[Source: This article was published in computerworld.com By Jonny Evans - Uploaded by the Association Member: Joshua Simon]

Apple users who care about privacy are moving to DuckDuckGo for search. These tips will get you started with it.

Like liberty for all, privacy demands vigilance, and that’s why Apple users who care about those things are moving to DuckDuckGo for search.

Why use DuckDuckGo?

Privacy is under attack.

It doesn’t take much effort to prove this truth. At the time of writing, recent news is full of creeping privacy erosion: 

And then there’s Duck Duck Go. 

With Duck Duck Go, you are the searcher, not the searched

I think most Apple users know about DuckDuckGo. It is an independent search engine designed from the ground up to maintain your privacy.

It means the search service doesn’t collect information about you, doesn’t gather your search queries, and doesn’t install cookies or tracking code on your systems.

It now also provides highly accurate maps thanks to a deal with Apple that lets it use the also private-by-design Apple Maps service. To do this, the search engine is using Apple’s MapKit JS framework, which Apple created so website owners could embed maps in their sites.

Maps on DuckDuckGo are quite satisfying and will only improve as Apple introduces more detailed maps, better local business listings, and additional feature. You should see this service in action here.

How Apple Maps works on DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo added Apple Maps support at the beginning of 2019.

Since then, it has introduced a set of compelling improvements to how it works, thanks to Apple’s framework. You now get the better implementation of Maps in your search, including the benefit of local search results. Additional enhancements include:

  • Map re-querying: You can now refine search queries within the expanded maps view. You can also zoom in and out or move around the map to find other results that match your search.
  • Local autocomplete: You will be provided with search suggestions as you type based on the local region visible on your map. Type fuel in a map of the Arizona desert, and you can see how many miles you’ll need to walk if your fuel runs out.
  • Dedicated Maps tag: Look at the top of a search result, and you’ll find a Maps tab, which joins the images, videos, news, and meanings tabs.

There’s even a Dark Mode that is enabled when you switch to DuckDuckGo’s dark theme – when you switch, you’ll see the embedded Apple Maps also do so.

(Switch to the dark theme in the search engine’s settings, which you’ll find here. You can also discover much more information on how the search engine protects your privacy, primarily by not collecting it in the first place.)

How do they ensure your privacy when running map and address-related searches? DuckDuck Go explains:

“With Apple, as with all other third parties we work with, we do not share any personally identifiable information such as IP address. And for local searches in particular, where your approximate location information is sent by your browser to us, we discard it immediately after use.”

How to set DuckDuckGo as default search on Apple devices

There are two ways to use DuckDuckGo rather than Google for search:

1. You can visit the DuckDuckGo.com website and use search in your browser there.

2. You can also change your Mac, iPhone or iPad’s default search service in order to use the far more private alternative. I think most readers know about this, but just in case:

  • On a Mac: Safari Preferences>choose the Search tab and choose DuckDuckGo in the drop-down list of search engine choices.
  • On iOS/iPad OS: Settings>Safari and select DuckDuckGo from the options provided in the Search Engine section. You need to do this for all your devices individually.

Once you change your default search engine, all the searches you make in the future will be made using the more private service. You may even want to switch to using MeWe as a social network to replace Facebook while you’re at it.

Up next…

“We believe there should be no trade-off for people wanting to protect their personal data while searching,” the search engine explains. “Working with Apple Maps to enhance DuckDuckGo Search is an example of how we do this and pushes us further in our vision of setting a new standard of trust online.”

This is all well and good, but how do they see this experience extending itself in the future?

I am not currently in possession of a working crystal ball, but here are two realistic and possible ways the service could be extended:

  1. Imagine how cool this would be with the addition of Apple’s delightfully lag-free Look Around Street View-killer.
  2. Imagine how embedded AR experiences could also become part of what’s on offer through the search service.

Why not? We know Apple takes this stuff seriously. It is surely only a matter of time until it declines Google for search.

Like liberty for all, privacy demands vigilance. Be vigilant.

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in zdnet.com written by Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Eric Beaudoin]

For less than a $100, you can have an open-source powered, easy-to-use server, which enables you -- and not Apple, Facebook, Google, or Microsoft -- to control your view of the internet.

On today's internet, most of us find ourselves locked into one service provider or the other. We find ourselves tied down to Apple, Facebook, Google, or Microsoft for our e-mail, social networking, calendaring -- you name it. It doesn't have to be that way. The FreedomBox Foundation has just released its first commercially available FreedomBox: The Pioneer Edition FreedomBox Home Server Kit. With it, you -- not some company -- control over your internet-based services.

The Olimex Pioneer FreedomBox costs less than $100 and is powered by a single-board computer (SBC), the open source hardware-based Olimex A20-OLinuXino-LIME2 board. This SBC is powered by a 1GHz A20/T2 dual-core Cortex-A7 processor and dual-core Mali 400 GPU. It also comes with a Gigabyte of RAM, a high-speed 32GB micro SD card for storage with the FreedomBox software pre-installed, two USB ports, SATA-drive support, a Gigabit Ethernet port, and a backup battery.

Doesn't sounds like much does it? But, here's the thing: You don't need much to run a personal server.

Sure, some of us have been running our own servers at home, the office, or at a hosting site for ages. I'm one of those people. But, it's hard to do. What the FreedomBox brings to the table is the power to let almost anyone run their own server without being a Linux expert.

