Website Search
Research Papers
plg_search_attachments
Articles
FAQs
Easy Profile - Search plugin
Courses & Exams
Pages
Specialized Search Engines
Events Calender
Upcoming Events

In the early years of the 20th Century, US carmakers had it good. As quickly as they could manufacture cars, people bought them.

By 1914, that was changing. In higher price brackets especially, purchasers and dealerships were becoming choosier. One commentator warned that the retailer "could no longer sell what his own judgement dictated". Instead, "he must sell what the consumer wanted".

That commentator was Charles Coolidge Parlin, widely recognised as the world's first professional market researcher and, indeed, the man who invented the very idea of market research.

A century later, the market research profession is huge: in the United States alone, it employs about 500,000 people.


 

Programme image for 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

50 Things That Made the Modern Economy highlights the inventions, ideas and innovations that helped create the economic world.

It is broadcast on the BBC World Service. You can find more information about the programme's sources and listen online or subscribe to the programme podcast.


Parlin was tasked with taking the pulse of the US automobile market. He travelled tens of thousands of miles, and interviewed hundreds of car dealers.

After months of work, he presented his employer with what he modestly described as "2,500 typewritten sheets, charts, maps, statistics, tables etc".

Better adverts?

You might wonder which carmaker employed Parlin to conduct this research. Was it, perhaps, Henry Ford, who at the time was busy gaining an edge on his rivals with another innovation - the assembly line?

But no: Ford didn't have a market research department to gauge what customers wanted.

Perhaps that's no surprise. Henry Ford is widely supposed to have quipped that people could have a Model T in "any colour they like, as long as it's black".

In fact, no carmakers employed market researchers.

Charles Parlin
Image captionCharles Parlin was charged with investigating markets to facilitate more effective advertising

Parlin had been hired by a magazine publisher.

The Curtis Publishing Company was responsible for some of the most widely read periodicals of the time: the Saturday Evening Post, The Ladies' Home Journal, The Country Gentleman.

The magazines depended on advertising revenue.

The company's founder thought he'd be able to sell more advertising space if advertising were perceived as more effective, and wondered if researching markets might make it possible to devise better adverts.

'Constructive service'

In 1911, he set up a new division of his company to explore this vaguely conceived idea, headed by Charles Parlin. It wasn't an obvious career move for a 39-year-old high school principal from Wisconsin - but then, being the world's first market researcher wouldn't have been an obvious career move for anyone.

Parlin started by immersing himself in agricultural machinery, then tackled department stores. Not everyone saw value in his activities, at first.

The crowded street outside Selfridges Store in Oxford Street, London, on its opening day, 15 March 1909
Image captionDepartment stores such as Selfridges also had a massive influence on the way people shopped

Even as he introduced his pamphlet The Merchandising of Automobiles: An Address to Retailers, he still felt the need to include a diffident justification of his job's existence.

He hoped to be "of constructive service to the industry as a whole," he wrote, explaining that carmakers spent heavily on advertising, and his employers wanted to "ascertain whether this important source of business was one which would continue". They needn't have worried.

'Consumer-led' approach

The invention of market research marks an early step in a broader shift from a "producer-led" to "consumer-led" approach to business - from making something then trying to persuade people to buy it, to trying to find out what people might buy, and then making it.

The producer-led mindset is exemplified by Henry Ford's "any colour, as long as it's black".

From 1914 to 1926, only black Model Ts rolled off Ford's production line: it was simpler to assemble cars of a single colour, and black paint was cheap and durable.

Henry Ford with one of his Model T cars, pictured in the 1930s
Image captionHenry Ford famously began by selling one type of car available in one colour

All that remained was to persuade customers that what they really wanted was a black Model T. To be fair, Ford excelled at this.

Few companies today would simply produce what's convenient, then hope to sell it.

A panoply of market research techniques helps determine what might sell: surveys, focus groups, beta testing. If metallic paint and go-faster stripes will sell more cars, that's what will get made.

Where Parlin led, others eventually followed.

By the late 1910s, not long after Parlin's report on automobiles, companies had started setting up their own market research departments. Over the next decade, US advertising budgets almost doubled.

George Gallup
Image captionGeorge Gallup pioneered opinion polls in the 1930s

Approaches to market research became more scientific. In the 1930s, George Gallup pioneered opinion polls. The first focus group was conducted in 1941 by an academic sociologist, Robert K Merton.

He later wished he could have patented the idea and collected royalties.

But systematically investigating consumer preferences was only part of the story. Marketers also realised it was possible systematically to change them.

Robert K Merton coined a phrase to describe the kind of successful, cool or savvy individual who routinely features in marketing campaigns: the "role model".

Manufacturing desire

The nature of advertising was changing: no longer merely providing information, but trying to manufacture desire.

Sigmund Freud's nephew Edward Bernays pioneered the fields of public relations and propaganda.

