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Nick Tridea

Nick Tridea

CREDIT: Getty Images

Cloak & Dagger vulnerability uses Android's own features to fool users.

Do you like downloading and trying a wide range Android games and apps? You may want to rethink that habit, or at least proceed with caution. A newly disclosed Android vulnerability means miscreants can use apparently harmless apps to fool you into giving them "permission" to take control of your phone or tablet and watch everything you do with it.

Researchers at UC Santa Barbara and the Georgia Institute of Technology recently revealed a vulnerability they call Cloak & Dagger that can let miscreants use your phone's own permissions against you. It works like this: You download and run a new app. As so many apps do, it pops up an opening screen that asks you to to agree to something. That something could be almost anything: Click here to watch our tutorial video. Or proceed to the game. It doesn't really matter what the app appears to be asking you to do. What it's really doing is asking your permission for administrative powers that let it use your phone for...whatever it likes.

How does it manage to fool you? Using an Android feature called "Draw over other apps," in which an image or dialog box appears on top of anything else that might be on your device's screen. The "chat heads" used by Facebook Messenger are one example of how this works.

Google routinely grants apps the right to draw over other apps if they request it. They can be highly useful, but a cleverly crafted drawing could be laid on top of an Android warning about granting an app extensive permissions, while making it appear that you're saying OK to something completely different. One example is that it can activate accessibility functions. That allows the nefarious app to see and record your keystrokes, as some accessibility functions need to do in order to function.

This (silent) video shows how it works:


What can you do about it? Unfortunately current versions of Android do not ask for your permission for a newly installed app to draw over other apps. So to find out if you're affected, begin by going into Settings, clicking on apps, and then clicking on settings from the app listing (the gear in the upper right). At the bottom of the list that appears, you'll find "Special access." Click that to see which apps have the right to draw over other apps. You can get detailed information about this vulnerability and how to check your device here.

Google has known about this vulnerability for some time now--the researchers alerted the company months before telling the rest of us. And the company says it is able to detect and block Play Store apps that take advantage of it. So a good place to start would be to avoid downloading Android apps from anywhere other than the Play Store unless you know and trust the source. And hope that Google finds a way to close this security loophole soon.

Source: This article was published on inc.com by Minda Zetlin

Sunday, 28 May 2017 07:14

5 YouTube secrets you should try

Want to know how popular YouTube is? Think how many conversations you've had lately that included the phrase, "I saw this great video on YouTube ..." News, instructions, cat videos, instant celebrities, music, humor, emotional stories and more are all within a split-second search.

But if you just go to YouTube and click "Play," you're missing out on some great features. Let's take a look at some tricks that could change how you use the service.

 

1. YouTube on your TV

Turning your TV into a computer monitor isn't hard, but it can make some common programs and websites a little harder to use. You have to deal with small type and icons that are harder to see from a distance, and you won't always know exactly where that small mouse cursor is.

YouTube has a simple solution. Head over to https://www.youtube.com/tv to load an interface designed just for TVs. You can easily navigate videos using the keyboard arrow keys, "S" to search and "G" to open the left-column guide.

2. Turn off annotations

You know when you're watching a video and little clickable messages pop up over the video and block what you want to see? Most YouTube creators use these sparingly, but some go overboard, and it can ruin the video.

To turn these off, click the gear icon at the lower right of the video player, and next to "Annotations," click "Off."

But that's only going to be for that one video. To turn off annotations across the site by default, click your profile icon in the upper right corner of YouTube, then click the gear icon to visit your YouTube settings. In the left column, select "Playback." Under "Annotations and interactivity." uncheck "Show annotations ..." Then click the "Save" button. Easy.

3. Change your video speed

Have you ever been watching a YouTube video and something amazing happens really fast? It would be nice if you could slow the video down to see what really happened.

There are entire YouTube channels devoted to slow-motion videos, like this one that shows what happens when a CD shatters. But you don't need a high-speed camera to slow things down.

On any video, click the gear icon in the lower-right corner of the video player and click the drop-down box next to "Speed." You can drop the video speed to half or a quarter of the normal playing speed. 

Or, if you want, you can speed the video up by a quarter, half or double. Speeding up a video is a good way to condense a long instructional video, or just a fun new way to listen to favorite song.