The supplied FreedomBox software is based on Debian Linux. It's designed from the ground up to make it as hard as possible for anyone to exploit your data. It does this by putting you in control of your own corner of the internet at home. Its simple user interface lets you host your own internet services with little expertise.

You can also just download the FreedomBox software and run it on your own SBC. The Foundation recommends using the CubietruckCubieboard2BeagleBone BlackA20 OLinuXino Lime2A20 OLinuXino MICRO, and PC Engines APU. It will also run on most newer Raspberry Pi models.

Want an encrypted chat server to replace WhatsApp? It's got that. A VoIP server? Sure. A personal website? Of course! Web-based file sharing à la Dropbox? You bet. A Virtual Private Network (VPN) server of your own? Yes, that's essential for its mission.

The software stack isn't perfect. This is still a work in progress. So, for example, it still doesn't have a personal email server or federated social networking, such as GNU Social and Diaspora, to provide a privacy-respecting alternative to Facebook. That's not because they won't run on a FreedomBox; they will. What they haven't been able to do yet is to make it easy enough for anyone to do and not someone with Linux sysadmin chops. That will come in time.

As the Foundation stated, "The word 'Pioneer' was included in the name of these kits in order to emphasize the leadership required to run a FreedomBox in 2019. Users will be pioneers both because they have the initiative to define this new frontier and because their feedback will make FreedomBox better for its next generation of users."

To help you get up to speed the FreedomBox community will be offering free technical support for owners of the Pioneer Edition FreedomBox servers on its support forum. The Foundation also welcomes new developers to help it perfect the FreedomBox platform. 

Why do this?  Eben Moglen, Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, saw the mess we were heading toward almost 10 years ago: "Mr. Zuckerberg has attained an unenviable record: he has done more harm to the human race than anybody else his age." That was before Facebook proved itself to be totally incompetent with security and sold off your data to Cambridge Analytica to scam 50 million US Facebook users with personalized anti-Clinton and pro-Trump propaganda in the 2016 election.

It didn't have to be that way. In an interview, Moglen told me this: "Concentration of technology is a surprising outcome of cheap hardware and free software. We could have had a world of peers. Instead, the net we built is the net we didn't want. We're in an age of surveillance with centralized control. We're in a world, which encourages swiping, clicking, and flame throwing."

With FreedomBox, "We can undo this. We can make it possible for ordinary people to provide internet services. You can have your own private messaging, services without a man in the middle watching your every move." 

We can, in short, rebuild the internet so that we, and not multi-billion dollar companies, are in charge.

I like this plan

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Wearable technology has been around just as long as the portable listening device, but originally in the form of a wristband that only told you how many steps you had taken that day; but not very accurately.

With the invention of the smartphone, we now have Bluetooth enabled bands that can monitor our heart, calories burned, and how well we’ve slept. As of last month, Apple celebrated their second anniversary since developing their groundbreaking wearable product, the Apple Watch.

The Apple Watch wasn’t a completely brand new invention but it was a convenient way to have your pedometer, iPhone, and heart rate monitor in one device. With the third series of Apple watches just on the horizon, it is fortuitous that Stanford has conducted a smartwatch study to test the accuracy of seven of the “best” products on the market.

Among the competitors are the likes of Fitbit, Samsung, Microsoft, and of course, the Apple Smartwatch (to name a few).

The findings

The test was conducted by 60 participants wearing said devices and undergoing 80 physical activities on your basic exercise equipment such as treadmills and ellipticals. When it came to heart rate monitoring, the Apple was the best of the best with a mere 2% error while other top shelf devices, such as Samsung, tested in 6.8%.

As a person just working out, you would think this is negligible but it means a lot when you consider the potential benefits to the healthcare world.

The other main focus of the study was the always obsessed over calorie burn measurements. This is always a tricky test because everyone burns calories differently because we all breath at different rates, our hearts pump differently based on height and weight, and of course, it’s nearly impossible for a wristband to know what the rest of our body is doing on that workout mat. The results varied from 20% all the way up to 92.6% in error with Apple falling right in the middle at 40%. 

What this means for the future

The fact that Apple is already at a 2% error rate with their heart rate monitoring in their second attempt tells us that they are only going to improve with each series. This could mean that the medical world could take their superb technology and use it to proactively predict a heart attack before it even happens.

This just could save someone’s life who is just sitting at home as an elder. The watch could warn the old man/woman about an impending attack and then have the time to either pop a pill or call 911 and state “I’m about to have a heart attack.”

Apple has also recently released a sleep monitor called the Beddit. It is a thin strip of cloth that you place under your bed sheet that monitors the activity in your chest while you doze. This could be combined with the watch and iPhone for a full laboratory’s worth of information at a much lower cost. 

The Apple Watch 3

The third series of Apple watches is due to be released in just three short months. The price will undoubtedly be substantial; likely $459 for the base model. It is currently rumored that this new generation will feature a big change called the smart band, which will move the center of measurement from the actual device to around the entire wrist for even more accuracy.

It will be going through big changes as seen here in a style sense as it will be lighter, look more like a traditional sports watch (rumored), and offer better water proofing which is essential for people actually using the watch for more than just apps.

All-in-all, it appears that Apple is trying to focus most of their upcoming technology to not only entertain but to improve the quality of life as well. 