In 1929, he helped the American Tobacco Company to persuade women that smoking in public was an act of female liberation. Cigarettes, he said, were "torches of freedom".

An advert for Lucky Strike cigarettes
Image captionAdverts began to portray smoking and smokers as liberated and modern

Today, attempts to discern and direct public preferences shape every corner of the economy.

Any viral marketer will tell you that creating buzz remains more of an art than a science, but with ever more data available, investigations of consumer psychology can get ever more detailed.

Where Ford offered cars in a single shade of black, Google famously tested the effect on click-through rates of 41 slightly different shades of blue.

Google's logo
Image captionGoogle carried out exhaustive tests on which precise shade of blue performed best

Should we worry about the reach and sophistication of corporate efforts to probe and manipulate our consumer psyches?

The evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller takes a more optimistic view.

"Like chivalrous lovers," Miller writes, "the best marketing-oriented companies help us discover desires we never knew we had, and ways of fulfilling them we never imagined." Perhaps.

Conspicuous consumption

Miller sees humans showing off through our consumer purchases much as peacocks impress peahens with their tails.

Such ideas hark back to an economist and sociologist named Thorstein Veblen, who invented the concept of conspicuous consumption back in 1899.

Charles Coolidge Parlin had read his Veblen. He understood the signalling power of consumer purchases.

"The pleasure car," he wrote in his address to retailers, "is the travelling representative of a man's taste or refinement."

"A dilapidated pleasure car," he added, "like a decrepit horse, advertises that the driver is lacking in funds, or lacking in pride."


What should be the 51st Thing?

The number 51

Tim Harford has discussed 50 things that have made the modern economy. Help choose the 51st by voting for one of these listener suggestions:

  • The credit card
  • Glass
  • Global Positioning System (GPS)
  • Irrigation
  • The pencil
  • The spreadsheet

You can vote on the 50 Things That Made the Modern Economy programme website. Voting closes at 12:00 GMT on Friday 6 October, and the winning 51st thing will be announced in a podcast on 28 October.


In other words, perhaps not someone you should trust as a business associate - or a husband.

Signalling these days is much more complex than merely displaying wealth: we might choose a Prius if we want to display our green credentials, or a Volvo if we want to be seen as safety-conscious.

These signals carry meaning only because brands have spent decades consciously trying to understand and respond to consumer desires - and to shape them.

By contrast with today's adverts, those of 1914 were delightfully unsophisticated.

The tagline of one, for a Model T, said: "Buy it because it's a better car." Isn't that advertisement, in its own way, perfect? But it couldn't last.

Charles Coolidge Parlin was in the process of ushering us towards a very different world.

Source: This article was published bbc.com By Tim Harford

Published in Market Research

Big data has and will change how advertisers work and businesses market.

There are plenty of words online about how big data will change every facet of our lives, and a substantial chunk of those words are devoted towards how big data will affect advertising. But instead of haphazardly leaping on the change bandwagon, advertisers need to sit down and understand what big data has changed and yet what still remains the same.

At its core, advertising is about communication as it seeks to inform consumers about a business’s product and services. But different consumers want to hear different messages, which becomes all the more important as new customers join the internet thanks to the growing popularity of mobile.

Big data can refine those messages, predict what customers want to hear with predictive analytics, and yield new insights in what customers want to hear. All of this is certainly revolutionary and will change how consumers and marketers approach advertising. But it will still be up to advertisers to create messages in the name of their clients.

Algorithms and targeting

Some things which many people do not think about as advertising are in fact a conflation of big data and marketing. Netflix is a terrific example of this. Netflix obviously does not have advertisements, but it heavily relies on algorithms to recommend shows to its viewers. These algorithms save Netflix $1 billion per year by reducing the churn rate and marketing the right shows to the right customers.

Netflix’s efforts to target consumers with the right shows is hardly unusual, as websites and online stores like YouTube, Amazon, or Steam do this all the time these days. But the key here is the reliance on algorithms to make targeting more accurate.

These algorithms require a constant stream of data to stay up to date. But now that data is everywhere. Internet users leave a constant stream of data not just on social media websites, but anywhere they go in the form of digital footprints.

This represents new opportunities and challenges for advertisers. On one hand, the digital footprints which everyone creates offers new insights to advertisers into what we truly want which can be more accurate than what we say on social media. But at the same time, advertisers do have to worry about protecting consumer privacy and security. This is not just a moral thing; advertisers or websites that are flagrantly cavalier with their user data will spark a backlash that will hurt business.

Advertising targeting has already been in place for some time now. But as advertisers collect more data, targeting will become more personalized and thus effective. Advertisers will fight not just to collect as much data as possible, but to collect data which accurately represents individual customers to market to their individual tastes.

Changing forms of advertising

Big data can uncover new information about each individual customer, but the advertiser must craft a message to appeal to said customer. But with these new insights, advertisers can entirely change how they approach marketing as they craft entirely new strategies.

