Website Search
Research Papers
plg_search_attachments
Articles
FAQs
Easy Profile - Search plugin
Courses & Exams
Pages
Specialized Search Engines
Events Calender
Upcoming Events
Bridget Miller

Bridget Miller

Did you ever need data on a topic you wanted to research, and had a hard time finding it? Wish you could just Google it? Well, now you can do that.

With data science and analytics on the rise and underway to being democratized, the importance of being able to find the right data to investigate hypotheses and derive insights is paramount

What used to be the realm of researchers and geeks is now the bread and butter of an ever-growing array of professionals, organizations, and tools, not to mention self-service enthusiasts.

Even for the most well-organized and data-rich out there, there comes a time when you need to utilize data from sources other than your own. Weather and environmental data is the archetypal example.

Suppose you want to correlate farming data with weather phenomena to predict crops, or you want to research the effect of weather on a phenomenon taking place throughout a historical period. That kind of historical weather data, almost impossible for any single organization to accumulate and curate, is very likely to be readily available by the likes of NOAA and NASA.

Those organizations curate and publish their data on a regular basis through dedicated data portals. So, if you need their data on a regular basis, you are probably familiar with the process of locating the data via those portals. Still, you will have to look at both NOAA and NASA, and potentially other sources, too.

And it gets worse if you don't just need weather data. You have to locate the right sources, and then the right data at those sources. Wouldn't it be much easier if you could just use one search interface and just find everything out there, just like when you Google something on the web? It sure would, and now you can just Google your data, too.

That did not come about out of the blue. Google's love affair with structured data and semantics has been an ongoing one. Some landmarks on this path have been the incorporation of Google's knowledge graph via the acquisition of Metaweb, and support for structured metadata via schema.org.

Anyone doing SEO will tell you just how this has transformed the quality of Google's search and the options content publishers now have available. The ability to markup content using schema.org vocabulary, apart from making possible things such as viewing ratings and the like in web search results, is the closest we have to a mass-scale web of data.

This is exactly how it works for dataset discovery, as well. In a research note published in early 2017 by Google's Natasha Noy and Dan Brickley, who also happen to be among the semantic web community's most prominent members, the development was outlined. The challenges were laid out, and a call to action was issued. The key element is, once more, schema.org.

schemaorgattributes.png 

Schema.org plays a big part in Google's search, and it's also behind the newly added support for dataset search. (Image: Go Live UK)

Schema.org is a controlled vocabulary that describes entities in the real world and their properties. When something described in schema.org is used to annotate content on the web, it lets search engines know what that content is, as well as its properties. So what happened here is that Google turned on support for dataset entities in schema.org, officially available as of today.

The first step was to make it easier to discover tabular data in search, which uses this same metadata along with the linked tabular data to provide answers to queries directly in the search results. This has been available for a while, and now full support for dataset indexing is here.

But is there anything out there to be discovered? How was Google's open call to dataset providers received? ZDNet had a Q&A with Natasha Noy from Google Research about this:

"We were pleasantly surprised by the reception that our call to action found. Perhaps, because we have many examples of other verticals at Google using the schema.org markup (think of jobs, events, and recipes), people trusted that providing this information would be useful.

Furthermore, because the standard is open and used by other companies, we know that many felt that they are doing it because it is 'the right thing to do.' While we reached out to a number of partners to encourage them to provide the markup, we were surprised to find schema.org/dataset on hundreds, if not thousands, of sites.

So, at launch, we already have millions of datasets, although we estimate it is only a fraction of what is out there. Most just marked up their data without ever letting us know."

NOAA's CDO, Ed Kearns, for example, is a strong supporter of this project and helped NOAA make many of its datasets searchable in this tool. "This type of search has long been the dream for many researchers in the open data and science communities," he said. "And for NOAA, whose mission includes the sharing of our data with others, this tool is key to making our data more accessible to an even wider community of users."

Under the hood

In other words, it's quite likely you may find what you are looking for already, and it will be increasingly likely going forward. You can already find data from NASA and NOAA, as well as from academic repositories such as Harvard's Dataverse and Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), and data provided by news organizations, such as ProPublica.

But there are a few gotchas here, as datasets are different from regular web content that you -- and Google -- can read.

To begin with, what exactly is a dataset? Is a single table a dataset? What about a collection of related tables? What about a protein sequence? A set of images? An API that provides access to data? That was challenge No. 1 set out in Google's research note.

Those fundamental questions -- "what is topic X" and "what is the scope of the system" -- are faced by any vocabulary curator and system architect respectively, and Noy said they decided to take a shortcut rather than get lost in semantics:

"We are basically treating anything that data providers call a dataset by marking schema.org/dataset as a dataset. What constitutes a dataset varies widely by discipline and at this point, we found it useful to be open-minded about the definition."

That is a pragmatic way to deal with the question, but what are its implications? Google has developed guidelines for dataset providers to describe their data, but what happens if a publisher mis-characterizes content as being a dataset? Will Google be able to tell it's not a dataset and not list it as such, or at least penalize its ranking?

Noy said this is the case: "While the process is not fool-proof, we hope to improve as we gain more experience once users start using the tool. We work very hard to improve the quality of our results."

google-data-tech-analytics2-ss-1920.jpg

Google and data has always gone hand in hand. Now Google takes things further, by letting you search for data.