Source: This article was published techdigg.com By John Pond

Categorized in Science & Tech

We already know the iPhone will change significantly in 2017, but now a new report has shed light on another radical alteration - and it comes from one of Apple AAPL -0.59%’s largest manufacturing partners…

In short: the iPhone 8 will not look like any previous iPhone because it will not be the same shape as any previous iPhone.

Categorized in Others

As we edge closer to the expected introduction of the iPhone 8, two big and interrelated questions have come to the fore.

First, has Apple figured out how to embed its Touch ID fingerprint scanner into the phone's display? And second, can the company (and its suppliers) implement this new technology in time to deliver the 10th anniversary edition model on schedule in early September?

1

Opposing viewpoints are driving a blitz of rumors on this topic. In the optimist camp, there is Chinese site Economic Daily News (whose reports are often publicized by DigiTimes). EDN says Apple and its suppliers have resolved any potential Touch ID issues and are right where they want to be -- preparing to ramp up production in June, with every intention of delivering millions of new iPhones in early September. (Since the debut of the iPhone 5 in 2012, Apple has delivered all major introductions of its flagship product in September.)

And in the other, more crowded, corner -- the naysayers. These include veteran Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, a handful of analyst firms, and the blog Mac Otakara, all of whom are reporting variations on one theme: Apple has been working to integrate this technology into the next iPhone; the process been more difficult than was anticipated; and, as a result, the usual September rollout is in doubt.

The theories about Apple's potential contingency plans, including a delayed or phased release, are detailed below. For now, there's one thing we feel very confident about: the iPhone updates made in March were not the main event for 2017. All the signs point to a major redesign coming later this year. And as we move ever closer to the introduction of the iPhone 8, we'll be assembling the most significant rumors below.

Specs we might see on the iPhone 8

  • Three new models including two incremental "S" upgrades plus an all-new iPhone 8
  • Home button/Touch ID embedded in display or located on back
  • New Touch ID featuring face or iris scanning
  • Curved, edge-to-edge OLED display with True Tone technology, possibly with Ion-X glass
  • Facial recognition via LG's new 3D sensor technology
  • AirPods come included
  • Wireless charging
  • Dual-lens camera, possibly in a vertical configuration and/or with AR capabilities
  • Support for the Apple Pencil
  • USB-C replacing Apple's Lightning connector
  • Enhanced water resistance
  • Higher quality earpiece for louder, clearer audio
  • Apple's next-generation processor (the A10X or A11)
  • Stainless steel and glass body
  • Upgraded storage starting at 64GB and 3GB of RAM
  • Intel or Qualcomm modem
  • Priced between $850 and $1,099

The iPhone... when?

We've grown accustomed to seeing a new iPhone every fall. But an expanding chorus of sources is casting doubt on Apple's ability to deliver this September. In recent weeks, there has been a steady stream of reports about manufacturing issues in Apple's supply chain related to the "significant hardware upgrades" the company has planned for the iPhone 8.

These rumors are driving multiple theories. Some of the scenarios in play include a October or November launch, an announcement in September followed by "severe shortages" of product, and deliveries delayed until later in the fall. There's also a credible story circulating that Apple will make a phased rollout -- that is, a launch of the "S" series editions of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus in September, with the big iPhone 8 debut coming a month or two later.

It's worth restating that that there are also reports that suggest that Apple is right on schedule. And, of course, officially, we have no idea when Apple will drop the iPhone 8. Could the company shock us with an introduction at its 2017 Worldwide Developers Conference in a few weeks? Unlikely -- though it sounds like we could see new MacBooks and MacBook Pros and even a new iPad there.

The iPhone... what?

For now, we're calling it the iPhone 8, though we don't know officially what the company will call it. As seen most recently with the new iPad -- with the iPad Air 2 succeeded by the iPad -- Apple may take a freewheeling approach to nomenclature.

It does seem likely that the company will offer up an iPhone 7S and iPhone 7S Plus -- updated versions of the current models -- as less expensive alternatives to the next generation flagship. For the 10th anniversary model itself, however, anything is possible. The iPhone 8 is the conservative bet but we've seen rumors about an iPhone 10; an iPhone X; and the offbeat iPhone Edition, seemingly inspired by the premium Apple Watch Edition.

Lots of potential changes to the display

After months of debate and conflicting reports, there appears to be one area of consensus: at least one new iPhone model will have an OLED display. (The iPhone 7S and iPhone 7S Plus, according to the rumors, are more likely to stick with current LCD technology.)

The Wall Street Journal and Nikkei Asian Review are predicting that Apple will give the iPhone 8 a curved OLED panel manufactured by Samsung. Purported documentation published by /LEAKS appears to suggest that the display could be made of Ion-X glass, like the Apple Watch.

And it's this new display technology -- new for Apple, Samsung has been using it for years -- that could be one of the major factors potentially pushing back the release of the iPhone. Bloomberg (and others) have published reports that Apple is testing a version of the iPhone 8 that features a screen that "covers almost the entire front of the device." Which leads one to wonder...

2

What's up with the home button?

The nature and location of the iPhone 8's home button and optical fingerprint scanner is a hot topic. The latest buzz is that Apple could move it to the back of the phone, as shown in alleged render images leaked on Chinese site Weibo (via /LEAKS) and on Twitter by Apple leaker Sonny Dickson. Analyst firm CLSA has also gotten in on the action, suggesting that there is a "high chance" that Apple will locate the scanner on the back of the iPhone, according to its supply chain sources.

