this article from Copyblogger on 10 Content Marketing Goals Worth Pursuing.

    2. Secure Your Content ‘Home Base’

    For content creation, lead gathering, and more, you need a home base on the web.

    This is:

    • Where your content will live.
    • What you’ll link to when you share your content on social.
    • Where you’ll gather leads from the traffic you pull in.

    If you don’t have a website, start researching options.

    If you have a website, make sure it’s optimized, user-friendly, and organized by following SEO and usability best practices.

    3. Start Strategizing

    Now that you have goals, a home for your content, and enthusiasm, it’s time to surge ahead with the rest of your content marketing strategy.

    We’ve already discussed strategy, but here are the actionable steps that make it work:

    6 Key, Actionable Steps for Content Strategizing

    • Target audience research and brand persona development
    • Keyword research and SEO opportunity research
    • Topic ideation and content planning
    • Creating/writing/producing content
    • Community building and nurturing
    • Sharing and promoting content on social channels

    This is a broad list. Each step has its own set of actions and planning involved.

    It’s important not to skip any steps. Each is vital for winning at content marketing.

    Yes – this takes time, effort, planning, patience, fortitude, and teamwork to get it all done.

    Once you get your internet marketing rolling, though, just one piece of content in your arsenal can have an impact like this:

    And that’s just what one piece of content can do.

    Imagine if you started up a consistent, quality content publishing schedule and built your cache of content assets.

    The possibilities are unreal.

    …But only if you’re ready to roll up your sleeves and get your hands dirty.

    Dig in, plot your course, get creative, build relationships, and enjoy the internet marketing of today.

    It’s different from what you’re used to – it has a beating heart.

    Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Julia McCoy

    Google has introduced a catch-all tool for testing rich snippets, rich cards, and other “rich” additions to a website’s content.

    Keeping things simple, Google has coined the phrase “rich results” to refer to all of these, which means its new tool is called the rich results testing tool.

    Google’s new testing tool will test for all types of structured data that can be shown as rich results. It tests data sources such as JSON-LD, Microdata, and RDFa. It offers a more accurate representation of how a page is displayed in search results, as well as the ability to test structured data within the dynamically loaded content.

    Currently, the rich results testing tool is able to test the following types of structured data: recipes, jobs, movies, and courses. Google notes this is just the first step, and support for more data types will be rolled out over time.

    Using the rich results testing tool is just like using any of Google’s other testing tools. Enter the URL, run it through the tool, and review the results. An invalid code will be highlighted, so you’ll know exactly what to fix if there are any issues.

    If and when you’re satisfied with the results of the test, the page can be submitted to Google’s index directly from the testing tool.

    Source: This article was published searchenginejournal By Matt Southern

    Google told us, 'We constantly experiment with new search formats and experiences to deliver the best experience for our users.'

    Google has confirmed it is testing a new mobile search interface and a new search refinement button. The new search interface shows fewer search results on the mobile search results page, with the option to click on a button labeled “more results.” In addition, Google is testing showing buttons to refine your search directly in the search results snippets.

    A Google spokesperson told us “We constantly experiment with new search formats and experiences to deliver the best experience for our users.”

    Dan Brackett shared screenshots with us on Twitter, but many others are noticing these new tests.

    ‘More results’ feature on Google mobile search

    Here is a screenshot showing the “more results” link, often Google is showing as few as two or three organic search results on this page. To see more organic results, you will have to click on the “more results” link, and Google will then dynamically load more search results below.

    You can also see the refinements at the top of the screenshot above. Here is another screenshot of these refinements directly in what is called a featured snippet.

    Google has been testing both of these at least for the past few weeks, and more and more searchers are beginning to notice it.

    This is just a test, and we do not know if or when Google will release this to a wider set of test users or to everyone.

    Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz

    The relentless pace of change that affects the technology industry is unremitting. When new technology can upend a marketplace virtually overnight, keeping current with customer expectations, attitudes and preferences is a matter of business survival. Market research is one tool tech companies use to guide strategies in these areas, but is it worth the investment?

    I believe so. In my time as Vice President of Engineering at Research Now, I’ve seen a number of our clients benefit from using research to monitor the marketplace and adapt to change. And our latest research report, conducted in partnership with Lawless Research, shows that tech companies use the insights they gain from survey research in many ways: to improve strategic decision-making, lift customer satisfaction and improve customer service, design better products and gain competitive advantage. It's also worth noting that only 6% of tech companies conducting market research are less than 5 years old -- most had been in business for 20 years or more.

    Given this, I'd like to highlight a few key takeaways for either better leveraging your existing market research or getting started for the first time.

    If your company is already conducting research:

    • Leverage it. Are you using research to support important business goals and functions, like sales, market share or product design? Consider how you’re using research data and insights and explore how you can expand the value your organization gains from it.

    • Integrate it. Are you expanding the value of your research data by integrating it with other data sources -- both internal and external? By integrating data, you can both broaden your perspective and, at the same time, draw deeper insights for more confident decision-making.