Speaking of ranking, how do you actually rank datasets? For documents, it's a combination of content (frequency and position of keywords and other such metrics) and network (authority of the source, links, etc). But what would apply to datasets? And, crucially, how would it even apply?

"We use a combination of web ranking for the pages where datasets come from (which, in turn, uses a variety of signals) and combine it with dataset-specific signals such as quality of metadata, citations, etc," Noy said.

So, it seems dataset content is not really inspected at this point. Besides the fact that this is an open challenge, there is another reason: Not all datasets discovered will be open, and therefore available for inspection.

"The metadata needs to be open, the dataset itself does not need to be. For an analogy, think of a search you do on Google Scholar: It may well take you to a publisher's website where the article is behind a paywall. Our goal is to help users discover where the data is and then access it directly from the provider," Noy said.

First research, then the world?

And what about the rest of the challenges laid out early on in this effort, and the way forward? Noy noted that while they started addressing some, the challenges in that note set a long-term agenda. Hopefully, she added, this work is the first step in that direction.

Identifying datasets, relating them, and propagating metadata among them was a related set of challenges. "You will see", Noy said, "that for many datasets, we list multiple repositories -- this information comes from a number of signals that we use to find replicas of the same dataset across repositories. We do not currently identify other relationships between datasets."

Indeed, when searching for a dataset, if it happens to be found in more than one locations, then all its instances will be listed. But there is also something else, uniquely applicable to datasets -- at least at first sight. A dataset can be related to a publication, as many datasets come from scientific work. A publication may also come with the dataset it produced, so is there a way of correlating those?

Noy said some initial steps were taken: "You will see that if a dataset directly corresponds to a publication, there is a link to the publication right next to the dataset name. We also give an approximate number of publications that reference the dataset. This is an area where we still need to do more research to understand when exactly a publication references a dataset."

pasted-image-0.png

Searching for datasets will retrieve not only multiple results for your query, but also multiple sources for each dataset. (Image: Google)

If you think about it, however, is this really only applicable to science? If you collect data from your sales pipeline and use them to derive insights and produce periodic reports, for example, isn't that conceptually similar to a scientific publication and its supporting dataset?

If data-driven decision making bears many similarities to the scientific process, and data discovery is a key part of this, could we perhaps see this as a first step of Google moving into this realm for commercial purposes as well?

When asked, Noy noted that Google sees scientists, researchers, data journalists, and others who are interested in working with data as the primary audience for this tool. She also added, however, that as Google's other recent initiatives indicate, Google sees these kinds of datasets becoming more prominent throughout Google products.

Either way, this is an important development for anyone interested in finding data out in the wild, and we expect Google to be moving the bar in data search in the coming period. First research, then the world?

Source: This article was Published zdnet.com By George Anadiotis

Saturday, 25 August 2018 13:40

Top 10 Deep Web Search Engines of 2017

When we have to search for something on the Internet, our mind by default goes to Google or Bing. Obviously, our mind is tuned that way, and we get the results we seek. But how often do we consider that the information we are really looking for might be available on the deep web?

The major search engine keeps meticulous details of our movement on the Internet. Well, if you don’t want Google to know about your online searches and activities, it is best to keep anonymity.

Now, what about those huge databases of content lying in the repository of ‘Invisible Web’ popularly known as the ‘Deep Web’ where the general crawlers are not able to reach? How do you get them?

Deep web content is believed to be about 500 times bigger than normal search content, and it mostly goes unnoticed by regular search engines. When you look at the typical search engine, it performs a generic search. For example, there are huge personal profiles, and records of people related documents on static websites, and this high-quality content is invisible to the search engines.

Why is a Deep Web search not available from Google?

The primary reason Google doesn’t provide deep web content is that this content doesn’t index in the regular search engines. Hence, these search engines will not show results, or crawl to a document or file which is unindexed by the world wide web. The content lies behind the HTML forms. Regular search engines crawl, and the searches are derived from interconnected servers.

Interconnected servers mean you are regularly interacting with the source, but when it comes to the dark web this does not happen. Everything is behind the veil and stays hidden internally on the Tor network; which ensures security and privacy.

Only 4 percent of Internet content is visible to the general public, and the other 96 percent is hidden behind the deep web.

Now, the reason Google is not picking up these data, or why deep web content does not get indexed is not a hidden secret. It is mainly that these businesses are either illegal or bad for the society at large. The content can be of things like porn, drugs, weapons, military information, hacking tools, etc.

Robots Exclusion

The robot.txt that we normally use is to tell the website which of the files it should record and register that is to be indexed.

Now we have a terminology called ‘robots Exclusion files’. Web administrators will tweak the setup in a way that certain pages will not show up for indexing, and will remain hidden when the crawlers search.

Let’s look at some of the crawlers that go deep into the internet.

List of Best Deep Web Search Engines of 2017
  • Pipl
  • MyLife
  • Yippy 
  • SurfWax 
  • Wayback machine 
  • Google Scholar 
  • DuckDuckGo 
  • Fazzle 
  • Not Evil 
  • Start Page

Pipl

This is one of the search engines that will help you dig deep and get the results which may be missing on Google and Bing. Pipl robots interact with searchable databases and extract facts, contact details and other relevant information from personal profiles, member directories, scientific publications, court records and numerous other deep-web sources.