This is not completely new. The rise in content marketing is often cited as a major beneficiary of big data, but content marketing as a concept is older than the Internet. Nevertheless, the rise in content marketing as well as other strategies like native advertising or the endless dance around search engine optimization.

These rising advertising strategies are fascinating because just as advertisers rely on data to craft new strategies, they give data right back to the consumer. Content marketing is all about giving consumers details about a business such as how they make food, what it is like to work there, and so on. By sharing this data, the company makes the customers feel like they are part of a group which knows common information. And in turn the customer ends up giving up his data to the company which lets it construct new advertising strategies.

This symbiosis between consumer and company shows that data is not just about cold analytics, but is about creating a bond between the two groups like all advertising sets out to do. Similarly, businesses must take the complexity of big data, analyze trends, and then create simple guidelines which their customer staff can use. All the advertising in the world will not make as big of an impression on a customer as one surly or confused customer representative.

Big data has and will change how advertisers work and businesses market to consumers through more personalized and targeted advertisement as well as creating new forms of advertising. But big data is less important than smart data and strategy. Business leaders who can break big data down into small chunks, come up with a smart strategy, and formulate an effective message will still thrive just as much as they would have in the past. In this way, big data is not quite the revolutionary change that many think.

This article is published as part of the IDG Contributor Network. Want to Join?

Published in Search Engine

WHY YOU SHOULD CARE Because companies will soon be able to recognize your face.

As you may already be aware, we know a lot about you. Yes, you! We know whether you clicked here from Facebook or if you came via our home page. We will know how long you spend reading this article and what you click to read next. That information enables us to figure out what interests you, which may affect what shows up next time you visit our site. If OZY were as big a part of your life as Facebook or Google is — if not yet, then soon! — we would know so much about you that we could show you advertisements targeted to your every interest.

But what if we could recognize your face? If so, we might adjust our messages to you depending on whether you look happy or sad, distracted or engaged. We’d adjust if you were looking to the left of the screen, or to the right. We’re not watching you read us, at least not yet, but the capability might not be too far away.

Indeed, facial recognition technology is almost ready for the mainstream. “Computer vision” is “moving very fast” toward the creation of browsers of the visual world, says Ambarish Mitra, co-founder and CEO of Blippar, an app that scans and recognizes images and faces and then shows you search and social-network results on your screen, combining two of the tech world’s current favorite functionalities — machine learning and augmented reality (AR). The dream, so it seems, is to become like a real-time, image-based search engine, a face-based social network and Pokémon Go, all rolled into one. Blippar is not the only “facial network” out there. The Russian website FindFace generated controversy last year when its search-by-faces function was used to reveal the identities of porn actresses. And just as a website to connect college students created by a fresh-faced Mark Zuckerberg in his dorm room eventually revolutionized the news media and advertising industries, these technologies could change how companies market products — and a whole lot more — in untold ways.

“We’re producing a paradigm shift in thinking in marketing and advertising,” says Mitra. His superlatives aren’t entirely unjustified: The Blippar logo has appeared on 12 billion products in the past four years through the company’s marketing partnerships with more than 1,500 brands, including Heinz, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch. These “Blippable” products can be scanned in Blippar’s smartphone app, but rather than just linking to a webpage the way QR codes do, the phone displays interactive AR marketing features. “And why should I need to recognize an ugly square,” Mitra asks, referring to QR codes, “when I can recognize something on its own?”

WHAT [APPLE’S] SIRI IS TRYING TO BE FOR THE AUDIO WORLD, BLIPPAR IS TRYING TO BE FOR THE VISUAL WORLD.

Imagine scanning the face of a billboard model to see an AR version of you wearing the same necklace, or scanning the car in front of you through your screen to get information on where you can buy the same model at local dealerships. (If this sounds like something from Netflix’s dystopian satire Black Mirror, it is — check out the first episode of the third season.) And what about a future where you walk into a store that recognizes your face and then offers you bespoke deals based on the shopping habits you revealed during your previous visit? That’s possible, says Dr. Gary Wilcox, a leading expert on social media and advertising. Indeed, it’s only an extension of existing geolocated marketing techniques that ping deals to your phone when you’re near a certain brand’s store — or its competitor’s.

“There’s a history of advertising staying pretty close to technological developments,” says Wilcox. But as technologies have evolved from print to radio to TV to the internet, marketers have largely relied on trial and error to find the techniques that work best, so “some of these early ideas” for virtual and augmented reality ads “are kinda silly,” he says. For Mitra, one medium remains to be conquered — the visual world: “What a lot of CMOs do not understand is that the biggest [form of] media in the world is actually products themselves. … We will reach a stage where if someone is curious about something, that’s the exact point [where] advertisers will put a very contextual message.”