 

4. Get smoother streaming

YouTube is fairly smart when it comes to picking video quality settings. It adjusts the quality based on your Internet connection speed so you don't get too much buffering (i.e. waiting around for the video to load).

Unfortunately, if you have an unstable Internet connection that speeds up and slows down, it can throw YouTube for a loop. When your connection speeds up, YouTube will try to push you to a higher video quality setting, and then you're stuck buffering when the connection slows down again.

Fortunately, if that starts happening, you can take control. Click the gear icon in the lower-right corner of the video player and look at the number next to "Quality."

Try dropping it down one setting and see if that smooths things out. So if it's 1080p, make it 720p. If you're still having trouble, drop it down another level until the buffering stops.

You can also use this to force YouTube to a higher quality setting than it would normally use for your connection. You'll be waiting longer for the video to start playing, but it should be smooth once it gets going.

Of course, continual buffering might actually indicate a problem with your Internet connection or Wi-Fi. Here are three tricks that can improve your streaming speed.

5. Share a video at the right time

You found a hilarious video you want to share with a friend. Unfortunately, it doesn't get good until three minutes in. The first part is boring and you don't want your friend to stop watching.

Cue up the video to the start of the section you want your friend to see. Then right-click the video and select "Get video URL at current time." Copy the link that appears and paste it into an email or on Facebook. When someone clicks on the link, the video will start at the exact spot you wanted.

Handy hint: Copying the link using the CTRL+C command doesn't always work. If you test the link and it doesn't start the video at the right time, do this instead: Right-click the video and select "Get video URL at current time." Then right-click on the link and select "Copy." Then paste it and it should work.

Bonus: Autoplay

Just recently, YouTube added an autoplay feature that advances you to a new video when your current video is done. It bases the next video off of related videos and what you've watched in the past.

 

But what if you want to stay on the same video? Just click the gear icon in the lower-right corner of the video player, and next to "Autoplay" click "Off." You can also turn it on and off from the "Up next" area of the right-hand column next to the video.

On the Kim Komando Show, the nation's largest weekend radio talk show, Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today's digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com. Kim also posts breaking tech news 24/7 at News.Komando.com.

Source: This article was published on foxnews.com By Kim Komando

Earth is a pretty nifty place. I mean, I’ve spent my entire life here and I’m guessing you have, too, and there’s plenty to see and do, but why is it here at all? For a long time, researchers have tried to answer that question with varying degrees of success, but a new theory of how Earth formed is gaining traction, and it might be the explanation we’ve been looking for.

 

The most widely-accepted explanation for how Earth and most terrestrial plants formed hinges on materials orbiting a newborn star — in this case, our sun — which bunched up and formed planets. It’s a fine theory, but some researchers have grown increasingly skeptical that the materials that make up our planet, which is rocky and iron-rich, could have stuck together on their own.

A new idea, introduced by Alexander Hubbard, a Ph.D. in Astronomy who now works with the American Museum of Natural History, turns to the sun for an explanation. Hubbard has proposed that the sun went through a period of intense volatility in which essentially roasted much of the material in its immediate vicinity, stretching as far as Mars. The softened materials would have been the right consistency to bunch up and form planets, and would explain why the rocky worlds of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars sprung up.

Hubbard’s theory isn’t just a random guess; He’s basing the idea on observed behavior of an infant star which went through a phase just like the one he’s proposing of our own sun. FU Orionis was first observed rapidly brightening in 1936 and at present it shines over 100 times brighter than it did when originally observed. If our own sun pulled the same trick in its early life it could have been exactly what was needed to form our planet.

Source: This article was published on bgr.com by Mike Wehner


Google Chrome users need to be on the lookout for websites trying to trick them into downloading a font update package for their browser, as most chances are that the file is laced with malware.

This infection technique was discovered by Proofpoint researchers, who say that only Chrome users on Windows are targeted, only from specific countries, and only if they navigated to a compromised website using a specific route (referrer), such as search engine results.

Attack replaces HTML tags, destroys web pages

The technique relies on attackers compromising websites and adding their own scripts to the site's source code.

These scripts filter out the incoming traffic and load another malicious script only for Chrome users on Windows.