Pipl

Pipl works by extracting files as it communicates with the searchable database. It attempts to get information pertaining to search queries from personal profiles and member directories, which can be highly sensitive. Pipl has the ability to deeply penetrate and get the information the user seeks. They use advanced ranking algorithms and language analysis to get you the results closest to your keyword.

MyLife

Mylife engine can get you the details of a person, viz-a-viz personal data, and profiles, age, occupation, residence, contact details etc. It also includes pictures and other relevant histories of the person latest trip and other surveys if conducted. What’s more, you can rate individuals based on the profile and information.

mylife

Almost everyone above 18-years-old in the United States has a profile on the Internet, so one can expect more than 200 million profiles with rich data on Mylife searches.

Yippy

Yippy in fact a Metasearch Engine (it gets its outcomes by utilizing other web indexes), I’ve included Yippy here as it has a place with an entryway of devices a web client might be occupied with, for example, such as email, games, videos and so on.

Yippy

The best thing about Yippy is that they don’t store information of the users like Google does. It is a Metasearch Engine, and it is dependent on other web indexes to show its results.

Yippy may not be a good search engine for people who are used to Google because this engine searches the web differently. If you search “marijuana,” for example, it will bring up results that will read ‘the effects of marijuana,” rather than a Wikipedia page and news stories. So it’s a pretty useful website that can be good for people who want their wards to know what is really required and not the other way round.

SurfWax

SurfWax is a subscription-based search engine. It has a bunch of features apart from contemporary search habits. According to the website, the name SurfWax arose because “On waves, surf wax helps surfers grip their surfboard; for Web surfing, SurfWax helps you get the best grip on information — providing the ‘best use’ of relevant search results.” SurfWax is able to integrate relevant search based with key finding elements for an effective search result.

SurfWax

Wayback machine

This engine gives you enormous access to the URL information. It is the front-end of the Internet Archive of open web pages. Internet Archive allows the public to post their digital documents, which can be downloaded to its data cluster. The majority of the data is collected by the web crawlers of Wayback machines automatically. The primary intention of this is to preserve public web information.

Wayback Machine

Google Scholar

Another Google search engine, but quite different from its prime engine, Google Scholar scans for a wide range of academic literature. The search results draw from university repositories, online journals, and other related web sources.

Google Scholar

Google Scholar helps researchers find sources that exist on the internet. You can customize your search results to a particular field of interest, region, or institution, for example, ‘psychology, Harvard University.’ This will give you access to relevant documents.

DuckDuckGo

Unlike Google, this search engine does not track your activities, which is the first good thing about it. This has a clean UI and it is simple and yes, it has the ability to deep search the internet.

DuckDuckGo

Having said that you can customize the searches, and even enhance them according to the results and satisfaction. The search engines believe in quality and not quantity. The emphasis is on the best results. It does this from over 500 independent sources, including Google, Yahoo, Bing, and all the other popular search engines.

Fazzle

Accessible in English, French, and Dutch, this is a meta web index engine. It is designed to get quick results. The query items include Images, Documents, Video, Audio, and Shopping, Whitepaper and more.

Fazzle

Fazzle list most of the items that may look like promotion, and like to know meta web indexes available, this search engine does not cover supported a connection in searches. So it looks like the first search results on any keyword could likely be a promotion. Nevertheless, among all the Deep Web Fazzle stands apart when it comes to giving you the best pick on searches.

Not Evil

The not for profit ‘not Evil’ search engines entirely survives on contribution, and it seems to be getting a fair share of support. Highly reliable in the search results, this SE has a functionality that is highly competitive in the TOR network.

Not Evil

There is no advertising or tracking, and due to the thoughtful and continuously updated algorithms of search, it is easy to find the necessary goods, content or information. Using not Evil, you can save a lot of time and keep total anonymity.

This search engine was formerly known as TorSearch.

Start Page

Startpage was made available in the year 2009. This name was chosen to make it easier for people to spell and remember.

Startpage.com and Ixquick.com are both the same and run by one company. It is a private search engine and offers the same level of protection.

Start Page

This is one of the best search engines when it comes to concealing privacy. Unlike popular search engines, Startpage.com does not record your IP and keeps your search history a secret.

 Source: This article was Published hackercombat.com By Julia Sowells

IN LATE JULY, a group of high-ranking Facebook executives organized an emergency conference call with reporters across the country. That morning, Facebook’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, explained, they had shut down 32 fake pages and accounts that appeared to be coordinating disinformation campaigns on Facebook and Instagram. They couldn’t pinpoint who was behind the activity just yet, but said the accounts and pages had loose ties to Russia’s Internet Research Agency, which had spread divisive propaganda like a flesh-eating virus throughout the 2016 US election cycle.

Facebook was only two weeks into its investigation of this new network, and the executives said they expected to have more answers in the days to come. Specifically, they said some of those answers would come from the Atlantic Council's Digital Forensics Research Lab. The group, whose mission is to spot, dissect, and explain the origins of online disinformation, was one of Facebook’s newest partners in the fight against digital assaults on elections around the world. “When they do that analysis, people will be able to understand better what’s at play here,” Facebook’s head of cybersecurity policy, Nathaniel Gleicher, said.

