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Andre Jansen

Andre Jansen

LIFE probably does not exist on Mars as there is no water on the surface of the planet, a new study found.

A new study of meteorites that have crashed into the surface of the Red Planet over millions of years has found none showed signs of rust, suggesting there is no liquid present on Earth’s neighbour.

Our Neightbouring planet still harbours plenty of secrets, but alien life may not be one of them
Who would live in a place like this? A photo of the barren Martian surface

Who would live in a place like this? A photo of the barren Martian surface

There is less moisture on Mars than in the driest place on Earth – the Atacama Desert in Chile and Peru.

Some weather stations in this region have received no rain for years, while another station reports an average of one millimetre per year.

An international team of planetary scientists led by the University of Stirling suggested rust free meteorites showed Mars was incredibly dry and has been for millions of years.

The findings showed how difficult it would be for life to exist on Mars today as Earth’s nearest neighbour is the primary target in the search for life elsewhere.

Dr Christian Schröder said: “Evidence shows that more than three billion years ago Mars was wet and habitable.

“However, this latest research reaffirms just how dry the environment is today.

“For life to exist in the areas we investigated, it would need to find pockets far beneath the surface, located away from the dryness and radiation present on the ground.”

National Geographic series Mars

An artist’s impression of astronauts exploring Mars

A study last year using data from the Curiosity Rover investigating Gale crater suggested very salty liquid water might be able to condense in the top layers of Martian soil overnight.

But the lecturer in environmental science and planetary exploration and science team collaborator for the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity mission added: "But, as our data show, this moisture is much less than the moisture present even in the driest places on Earth."

The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity provided data on a cluster of meteorites at Meridiani Planum - a plain just south of the planet's equator and at a similar latitude to Gale crater.

The study comes as the European Space Agency's Schiaparelli lander prepares to land on Mars to search for life

The European Space Agency's Schiaparelli craft, which failed in its mission to land a exploration robot on the Red Planet

Author:  Tony Whitfield

Source:  https://www.thesun.co.uk

Sunday, 06 November 2016 13:27

Seven iOS Web Browsers Compared

Apple's Safari is a great web browser, but there are many reasons why you may want to use another one on your iPhone or iPad (or even on your Mac). You may use Google services a lot, and find that Chrome helps you be more efficient; or you might want to use another browser because it's faster, or because it offers more privacy.

It's easy to switch browsers on OS X, but it's not that simple on iOS. You can't change the default web browser on Apple's iPhone or iPad devices, so any links you tap will open in Safari. But you can use another browser when you manually search, enter addresses, use bookmarks, or by copying links instead of tapping them, and then pasting them into the browser of your choice.

Here's a look at seven web browsers for iOS. I compare their specific features, and review why you might want to use one of these alternatives instead of Safari. Try them out and see which one works best for you!

Google Chrome

chrome


If you're an inveterate Google user, then you may want to switch to Google Chrome on your iPhone or iPad. Chrome syncs across your devices, so, if you sign into your Google account, you can access your bookmarks, and open tabs you've opened on other devices, including your Mac, PC, iPhone, or iPad. Its Incognito Mode lets you surf privately, without saving your browsing history. You can also use Google voice search.

The feature I like best is the Data Saver. If you turn this on, Chrome compresses web pages before loading them. If you use your iOS device on cell networks a lot, this will save time downloading data, and save money (or make your data plan last longer). Chrome is fast and easy to use, and free.

iCab Mobile

icab

 

The $2 iCab Mobile is chock full of interesting features. In fact, at first glance, it seems like it has a bit too many options. It has URL filters to block web ads (which can save you time and data), has a download manager, supports multiple users, private browsing, fullscreen reading, and tabs. It has a built-in RSS reader, cookie manager, and you can save web pages for offline reading. It's stable and reliable, and is regularly updated. It also installs a share service, so you can view a web page in Safari, tap the Share button, and choose to open that page in iCab.

iCab Mobile can be a bit complex to get used to, and its buttons and settings can be a bit off-putting. But it's definitely a browser for power users. If that's you, then iCab Mobile might be the browser you need.

