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Source: This article was Published qz.com By Dave Gershgorn - Contributed by Member: Dennis Smith

Ten years into its life, Chrome is the most widely-used internet browser in the world. But the stock features aren’t what make it so popular. There’s also a thriving community of developers adding onto the browser with extensions, little pieces of software that add features Google hasn’t dreamt up yet.

The Quartz staff like their extensions. After all, we all spend a borderline unhealthy amount of time on the internet, whether it be researching, writing, or fact-checking stories. Here are the ways our favorites have helped us out:

Clutter/tab maintenance

If you’re like us, you have way too many tabs open. The holy trinity of tab maintenance can help: The Great Suspender pauses tabs after a certain amount of time so they don’t use processing power in the background, OneTab is great for condensing all the tabs you’re keeping open “to read later” into one summary tab, and Clutter Freemakes sure you don’t have duplicate tabs open.

Productivity

Sometimes you want to jot down a quick note but don’t want to open a word processor. Papier turns each new tab’s homepage into a notebook for recording quick thoughts or distraction-free writing. And everything is backed up to Chrome, so you won’t lose it later.

Search

The Personal Blocklist extension, made by Google, filters out certain domains from your searches, so if you don’t like a certain site you don’t need to see it. (Keep qz.com, please.) A Quartz developer says that it’s useful to block out certain unhelpful sites when Googling through a web development problem.

Writing

Sometimes a hand you need with grammar. Grammarly.

News

Use Pocket to save good stories and NewsGuard to fend against bad ones. Quartz science editor Elijah Wolfson also sends longer stories he really wants to read to his Kindle using Push to Kindle. It’s distraction-free reading at its best, with no notifications or ads or messages.

Password management

A password manager is just basic internet hygiene—use one to maintain strong passwords for every one of your internet accounts. The most popular ones are 1Password, LastPass, and Dashlane— there are pros and cons to each, and the Quartz staff uses them all. Just remember the master password—your digital life depends on it.

Archive search

Once it’s on the internet, it lives forever. That’s pretty much due to Archive.org, which stores decades of revisions to websites, as well as preserved copies of sites that don’t exist anymore. The Wayback Machine extension allows you to see saved versions of web pages that have been either taken down or are otherwise unavailable, a boon to any internet historian.

Money Saver

Get around academic paywalls with extensions like Kopernio and Unpaywall, which search for accessible PDFs of the paper online. Or, find out if you’re actually getting a good deal with a price tracker like CamelCamelCamel.

GIFs

My trustiest Chrome extension is called MakeGIF, and it’s very simple. It makes GIFs. It’s particularly good at capturing and converting YouTube videos.

Fun

Inject a little bit of simple internet nostalgia into your life with Tabogotchi, which makes a game out of how many tabs you have open, or Tabby Cat, which generates an internet cat you can virtually pet for every tab you open.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published cbsnews.com - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

Even if "Location History" is off on your phone, Google often still stores your precise location.

Here are some things you can do to delete those markers and keep your location as private as possible. But there's no panacea because simply connecting to the internet on any device flags an IP address, a numeric designation that can be geographically mapped. Smartphones also connect to cell towers, so your carrier knows your general location at all times.

To prevent further tracking

For any device:

Fire up your browser and go to myactivity.google.com . Sign into Google if you haven't already. On the upper left drop-down menu, go to "Activity Controls." Turn off both "Web & App Activity" and "Location History." That should prevent precise location markers from being stored to your Google account.

Google will warn you that some of its services won't work as well with these settings off. In particular, neither the Google Assistant, a digital concierge, nor the Google Home smart speaker will be particularly useful.

On iOS:

If you use Google Maps, adjust your location setting to "While Using" the app; this will prevent the app from accessing your location when it's not active. Go to Settings - Privacy - Location Services and from there select Google Maps to make the adjustment.

In the Safari web browser, consider using a search engine other than Google. Under Settings - Safari - Search Engine, you can find other options like Bing or DuckDuckGo. You can turn location off while browsing by going to Settings - Privacy - Location Services - Safari Websites, and turn this to "Never." (This still won't prevent advertisers from knowing your rough location based on IP address on any website.)