This second script will replace HTML tags with "& # 0," which ruins the site's content and displays "�" characters all over the page.

These characters are often encountered on websites and in software when there's a font and character rendering problem. As such, the crooks display a popup telling the user that a specific font wasn't found on their device, and the user will need to download and install a font package update.

 

To give it legitimacy, the popup is marked with Google Chrome's logo and uses classic button styles, as seen on the official Google Chrome website. A GIF showing the entire infection chain is available below:

EITest infection chain targeting Chrome users

According to Proofpoint, this technique was regularly found on hacked sites, as part of the EITest infection chain. EITest is the nickname given to a malware distribution campaign, similar to pseudo-Darkleech.

The group behind EITest works by compromising a large number of websites, usually WordPress or Joomla, using known vulnerabilities.

They act by stealing small amounts of traffic (users) from these sites and redirecting them to a malicious payload.

The EITest campaign appeared in 2014, and across time, the final payload has varied greatly, hinting that the EITest group is renting out their traffic source to multiple other cyber-criminal operations.

For the vast majority of its lifespan, the EITest group has rented traffic to exploit kit operators, who used Flash, Silverlight, IE, and other vulnerabilities to install malware on the users' devices automatically, without the user ever noticing anything wrong.

Chrome users infected with Fleercivet click-fraud malware

These recent "font wasn't found" attacks on Chrome users are different because they rely on users clicking a download button, something that doesn't guarantee the same high level of successful infections that exploit kits assure.

Proofpoint says that the font update packages that users download via this technique are infected with the Fleercivet click-fraud malware, which works by navigating to preset URLs and clicking on hidden ads behind the user's back, earning crooks money.

This same malware was advertised on underground cybercrime services under the name of Simby in early 2015, and Clicool in late 2015 and in 2016.

Author: Catalin Cimpanu
Source: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/chrome-users-targeted-with-malware-via-new-font-wasnt-found-technique

The private search engine Startpage is my search engine of choice. If you are a long-time reader, you know that I made the switch from using Google first to DuckDuckGo, and then to Startpage, back when news about Prism and other government surveillance and privacy-invading activities hit the world.

Startpage works considerably well out of the box. Open the site, enter your search query, and browse the results. It features web, image, and video searches, and ships with a couple of extras that make the experience even better.

I mentioned the Startpage proxy in 2014 already that enables you to load results anonymously, and posted a list of ten tips to improve Startpage search back in 2014 as well.

This guide will focus on tips that are new and have not been mentioned yet.

Startpage Tips

startpage tips

The following tips let you customize your Startpage search experience. All options are accessible on the preferences page.

 

Only connect to servers

startpage servers

Startpage will connect you to the closest (of their) servers when you connect to the site and run searches on it. This ensures quick response times.

You can change that default option in the settings. Basically, what it allows you to do is set a server that you want to be connected to.

So, if you don't want your search queries to be processed by a server in the US for instance, you could set this option to EU or Asian servers instead to avoid that.

The four options provided are a) closest, b) EU servers, c) US servers, or d) Asian servers.

Homepage Search Mode

startpage advanced search

If you happen to use the advanced search interface regularly, or maybe even exclusively, then you may find this option useful.

It allows you to switch from the basic search interface to the advanced search interface by default. So, whenever you open Startpage, the advanced search interface is loaded directly.

Homepage Theme

startpage theme

Startpage supports several themes that you can switch between. The default theme is called Air, and it is a light theme. You can switch to night for a darker theme, or white or black, which are like Air and Night, but without the background image for the most part.

Last but not least, you may also switch to classic themes if you prefer those. The classic themes change link placements on the Startpage homepage though, so keep that in mind.

The main use here is for users who prefer a dark theme instead of a light one, and for users who prefer a basic design when it comes to search (by removing the background images).

Search Suggestions

startpage suggestions

Startpage displays no search suggestions by default. You can enable those in the preferences. Startpage's suggestions system is different from many others as it puts privacy first and foremost.

The search engine displays general suggestions and won't display user queries as suggestions. Startpage shows "generally relevant suggestions" for queries only. Suggestions honor family filter settings.