Back in Washington DC, meanwhile, DFRLab was still scrambling to understand just what was going on themselves. Facebook had alerted them to the eight suspicious pages the day before the press call. The lab had no access to the accounts connected to those pages, nor to any information on Facebook’s backend that would have revealed strange patterns of behavior. They could only see the parts of the pages that would have been visible to any other Facebook user before the pages were shut down—and they had less than 24 hours to do it.

“We screenshotted as much as possible,” says Graham Brookie, the group’s 28-year-old director. “But as soon as those accounts are taken down, we don’t have access to them... We had a good head start, but not a full understanding.” DFRLab is preparing to release a longer report on its findings this week.

As a company, Facebook has rarely been one to throw open its doors to outsiders. That started to change after the 2016 election, when it became clear that Facebook and other tech giants missed an active, and arguably incredibly successful, foreign influence campaign going on right under their noses. Faced with a backlash from lawmakers, the media, and their users, the company publicly committed to being more transparent and to work with outside researchers, including at the Atlantic Council.

'[Facebook] is trying to figure out what the rules of the road are, frankly, as are research organizations like ours.'

GRAHAM BROOKIE, DIGITAL FORENSICS RESEARCH LAB

DFRLab is a scrappier, substantially smaller offshoot of the 57-year-old bipartisan think tank based in DC, and its team of 14 is spread around the globe. Using open source tools like Google Earth and public social media data, they analyze suspicious political activity on Facebook, offer guidance to the company, and publish their findings in regular reports on Medium. Sometimes, as with the recent batch of fake accounts and pages, Facebook feeds tips to the DFRLab for further digging. It's an evolving, somewhat delicate relationship between a corporate behemoth that wants to appear transparent without ceding too much control or violating users' privacy, and a young research group that’s ravenous for Intel and eager to establish its reputation.

“This kind of new world of information sharing is just that, it’s new,” Brookie says. “[Facebook] is trying to figure out what the rules of the road are, frankly, as are research organizations like ours.”

The lab got its start almost by accident. In 2014, Brookie was working for the National Security Council under President Obama when the military conflict broke out in eastern Ukraine. At the time, he says, the US intelligence community knew that Russian troops had invaded the region, but given the classified nature of their intel they had no way to prove it to the public. That allowed the Russian government to continue denying their involvement.

What the Russians didn’t know was that proof of their military surge was sitting right out in the open online. A working group within the Atlantic Council was among the groups busy sifting through the selfies and videos that Russian soldiers were uploading to sites like Instagram and YouTube. By comparing the geolocation data on those posts to Google Earth street view images that could reveal precisely where the photos were taken, the researchers were able to track the soldiers as they made their way through Ukraine.

“It was old-school Facebook stalking, but for classified national security interests,” says Brookie.

This experiment formed the basis of DFRLab, which has continued using open source tools to investigate national security issues ever since. After the initial report on eastern Ukraine, for instance, DFRLab followed up with a piece that used satellite images to prove that the Russian government had misled the world about its air strikes on Syria; instead of hitting ISIS territory and oil reserves, as it claimed, it had in fact targeted civilian populations, hospitals, and schools.

But Brookie, who joined DFRLab in 2017, says the 2016 election radically changed the way the team worked. Unlike Syria or Ukraine, where researchers needed to extract the truth in a low-information environment, the election was plagued by another scourge: information overload. Suddenly, there was a flood of myths to be debunked. DFRLab shifted from writing lengthy policy papers to quick hits on Medium. To expand its reach even further, the group also launched a series of live events to train other academics, journalists, and government officials in their research tactics, creating even more so-called “digital Sherlocks.”

'Sometimes a fresh pair of eyes can see something we may have missed.'

KATIE HARBATH, FACEBOOK

This work caught Facebook’s attention in 2017. After it became clear that bad actors, including Russian trolls, had used Facebook to prey on users' political views during the 2016 race, Facebook pledged to better safeguard election integrity around the world. The company has since begun staffing up its security team, developing artificial intelligence to spot fake accounts and coordinated activity, and enacting measures to verify the identities of political advertisers and administrators for large pages on Facebook.

According to Katie Harbath, Facebook’s director of politics, DFRLab's skill at tracking disinformation not just on Facebook but across platforms felt like a valuable addition to this effort. The fact that the Atlantic Council’s board is stacked with foreign policy experts including former secretary of state Madeleine Albright and Stephen Hadley, former national security adviser to President George W. Bush, was an added bonus.

“They bring that unique, global view set of both established foreign policy people, who have had a lot of experience, combined with innovation and looking at problems in new ways, using open source material,” Harbath says.

That combination has helped the Atlantic Council attract as much as $24 million a year in contributions, including from government and corporate sponsors. As the think tank's profile has grown, however, it has also been accused of peddling influence for major corporate donors like FedEx. Now, after committing roughly $1 million in funding to the Atlantic Council, the bulk of which supports the DFRLab’s work, Facebook is among the organization's biggest sponsors.

But for Facebook, giving money away is the easy part. The challenge now is figuring out how best to leverage this new partnership. Facebook is a $500 billion tech juggernaut with 30,000 employees in offices around the world; it's hard to imagine what a 14-person team at a non-profit could tell them that they don't already know. But Facebook's security team and DFRLab staff swap tips daily through a shared Slack channel, and Harbath says that Brookie’s team has already made some valuable discoveries.