3

It's also possible that Apple could ditch the home button altogether, following in the footsteps of Samsung with its Galaxy S8. But the most interesting scenario is that Apple has figured out some way to embed or integrate it directly into the display. Which brings us to...

Touch ID 2.0

Today, Apple's Touch ID authentication protocol uses a fingerprint reader embedded in the home button. Over the past few months, there have been multiple reports that Apple has been working to integrate Touch ID into the iPhone 8's new OLED display -- and is running into big problems. According to analysts, the crux of the issue involves embedding a virtual home button and optical fingerprint sensor into the new full-screen OLED panel.

Economic Daily News reports (via MacRumors) that Apple supplier Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company says the company has "finalized a solution." That noted, there are several interesting theories about what Apple might do if this manufacturing process doesn't coalesce.

These range from relocating Touch ID to the back of the phone to eliminating Touch ID to, again, delaying the iPhone 8 launch altogether. But there's also another possibility: that the phone could leverage an entirely new (for Apple) paradigm for authentication that's rumored to be in development.

Benjamin Geskin's render of the iPhone 8

A render of the iPhone 8 with a pair of front-facing cameras and sensors.Benjamin Geskin

Face ID?

According to a report from The Korea Economic Daily, LG will provide 3D facial recognition technology for the iPhone 8. The article suggests that the new technology could be used for "biometric" identification. So it's plausible that Apple could use this new capability, which would ostensibly use the iPhone 8's new front lens array, to replace the fingerprint sensor as the primary interface for user authentication.

New body

The majority of images of cases, renders, and molds that have appeared so far show an iPhone 8 that, size-wise, sits between the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. It's worth noting that the iPhone 8's display, rumored to extend from edge to edge, would likely be more comparable with that of the 7 Plus.

In terms of materials, one of Apple's prototypes features a combination of curved glass and stainless steel, according to Bloomberg. This corroborates earlier rumors (reported by DigiTimes and Nikkei Asian Review) suggesting that the company might replace the traditional aluminum iPhone design with a glass and steel body. Previous rumors about the possibility of a ceramic body seem to have faded out.

Enhanced audio

According to JPMorgan (as reported by MacRumors), Apple may equip the iPhone 8 with an "enhanced receiver," which is housed within the slit on the front of the phone where you put your ear during calls. This upgrade would ostensibly deliver louder, clearer audio as well as superior water-proofing (more on that below).

airpods-classic-sticker.jpg

Today, the AirPods are a $159 accessory. Could Apple included them for free with the iPhone 8?Apple

AirPods included

JPMorgan has also postulated that the iPhone 8 will come with AirPods included. These Bluetooth-enabled headphones currently sell as a $159 accessory. And so this one is a stretch. But if Apple prices the new phone high enough, there could be margin enough to make it happen. Which brings us to...

Price Point

This remains way up in the air. Sources ranging from Morgan Stanley to Fast Company to, most recently, Goldman Sachs are talking about an iPhone 8 that could cost more than $1,000. A UBS analyst has theorizedthat the 64GB entry-level model would start at $850 -- just like the new Samsung Galaxy S8+ -- and that the iPhone 7S and 7S Plus would cost $649 and $749, respectively.

Gigabit LTE

One area in which the iPhone 8 may end up trailing the Galaxy S8 is cellular network speed. The Samsung phone features Qualcomm's Snapdragon 835 processor or, in some markets, Samsung's own Exynos 8895 chip -- both of which support Gigabit LTE. According to CNET's Roger Cheng, Apple uses Qualcomm and Intel modems -- and, at the moment, the Intel version can't deliver Gigabit LTE speed. This could force Apple to slow down the Qualcomm version to ensure all iPhones are on the same footing.

USB-C vs. Lightning

Countering a Wall Street Journal report that Apple would go with a USB-C port for the iPhone 8, a Barclays analyst (reported by MacRumors) has suggested that Apple will stick with its Lightning connector -- and include a 3.5mm headphone jack adapter -- for the next phone.

Wireless charging

4

Reuters reports that there are multiple groups at Apple working on technology for an iPhone that supports wireless charging. And we are seeing more leaked schematic drawings that seem to suggest that wireless charging could be a real thing.

In the past, The Verge has reported that Apple has been staffing up on wireless-charging experts. The Nikkei Asian Review reported that Foxconn, one of Apple's main manufacturing partners, is making wireless charging modules. Though Apple would likely make this feature available on the premium iPhone 8, MacRumors reports that Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has suggested that all new iPhone models -- that would include the "S" series, presumably -- will get it.

Enhanced waterproofing

Apple could walk away from the Lightning port and not add a USB-C connection, of course, which would make the iPhone more resistant to water. On that note, the Korea Herald reports that the next iPhone will have a higher water resistance rating -- IP68 compared with the current generation's IP67, for those keeping score.

Vertical cameras and AR

Nearly every "leaked" image, including the one here published by OnLeaks, shows the iPhone 8 with two cameras in a vertical configuration; this one appears to show an LED flash in the middle. And if the iPhone does come with those LG 3D sensors, they would almost certainly also support augmented reality applications.

