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GOOGLE is the most popular search engine on the internet, with Microsoft's Bing a distant second. But which is better, and which is safer to use?

People can actually choose from more than 20 different search engines. Most, however, stick with the most popular search engines, particularly  (92 percent) and Bing (2.5 percent). Both Google and  Bing take online safety extremely seriously, making it very it very difficult to choose between them.

Google's sheer pervasiveness into the fabric of our everyday lives makes it very difficult to argue any other search is a credible challenger to its crown.

Google can help users narrow down what exactly they are looking for with specialised searches.

Users can browse through different categories pertaining to keywords, including: Images, Maps, News articles, Products or services you can purchase online, Videos and scholarly papers.

 

Like all search engines, Google uses a special algorithm to determine its search results.

And while Google shares some facts about its algorithm, the specifics are a company secret.

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Google vs Bing: The overwhelming majority of people stick with the most popular search engines - Google and Bing (Image: Getty)

This helps Google remain competitive with other search engines and reduces the chance of hackers discovering how to abuse the system.

Google uses automated programs called spiders or crawlers to help generate its search results.

What differentiates Google is how it ranks its results, which determines the order Google displays results on its search engine results pages.

The world-leading search engine uses the PageRank algorithm to assign each Web page a relevancy score.

A web page's PageRank depends on three main factors:

google-vs-bing-which-search-engine-better-is-google-or-bing-safer-2461896.jpg

Google vs Bing: Google can help users narrow down what exactly they are looking for with specialised searches (Image: Getty)

The most important factor is the number of other Web pages linking to the page in question.

Also, if the keyword appears only once within the body of a page, it will receive a low score for that keyword.

 

And the length of time a web page has existed ensures Google places more value on those with an established history.

Although Microsoft's Bing is also a search engine, it differs slightly to Google in the way it works.

But the way Bing works is relatively simple in comparison to Google.

Bing will scan all documents for the frequency of root words, meaning "running" will be shortened to "run" and will cut out the irrelevant words.

These frequencies are then given a hash value or an ID number.

So, when a term is typed into the search bar, the roots of the words are found, a hash value is calculated and found in a frequency table.

The outcomes that contain this result are called essential pages and only the highest-scoring pages will be chosen.

These pages then go through a second process called Click Distance.

Bing combines a page’s relevancy in addition to Click Distance – the number of mouse clicks it takes to find the content.

This is then analysed using URL depth property, with lengthier URLs considered less important due to their distance from the homepage.

So if a URL has numerous backslashes, Bing will not rank it, even if it is linked to from the homepage.

And although relevancy and click distance are important factors, Bing also factors a user’s search history when displaying search results.

Is Google or Bing safer?

Google Safe Browsing helps protect over four billion devices every day by showing warnings to users when they attempt to navigate to dangerous sites or download dangerous files.

Safe Browsing also notifies webmasters when their websites are compromised by malicious actors and helps them diagnose and resolve the problem so that their visitors stay safer.

Safe Browsing protections work across Google products and power safer browsing experiences across the Internet.

Google Chrome and other browsers use Safe Browsing to show users a warning message before they visit a dangerous site or download a harmful app.

Bing's SafeSearch helps keep adult content out of your search results.

There are three different ways you can turn on SafeSearch.

For individual accounts, choose SafeSearch options on the Settings page.

At a network level, map www.bing.com to strict.bing.com.

For an individual PC, map www.bing.com to strict.bing.com.

 

[Source: This article was published in express.co.uk By TOM FISH - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore] 

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in popsci.com written by David Nield - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Nevena Gojkovic Turunz]

Is your search engine of choice pulling its weight? It's perhaps a choice you've stopped thinking about, settling for whatever default option appears in your browser or on your phone—but as with most tech choices, you've got options.

Google has come to dominate search to the extent that it's become a verb in itself, but here we're going to check how Google stacks up against two of its biggest rivals including Microsoft's Bing, in 2019 and the privacy-focused search site known as DuckDuckGo.

 

Search results

Google Search results

Google results for "Abraham Lincoln."

We don't know what you're searching for, and without running thousands of searches across several months we can't really present you with a comprehensive comparison of how well these search engines scour the web. What we can do is tell you how these services performed on a few sample searches.

First we tried "Abraham Lincoln": All three search engines returned the Wikipedia page first, the History Channel site second, and Britannica third. DuckDuckGo listed Abraham Lincoln news above the search results, even though the 16th President of the United States hasn't really been in the news lately.

bing Search results

Bing results for "Abraham Lincoln."

 

As we wrote this article a few days after the 2019 Super Bowl, we tried "Super Bowl score" next, and all three search engines produced the right result in a box out above the search results. DuckDuckGo followed this with the official NFL site then some sports news sites, while Bing had a sports news site first and the NFL second. Google listed the score, then Super Bowl news, then some relevant tweets, and then other results.