Somewhat ironically, the personalization of technology that enables marketers to know everything about you essentially brings us back to the pretechnology era of personalized commerce when you were friends with the local store manager, says Harikesh Nair, a professor of marketing at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. If you’re a little freaked out by the idea of companies recognizing your face, “the market will determine” how much of this intrusion society will accept, says Nair — humans will probably never be comfortable having medical, family or financial details digitally attached to their faces as they walk down the street, he thinks. But as far as he’s concerned, if it makes it easier for him to find a suit he likes, it’s all good. “I think we as a society have already implicitly accepted that trade-off,” he says.

To be sure, Blippar isn’t the new Facebook or Google — at least not yet. “You would have to have a [new piece of] hardware that aids these sorts of applications,” says Dokyun Lee, a professor of business analytics at Carnegie Mellon University, insisting that people aren’t going to walk around viewing the entire world through smartphone cameras all the time. Facial-recognition software was banned from Google Glass because it was considered too creepy, and even then the product never made it to market. The future would certainly be more awkward than most sci-fi films suggest if we have to view everything — and everyone’s faces — through our phone screens.

But for the Blippar CEO, the Pokémon Go mania wasn’t some alienating dystopia; it was the start of an enlightened future. “Mark my words,” says Mitra, “computer vision and AR will go mainstream well before head-mounted devices take off, and it’s gonna happen through phones.” Just be sure to watch where you’re going when some irritating ad pops into your AR universe.

This article was  published in ozy.com by James Watkins

Published in Others

Inconsistencies behind the company’s ability to police advertising on controversial content are coming to light.

Google’s decision-making process over which YouTube videos are deemed “advertiser friendly” faces scrutiny from both brands and creators, highlighting once again the challenge of large-scale moderation.

The company last week pledged to change its advertising policies after several big brands pulled their budgets from YouTube following an investigation that revealed their ads were shown alongside extremist content, such as videos promoting terrorism or antisemitism.

Havas, the world’s sixth largest advertising and marketing company, pulled all of its UK clients’ ads, including O2, BBC and Domino’s Pizza, from Google and YouTube on Friday, following similar moves from the UK government, the Guardian, Transport for London and L’Oreal.

Google responded with a blog post promising to update its ad policies, stating that with 400 hours of video uploaded to YouTube each minute “we don’t always get it right”.

However, the inconsistencies behind the company’s ability to police advertising on controversial content are coming to light – and it’s not just advertisers who are complaining. Some YouTube creators argue their videos are being unfairly and inconsistently “demonetized” by the platform, cutting off their source of income that comes from the revenue share on ads placed on videos.

Matan Uziel runs a YouTube channel called Real Women, Real Stories that features interviews with women about hardship, including sex trafficking, abuse and racism. The videos are not graphic, and Uziel relied on the advertising revenue to fund their production. However, after a year, Google has pulled the plug.

“It’s a nightmare,” he said. “I can’t trust YouTube any more.”

Policies seem more reasonable when you ask a human, but the algorithm that catches videos originally is really unfair

Quinby Stewart

“It’s staggering because YouTube has a CEO [Susan Wojcicki] who is a feminist and a big champion for gender equality,” he said, pointing out that there were other far more extreme videos such as those promoting anorexia and self-harm that continued to be monetized. He also referenced PewDiePie’s videos featuring antisemitic “jokes” that were allowed on the platform for months.

“It’s bad that YouTube attempts to censor this very important topic and is not putting its efforts into censoring white supremacy, antisemitism, Islamophobia, racism, jihadists and stuff like that,” Uziel said.

He wants Google to be more open about how exactly they moderate content. “I want them to be transparent about what they think to be advertiser friendly,” he said.

Google currently uses a mixture of automated screening and human moderation to police its video sharing platform and to ensure that ads are only placed against appropriate content. Videos considered “not advertiser-friendly” include those that are sexually suggestive, violent, contain foul language, promote drug use or deal with controversial topics such as war, political conflict and natural disasters.

Transgender activist Quinby Stewart agrees there needs to be more transparency. He complained after YouTube demonetized a video about disordered eating habits. “I definitely don’t think the video was even close to the least advertiser-friendly content I’ve posted,” he said.

He complained to the platform and the company has since approved the video for monetization.

“YouTube’s policy is just very vague, which makes sense because I think demonetization needs to be handled on a case-by-case basis. Their policies seem more reasonable when you ask a human to check it, but the algorithm that catches videos originally is really unfair,” he said.

Sarah T Roberts, an information studies professor from UCLA who studies large-scale moderation of online platforms, said that large technology companies need to be more honest about their shortcomings when it comes to policing content.

“I’m not sure they fully apprehend the extent to which this is a social issue and not just a technical one,” she said.

Companies such as Google and Facebook need to carefully think through their cultural values and then make sure they are applied consistently, taking into account local laws and social norms. Roberts said the drive to blame either humans or algorithms for decisions was based on a false dichotomy as human values are embedded into the algorithms. “The truth is they are both engaged in almost every case,” she said.

The fact that it is now hitting Google’s bottom line should be a wake-up call. “Now it’s financial and is going to hit them where it hurts. That should create some kind of impetus.”