More storage

Apple may dump its 32GB model and offer a 64GB and 256GB model, according to TrendForce; the report also suggests that the company will boost the amount of RAM to 3GB. This incremental bump would follow the recent precedent of Apple ditching its dreaded entry-level model (formerly 16GB) when it released the iPhone 7.

ipad-truetone.jpg

Is True Tone coming to the iPhone?Apple

Mood lighting

And Barclays analysts have predicted that all three forthcoming iPhones -- the 7S, 7S Plus, and iPhone 8 -- will come equipped with Apple's True Tone technology, which adjusts display settings for ambient lighting conditions, and which is currently featured on the 9.7-inch iPad Pro. (The next edition of the iPad Pro is also rumored to have a True Tone display.)

Bringing the GPU in house

Apple is developing its own graphics chips to be used in future versions of products including the iPhone. But the timeframe for phasing out its current supplier is 15 to 24 months, so it's unlikely that an Apple-manufactured GPU will make it into the next iPhone. We're probably looking at 2018 or 2019 for this one.

And what about the iPhone 9?

From the outer frontier of the iPhone hype cycle, The Bell (via Korean site The Investor) reports that Apple will supersize the next generation, with the iPhone 9 featuring two variations with an OLED display -- a 5.28-inch model and a 6.46-inch model.

Source: This article was published cnet.com

Categorized in Others

Apple’s iOS platform has a wonderfully simple and intuitive UX, but the platform continues to grow more and more complex with each passing year. The iPhone is the kind of device that just about anyone can pick up and figure out how to use quickly, and yet it also hides all sorts of nifty features and functions that even the most savvy users probably don’t know about.

Learning about cool secret features that are hiding in your iPhone is always fun because it makes your phone feel fresh and new, if even for a moment. We’re going to run through 10 little-known iPhone tricks in this post. Even if you already know about some of them, we guarantee you’ll learn something new.

Delete text faster: When you tap and hold the backspace key on the iPhone’s keyboard, the delete rate speeds up after a while. But here’s a trick we bet you didn’t know — if you press harder on the backspace key on any iPhone with 3D Touch, it’ll speed up instantly. Deleting will also slow back down if you release some of the pressure.

Quickly and easily turn off the flashlight: Being able to turn on the iPhone’s flashlight from Control Center while the phone is locked is super convenient. But having to swipe back in and tap the button again to turn it off can be annoying, especially when your hands are full. Instead, simply start to swipe our lock screen to the left like you’re opening the camera, but only swipe a tiny bit and then let go. Your phone will think you’re opening the camera app and the flash will turn off.

As someone who walks a dog late at night every day, I can confirm that this trick definitely comes in handy when you’ve got an iPhone 7 Plus in one hand and a bag full of in the other.

See all open Safari tabs: Isn’t that cascading list of Safari tabs annoying? Instead of scrolling around looking for something, turn your phone to landscape while on any tab. Then pinch the screen like you’re zooming out on a photo, and you’ll see all of your open tabs like this:

Open Spotlight in any app: Sometimes you want to search your phone without opening the Notification Center. You can — with any app open, just pull down from the top of the screen like you’re opening Notification Center, but stop when just the search field is visible and you feel a little haptic vibration.

Easy package tracking: Did someone send you a package and then text you the tracking number? Tap and hold on the tracking number in the Messages app and an option will pop up right there to track it.

Prioritize app downloads: Via Reddit, did you know you could prioritize your app downloads? If you’re in the middle of downloading and/or updating a whole bunch of apps but there’s one in particular you need, just 3D Touch the icon and you’ll get this menu:

Infinite zoom on any photo: It’s kind of annoying that you can only zoom in to a certain point on photos you capture on your iPhone. Check this out — tap the edit button, crop the photo just a tiny little bit, and save it. Now you can zoom in infinitely! Things start to get a little weird after you zoom in too far, so try not to get lost.

Search for words on a webpage: Okay, this one is HUGE. Most people have no idea that you can actually search for words on a webpage in mobile Safari just like you can in a desktop browser. One any webpage, type the word you’re looking for in the URL bar but don’t tap “Go.” Instead, scroll down and you’ll see an option to search for the word, and you can then tap through each instance. Here, you can see that I searched for the word “echo”:

Close all Safari tabs at once: This is a big one for people who leave tons of tabs open and decide they need to start fresh. Just tap and hold on the tab switcher button in the bottom-right corner in Safari, no 3D Touch needed. A little menu will then pop up and give you the option to close all tabs.

Drag share sheet options to rearrange them: Here’s another trick that comes courtesy of Reddit. If you want to quickly reorder your options on the iOS share sheet, simply tap on one and drag it around. Here’s a screenshot that shows how it works:

 

Source: This article was published on bgr.com by Zach Epstein


 

Categorized in Others

A new website and series of videos highlight several reasons to give up your Android phone and switch to iPhone.

Apple and Android may forever be locked in a fight for mobile domination, but they take very different approaches to their quest for market share. On the one hand, there are more than 2 billion active Android devices in use around the world. On the other, Apple makes gobs of money from selling just a handful of handsets.

But like the PC wars of the 90s, Apple isn’t content with such a slim slice of the market. While it has had a Move to iOS app in the Play Store for a while now, Apple is now taking the fight directly to Android users with a new campaign devoted to switching.