You can also turn Location Services off to the device almost completely from Settings - Privacy - Location Services. Both Google Maps and Apple Maps will still work, but they won't know where you are on the map and won't be able to give you directions. Emergency responders will still be able to find you if the need arises.

On Android:

Under the main settings icon click on "Security & location." Scroll down to the "Privacy" heading. Tap "Location." You can toggle it off for the entire device.

Use "App-level permissions" to turn off access to various apps. Unlike the iPhone, there is no setting for "While Using." You cannot turn off Google Play services, which supplies your location to other apps if you leave that service on.

Sign in as a "guest" on your Android device by swiping down from the top and tapping the downward-facing caret, then again on the torso icon. Be aware of which services you sign in on, like Chrome.

You can also change search engines even in Chrome.

To delete past location tracking

For any device:

On the page myactivity.google.com , look for any entry that has a location pin icon beside the word "details." Clicking on that pops up a window that includes a link that sometimes says "From your current location." Clicking on it will open Google Maps, which will display where you were at the time.

You can delete it from this popup by clicking on the navigation icon with the three stacked dots and then "Delete."

Some items will be grouped in unexpected places, such as topic names, google.com, Search, or Maps. You have to delete them item by item. You can wholesale delete all items in date ranges or by service but will end up taking out more than just location markers.

Categorized in How to

There was a time when the majority used Firefox as their favorite internet browser. Times changed, and Google Chrome took the lead. Now Firefox has returned with their updated browser, Firefox Quantum. Not only this, but an update to the browser is coming as well, set to introduce new features.

The new Firefox, termed Firefox 59, shall help you block that pesky notification at the top bar asking for permission to send you further notifications in the future. Not everyone likes notifications to appear unwantedly. Not only this, if a website wants to know your location, the new Firefox can stop that notification too.

The only disappointment is that you shall have to wait for Firefox to get updated to its new version unless you do some digging on your own. Yes, it’s perfectly possible for you to implement these new features which also includes, shutting off the notification by a website asking for Webcam access right now with your own build, with a little bit of tweaking though.

All you need to do is delve into Firefox’s “about:config” and you will find a plethora of settings you can change to your will.

Tired of the Notification Requests? Problem Solved!

Sites ask you to allow or block them from sending you notification just like your smartphone does. For some, it is a really handy feature who want to stay updated every time, but not everyone likes their screen to show a pop up every now and then about some “Jack commented on Drake’s post” blah blah. If you are tired of keeping on blocking every such website from sending you a notification, then there is a simple way to do this to block such notifications to come in the first place forever.


Just open up your Firefox search bar, and type “about:config” and press Enter. A new page shall come up which shall give you a warning about tweaking with Firefox’s advanced settings. Just click on the I accept the risk button. Now there would be a search bar on the new screen that comes. If there isn’t just press CTRL+F to bring up the search bar. Type in “dom.push.enabled”. Double click on it. This shall modify it’s value to false. The default setting is true, and after turning it to false by doing such, you won’t get Notification Requests from now on.

In case you want to revert the setting just do exactly same as above toggling it to True.

Location Requests are pesky too, right?

Location Requests are more commonly asked by sites such as weather, transport, or even search engines to bring up tailored content. But then some might consider it as an invasion of their privacy as well. The best alternative is to just block location requests forever so that you don’t accidentally allow them. To do this just go to “about:config” again and search for “geo.enabled”.

Again double clicking on it would set it’s Boolean value to false. To revert the changes, just repeat the steps toggling it to true.

All those chat sites requiring camera and microphone requests

If you frequently visit online chat sites or use social messaging platforms, then you would be bothered by such requests as well. To avoid these requests, just head to “about:config” again and search for “media.navigator.enabled”. Now double click on it to toggle it to off. Do the same with “media.peerconnection.enabled” In case you want to change these settings to default, just repeat the steps toggling them to True.

Source: This article was published factschronicle.com By MICHAEL LOWRY

Categorized in Search Engine

Mozilla rolled out a major update to its Firefox web browser on Tuesday with a bevy of new features, and one old frenemy: Google.

In a blog post, Mozilla said Firefox’s default search engine will be Google in the U.S., Canada, Hong Kong and Taiwan. The agreement recalls a similar, older deal that was scuttled when Firefox and Google’s Chrome web browser became bitter rivals. Three years ago, Mozilla switched from Google to Yahoo as the default Firefox search provider in the U.S. after Yahoo agreed to pay more than $300 million a year over five years — more than Google was willing to pay.