During the recent elections in Mexico, for example, DFRLab dissected the behavior of a political consulting group called Victory Lab that was spamming the election with fake news, driven by Twitter bots and Facebook likes that appeared to have been purchased in bulk. The team found that a substantial number of those phony likes came from the same set of Brazilian Facebook users. What's more, they all listed the same company, Frases & Versos, as their employer.

The team dug deeper, looking into the managers of Frases & Versos, and found that they were connected with an entity called PCSD, which maintained a number of pages where Facebook users could buy and sell likes, shares, and even entire pages. With the Brazilian elections on the horizon in October, Brookie says, it was critical to get the information in front of Facebook immediately.

"We flagged it for Facebook, like, 'Holy cow this is interesting,'" Brookie remembers. The Facebook team took on the investigation from there. On Wednesday, the DFRLab published its report on the topic, and Facebook confirmed to WIRED that it had removed a network of 72 groups, 46 accounts, and five pages associated with PCSD.

"We’re in this all day, every day, looking at these things," Harbath says. "Sometimes a fresh pair of eyes can see something we may have missed."

Of course, Facebook has missed a lot in the past few years, and the partnership with the DFRLab is no guarantee it won't miss more. Even as it stumbles toward transparency, the company remains highly selective about which sets of eyes get to search for what they've missed, and what they get to see. After all, Brookie's team can only examine clues that are already publicly accessible. Whatever signals Facebook is studying behind the scenes remain a mystery.

 Source: This article was Published wired.com By IE LAPOWSKY

Even if "Location History" is off on your phone, Google often still stores your precise location.

Here are some things you can do to delete those markers and keep your location as private as possible. But there's no panacea because simply connecting to the internet on any device flags an IP address, a numeric designation that can be geographically mapped. Smartphones also connect to cell towers, so your carrier knows your general location at all times.

To prevent further tracking

For any device:

Fire up your browser and go to myactivity.google.com . Sign into Google if you haven't already. On the upper left drop-down menu, go to "Activity Controls." Turn off both "Web & App Activity" and "Location History." That should prevent precise location markers from being stored to your Google account.

Google will warn you that some of its services won't work as well with these settings off. In particular, neither the Google Assistant, a digital concierge, nor the Google Home smart speaker will be particularly useful.

On iOS:

If you use Google Maps, adjust your location setting to "While Using" the app; this will prevent the app from accessing your location when it's not active. Go to Settings - Privacy - Location Services and from there select Google Maps to make the adjustment.

In the Safari web browser, consider using a search engine other than Google. Under Settings - Safari - Search Engine, you can find other options like Bing or DuckDuckGo. You can turn location off while browsing by going to Settings - Privacy - Location Services - Safari Websites, and turn this to "Never." (This still won't prevent advertisers from knowing your rough location based on IP address on any website.)

You can also turn Location Services off to the device almost completely from Settings - Privacy - Location Services. Both Google Maps and Apple Maps will still work, but they won't know where you are on the map and won't be able to give you directions. Emergency responders will still be able to find you if the need arises.

On Android:

Under the main settings icon click on "Security & location." Scroll down to the "Privacy" heading. Tap "Location." You can toggle it off for the entire device.

Use "App-level permissions" to turn off access to various apps. Unlike the iPhone, there is no setting for "While Using." You cannot turn off Google Play services, which supplies your location to other apps if you leave that service on.

Sign in as a "guest" on your Android device by swiping down from the top and tapping the downward-facing caret, then again on the torso icon. Be aware of which services you sign in on, like Chrome.

You can also change search engines even in Chrome.

To delete past location tracking

For any device:

On the page myactivity.google.com , look for any entry that has a location pin icon beside the word "details." Clicking on that pops up a window that includes a link that sometimes says "From your current location." Clicking on it will open Google Maps, which will display where you were at the time.

You can delete it from this popup by clicking on the navigation icon with the three stacked dots and then "Delete."

Some items will be grouped in unexpected places, such as topic names, google.com, Search, or Maps. You have to delete them item by item. You can wholesale delete all items in date ranges or by service but will end up taking out more than just location markers.

Source: This article was Published cbsnews.com

The Global Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Market report is organized by executing a phenomenal research process to collect key information of the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management industry. The Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management research study is based on two parts, especially, the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management primary research and outstanding secondary research. Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market secondary research provides a dynamic Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market review and classification of the worldwide Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market. It also lamps on leading players in the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market. Likewise, the primary Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management research highlights the major region/countries, transportation channel, and the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management product category.

The Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market report focuses on major market vendors and various manufacturers persuading the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market. It also includes Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management vital financials, SWOT study, technologies advancement, Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management improvement processes, and so on. The Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market report guide the user by offering a detailed study of the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market. Additionally, the main Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management product categories such as platform, service, cloud deployment, solution, application, and region analysis are covered in the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management report.

The Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market report includes an in-depth analysis of key Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market players. It also includes a review of various supporter along with Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management manufacture study, market size, share, current and forecast trends, sales(volume), supply, Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management production, and CAGR (%). The global Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market research report assists the user to propel their Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management business by providing them detailed market insights. It guides them in planning strategies to explore their Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management businesses.