The Guardian asked Google for more clarification over how the moderation process works, but the company did not respond. 

Source : theguardian.com

Published in Social

Online advertising is likewise known as internet advertising or digital advertising which makes usage of the cyberspace to communicate the promotional marketing message to the customers.

The online advertising term is broadly categorized on the basis of types of advertising which includes search engine optimization (SEO), banner marketing, search engine advertising (SEA), email marketing, online video advertising, local online advertising, social media optimization (SMO) strategies and additional types of online advertising. These online advertisings appear on the internet more often than traditional advertising media such as television and newspapers.

Search engine advertising and pay per click marketing are the fastest evolving advertising concepts for numerous assortments of businesses. Pay per clip is comparatively simple and effortless to carry out scalable, enormously cost efficient and in house. PPC is a huge component of effective and efficient online advertising for the business.



Online advertising uses numerous tools and techniques for online marketing functions which include sales CRM, e-commerce, e-mail, marketing automation, WCM, social CRM and web analytics. All these software tools collectively facilitate an organization to develop and implement effective and efficient marketing strategies.

The global online advertising market continues to rise in tandem with the global internet user base, social networking websites, income and widespread adoption of broadband. The industry is being motivated by mobile internet activity, increasing attractiveness and fame of mobile devices which includes tablets and smart phones that are proving to be beneficial.

The main factors that are driving the online advertising market are increased focus on digital media, cost effective, smart phone penetration, advertising by content providers and rising numbers of advertisers on social networking sites. The main factor that is restraining the growth of online advertising are lack of skilled personnel and still use of tradition advertising factors such as television and newspapers. The main opportunity for the growth of online advertising in future would be the emergence of SAAS based solutions.

The online advertising market is segmented on the basis of advertising sectors which include online classifieds, search, directories, and general advertising. In addition, the market is segmented on the basis of its mode of interaction which includes web sites, commercial online services, email providers, as well as other companies selling online advertising. Further, the online advertising is segmented on the basis of end use industry which includes BFSI and automotive industry among others. Furthermore, the market could be segmented on the basis of geography which includes North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and RoW.

The North American region dominates the market of global online advertising industry and is remain the market leaders in future as well. Asia Pacific region is expected to be the biggest emerging market for online advertising because of the large customer base.

Request for Sample Report and Table of content @: www.persistencemarketresearch.com/toc/4711

Some of the major companies that are dominating in the online advertising market include IBM Corp., SAP AG, Oracle Corp., Salesforce.com Inc., Aplicor LLC, Adobe Systems Inc., ComScore Networks Inc., Ebay GSI Commerce, Lithium Technologies Inc., Demandware Inc., Attensity Corp., Microsoft Corp., LongJump CRM, OpenText Corp., StrongMail Systems Inc., Percussion Software Inc., Zoho CRM Inc., Yahoo Analytics, SugarCRM Inc., Netsuite Inc. and Sitecore Inc. among others.

About Us:

Persistence Market Research (PMR) is a third-platform research firm. Our research model is a unique collaboration of data analytics and market research methodology to help businesses achieve optimal performance.


To support companies in overcoming complex business challenges, we follow a multi-disciplinary approach. At PMR, we unite various data streams from multi-dimensional sources. By deploying real-time data collection, big data, and customer experience analytics, we deliver business intelligence for organizations of all sizes.

Contact Us:

Persistence Market Research
305 Broadway
7th Floor, New York City, 
NY 10007, United States,
USA - Canada Toll Free: 800-961-0353
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Web: www.persistencemarketresearch.com

Published in Market Research

While it would have been nice to tackle this issue before the election, Google and Facebook are finally taking a tiny step in order to fight back against fake news. According to multiple statements, both companies have updated their policies to ban fake news sites from using Facebook’s and Google’s advertising networks.

With the U.S. election, fake news became incredibly popular on social networks, such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, as well as news aggregating services, such as Google News and news articles in Google search results. We’re not talking about opinion articles — we’re talking about reports spreading blatantly inaccurate information.

Google first updated its policy saying that the company will try to ban sites that “misrepresent, misstate, or conceal information.” Websites who don’t comply with this rule will get banned from using Google AdSense.

When it comes to Facebook, the company has also updated its policy to rule out fake news sites from using Facebook Audience Network.

Google AdSense and Facebook Audience Network let content publishers display ads on their websites. Google and Facebook manage the ad inventories, content publishers get a cut for clicks or impressions.

Both companies already have strict policies for their ad networks. For instance, you can’t use Google AdSense on a porn website. Google uses a combination of algorithms and human moderation to decide whether a site is eligible to use its advertising service.

By removing a potential revenue stream, it makes the business of fake news a bit less lucrative. For instance, Buzzfeed discovered that more than 100 fake news sites were created in a tiny city in Macedonia. So it’s clear that it’s not just about influencing the election — people are taking advantage of social networks to make money using fake news.