Next we tried a question, specifically "how many days until Christmas?", to see how our search engines fared. Only Google presented the right answer front and center as part of its own interface, with DuckDuckGo and Bing returning links to Christmas countdown sites instead (though Bing did put "Wednesday December 25" right at the top).

duckduckgo Search results

DuckDuckGo results for "Abraham Lincoln."

For something a little more obscure we tried "Empire of the Sun" (both a 1987 Steven Spielberg movie and a music duo). Google returned the Wikipedia sites for the film then the band at the top, Bing returned the Wikipedia page for the movie then the band's official site, and DuckDuckGo returned the IMDB page for the Empire of the Sun film then the band's official site.

These are slight differences really, and the "best" one really depends on your personal preference (do you want to see Twitter results, or not?). All three sites are obviously very competent with basic searches, but Google obviously has the edge when it comes to finding content besides web pages, as well as answering questions directly (no doubt thanks to all that Google Assistant technology behind the scenes).

Search features

google Search features

Google really will flip a coin for you.

Speaking of Google Assistant, one of the advantages of Google is of course the way it ties into all the other Google apps and services: You can search for places on Google Maps, or bring up images in Google Photos, or query your Google Calendar, right from the Google homepage (as long as you're signed in). Try Googling "my trips" for example to see bookings stored in your Gmail account.

All three of these search engines feature filters for images, videos, news, and products; Bing and Google include a Maps option as well. You can dig in further on all three sites as well—filtering images by size or by color, for example. Google and Bing let you save searches to come back to later, whereas DuckDuckGo doesn't (see the separate section on privacy below).

bing Search features

Bing has a comprehensive image search feature.

 

Besides from basic searches, Google and DuckDuckGo do very well on extras: Unlike Bing, they can toss a coin, roll a die, or start a timer right there on the results screen, no more clicking required. Meanwhile, both Google and Bing can display details of a flight in a pop-up box outside the search results, whereas DuckDuckGo directs you to flight-tracking websites instead.

All three of our search engines can limit results to pages that have been published recently, but Google and Bing have a "custom date" search option (say 1980-1990, for example) that isn't available on DuckDuckGo. Google and Bing let you search by region too, whereas DuckDuckGo doesn't.

duckduck go Search features

DuckDuckGo can start a timer right in your web browser.

Appearance may not be number one in your list of priorities, but Bing presents its search box on top of an appealing full-screen wallpaper image, with links to news stories and other interesting articles underneath. It's more appealing visually than Google or DuckDuckGo, though Google has its doodles and DuckDuckGo has a few different color schemes to pick from.

As you can see, Google can do just about everything—it has been in the search engine game for a long time, after all. Bing and DuckDuckGo are able to match Google on some features, but not all, which makes it hard to switch from unless you have a specific reason to... and that brings us neatly on to the issue of user privacy.

User privacy

Google User privacy

 

Google knows a lot about you—and can serve up results from other Google apps, like Google Photos.

This is the big feature that DuckDuckGo sells itself on: As we've noted above, it doesn't log what you're searching for, and only puts up occasional advertising, which isn't personalized and can be disabled. If you're tired of the big tech firms hoovering up data on you, DuckDuckGo will appeal.

What's more, the sites you visit don't know the search terms you used to find them—something they can otherwise do by piecing together different clues from your browsing behavior and the data that your computer broadcasts publicly. DuckDuckGo also attaches to encrypted versions of site by default.

 

Bing User privacy

Bing, like Google, keeps a record of searches you've run.

Cookies aren't saved by DuckDuckGo either, those little files that sit locally on your computer and tell websites when you've visited before. Data like your IP address (your router's address on the web) and the browser you're using gets wiped by default too. You're effectively searching anonymously.

There's no doubt that both Google and Microsoft promise to protect your privacy and use the data they have on you responsibly—you can read their respective privacy policies here and here. However, it's also true that they collect much more data on you and what you're doing, so it's up to you whether you trust Google and Microsoft to use it wisely.

duckduckgo User privacy

Categorized in Search Engine

Search engines are a sourcers best friend, but how do you know when to use what search engine and what type of search to perform? A search will pull up almost anything you ask it to do as long as you know how to ask the right questions. The key to a successful search query is knowing what’s available and knowing exactly what you want without having to pour over pages and pages of useless results. Using search engines to find your ideal candidate will help cut out all of the noise by using them correctly.

Using search engines to find your ideal candidate

Not all searches or search engines are made equal. Understanding the fundamentals of search engines and when to use which one is critical when it comes to finding candidates in the most efficient way possible.  

Understanding the power of a Google Search

We all probably use this search engine several times a day, but do you know how to leverage a search to pinpoint what you’re looking for? There are two popular types of search strings that most sourcers are using when it comes to using Google. Both Boolean and X-ray searches will give you a boost in your searching endeavors.