To Get Sample Copy of Report visit @ https://marketresearch.biz/report/internet-of-things-iot-fleet-management-market/request-sample

The major Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market players are:

  • Oracle Corporation
  • Cisco Systems, Inc. 
  • IBM Corporation 
  • AT&T, Inc. 
  • Intel Corporation 
  • Verizon Communications, Inc. 
  • TomTom International BV 
  • Trimble Inc. 
  • Sierra Wireless 
  • Omnitracs, LLC

An extensive research report of the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market features crucial growth opportunities in the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market that will assist the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management user to plan the business strategy for their future expansions in the worldwide Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market in a specific region. All the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management statistical information and other information are comprehensively crafted to helps the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management user to explore their business wisely.

An in-depth Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market research report focused the growth opportunities in the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market that helps the user to plan upcoming development and progress in the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market in a projected area. All the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market insights, stats, and other information are skillfully organized and represented as per the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management user demand. We also provide the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management customized reports as per the user requirement.

Global Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Report mainly includes the following:

  1. Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Industry Outlook
  2. Region and Country Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Market Analysis
  3. Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Technical Information and Manufacturing Industry Study
  4. Region-wise Production Analysis And the Various Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Segmentation Study
  5. Manufacturing Process of an Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management and Cost Structure
  6. Productions, Supply-Demand, Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Sales, Current Status and Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Market Forecast
  7. Key Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Succeedings Factor and Industry Share Overview
  8. Research Methodology

Have Query? Enquire Here @ https://marketresearch.biz/report/internet-of-things-iot-fleet-management-market/#inquiry

The Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market research report highlights on offering data such as Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market share, growth ratio, cost, revenue(USD$), Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management industry utilization, and import-export insights of Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market globally. This Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management report also studied remarkable company profiles, their suppliers, distributors, investors and Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management marketing channel. Finally, Global Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management Market 2018 report solve the queries and gives the answers of the fundamental questions (What will be the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market size and growth rate in 2026?, What are the Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management market driving factors?) which will be beneficial for your Internet of Things (IoT) Fleet Management business to grow over the globe.

 Source: This article was published thebusinesstactics.com By Carl Sanford

The time for brands to begin tuning their online presence for voice has arrived, says Michael Jenkins. Here is a brief guide to navigating the data barrier to voice marketing, AI in voice SEO and improving your searchability.

‘Hey Siri, how popular is voice search?’ The short answer is: very.

According to Alpine.AI, there are now over one billion voice searches each month.

Voice search has come a long way since Siri snuck onto the market in 2011 with painstakingly slow – and rarely accurate – search returns.  Voice assistants are now programmed to understand nuances in conversation, humour and, as we saw with the launch of a mind-blowingtechnology from Google last month, can even book haircuts.

With these technological advances, sales of smart technologies like Amazon Echo, Siri and Google Home have also grown astronomically over the past 12 months. Outside of the home or office, brands like BMW ensure that every car is fully optimised for ConnectedDrive, placing connectivity alongside electrification and autonomous driving on the customer priority list.

This seismic technological shift toward voice controlled search is something marketers simply cannot afford be complacent about when employing an SEO strategy. Here’s why.

Voice data

One of the biggest challenges that marketers face is the massive amount of data required to do voice search correctly. If you want to understand voice search you need to start by examining how voice data works.

Artificial intelligences programs have become highly sophisticated by learning more about:

  • Intent and parameter – while becoming increasingly sophisticated, voice search has more intent than traditional search. For example, common words such as ‘king’ can be confusing. Computers do not know if you referred to royalty or Elvis Presley. A parameter such as, ‘play the king of rock and roll music’ provides helpful data to choose the correct version.
  • Paths – instead of simply relying upon the search, companies like Google and Facebook explore how users interact with brands and other channels to predict voice interactions. When they know you came to their site from another, they can see how you liked this type of site and use it as a predicator for future possible voice searches.
  • Errors – while this has dropped dramatically, voice search is still in its infancy. Mistakes occur, and it is important for marketers to be aware of this when optimising for voice search.

Currently, cumulative spending on data accounts for 20% of all voice marketing. Those who do not store, manage and utilise their data cannot compete against the companies who have volumes of data at the ready to help guide their decisions.

Voice search is one area where having more data can help set you apart from the crowd.

Experiment

Like any emerging trend in SEO, you must experiment to determine what works best.

For example, many companies have just transferred their websites to a mobile apps. Instead of experimenting with the channel to understand the needs of their customers or how to gain advantages over their competitors, companies stuck with what they knew.

However, the mobile experience is completely different from websites. The same holds true for voice search. You do not need to make huge changes, but you need to continually tweak your voice search efforts. Fortunately, the data you collect will improve the efficiency and effectiveness of your experimenting.

Long tail keywords

Long tail keywords are those three and four keyword phrases which are very, very specific to whatever you are selling. What this means for marketers is that SEO now is about going for a larger keyword strategy. Searchers queries, particularly on voice are more conversational by nature. People are not typing – or saying for that matter – phrases like ‘clothing store’, they may, however ask, ‘best designer fashion stores to buy a cashmere coat near me’.