But there will always be alternative revenue streams, so this move is not enough. Reducing the reach of these websites is the best way to prevent fake news sites from popping out. If Facebook, Twitter, Google News and other websites flagged fake news appropriately, then there would be no reason to create fake news sites in the first place.

Source:  techcrunch.com

Published in Social

The search giant on the Internet, Google, has updated its privacy policy to ensure protection of its users’ personal information. A provision on the technology firm’s privacy statement had been ruled out. In this statement, Google promises not to integrate cookies on personal information without approval from each user.

Ever since Google had changed its method of tracking its users, their personal information on their account had been incorporated with the company’s search records on the Internet.

ProPublica, a non-profit news agency, had conducted a study on Google’s changes in its privacy statement. They research explained that the search engine had promised primarily to keep the two sets of data as separate entities so as to protect user’s information. However, it had update its policies so that it deleted the statement that supports this promise. They used to state that they would ask for user’s consent before the combine cookie data with personally identifiable information.

 

Google had slightly been scrutinized because of this turnaround. In the media, reports had been centered on Google’s tools that enable users to watch and maintain advertisements rather than the new influence that Google had acquired.

DoubleClick is actually an online advertising company acquired by Google. This company employs the cookies to monitor surfing people’s surfing behavior through their IP address. This mechanism allows the company to point their ads to the right target. With cookie information, DoubleClick can predict the surfing habit in one’s location. However, it is unable to determine one’s identity.

DoubleClick-.jpgMeanwhile, Google had all the names, email and other information in their search data.

Many organizations of Google’s users had filed a complaint against the company to the Federal Trade Commission during this acquisition. They contest that their privacy had been violated by this provision change in Google’s privacy statement.

Sergey Brin, on behalf of Google, guarantees the complainants that they are being very watchful of people’s personal information. Data security is their primary concern when it comes to advertising.

Another disputed update on its privacy policy was made by Google in the year 2012. This update permits the company to share user’s data within a variety of Google’s services. DoubleClick, however, had been kept away.

The practical implication of this move is that Google can already make up ample information on people’s online habits. Additionally, DoubleClick advertisements can be embodied according to the keywords that a person uses on his or her Gmail.

Google, however, attested that the change is only voluntary. It is also intended to provide users with greater control of their data. Besides, Google is not the only online firm which tracks people in this method.  Many other websites, including Facebook, are doing the same.

Users have the ability to elect or refuse these changes. They can access their “My Account” settings to opt-out of this feature.

Source : opptrends

Published in Internet Privacy

Facebook's goal is to connect with everyone, yes every single person in the world. Not just that, but Facebook wants to connect to everyone at all times, in every waking moment. Facebook envisions a future where you will always be engaging with some part of the Facebook ecosystem, whether it's on its mega social platform at Facebook, using it's search engine, messaging a business associate or communicating on video or via a virtual reality environment.

But first lets talk business.

"I often talk about how when we develop new products we think about it in three phases, said Zuckerberg. "First, building a consumer use case. Then, second, making it so that people can organically interact with businesses. And then third, on top of that, once there's a large volume of people interacting with businesses, give businesses tools to reach more people and pay. And that's ultimately the business opportunity."

During the earnings call yesterday, Mark Zuckerberg opened the curtain into Facebook's plans, strategies and dreams for the future. He first provided the latest metrics illustrating Facebook's continued success, 1.7 billion people now use Facebook every month, and 1.1 billion people use it every day. He said that Facebook revenue grew by 59% year-over year to $6.4 billion, and advertising revenue was up 63% to $6.2 billion.

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook said that Q2 ad revenue grew 63% and mobile ad revenue hit $5.2 billion, up 81% year-over-year, and was approximately 84% of total ad revenue. Facebook is now truly a mobile app rather than a desktop experience for the vast majority of its users.

Zuckerberg said that they continue to see excellent growth and over the past year Facebook has added over 200 million people using Facebook on a monthly basis. Time spent per person increased double digit percentages year-over-year across Facebook, Instagram and Messenger. And that doesn't even include WhatsApp yet.

Facebook is still growing rapidly and that's because it has continued to evolve. It's evolution has happened because of increased bandwidth, technological advancements, acquisitions of new platforms like WhatsApp and Instagram and most importantly continuing to be on the cutting edge of what people want in a social network. All of this while simultaneously building a successful business model that pays for this evolution.

What's really interesting however, is how Zuckerberg sees Facebook transforming in the future. "Our results show our progress as we work to make the world more open and connected across our three-, five- and ten-year horizons," he said. "Over the next three years we are focused on continuing to build our community and help people share more of what matters to them. The next five years are about building our newer products into full ecosystems with developers and businesses. And over the next ten years we are working to build new technologies to help everyone connect in new ways."

Facebook is seeking to be the world's business platform, not just the peoples. More on this below in the Search section on a Facebook future where it is competing with LinkedIn.