Head over to the iPhone tab on Apple.com and you’ll see a new box in the middle of the page. Called “Why Switch,” it declares that “Life is easier on the iPhone,” and offers 10 questions potential switchers might be asking:

  1. Will it be easy to switch?
  2. Is the camera as good as they say?
  3. Why is the iPhone so fast?
  4. Will iPhone be easy to use?
  5. How does iPhone help protect my personal information?
  6. What makes Messages so great?
  7. Can I get help from a real person?
  8. Can I switch at an Apple Store?
  9. What about the environment?
  10. Will I love my iPhone?

And finally, it asks, “Are you ready to switch?” while offering links to purchase all five of the phone models. The site also promotes Apple’s trade-in policy, boasting up to $260 in credits.

There is also a series of videos on Apple’s YouTube channel to highlight many of the points, including speed, ease of switching, and privacy. It’s unclear whether Apple plans on taking the campaign beyond the web, but it’s not too hard to see a TV or print campaign accompanying the site.

Earlier this year, Google unveiled its own switching site, coinciding with a new transfer tool that synced your contacts, calendar entries, and photos through Google Drive. It’s similar in practice to Apple’s Move to iOS app, but doesn’t require the installation of app you won’t need after the transfer is finished.

Apple ran a highly successful switcher campaign in the early 2000s, which used real people to tell stories about why they moved to a Mac. While Tim Cook has said upwards of 30 percent of new iPhone buyers are making the switch from an Android phone, Apple hasn’t previously launched an ad campaign targeted at Android.

Flip the switch: It’s no secret that Apple is looking for signs of growth. While the upcoming iPhone 8 will surely boost sales in the holiday quarter, Apple still needs to generate excitement during the rest of the year, which has proven difficult due to a steady stream of rumors and flagship competitors from the likes of LG and Samsung. But a new switcher campaign could be just what the doctor ordered.

Source: This article was published macworld.com By Michael Simon

Categorized in Others

5G is the future, so what do you need to know?

Faster, more stable, capable of supporting more devices and equipped to handle life in the fast lane, 5G technology is the next wave of networking, and Apple is deeply involved in testing and developing the standard. What does Apple hope to gain and why should this matter to an iOS enterprise?

What is 5G?         

While it is important to note that 5G is not yet ratified as a standard and networks that use the standard aren’t expected before 2020, 5G is touted as the next-generation of wireless broadband.  


The GSMA has set some criteria, most of which need to be met for a network to call itself ‘5G’. They include 1-10Gbps connections to devices and other end points and the capacity to support up to 100 times as many devices per cell as possible in current implementations.

To be incredibly simplistic, 5G should be able to download entire movies in second, will enable high-bandwidth computations, such as gaming, and will be capable of supporting the billions of connected devices expected to be in use by 2025.

One more thing: 5G will also be much more stable when used in moving vehicles, such as trains, public transport, and (of course) cars.

What is Apple doing?

Apple recently applied for FCC permission to test a new wireless technology, called millimeter wave. The company intends testing transmissions using the standard between two fixed points in Cupertino and Milpitas, CA. "These assessments will provide engineering data relevant to the operation of devices on wireless carriers’ future 5G networks,” its application said.

That’s not the only way in which Apple is involved in 5G development. Way back in 2014 the company joined the Next Generation Mobile Networks (NGMN) Alliance, an association of stakeholders from within the industry working to ensure next-gen networks, infrastructure, and devices are compliant.

Light Reading last year reported Apple to be hiring at least one engineer with knowledge and experience of “radar signal processing”, which basically means the signals which are used in millimeter wave. Millimeter wave is the band of spectrum between 30GHz and 300GHz which is ear-marked for use by 5G networks.

Why is Apple doing this?

The reasons for Apple’s interest are pretty obvious: not only must the company ensure its mobile products play nice with the 5G standard once it appears, it also seems likely the company understands the strategic value of gaining an early mover advantage once carrier deployments of 5G make hardware products viable. That means Apple doesn’t need to be first to market, but will want to hit the market soon after 5G is made available in key markets: U.S., China, India, Europe, potentially the UK.

The capacity to handle high bandwidth activity with low latency and support for billions of devices is alluring enough, but stability in moving vehicles has obvious implications.

These 5G stalwarts mean the standard will be able to handle things like mobile virtual and augmented reality services, vehicle-to-vehicle communications systems, and will have pipes plenty big enough to handle the vastly complex data exchange demands of unstructured machine intelligence analytics.

We know Apple has interest in all of these sectors.

(We also know Apple is now working far more closely with Nokia, which holds so much network knowledge).

How does this impact my business?

Consumers should benefit from fast and reliable access to the kinds of services they use their home broadband connection to access today.

It doesn’t end there, of course – they can also look forward to next-generation services (such as mobile VR) and solutions we’ve not imagined yet. Provision of powerful mobile broadband also has implications on the Internet-of-things (IoT), as 5G will provide the capacity to support billions of devices without generating undue interference on existing data traffic.

That’s the consumer: Beyond the opportunity to provide new breeds of next-generation service to consumers, business users should benefit from:

  • Ultra-fast unified communications
  • The capacity to provide truly wireless cloud-based office solutions
  • Opportunities to expand using mobile VR
  • Improvements in business agility – you can use 5G as a primary fixed-line broadband replacement, enabling enterprises to “pop-up” whole offices in response to immediate business need.