 

Boolean involves using terms like AND OR NOT in your Google search to limit or broaden what you’re looking for. So, searching for “copy editors” -jobs -Nashville would exclude the term jobs and the results of candidates who live in Nashville, while (“copy editors” OR writers) would give you candidates with editing skills as well as those who may only have writing skills.

Check out some helpful hints from Google:

Common search techniques

Search social media

Put @ in front of a word to search social media. For example: @twitter.

Search for a price

Put in front of a number. For example: camera $400.

Search hashtags

Put in front of a word. For example: #throwbackthursday

Exclude words from your search

Put - in front of a word you want to leave out. For example, jaguar speed -car

Search for an exact match

Put a word or phrase inside quotes. For example, "tallest building".

Search for wildcards or unknown words

Put a * in your word or phrase where you want to leave a placeholder. For example, "largest * in the world".

Search within a range of numbers

Put .. between two numbers. For example, camera $50..$100.

Combine searches

Put “OR” between each search query. For example,  marathon OR race.

Search for a specific site

Put “site:” in front of a site or domain. For example, site:youtube.com or site:.gov.

Search for related sites

Put “related:” in front of a web address you already know. For example, related:time.com.

X-ray allows you to utilize a more powerful search engine (like Google) to search a website (like LinkedIn) whose search function may not be as thorough. You can give it a Google to see how to format your X-ray search. site:linkedin.com/in

search.png

Custom Search Engines

Another benefit to using Google over other search engines is their ability to provide a custom search engine. If you’re tired of writing out the same string of criteria time and time again, Google has provided this type of search engine that allows you to set up and refine your search in one easy location.

Bing Matters!

Google may be the most popular choice when choosing a search engine, but it’s important also to give others a chance as well. Results from each of these sources will be displayed differently and can bring up different results that allow you to see what another may have failed to show you. Make sure you check out the Boolean and X-ray functions of whatever search engine you are using as they may need to be formatted differently.

The reason we pick out Bing as a contender is that all of your popular platforms such as Yahoo, Altavista, and MSN all run off Bing’s search engine (Fun Fact circa 2010). There are some nuances to understand when working with Bing that doesn’t necessarily work when it comes to Google. For instance:

 

inurl: is something that works well in Google, but doesn’t work in Bing search engine because it was deemed as a “mass data mining tool” back in 2007. It’s long since been retired in Bing and never seen again. Instead, you’ll want to use a more friendly search string such as intitle:recruitment. This type of search string is going to look for the letters “recruitment” in either the title a web page. It also works in Google and most other search engines. This allows you to search for specific titles within a certain website using Bing’s search engine.

Take a look at the X-ray Search in Bing (PRO TIP – In Bing, you have to use the parentheses):

bing.png

Others

DuckDuckGo – The key feature of DuckDuckGo is that it’s a private search engine and doesn’t track your search history, like Google.

Dogpile – Dogpile has been around for decades and is still an excellent metasearch engine that all sourcers should consider.

Yandex – From Russia, with tons of love, this is one of the most popular and widely used search engines in the world!

Search engines are beautiful things. But learning to use them beyond looking up a single term is imperative if you want to remain a productive and efficient sourcer. Let the search engine do the brunt of the work for you, so you can focus on honing in on finding that perfect fit for the job. We know which is your favorite, but humor us anyway, Google or Bing? Go!

Source: This article was published sourcecon.com By Shannon Pritchett

Categorized in Search Engine

“Who’s playing against OSU this week?”

“I don’t know. I’ll google it.”

Although Google is the only search engine to pop up as a part of speech in Webster’s, the search engine giant has been feeling the heat from competitor, Bing. Our first whiffs of Bing came from word association TV spots that made us laugh but got us thinking: what IS this thing?

So we googled it. And what we found was a slick screen and a search bar, leaving us with a new question: how is this any different from Google?

What’s the difference?

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To start off, Bing’s homepage differs from Google by keeping it interesting with its ever changing photo. However, Google’s plain screen has its advantages. The all-white look is sleeker, making it seem less cluttered. Users feel like they’re starting with a clean slate.

Once a search is conducted, Google brings up a litany of results ranked from most to least relevant. It’s new Google Instant feature attempts to give users that extra push towards more specific searches to make the more relevant searcher even MORE relevant.  Bing takes a slightly different approach by categorizing answers into instant answers, deep links, multimedia and other relevant categories. This targets user results and makes them easier to shift through. Google does provide results filter options on its SERP, but the user must filter the results manually.

 

When it comes to Google vs. Bing, it’s hard to say which is “better”. In the end it depends on what you’re looking for in terms of search.

More than results

If you want to go beyond getting good results, Google has the upper hand on the extra “stuff”. Things like Gmail, Google Docs, Google Talk and Google Reader make it easier for Google to keep users coming back. If you’re chatting with a friend on GChat and need to look up some info before sharing a presentation from your Google Docs, no doubt Google will be on the brain.

Source : globotimes

Categorized in Search Engine

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