"We're excited to announce that we now have 60 million monthly active business Pages on Facebook," said Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg. "We also continue to grow the number of active advertisers on our platform. This shows that both our free and paid products are providing value to marketers of all sizes around the world. We continue to focus on our three priorities — capitalizing on the shift to mobile, growing the number of marketers using our ad products, and making our ads more relevant and effective."

Trust me, this is just the beginning of Facebook's morphing into both a personal and business platform in the future.

The Future of Facebook is Video

Facebook used to be mostly text and over the years they changed to be photo centric, with many people using Facebook as their family photo album. People still do that but Zuckerberg envisions a huge change coming. "We see a world that is video first, with video at the heart of all of our apps and services."

"Over the past six months we have been particularly focused on Live video. Live represents a new way to share what's happening in more immediate and creative ways," Zuckerberg said. "This quarter Candace Payne's Chewbacca mask video was viewed almost 160 million times. Live is also changing the way we see politics, as news organizations and delegates go Live from the Republican and Democratic conventions. And we have seen in Minnesota and Dallas how Live can shine a light on important moments as they happen."

At Fortune‘s Most Powerful Women International Summit in London, Nicola Mendelsohn, VP EMEA at Facebook, predicted that the Facebook newsfeed will be all video in 5 years. "It will definitely be mobile. It will probably be all video," Mendelsohn said. "I just think if we look, we already are seeing a year on year decline in text. We're seeing a massive increase as I've said on both pictures and video. So yeah, if I was having a bet, I would say video, video, video."

"When you think about what's happening on video on our platform we're really excited by the production and consumption of video and we're seeing the full range from people posting the things in their personal lives; the power of what a mobile phone can produce and distribute now is pretty incredible when you compare it to just a few years ago to some of the most sophisticated content producers in the world producing for us," added Sandberg.

Facebook Focuses on Search

Facebook is moving into the search space aggressively, definitely to help it compete with Twitter and perhaps even Google in the future. Facebook launched true keyword search in late 2014 that allows users to search not just profile names or just your friends posts, but also everyone's public posts. And, if you didn't know, all postings default at public, which means that anyone can search for your posts.

The first goal for Facebook with search is to become more like Twitter, where people post their thoughts, feelings and most importantly news reports, especially the on-the-scene kind. When the next plane lands in the Hudson, Facebook wants the survivor standing on the wing to use their platform to post about this breaking news, not Twitter. More precisely, Facebook wants you to use Facebook Live to stream your personalized live news coverage.

"We're making good progress on core services within the Facebook app, like Search," Zuckerberg stated. "A growing way people use search is to find what people are saying about a topic across the more than 2.5 trillion posts in our network. Now, people are doing more than 2 billion searches a day, between looking up people, businesses and other things that they care about. Continuous, steady improvement to services like search are an important part of helping people connect and realizing our mission."

He also said this in minimizing their true plans, in my opinion.

So I'd say we're around the second phase of that in search now. We have a pretty big navigational use case where people look up people and pages and groups that they want to get to and look at and search. One of the big growing use cases that we're investing a lot in is looking up the content in the ecosystem and that is an area that we're very excited about which helps people find more content.

But certainly there's a reasonable amount of behavior in there which is looking for things that over time could be monetizeable or commercial intense and at some point we will probably want to work on that but we're still in the phase of just making it easier for people to find all the content they want and connect with businesses organically.

But what's their next goal? Facebook has certainly focused on the business use of their platform as they continue to look for monetization opportunities. My guess is that Facebook will seek to compete with LinkedIn as the business platform of record.

Over the last few years LinkedIn has certainly moved from a glorified directory of business professionals to a platform for business related news, conversation and connection. Facebook has the platform but would need to figure out how to easily separate family life from business life, which could be done rather easily. With Microsoft buying LinkedIn, Facebook will be highly motivated to compete.

Next up for Facebook Search would be to compete with Google. Why... you ask? Because Google has a market cap of $520 billion, with the majority of that credited to its search business, whileFacebook has a market cap of $362 billion. More importantly, it's about revenue and profit. In 2015, Google had $75 billion in revenue and $16 billion in net income while Facebook had $17 billion in revenue and $3.6 billion in net income.

Google tried to compete with Facebook with Google+ and it failed miserably, but that's because it's harder to get people to change their social habits than it is their search habits. You don't need your friends to use Facebook Search in order for you to find it useful, but you definitely need your friends to move to a new social platform to make it work for you. That was Google's dilemma, but it won't be Facebook's.

"Since it refocused on keywords, Facebook is now seeing 2 billion searches per day of its 2.5 trillion posts," stated TechCrunch writer Josh Constine. "That’s compared to 1.5 billion searches per day in July 2015, and 1 billion in September 2012. That’s a 33% climb in just 9 months."