However, the enterprise opportunity of 5G isn’t going to manifest itself until full-scale commercial deployments of the standard begin around 2020.

That’s good for IT purchasers looking to extend their Apple deployment, as it means mobile products purchased in the current equipment upgrade cycle (2017-18) will likely be due for replacement by the time the standard appears.

This means those C-class execs will likely get their wish in the form of an iPhone 8 when this ships later this year, as even though Apple is evidently working to develop a 5G iPhone, there’s no need to plan for its appearance… yet.

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Source: This article was published computerworld.com By Jonny Evans

Categorized in Others

Apple’s upcoming new iPhone 8 is the most hotly anticipated smartphone since 2014, when news first began to leak that the company would finally release larger iPhones. The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus featured the bigger displays users had been clamoring for, and they also sported a sleek new design that Apple fans loved. But now, three years later, Apple’s flagship iPhones still feature a design that is practically identical to the company’s 2014 models. The iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus pack plenty of power and new features, but smartphone fans have clearly grown tired of Apple’s 2014 iPhone design, and sales are slumping as a result.

The world is long overdue for a fresh new iPhone design, and Apple fans will finally get what they want in 2017 when Apple unveils its completely redesigned iPhone 8. Now, for the first time ever, consumers will get their first look at Apple’s reimagined iPhone 8 design in real life.

This coming September, Apple is expected to unveil three new iPhone models. The iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus are believed to be modest updates to the current iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. For the first time, however, Apple is expected to make a significant change to an “S” update’s hardware by making the back of the phones glass instead of aluminum. Both new models are expected to support wireless charging, and present technology is unable to pass current as efficiently through metal as it does through glass.

Apple’s new iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus will surely be impressive smartphones, but the device everyone is waiting for is the iPhone 8. According to multiple independent reports, the iPhone 8 will feature a bold new design that sandwiches a stainless steel frame between two 2.5D glass panels. The result will supposedly appear seamless, bringing Apple closer than ever to realizing Jony Ive’s dream of an iPhone made of one continuous sheet of glass.

The face of the iPhone 8 is expected to feature a new OLED display with a screen-to-body ratio even more impressive than the 83% ratio managed by Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+. This will reportedly be achieved in part by shifting around the device’s internal components, but also by completely removing the iPhone’s physical home button.

Here is where reports begin to diverge. We know that Apple has been working for years on technology that will allow it to embed a TouchID fingerprint scanner directly into an iPhone’s display, and several reports have said the iPhone 8 will be the first iPhone to feature an embedded fingerprint sensor. But conflicting reports suggest that the required tech isn’t yet mature enough to mass-produce at the scale Apple would require for the iPhone 8, so the company may be forced to move the scanner to the back of the handset, as was the case for Samsung and its Galaxy S8.

Everyone hates the iPhone 8 design that has floated around with a fingerprint scanner on the back of the phone, so we can only hope that Apple and its manufacturing partners found a way to make the embedded scanner work. The bad news is we cannot confirm one way or the other at this time. But the good news is Apple’s iPhone 8 design has seemingly been finalized, and we’re giving the world an exclusive first look at the hotly anticipated tenth-anniversary iPhone.

BGR has exclusively obtained photos of an iPhone 8 mockup that is believed to feature Apple’s final design. As has been the case in years past, this mockup is thought to have been built using actual finalized schematics that were leaked from the factories that will build Apple’s next-generation iPhones.

The mockup doesn’t feature any indication of a fingerprint scanner on the back of the phone, however not all markings are present on the dummy, so it’s not clear if this is an indication that the phone’s TouchID sensor will be embedded in the display.

These photos show an iPhone 8 design that is largely in line with recent rumors. The phone features 2.5D glass panels on the front and back that curve slightly at their edges. Sandwiched between them is a polished stainless steel midframe that is rounded as well, perfectly continuing the slope of the 2.5D glass. The result is a smooth design that will likely feel seamless in the hand.

On the back of the iPhone 8 mockup, we can see an oversized “camera bump” positioned vertically rather than horizontally, as is the case on the iPhone 7 Plus. This area of the phone’s back is thought to house a new dual-lens camera system, as well as an LED flash and a microphone. Apple’s next-generation camera on the iPhone 8 is expected to feature the same optical zoom capability as the iPhone 7 Plus’ camera, but it may also enable exciting new augmented reality features that Apple will announce this coming September.

And just in case you’re wondering, no, the iPhone 8 will not have a 3.5mm headphone jack.

We have about four months to go before Apple finally takes the wraps off its tenth-anniversary iPhone, and there are still plenty of new details left to leak between now and then. In fact, we still don’t even know what the new handset will be called. While most people currently refer to the phone as the “iPhone 8,” that name has not been confirmed. Other possibilities that have been tossed around include “iPhone X” and “iPhone Edition,” which would align with the high-end Apple Watch Edition.

There is indeed much we still do not know, but the iPhone 8’s design now appears to be finalized. While BGR’s exclusive photos give the world its first look at this sleek new design, we can expect to see more iPhone 8 mockups begin to surface as third-party case makers like Ghostek and Spigen get a jump on building cases for Apple’s new iPhone so they’re ready at launch. As regular readers will recall, Ghostek was the first case maker to reveal Samsung’s Galaxy S8 design when renders of its upcoming cases were leaked earlier this year.