Switch the "search suggestions" option in the Startpage preferences to "on" to enable suggestions.

Automatic highlighting

startpage search highlight

This is another interesting option. It highlights the search term on the web page that you open when you click on results.

But that is not the only thing that happens. Startpage opens the result using its proxy as well. If you enable the option, all results are automatically loaded using the proxy.

So, if you always want to use the proxy, this is one option to automate this.

Author: Martin Brinkmann
Source: https://www.ghacks.net/2017/01/03/startpage-tips-search

The meme that 2016 has been the “worst year ever” has certainly had a lot of material to work with in these last days before 2017 arrives.

But while many have found Internet culture in 2016 to be irredeemable, this past year wasn’t all bad on the Internet for us as individuals. So I asked some of my colleagues to send me stories about where, personally, they found the good on the Internet this year, for one last look at some of its small bright spots, before we get on with the task of finding 2017 to be even worse.

Self-care lists

In the midst of a 2016 that bombarded us with wave after wave of hate and fear, Tumblr’s self-care master lists were my refuge. Even just seeing the tips in numbered order , helpfully suggesting different self-soothers, felt calming in its own way. “Put on comfy clothes.” “Drink some water.” “Play with a pet.” “My personal favorite: this master list of master lists . Even if you can’t change the world, a bath bomb can. Or more accurately, maybe someone nice on Tumblr can, gently reminding you to indulge in some bath bombs. “You deserve it” — sometimes I wish I could wrap those three words around me forever. — Julia Carpenter 

The country of New Zealand 

Somehow, among all the churning badness of Twitter culture, I managed to make a friend on the platform. That friend is a dairy farmer in New Zealand, whom I had to contact in February to confirm that he did, in fact, send a picture of his dog to someone to have it rated on a scale of 1-10 (it’s a long story; digital culture is a weird beat). He replied with a beautifully-told email in response to what was, essentially, a random reporter asking him for a couple of fact confirmations.

 

See all those likes and retweets? Those came mostly from New Zealanders, because what followed was a long-lasting absorption into “New Zealand Twitter,” which has been mostly delightful. For months, Twitter’s algorithm decided (correctly) that those tweets were ones I’d like to see again:

Making a friend on the Internet isn’t a monumental achievement, but for me, in this year where we’ve learned a lot about the real-life consequences of the worst parts of Internet culture, it helped to remind me of what I used to like so much about being online in the first place. — Abby Ohlheiser

Goldendoodles

Most days, scrolling through my Facebook news feed can feel like an assault on my peace of mind. As has been well-documented this election cycle, Facebook has become deeply partisan, emotional and vitriolic — and yet every day, I return. Yes, it’s partially because it’s my job to be on Facebook. But I’ve also discovered the most wonderful community on Facebook in the form of a public group somewhat inelegantly named “Goldendoodle’s friend and family!!” or GFAF, as I’ll call it.

GFAF is composed of nearly 6,000 goldendoodle owners and lovers who literally post pictures of their dogs cuddling with teddy bears, riding in the passenger seat of cars, or running around the house fresh from a bath. Members also exchange food recommendations, behavioral challenges and tips for combing through doodles’ matted hair.

For the uninitiated, goldendoodle owners are a bit … obsessive. But you can’t blame them. Goldendoodles, a designer dog mix of a poodle and a golden retriever, are truly the most perfect form of animal. They possess the poodle’s intelligence and the retriever’s allegiance. Their eyes are deeply emotive, and they look like giant teddy bears. Also, they’re hypoallergenic.

Doodle owners know this, and in GFAF, they’ve found their people. It’s a full-throated and elated celebration of these dogs who are just so darn cute. GFAF members live all over the country and undoubtedly hold myriad political beliefs, but in this group, they can all agree on this one thing. It’s a welcome break from the rest of the Internet — even for those of us without goldendoodles. — Alex Laughlin

 

Ron Lehker, the 90-year-old Redditor

Nearly every day this year, a now 91-year-old man living in Washington, D.C., has slowly climbed the stairs to his third floor attic, set his cane aside, and sat down in front of Reddit.com. Ron Lehker’s grandson first got him hooked in January. He posted a photo of his white-haired, blue-eyed grandfather on the “Ask Me Anything” thread.  “I Am 90 Years Old — An officer during WWII, a retired educator, and more engaged with society today than I’ve ever been before. AMA!” More than a thousand questions flooded in.