This behaviour highlights the importance of content. To do this a site requires more content on pages – content that is mapped to the search keyword strategy. Having more content means that you will also need to balance the user experience – ensuring that it both enhances usability and also enhances SEO. Most importantly, it’s imperative that longer tail keywords are seamlessly sprinkled through the syntax of website copy. This will allow search engines to see more context via voice-activated search and will result in pages appearing for a higher volume of phrases.

Structured data

Help search engines with voice search by including structured data in your website. A few years ago, the major search engines agreed upon a unified mark up structure that website admins should use on their website. This information is part of the data that search engines use for voice search to determine the relevancy of a website. Furthermore, this information is a goldmine for websites that want to get local search traffic.

Location plays a role in 80% of all searches, and voice search makes up a large percentage of these searches. Including micro-data on each page like location, product information and other essential details helps you improve your searchability when people ask for a local establishment.

This is one of the reasons we discussed why your name, address and phone must be correct on your website. Search engines extract this information when comparing users’ searches to nearby retail outlets – you can even it use it for keywords. We use structured data to let Google know some of the most important pages (e.g. social media agency, conversion rate optimisation, SEO agency and PPC) for them to index.

The structured data on your website provides the extra ammunition you need to increase your voice search traffic.

Final Thoughts

With voice search growing in popularity as voice queries improve in accuracy, it is vital that your company optimises your voice search efforts to reach consumers. Do this by looking at the data, testing and improving the structured data you have on your website to drive more targeted traffic.

Michael Jenkins is founder and director at Shout Agency.

Source: This article was published marketingmag.com.au

How do you research thoroughly, save time, and get directly to the source you wish to find? GIJN’s Research Director Gary Price, who is also the editor of InfoDOCKET, and Margot Williams, research editor for investigations at The Intercept, shared their Top 100 Research Tools. Overwhelmed with information; we asked Williams and Price to refine their tools and research strategies down to a Top 10. Russian translation available here.

What are the bare-essentials for an investigative journalist?

1. Security and Privacy  Security tools have never been more important. There is so much information that you give out without even knowing it. Arm yourself with knowledge. Be aware of privacy issues and learn how to modify your own traceability. This is paramount for your own security and privacy. Price and Williams recommend using Tor and Disconnect.me for sites that will block others from tracking your browsing history.

2. Find Specialized Sites and Databases  Do not run a generalized blind search. Think about who will have the information that you want to find. Get precise about your keywords. Does the file you are looking for even exist online? Or do you have to get it yourself in some way? Will you have to find an archive? Or get a first-person interview? Fine-tuning your research process will save you a lot of time.

3. Stay Current Price highly recommends Website Watcher. This tool automates the entire search process by monitoring your chosen web pages, and sends you instant updates when there are changes in the site. This tool allows you to stay current, with little effort. No more refreshing a webpage over and over again.

4. Read from Back to Front Where do you start looking for information? Do you start reading the headline or the footnotes? Most people start with the headline, however Williams gives an inside tip; she always start at the footnotes. The footnotes inform the articles body, and you can get straight to your information, without obtaining any bias from the author.

5. Create Your Own Archive Wayback Machine is a digital archive of the web. This site makes you see archived versions of web pages across time. Most importantly, Price recommended that you use this site to develop your own personal archive. A feature of the Wayback Machine now allows you to archive most webpages and pdf files. Do not keep all your sources on a site you might not always be able to access. You can now keep the files not only in your own hard drive, but you share them online. Another useful resource for archiving is Zotero, a personal information management tool. Watch here for Price teaching how to use this incredible archive and information management tool. You can also form your own data with IFTTT. Gary Price teaches us how to do this here:

6. Pop up Archive Sick of scanning through podcasts and videos in order to get the information you need? Audio and Video searches are becoming increasingly popular, and can save you an incredible amount of time. This can be done with search engines like Popup Archive and C-SPAN.

7. Ignore Mainstream Media Reports Williams ignores sites like Reddit at all costs. These sites can lead your research astray, and you can become wrapped in knowledge that might later be deemed as false. Price is also wary of Wikipedia, for obvious reasons; any person, anywhere at anytime can change a story as they see fit. Stay curious, and keep digging. 

8. Marine Traffic Marinetraffic.com makes it possible to track any kind of boat and real-time ship locations, port arrivals and departures. You can also see the track of the boats and follow the path to any vessel movement. Check out Price’s tutorial video of FlightAware, a data search that traces real time and historical flight movements.

9. Foreign Influence Explorer Needing to find sources on governments and money tracking? Foreign Influence Explorer will make your searches incredibly easy. This search engine makes it possible to track disclosures as they become available, and allows you to find out what people or countries have given money to, with the exact time and dates.

10. If you are going to use Google… Use it well. Google’s potential is rarely reached. For a common search engine, you can get extremely specific results if you know how. Williams explains that the Congress has a terrible search engine on their site, but if you use google you can better refine your search by typing your keywords next to “site:(URL)”. You can even get the time and date it was published by further specialising. Watch a video demonstration of a Google advance search feature here.

 Source: This article was published gijc2015.org By Zita Evangeline Campbell & Line Løtveit

After killing off prayer time results in Google several years ago, Google brings the feature back for some regions.

The prayer times can be triggered for some queries that seem to be asking for that information and also include geographic designators, such as [prayer times mecca], where Islamic prayer times are relevant. It’s possible that queries without a specific location term, but conducted from one of those locations, would also trigger the prayer times, but we weren’t able to test that functionality.