Apple’s iPhone 8 is expected to be unveiled this coming September, though its release may be pushed back to October or November if recent rumors of manufacturing difficulties end up being accurate.

Source: This article was published on bgr.com

Categorized in Science & Tech

Apple’s upcoming new iPhone 8 is the most hotly anticipated smartphone since 2014, when news first began to leak that the company would finally release larger iPhones. The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus featured the bigger displays users had been clamoring for, and they also sported a sleek new design that Apple fans loved. But now, three years later, Apple’s flagship iPhones still feature a design that is practically identical to the company’s 2014 models. The iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus pack plenty of power and new features, but smartphone fans have clearly grown tired of Apple’s 2014 iPhone design, and sales are slumping as a result.

The world is long overdue for a fresh new iPhone design, and Apple fans will finally get what they want in 2017 when Apple unveils its completely redesigned iPhone 8. Now, for the first time ever, consumers will get their first look at Apple’s reimagined iPhone 8 design in real life.

This coming September, Apple is expected to unveil three new iPhone models. The iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus are believed to be modest updates to the current iPhone 7 and 7 Plus. For the first time, however, Apple is expected to make a significant change to an “S” update’s hardware by making the back of the phones glass instead of aluminum. Both new models are expected to support wireless charging, and present technology is unable to pass current as efficiently through metal as it does through glass.

Apple’s new iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus will surely be impressive smartphones, but the device everyone is waiting for is the iPhone 8. According to multiple independent reports, the iPhone 8 will feature a bold new design that sandwiches a stainless steel frame between two 2.5D glass panels. The result will supposedly appear seamless, bringing Apple closer than ever to realizing Jony Ive’s dream of an iPhone made of one continuous sheet of glass.

The face of the iPhone 8 is expected to feature a new OLED display with a screen-to-body ratio even more impressive than the 83% ratio managed by Samsung’s Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+. This will reportedly be achieved in part by shifting around the device’s internal components, but also by completely removing the iPhone’s physical home button.

Here is where reports begin to diverge. We know that Apple has been working for years on technology that will allow it to embed a TouchID fingerprint scanner directly into an iPhone’s display, and several reports have said the iPhone 8 will be the first iPhone to feature an embedded fingerprint sensor. But conflicting reports suggest that the required tech isn’t yet mature enough to mass-produce at the scale Apple would require for the iPhone 8, so the company may be forced to move the scanner to the back of the handset, as was the case for Samsung and its Galaxy S8.

Everyone hates the iPhone 8 design that has floated around with a fingerprint scanner on the back of the phone, so we can only hope that Apple and its manufacturing partners found a way to make the embedded scanner work. The bad news is we cannot confirm one way or the other at this time. But the good news is Apple’s iPhone 8 design has seemingly been finalized, and we’re giving the world an exclusive first look at the hotly anticipated tenth-anniversary iPhone.

BGR has exclusively obtained photos of an iPhone 8 mockup that is believed to feature Apple’s final design. As has been the case in years past, this mockup is thought to have been built using actual finalized schematics that were leaked from the factories that will build Apple’s next-generation iPhones.

The mockup doesn’t feature any indication of a fingerprint scanner on the back of the phone, however not all markings are present on the dummy, so it’s not clear if this is an indication that the phone’s TouchID sensor will be embedded in the display.

These photos show an iPhone 8 design that is largely in line with recent rumors. The phone features 2.5D glass panels on the front and back that curve slightly at their edges. Sandwiched between them is a polished stainless steel midframe that is rounded as well, perfectly continuing the slope of the 2.5D glass. The result is a smooth design that will likely feel seamless in the hand.

On the back of the iPhone 8 mockup, we can see an oversized “camera bump” positioned vertically rather than horizontally, as is the case on the iPhone 7 Plus. This area of the phone’s back is thought to house a new dual-lens camera system, as well as an LED flash and a microphone. Apple’s next-generation camera on the iPhone 8 is expected to feature the same optical zoom capability as the iPhone 7 Plus’ camera, but it may also enable exciting new augmented reality features that Apple will announce this coming September.

And just in case you’re wondering, no, the iPhone 8 will not have a 3.5mm headphone jack.

We have about four months to go before Apple finally takes the wraps off its tenth-anniversary iPhone, and there are still plenty of new details left to leak between now and then. In fact, we still don’t even know what the new handset will be called. While most people currently refer to the phone as the “iPhone 8,” that name has not been confirmed. Other possibilities that have been tossed around include “iPhone X” and “iPhone Edition,” which would align with the high-end Apple Watch Edition.

There is indeed much we still do not know, but the iPhone 8’s design now appears to be finalized. While BGR’s exclusive photos give the world its first look at this sleek new design, we can expect to see more iPhone 8 mockups begin to surface as third-party case makers like Ghostek and Spigen get a jump on building cases for Apple’s new iPhone so they’re ready at launch. As regular readers will recall, Ghostek was the first case maker to reveal Samsung’s Galaxy S8 design when renders of its upcoming cases were leaked earlier this year.

Apple’s iPhone 8 is expected to be unveiled this coming September, though its release may be pushed back to October or November if recent rumors of manufacturing difficulties end up being accurate.

Source: The original version of this article on BGR.com By Zach Epstein

Categorized in Others
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