Opera Mini

opera-mini

 

The free Opera Mini is probably the only web browser that works on all mobile phones. There are iOS, Android, and Windows Phone versions, and it even works on "basic phones." You can create an Opera Link account and sync bookmarks across your devices. One of this browser's marquee features is its Video Boost feature, which compresses videos, saving you time and data. It also compresses web pages, making slow connections a lot faster, with one of two settings: Opera Mini and Opera Turbo.

Opera Mini also has a Discover feature, which is a built-in selection of news articles by topic. It's not as detailed as, say, Flipboard or Google News, but you may find that it gives you the news you need.

Opera Coast

opera-coast

Opera also has another iOS browser, Opera Coast. It does away with all the widgets other browsers have: there's no address bar, there are no buttons (you swipe to move around), and you save your favorites sites as tiles on its home screen. You can search using Google, of course, but the power of this browser lies in the way it gives you easy access to the sites you visit most. Opera Coast is uncluttered, and, if you only visit a handful of sites, it's a great way to access the web.

Ghostery

ghostery

Ghostery, a free browser, is for users who are annoyed by how much they're tracked on the web. When you load a web page in Ghostery, you tap the app's ghost icon to see a list of trackers on that page. You can turn off tracking for any of the specific trackers, web bugs, pixels, and beacons, then reload the page. Over time, Ghostery develops a list of the trackers you don't like and prevents them from loading.

Turning off trackers not only protects your privacy, but it can also make web pages load more quickly. When you load a page, your browser has to contact every server that provides content to the page. If there are a couple dozen trackers, you need to connect to that many servers. Ghostery isn't the most feature-laden browser; it does one thing, and does it well.

Intego Rook

rook

If you've got kids, you might not want them to be able to browse just any website, and you may want to monitor their browsing activity. These days, it's common for parents to control what their children can see online, only allowing content that's age-appropriate by limiting access to sites you've approved. Rook, part of Intego's Family Protector parental controls for iOS, lets you choose exactly what your kids can access on the web. You can configure it on a website, from any computer or mobile device, and you can see where your kids have been browsing.

Intego Rook filters web content, blocks web pages you don't want your kids to see, and lets you even turn off web access when your kids should be doing their homework. And, with Intego Family Protector, you can do much more to control what your kids can do with their iOS devices.

Source : intego

In addition to launching a hub for the Olympics, Google Trends has released new tools for viewing and exporting search data. 

Last week, Google Trends announced a refresh to its site, in addition to the launch of a new hub for Olympic trends.

According to a Google spokesperson, the Google Trends refresh came with a few new tools, including the ability to compare search trends by geographic location and view historical data by day.

Google-trends-data-by-day-800x386

Google Trends has also added search term filtering, a new mobile embed option for graphs, and an export-to-excel feature — both of which can be found by clicking the menu in the right-hand corner of a trends graph.

Google-Trends-mobile-export-800x406

Source : http://searchengineland.com/google-trends-refresh-includes-geographic-comparisons-export-excel-feature-256519 

Friday, 19 August 2016 11:38

AOL Search Now Powered By Bing

 We knew this was coming, AOL Search is now powered by Bing. Bing confirmed this saying

"as of Jan. 1, Bing powers AOL's web, mobile, and tablet search, providing paid search ads and algorithmic organic search results to AOL's properties worldwide."

You can see it by going to AOL search and looking at the footer. The powered by Bing disclaimer is placed there:


aol-powered-by-bing-1451997829

Bing wrote:

Our partnership with AOL brings additional scale and opportunity to advertisers and marketers. Today, 1 in 5 searches happen on Bing.com, and by providing Bing search results for the number 3 (Yahoo) and 5 (AOL) search providers in the US, Bing powers close to one-third of US PC web searches.1 Today’s announcement is testament to Microsoft’s ongoing focus on search and search advertising and our increasing scale that connects a marketer’s media buys to new publishers and audiences to help them achieve more impact for their business.

AOL doesn't have that much marketshare but this is 100% a big win for Bing over Google.

Source : https://www.seroundtable.com/aol-search-powered-by-bing-21426.html

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