    • Evaluate it. Is your research budget adequate to support your company’s growth and success? If budget is an issue, can you take advantage of new, automated solutions that reduce costs without compromising quality?

    Even a successful research program can benefit from a reexamination based on new approaches to research.

    • Create a case for it. Enlist colleagues from functional areas that will benefit from the insights research provides -- product management, product development, customer service, marketing, sales -- and build a business case for conducting research.

    • Next, search for a trusted data partner. In the world of survey research, there are many entities that provide access to survey samples -- or, people willing to participate in research. Some entities collect panel data via partnerships with major brands and publishers and own, manage and sell their data. They may also offer optimization services. Others sell survey respondent data collected via websites and online communities or collect data via web intercept. Some don’t collect panel data themselves but simply offer data from other providers, with varying levels of added services or refinement. And finally, some providers simply aggregate other data sources. Understanding how these research participant sources differ -- and how those differences influences result -- is important in making informed decisions.

    Related...

    • Vet recruitment methodology, participant management and quality measures. Buyers of research data can often assume quality in their sample source from the start and jump straight into the reporting, insights and takeaways. That can be a mistake. How survey participants are asked to join a survey matters, as well as how much information is known about them before they join. Are they a truly verified person or just a robot? Are they the right person to be taking the survey? If you’re looking to reach technology decision makers and your survey participant is a freshman in college majoring in journalism, the data collected can skew potential insights. Likewise, a high-quality data partner will have control over who, where and how they source research participants, as well as how they enforce quality checks before, during and after data collection.

    • Select the partner that meets all your research needs. A data provider should ensure quality in the sample, but if you're thinking long term, consider a partner organization that could potentially offer more. Certain data providers offer end-to-end solutions, from simple to complex, that can be a good fit for a variety of research conducted. Your partner should provide flexibility to adapt to your specific project needs and/or changes in research scope.

    Whether your company is a startup or long-time player in the tech industry, the role of market research can be critical to a company’s success.

    Source: This article was published forbes.com By Khusro Khalid

    Response:now uses machine learning to save companies time and money with automatically produced, actionable research insights.

    We’re hearing about a lot of companies using artificial intelligence (AI) to make the most of the data they collect. Now market research has adopted the technology.

    After finding success with clients such as Google and Mastercard abroad, Prague-based response:now is bringing their AI-powered app to the United States.

    The company now offers a fully self-service, programmatic platform that creates research reports based on machine learning. Then it uses a human editor to tease out any undetected nuances and reconcile any disparities.

    Fred Barber, newly appointed managing director of response:now in North America says it makes sense to use AI in research.

    Since research is essentially data — and common metrics such as the Net Promoter score are basically formulas — an algorithm can learn to make reasonable assumptions and conclusions about the data it analyzes, Barber said. Using AI, response:now automatically creates reports, cutting down much of the time spent in traditional research environments.

    According to Barber, 75-80 percent of the work effort in market research is in the writing of the reports. “It’s costly and time-consuming,” Barber said. In comparison to traditional research, response:now can deliver in “five days, not five weeks and for 2K instead of $20 (on average).”

    In many cases, Barber says, the company can provide research at three times the speed and one-third the cost of current market research and DIY offerings.

    Related...

    The company enables their clients to get research on a wide variety of variables, including ad performance, packaging design, customer satisfaction and more.

    “We’ve enabled market research to become a much more ubiquitous part of the business process,” Barber said.

    Source: This article was published martechtoday.com By Robin Kurzer

    Last week, Mozilla unleashed Firefox Quantum, a new version of its popular web browser that makes all manner of improvements to the experience. One particularly interesting tweak is the fact that its stock search engine is now Google, rather than Yahoo.

    In November 2014, Mozilla inked a deal with Yahoo that would see the company’s search services integrated into the Firefox browser. The deal was set to be in place for five years, but the developer decided to cut it short in order to deliver a better product to its users.

    “We exercised our contractual right to terminate our agreement with Yahoo! based on a number of factors including doing what’s best for our brand, our effort to provide quality web search, and the broader content experience for our users,” said Mozilla’s chief business and legal officer, Denelle Dixon, according to a report from 9to5Google. “We believe there are opportunities to work with Oath and Verizon outside of search.”

    There’s big money to be made in offering a search engine the chance to serve as the default option for a particular piece of software or hardware. For instance, Google has recently expanded its relationship with Apple to include Siri and Spotlight search results – and the search giant was already paying as much as $3 billion per year to ensure that it was the default for iOS, according to a report from CNBC.

    It would seem that Mozilla would stand to lose out on a significant amount of money by backing out of its arrangement with Yahoo. However, there’s a clause in the contract that provides that Mozilla is entitled to annual payments of up to $375 million through 2019 if it didn’t want to work with any company that purchased Yahoo – even if another search deal was put in place – as per reporting from Recode.

    Search engines are the primary discovery tool for many internet users, and that makes them hugely important when it comes to online advertising. Having a large audience makes it easier to sell ad space at a premium, which should explain why companies are ready to shell out millions upon millions to work with the likes of Mozilla and Apple.

    Source: This article was published digitaltrends.com By Brad Jones

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