A Google spokesperson told Search Engine Land “coinciding with Ramadan, we launched this feature in a number of predominantly Islamic countries to make it easier to find prayer times for locally popular queries.”

“We continue to explore ways we can help people around the world find information about their preferred religious rituals and celebrations,” Google added.

Here is a screenshot of prayer times done on desktop search:

Google gives you the ability to customize the calculation method used to figure out when the prayer times are in that region. Depending on your religious observance, you may hold one method over another. Here are the available Islamic prayer time calculation methods that Google offers:

Not all queries return this response, and some may return featured snippets as opposed to this specific prayer times box. So please do not be confused when you see a featured snippet versus a prayer-time one-box.

This is what a featured snippet looks like in comparison to the image above:

The most noticeable way to tell this isn’t a real prayer-times box is that you cannot change the calculation method in the featured snippet. In my opinion, it would make sense for Google to remove the featured snippets for prayer times so searchers aren’t confused. Since featured snippets may be delayed, they probably aren’t trustworthy responses for those who rely on these prayer times. Smart answers are immediate and are calculated by Google directly.

Back in 2011, Google launched prayer times rich snippets, but about a year later, Google killed off the feature. Now, Google has deployed this new approach without using markup or schema; instead, Google does the calculation internally without depending on third-party resources or websites.

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz

Only 3% of the 1,000 internet users surveyed between the ages of 18 and 35 say they trust search engines like Google or Bing to keep their data safe and private. Just 4% trust social sites like Facebook, and 6% trust email providers like AOL, Yahoo or Gmail.

Blue Fountain Media commissioned a survey through SurveyMonkey in May 2018 to show brands the importance of protecting consumer data. The 1,000 survey participants, ages 18 to 35, were consumers found across the internet, not the customers of agency clients.

Overall, 90% of the internet users in the U.S. said they are concerned about privacy, yet only 5% are willing to give up technology like Amazon Echo and Alexa, or Google Home and Assistant.

Ironically, internet users want the ability to use the devices to search for information via their voice, but they are not willing to spend the time to read or hear the fine print that tells them how their data will be collected and used.

Consumers have more trust in other types of sites than they do in search engines and social sites. When it comes to keeping their personal data most secure, 21% trust online banking or financial institutions the most, while 18% feel safe on government sites and 17% say credit card companies are secure.

Overall, the study also found that more than 40% “feel hopeless and worried” that their private information is being shared with dangerous people.

“I invited Google into my home,” said Brian Byer, vice president of business development at New York-based digital agency Blue Fountain Media. “I ask her the temperature and weather and she’ll tell me. Having that connivance is worth having an open mic at my house all day long.”

While 58% will not download an app if it enables microphone use, only 5% of respondents claim to have ditched their Alexa because their microphone is always enabled.

People will download apps without reading the terms and conditions and without understanding what happens with their data. Some 60% of people polled do not read the T&Cs, and 20% download the app even when they read and don’t like them.

A smaller percentage will delete the app once they realize that it accesses their camera and tracks their location. Users in apps like Uber can disable functions until they are ready to use them, but some people just don’t know how.

In addition to search engines, close to 82% of those surveyed do not feel confident that online retailers keep their info safe; and 37% think giving companies access to personal information makes surfing the web, staying in touch with friends and shopping easier and more personalized. The study also found that even 31% of respondents create another email account just for signing up for services.

It doesn’t need to be that way, Byer said. Brands need to be open with customers, give them ways to opt in and opt out, and have an open relationship for a stronger partnership. 

Source: This article was published mediapost.com By Laurie Sullivan

San Francisco, Google took action on nearly 90,000 user reports of spam in its Search in 2017 and has now asked more users to come forward and help the tech giant spot and squash spam.

According to Juan Felipe Rincon, Global Search Outreach Lead at Google, the automated Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based systems are constantly working to detect and block spam.

"Still, we always welcome hearing from you when something seems phishy. Reporting spam, malware, and other issues you find help us protect the site owner and other searchers from this abuse," Rincon said in a blog post.

"You can file a spam report, a phishing report or a malware report. You can also alert us to any issue with Google search by clicking on the 'Send feedback' link at the bottom of the search results page," he added.



Last year, Google sent over 45 million notifications to registered website owners, alerting them to possible problems with their websites which could affect their appearance in a search.

"Just as Gmail fights email spam and keeps it out of your inbox, our search spam fighting systems work to keep your search results clean," Rincon said.

In 2017, Google conducted over 250 webmaster meetups and office hours around the world reaching more than 220,000 website owners.

"Last year, we sent 6 million manual action messages to webmasters about practices we identified that were against our guidelines, along with information on how to resolve the issue," the Google executive said.

With AI-based systems, Google was able to detect and remove more than 80 percent of compromised sites from search results last year.

"We're also working closely with many providers of popular content management systems like WordPress and Joomla to help them fight spammers that abuse forums and comment sections," the blog post said.

Source: This article was published cio.economictimes.indiatimes.com

Page 1 of 16

Upcoming Events

There are no up-coming events

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait
Internet research courses

airs logo

AIRS is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Subscribe to AIRS Newsletter

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

Follow Us on Social Media