The new Firefox deal could boost Google’s already massive share of the web-search market. When people use Firefox, Google’s search box will be on the launch page, prompting users to type in valuable queries that Google can sell ads against. But the agreement also adds another payment that Alphabet’s Google must make to partners that send online traffic to its search engine, a worrisome cost for shareholders.

 

 

It’s unclear how much Google paid to reclaim this prized digital spot. A Google spokeswoman confirmed the deal but declined to comment further, and Mozilla didn’t disclose financial details.

As Google’s ad sales keep rising, so too has the amount it must dole out to browsers, mobile device makers and other distribution channels to ensure that Google’s search, video service and digital ads are seen. Those sums, called Traffic Acquisition Costs or TAC, rose to $5.5 billion during the third quarter, or 23 percent of ad revenue.

Last quarter, the increase in TAC was primarily due to “changes in partner agreements,” Google Chief Financial Officer Ruth Porat said on the earnings call. She declined to disclose specific partners. A lot of these payments go to Apple, which runs Google search as the default on its Safari browser. In September, Apple added Google search as the default provider for questions people ask Apple’s voice-based assistant Siri, replacing Microsoft’s Bing. In the third quarter, the TAC Google paid to distribution partners, like Apple, jumped 54 percent to $2.4 billion.

Google is likely paying Mozilla less than Apple for search rights. In 2014, Yahoo’s then-Chief Executive Officer, Marissa Mayer, lobbied heavily for the Firefox deal by agreeing to pay $375 million a year, according to regulatory filings. Google paid $1 billion to Apple in 2014 to keep its search bar on iPhones, according to court records.

Firefox once commanded roughly a fourth of the web browser market, but its share has slid in recent years. It now controls 6 percent of the global market, according to research firm Statcounter. Apple’s Safari holds 15 percent followed by Alibaba’s UC Browser with 8 percent. Google’s Chrome browser has 55 percent of the market.

Source: This article was published siliconvalley.com By Mark Bergen

Categorized in Search Engine

Mozilla has unveiled a new browser called Firefox Quantum, which is supposedly twice as fast as the older version of the program as it uses a new core engine, coupled with the significantly reduced use of memory space. Firefox Quantum represents the largest upgrade Mozilla has made to its web browser since it rolled out version 1.0 of Firefox thirteen years ago. The new version of Firefox is now rolling out to desktop and laptop computers running Windows, Linux or Mac, as well as mobile devices powered by Android and iOS.

One of the most noticeable upgrades that comes with Firefox Quantum is that opening a website or web page happens very quickly, with the current tab no longer showing the rotating icon for page loads in most cases. The non-profit organization boasts of Firefox Quantum as the fastest browser compared to all other browsers it produced in the past. As well as the improved speed, the new Firefox browser also includes a fresh user interface called Photon, which gained its new look based on the way internet users surfed the web, thanks to Mozilla’s user research team which conducted the study. Mozilla said a lot of work has been brought into play as part of the development efforts for Firefox Quantum. For instance, over 700 authors have written code for Firefox since its initial release in August, with contributions from some 80 other code authors from across the globe. A beta versionof Firefox Quantum went live in September, having already demonstrated significantly improved performance. In fact, Mozilla backed its claim with a web test benchmark called Speedometer 2.0 as well as a video clip showcasing that Firefox Quantum performed better than Google Chrome.

Additionally, Mozilla also introduced a new CSS engine to the browser called Stylo, which uses hardware with multiple cores that work best for tasks that require less power. Additionally, although subtle, Firefox Quantum prioritizes a tab that a user is on above the rest by optimizing system resources. As to the default search engine for the browser, users in the United States and Canada will have Google as the automatic search tool once they launch Firefox Quantum. This is after Mozilla teamed up with Google to provide its search engine as the default option for Firefox in the United States, Canada, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, though users can also browse with other search engines of their choice as usual.

Source: This article was published androidheadlines.com By Manny Reyes

Categorized in Search Engine

There’s no shortage of web browsers tempting those who want a new browsing experience. Google’s Chrome browser leads the pack, followed by Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, Microsoft Edge, Opera, and many, many more.