That's lets than half a reported 3.5 billion searches per day on Google. The difference is that Google's searches are monitizable, while Facebook searches, not so much. However, this must scare the heck out of Google because it shows how ingrained people are to use Facebook for search. Therefore, over time I predict that Facebook will add web indexing to it's search engine. They already have 3.5 billion searches, why not open up search to everything and in the process open up a huge monetization opportunity.

One other prediction, Facebook will disconnect its search app from just Facebook.com, just like they did Messenger. Then, voilà, Facebook is competing with Google.

Making Instagram Stronger

Instagram was purchased by Facebook for $1 billion while it was just getting off the ground. It is now center to its plans on connecting with everyone in the world on a constant always on basis. That's why Instagram is so important to Facebook, it has a foothold with younger people and its active user base is not a clone of Facebook's, so it expands the corporate Facebook's universe of connectivity and engagement.

"Over the next five years we are working hard to build ecosystems around some of our newer products," said Zuckerberg. "Instagram now has more than 500 million monthly actives, with more than 300 million daily. Now we’re working to make the experience more engaging."

He said that when Instagram, despite user pushback, began to rank its feed in order to improve the experience, that they are already seeing a "positive impact" with people spending more time and share more content within the platform.

As always, business is important to Zuckerberg as well. "We’ve also introduced our advertising tools on Instagram and we’re seeing marketers engage with people in creative and innovative ways."

Messaging with Messenger & WhatsApp

"In the two years since we separated Messenger from the main Facebook app -- which was a controversial decision at the time -- we've improved performance and given people new ways to express themselves," commented Zuckerberg. "Now, for the first time, more than 1 billion people are using Messenger every month."

Facebook sees a huge opportunity with messaging because it moves them closer to their goal of connecting everyone on a constant always on basis. That's why they paid $22 billion for WhatsApp, which is a service that barely had a business model.

"I’m also happy with the updates we're making to WhatsApp -- which also has a community of more than 1 billion people," said Zuckerberg. "This quarter we launched new desktop apps and end-to-end encryption, and millions of people are using WhatsApp's voice calling features."

Facebook has big plans for messaging because not only does it help them bring even more people into Facebook's universe, but it moves them into the business space, where Facebook desperately wants to be, because that's where the money is.

"The scale we’ve achieved with our messaging services makes it clear that they are more than just a way to chat with friends," Zuckerberg noted. "That’s why we’re also making it easier for people to connect with groups and businesses as well. We are going to keep focusing on this over the next several years."

Facebook owned messaging has now taken over standard text messaging according to Zuckerberg.

"Between Messenger and WhatsApp I think we're around 60 billion messages a day which is something like three times more than the peak of global SMS traffic."

It's incredible to think that Facebook now owns the messaging space. Who would have thought that 3 years ago?

New Technologies

"I’m also excited about the early progress we’re making on our 10-year initiatives," said Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg during their recent earnings announcement. "We are investing in new technologies to give more people a voice -- including the 4 billion people around the world who aren’t yet online -- and helping more people take advantage of the opportunities that come with the internet."

Facebook is seeking to connect everyone in the world, regardless of any obstacle. It's a long term plan, but Facebook is on it.

"One of the biggest opportunities to grow our community is in developing countries where connectivity is less advanced than what we take for granted here at home," Zuckerberg said. "So over the past couple of years, we’ve began making steady improvements to our apps to make them work regardless of the device or connection people are using. We also built a light-weight version of our Android app, called Facebook Lite, that is tuned to work on 2G networks and is now used by more than 100 million people."

Virtual reality is another huge area of investment for Facebook, especially with their $2 billion purchase of Oculus. They see VR as an extension of connecting and sharing. Know one really knows the future of VR, but it will be deeply engrained in advertising in the future and since all of Facebook's revenue comes from advertising, they need to be in this space.

"We believe that virtual reality can help people share richer experiences and help everyone understand what’s going on around the world," said Zuckerberg. "It’s really early for us in VR but we’re hitting some important milestones. As of the second quarter more than 1 million people a month are using Oculus on mobile phones through our Gear VR 4partnership with Samsung."

Zuckerberg also commented on the potential revenue importance of their investment in VR:

"More than 300 apps are already available at the Oculus store for Gear VR, we’ve filled all of our pre-orders for Oculus Rift and we are seeing increasing demand from retail as stores plan for the holidays. While it’s still early for augmented reality, we're doing AR research and are seeing lightweight versions of AR technology today in mobile apps like MSQRD."

Facebook is Just Getting Started

"So that’s a recap of the progress we’re making in our 10 year plan," said Zuckerberg. "We have a saying at Facebook that our journey is only 1% done -- and while I'm happy with our progress, we have a lot more work to do to grow our community and connect the whole world. That means making big investments and taking risks -- focusing not just on what Facebook is, but on what it can be."

http://www.webpronews.com/facebooks-future-video-search-messaging-vr-2016-07/

Published in Search Engine

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait
online research banner

airs logo

AIRS is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Subscribe to AIRS Newsletter

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

Follow Us on Social Media

Follow us on Facebook