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Tuesday, 25 August 2020 17:56

Hacker Leaks 900 Enterprise VPN Server Passwords on Dark Web

Author:  [Source: This article was published in healthitsecurity.com By Jessica Davis]

 Threat intelligence firm KELA shared a list of more than 900 Pulse Secure VPN enterprise server usernames and passwords with ZDNet, which a hacker had posted on the dark web in plain text.

The usernames and passwords, as well as IP addresses, from more than 900 Pulse Secure Virtual Private Network enterprise servers were posted in plain text on the dark web by a Russian-speaking hacker, first reported by ZDNet.com, which obtained the list with help from threat intelligence firm KELA. 

The list contained Pulse Secure VPN server firmware version, SSH server keys, all local users and password hashes, administrator account details, previous VPN logins with cleartext credentials, and session cookies.  

The authenticity of the list was verified by multiple cybersecurity sources. Further, the list was published on a forum frequented by popular ransomware threat actors, such as REvil and NetWalker. 

 

 

The leak was first discovered by researchers from Bank Security, which observed that the VPN servers listed by the hacker were operating with the firmware version that contained the CVE-2019-11510 vulnerability patched by Pulse Secure in early 2019. 

The Department of Homeland Security and other security researchers have repeatedly urged organizations to patch this critical vulnerability, as hackers continued to target the flawThose targeted attacks continued through January 2020. 

And in April, DHS warned that hackers were using stolen credentials to crack into enterprise networks through the Pulse Secure VPN, even if the vulnerability was patched. 

To find vulnerable VPNs, it appears that the hacker who compiled the list scanned the internet IPv4 address between June 24 and July 8, 2020 and leveraged the known vulnerability to access servers. Then, the threat actor gathered the server details and credentials, collecting the data into a central repository. 

Reviewing the list, it appears that 677 companies failed to patch the Pulse Secure VPN vulnerability. 

VPNs are one of the most common, secure methods used to remotely connect to the network. But as remote connections and telehealth use expanded amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the threat landscape has become much more complex. 

Pulse Secure CMO Scott Gordon told HealthITSecurity.com in March, that in healthcare, providers need to be employing endpoint protection and modern VPN solutions “where you’re encrypting communication session between the device and the data between the practitioner’s devices and application.” 

Since you are now expanding VPN use to more sets of employees contracts and affiliates you should for sure that the VPN software is up to date and current to eliminate the potential VPN vulnerabilities,” Gordon said, at the time. “They’ve essentially broadened the attack surface. Every end user accessing information and resources are now part of their attack surface, and they want to do everything they can now that they've added greater accessibility.” 

To Laurence Pitt, Global Security Strategy Director, Juniper Networks, its unacceptable that organizations failed to patch the vulnerability more than a year after a fix was provided, which allowed for cleartext data dump to occur. 

Further, security researchers have repeatedly provided proof-of-concept data that showed just what could occur if the enterprise left the vulnerability exposed.   

“The lesson learned here? Patch, patch, patch,” Pitt said in an emailed statement. “The data published lists only 900 servers. What we do not know is how many more have not been released – or, which of these could be sensitive servers that are now being poked and prodded in planning for a bigger attack.  

If you are running an older version of code on a service as critical as the VPN is today, then find the latest version and get that upgrade planned, he added.

Healthcare organizations should review insights recently provided by the National Security Agency to better understand the risk and best practice methods to secure VPNs, telework, and other remote sites.

 

[Source: This article was published in healthitsecurity.com By Jessica Davis - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jeremy Frink]

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