Chances are you’ve heard of these, and maybe tried them all. Now, though, there’s a new browser on the scene, trying to push through the crowd to get into the cool group. It’s called Vivaldi, and its roots stem from Opera, the plucky underdog of the web browsing world which, if you ask many long-time users, went off the rails. The Vivaldi web browser was born to calm those disgruntled Opera natives. It accomplishes much more than that.

What exactly is a Vivaldi?

The Opera browser was once based on Presto, a proprietary browser and layout engine developed by Opera Software. In February of 2013, however, the company decided to jump on the Chromium bandwagon and completely re-write its browserfrom scratch to use an engine called “Blink,” introduced to the Chromium project in April of 2013.

Released as Opera 15 in May of 2013, the overhaul angered many users given a number of distinct features were dropped. By then, Opera Software co-founder and former CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner had already left the company, and moved on to form Vivaldi Technologies at the end of 2013. He set out to pick up where Opera 14 ended, providing features power users want in an entirely new browser.

vivaldi web browser best youve never tried main

Drawing inspiration from Italian Baroque composer and virtuoso violinist Antonio Lucio Vivaldi, Tetzchner and his team created Vivaldi on the open-source Chromium browser engine, which powers Google Chrome, Chrome OS, Opera, and similar browsers outside the Mozilla and Microsoft fold.

That means it uses the Blink layout engine to “compose” web pages in the browser window, just like the latest release of Opera. Unlike Opera, though, Vivaldi was built to support a broad range of features that today’s streamlined, purpose-built browsers have ditched.

Power users need apply

Google Chrome is often preferred by people who consider themselves power users, yet most of what makes it powerful isn’t part of the browser. There’s no default option to make the interface your own, save for installing themes that can be downloaded through the Chrome Store. There’s no way to natively take in-browser notes. It has no native mouse gesture-based commands. There’s no native Reader View – and so on. Power users instead gain features through extensions, which do the job, but can slow and clutter the browser as they’re piled on, as well as pose a security risk.

Vivaldi offers these features without using extensions by default. It aims to make the most out of your internet use by providing tools to make the experience easier, more manageable, and intelligent. That comes with a price — a slight reduction in size of the main browser window. You might consider that an acceptable trade, though, if you’re interested in using the web to do more than order a pair of socks from Amazon.

Vivaldi aims to make the most out of your internet use by providing tools to make the experience easier, more manageable, and intelligent.

Vivaldi’s default layout includes a slim Panel residing to the left providing four specific tools — Bookmarks, Downloads, Notes, and History – that you can hide if not used. Along the bottom is the thin Status Bar for taking screenshots, tiling/stacking pages, managing images, and adjusting the zoom. In the top-left corner, a slick Vivaldi logo hides all the menus, such as File, View, and Tools. These options, which tend to be obscured into menus in other browsers, take up space here.

That said, Vivaldi is visually clean despite its visible Panel and Status Bar. That’s where the Vivaldi name really takes off, as you become the composer of the interface. Many elements can be re-arranged in the “Settings” window, such as positioning all tabs in a vertical tower, and moving the address bar to the bottom.

Your composition doesn’t stop there. With Vivaldi, you can “compose” your own themes. This includes changing the colors of the background, foreground, highlights, and accents. You can also toggle on the “adaptive” theme, which will change the browser’s colors to match the current website. In a sense, Vivaldi can become your own visual masterpiece.

The Settings panel reveals its real depth

Outside the visual composition, Vivaldi’s “Settings” window digs deep into the power user’s toolbox. You’ll find a tool for customizing keyboard shortcuts spanning handy Window, View, Tab, and Page commands. You’ll also find a tool to compose mouse gestures that you define based on set commands. For instance, you can assign a specific motion to open a new tab, reload a page, or rewind the history. By default, gestures will only execute if you are pressing the right mouse button during the process. Using the ALT key as an alternative is ideal when using a laptop’s trackpad.

Vivaldi’s heavy “power user” aspect isn’t just locked to the “Settings” window. Hit the F2 key, and you can type anything into the Quick Command text field to perform a search using the browser’s default search engine. This window also provides a long list of commands that can be executed in the text field, such as accessing the browser’s built-in Task Manager, importing bookmarks from another installed browser, and more.