Hi! If you would want everyone to know one thing, what would it be?

How much porn do you watch?

Would you say your love for your new partner is the “same” as the love you had for your wife of 43 years?

Ron carefully reads each inquiry, then leans back in his chair and thinks deeply about what his 91 years have taught him.

“OMG! I love the new social media,” he wrote to the person who asked about his love for his wife. “Such a fascinating way to connect, yet so sterile in its ability for us to get acquainted …”

It’s been nearly a year since people started asking questions, and Ron’s AMAs are buried deep in the mountain of nonsense on Reddit. But all that matters to him is that every person who reached out to him gets a response, even if no one else reads it. Ron provides wisdom on love and loss, religion and politics, living and dying.

He is the Internet in its purest and best form: connecting people who need each other, even if they’ll never meet. — Jessica Contrera

Group chats

2016 has been a pretty weird year for anyone who likes to spend time online. This year, however, I’m thankful for a corner of the Internet in which I’ve found solace: group chats.

To be clear, there is nothing new about group chats. I discovered them like I discover most popular things: late and then aggressively. There’s a good chance you’ve been in a group chat if you’ve ever used GroupMe, WeChat, Gchat, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Kik or Instagram DMs. They’re actually hard to avoid.

The particular chat that rekindled my love with the Internet happens to be a Facebook Messenger chat with some friends from college.

Some of them still live in our college town, others have moved, and it spans a couple of graduating classes. While we were all friends in college, we weren’t any sort of tightknit group at the time. The chat itself started sometime last February as a forum to discuss Kanye West’s then-new album “The Life of Pablo,” and, well, we never stopped. We still discuss music, but the conversations have meandered into television, sports, employment, unemployment, “graduate school?” and the general aspirations and fears of 20-somethings on the precipice of “real” adulthood. We roast each other. We coach each other up before job interviews. We have inside jokes. We go into the settings and change each other’s display names (in November, they were all Thanksgiving related; this month, they’re all Christmas puns). Mostly, it’s very friendly, and we’re all pretty positive and supportive with each other.

People’s online personas don’t always match with who they are in real life. I’m a reserved person IRL, and I tend to steer toward the more performative, less personal social networks like Instagram and Twitter. It’s been nice to have a closed-off platform, with people I trust, where I can relax and be the big ol’ goofus I am. There’s an element of trust in a closed group, and it’s a stark contrast from virtually every other second I spend on the Internet. — Ric Sanchez

The Teens 

Source: GiphyThe teens never asked for much.

And yet, they are benevolent bunch, giving us so much when we’ve given them so little in return. Considering what we have gifted them — melting polar ice caps that threaten our way of life and a national debt well into the trillions — you’d think the teens wouldn’t be so generous. But it is their altruism, as evidenced by their ceaseless production of the purest memes, that I am most thankful for this year.

Whether I’m scrolling through my Instagram Explore tab or checking Tumblr, I know the boundless creativity of the teens will always greet me, pulling me out of whatever spiraling sense of despair I’ve found myself in. Be it their PSAT memes , their enthusiastic support of their peers , their ability to create a cultural phenomenon out of a frog on a unicycle that once appeared in a physics textbook or their array of viral challenges , the teens are creating some of the most wholesome content on the Internet.

I — we — need the teens now more than ever. In a country plagued by increasing divisiveness and less-than-wholesome political discourse, I fear that the only people capable of bringing us together are the teens and their memes. — Tanya Sichynsky

Author: Abby Ohlheiser
Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/these-were-our-bright-spots-on-the-internet-in-2016/ar-BBxLMmV

 

Slower than expected sales may have Apple reducing iPhone production.

Traditionally, new iPhones sell pretty well in their first few months -- often outperforming the previous model's sales during the same quarter. That might not be the case with Apple's latest handset: according to Nikkei, sluggish sales are forcing the company to cut back production of iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus devices. Based on data received from suppliers, Nikkei expects Apple to slow stock production by about 10 percent.

Apple saw an early sign of this reported slowdown in March, when its Q2 earnings showed that while iPhone 6S upgrades were outpacing the previous year, they still weren't up to snuff with sales from users who upgraded to the iPhone 6 is 2014. It's too early to say if the iPhone 7's slower sales are enough to make it the company's first device not to outsell the previous model, but we'll know soon enough: Apple's next quarterly earnings are set to drop sometime at the end of next month.

 

Author: Sean Buckley
Source: https://www.engadget.com/2016/12/30/the-iphone-7-may-not-be-selling-as-well-as-apple-hoped

An intelligent video analytics platform was officially launched by IDENTV. The  IVP (Intelligent Video-Fingerprinting Platform) is the first of its kind to use real-time media intelligence and content-recognition technologies to analyze big video data on a massive scale, allowing media companies and government agencies to easily identify and extract the information they need.

Designed by a global team of machine learning experts, the product has clients in the television, media, and national security spaces.

The platform contains a full suite of proven Automated Content Recognition technologies that can extract visual data from thousands of streams simultaneously. Pioneering algorithms search these cloud-based indexes in seconds, and the latest AI techniques allow users to identify specific moments or in-video elements with extreme accuracy. Whether it is facial recognition for national security purposes or tracking products to monitor ad spends, this technology has the power to revolutionize how a range of industries use video to do business.

Founder and CEO, Mohammad Shihadah, explained: “IDENTV is to video what Google is to text. Imagine being able to instantly pinpoint an exact match of one specific clip, face, object or text that sits buried in a virtual ocean of millions of minutes of video. Now imagine being able to track the in-video movement of persons and objects over time.”

 

According to the company’s press release, the new development comes at a time in which video is more accessible than ever. Yet searching and analysing across this ever-expanding sea of video content has remained a frustrating process. IDENTV’s mission is to fill the gap left by current video and analytics software.

“From drones to cell phones to live streams, there is zero doubt that video will make up the majority of future internet traffic,” Shihadah explains. “What sets us apart from our competitors is the unique ability to provide instant metrics from billions of hours of real-time video, as well as extract cross-channel analytics.”

Satprnews.com cites Market and Markets research publication, saying the automatic content recognition market will be worth $3.57 Billion by 2021, with “acoustic and digital video fingerprinting technology” expected to be “one of the most promising segments.”

Source:  http://i-hls.com/2016/12/industry-making-intelligent-video-search-engines

What if you could look up medical symptoms online using an accurate virtual doctor system and avoid expensive trips to a real-life doctor completely? Taking sites like WebMD or Mayo Clinic to a whole new level, former Vroom CEO and Wix Board Member Allon Bloch founded Kang Health—the “Siri” of online medical search engines.

Kang_Health_Does_Not_Take_Away_From_Doctors.jpg

It’s a no-brainer that when people feel ill, they tend to turn to the Internet to discover what’s ailing them to avoid scheduling a doctor’s appointment. However, this too often leads to a false diagnosis.

 

Kang Health to the rescue. Users can simply enter their age, gender and the symptoms they are experiencing, and the system mines through search results of similar cases from people with the same demographic data and symptoms, alerting them of typical diagnoses or notifying them if they require medical assistance.

Kang_Health_Prepares_Those_Who_May_Have_More_Than_A_Cold.jpg

Although most of the information on Kang Health’s website and app is user-generated, the company has two full-time doctors serving on the board to validate the information coming in to ensure its accuracy. Users can also store their medical history and lifestyle for higher quality results.

Kang Health is slated for release in April or May 2017.

Author:  ZACK PALM

Source:  http://www.psfk.com/2016/11/startup-creates-better-online-medical-search-engine.html

The deep web (also known more sinisterly as the dark web) has a bad reputation—black marketplaces, identities for sale, grisly and horrifying images, illegal pornography, and just about every other bad thing you can think of is available there. But there are also some really great things you might want to check out.

To access these sites, you’ll need to use Tor, which allows you to connect to these sites anonymously, and will keep your connection private. As long as you’re not doing anything too sensitive, you shouldn’t need to worry about compromised exit nodes, so check out these sites and enjoy!

Jotunbane’s Reading Club

jotunbanes-reading-club

Jotunbane describes the reasoning behind his website like this: “I got tired of ebooks that looked like they were made in a hurry, and since I had the skill set to do something about it, well here we are.” In short, the Reading Club lets you download books that have been cleaned up from their original e-book versions.

I downloaded William Gibson’s Neuromancer and gave it a quick look, and it definitely looks better than a lot of e-books that I’ve read, where words run together, there are inexplicable page breaks, and other weird formatting issues. I can’t speak for all of the books on the site, but because that’s pretty much the whole point, I’d imagine they’re all similarly high-quality. If you don’t abuse the system, it seems to be a good way around freedom-stifling DRM practices.

 

Flashlight

If you want dark-web-related news, Flashlight is a great place to get it. There’s a lot of information on Bitcoin, Tor-related projects, and Internet privacy in general. A lot of the news can be found elsewhere, but Flashlight has brought it all together under one banner to serve the needs of deep web enthusiasts.

flashlight

In addition to news, there’s also an active forum where you can discuss anything from dark web marketplaces to shipping practices—there are sections for people looking for a job or a business partner, places to leave reviews for vendors, and discussions about privacy and security. The Links section of Flashlight also has a number of useful links, though not as many as Hidden Wiki or other dark web directory sites.

Hidden Answers

If you have a question, you can get the answer (or at least a sarcastic response) at Hidden Answers. As a large forum site, HA puts people in contact with other people to exchange information. There are loads of different categories, from drugs and erotica to gainful employment, governments and law, and knowledge and information.

hidden-answers

The site is great if you want to get the answers to specific questions, but it’s also a fascinating place to explore: on the deep web, people can ask the questions they want and get honest answers, often on topics that aren’t discussed on the clear web. You never know what you’ll find when you go browsing around Hidden Answers, but you can be sure that it’ll be pretty interesting.

Strategic Intelligence Network

According to the homepage, SIN exists to “provide intelligences, resources and tools to be prepared and to respond to crisis situations anywhere you are in the world. . . . Be prepared for the day you might face abduction, natural disaster, riot or even war.” The site is essentially a repository of useful information that could come in handy in a wide range of different situations.

sin-library

 

The library contains files on just about anything you could want: encryption, ham radio, submarine cables, fitness, forensic investigation, blacksmithing, getaway driving, sailing, hunting and trapping, fallout shelter creation, body armor, how to survive falling through ice . . . the list goes on and on. The maps section provides a huge amount of satellite imagery, and the atlas provides situation reports and a ton of information about countries around the world. This is definitely one of my new favorite sites.

AnonInbox

AnonInbox was founded on the idea that email should be totally private: “If you have nothing to hide, then use Yahoo and Gmail instead. We believe that your e-mail belongs to you and you only and we can provide solution [sic] for you to achieve this goal.” There are a number of different Tor-based email providers, but AnonInbox is one of the most serious about what they do.

anoninbox

For a cost of 0.1 bitcoins per year, you get dedicated Tor hidden service servers, firewalled outbound traffic, encrypted disks, daily backups, daily erased logfiles, and a number of other security-focused features. You also get 10GB of storage; IMAP, POP3, and SMTP access; web-based access; and peering with other .onion mailservers. While you can use this account for whatever you want, if they find out that you’re using it for anything illegal, it could be terminated.

How Will You Tell the World?

Here’s an interesting site that could occupy you for hours . . . or cause you to shake your head and hit the back button right away. How Will You Tell the World? is a long, complex riddle that combines audio and visual clues. As you can see in the image below, it’s quite complex.

how-will-you-tell

What does it mean? Is it a message to mankind? A philosophical treatise? An extended mathematics exercise? Or just a bunch of drawings thrown together as a pratical joke? Only you can decide.

Scratch the Surface

As you probably know, the deep web is absolutely huge, and there’s a seemingly infinite amount of stuff out there. You just have to know where to find it. These six sites will give you a fun introduction to the dark web and using Tor, and might even inspire you to become a dark web spelunker in your spare time.

What are your favorite deep web sites? What have you found in your travels that’s interesting, unique, or bizarre? Share your favorites below — We’d all love to hear about them!

Author:  Dann Albright

Source:  http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/little-known-corners-deep-web-might-actually-like

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