Another notable power user feature resides in the History section of the browser’s Start Page. Not only will you see all the places you’ve visited via links, but three graphs showing your browsing habits. They display your page views, page transition percentages, and a list of the top domains visited in an easily-read fashion.

It’s ideal for students, office workers, and designers

One of Vivaldi’s most unique extras is the Notes feature, found on the Panel. Vivaldi lets you type notes within a small window embedded in the expanded Panel while you browse the internet. These notes can include attached files stored locally on your PC, full screenshots, links, and a specific capture of a selected area.

Another nifty, time-saving tool is Vivaldi’s Web Panel feature. Web Panels aren’t exactly bookmarks, but are instead meant for websites that serve as tools, such as Wikipedia, online dictionaries, RSS feeds, and whatnot. Web Panels open within the Panel, and do not include address bars.

Finally, we must point out Vivaldi’s nifty tab stacking and tiling features. We crammed seven tabs into our stack, and accessed each one by hovering the cursor over the stack’s main tab, which rendered a thumbnail view of all stacked windows. This is good for grouping multiple pages together under a single tab, rather than having eight or more tabs strung along the top.

Meanwhile, the tiling feature essentially stuffs up to four websites into a single window. The Page Tiling button resides on the Status Bar, which provides options to Tile Vertically, Tile Horizontally, or Tile to Grid. In this case, you can just view up to four pages simultaneously rather than switch between tabs, or dig out a tab in a stack.

You should give Vivaldi a try

We could go on about the Vivaldi browser, but we’ve outlined the basics. Vivaldi is a web surfer’s complete toolbox, packed with gadgets you probably didn’t even know you needed. It’s a browser that you can move into, and make your own.

Give Vivaldi a shot. It’s completely free, so the only expense is the time you spend giving it a test drive.

Source: This article was published digitaltrends.com By Kevin Parrish

Categorized in Search Engine

We take a look at the performance and features of the big four internet browsers to see which one will serve you best in 2017.

The web browser is by far the most important piece of software on your PC—at least for most users. Unless you’re at a workstation crunching numbers or editing the next Star Wars you probably spend the majority of your computer time staring at a web app or a website.

That’s why it’s important to make sure you’ve always got the best tool for the job, and in 2017 that does not include Internet Explorer. If you still want the built-in option for Windows that would be Edge, but it’s hard to stick strictly with Edge when you’ve got other choices including Google’s Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera.

Let’s take a look at the four major (and modern) browsers to see how they stack up in 2017.

(If none of these internet browsers strike your fancy, head over to PCWorld's roundup of 10 intriguing alternative browsers.)

Browsers in brief

Chrome

chromelogo

The current people’s champion, Google Chrome tops the metrics charts of both StatCounter and NetMarketShare by a huge margin. Google’s browser has built a dedicated fan base thanks to its massive extensions library, and the fact that it just gets out of your way to put the focus on web content, not the browser’s trimmings.

Chrome isn’t quite as simplistic as it once was, but it’s still very easy to use. There isn’t much to Chrome except a huge URL bar—known as the OmniBar—plus a space for extensions, a bookmarking icon, tabs, and that’s it.

Yet Google still finds a way to hide all kinds of features inside the browser, including deep integration with Google’s services. This allows you to sync your bookmarks, passwords, open tabs, and more across devices. Chrome also has multi-account support if you need it on a family machine, a built-in PDF viewer, built-in Google Translate functionality, a task manager, and the always handy Paste and go context menu item.

If there’s one complaint people have about Chrome it’s that the browser eats up available memory. Our browser testing in 2015 showed that Chrome was definitely a memory beast, but two years later it fared pretty well in our tests.

Firefox

 

mozilla firefox logo

 

For users who love extensibility but want greater privacy than a Google-made browser can provide, the open source Mozilla Firefox is your best bet. Firefox paved the way for other browsers to become extensible, and while Firefox’s add-on catalog is pretty good, it now pales in comparison to the Chrome Web Store. Like Google, Firefox has a sync feature.

Where Firefox has really shined in recent years is with the browser’s incognito mode. All browsers have a private mode that lets you browse without any of your activity being logged in your saved history. But most of the time these private modes still allow websites to track your activity for that specific session. Firefox does away with this by including an ad and tracker blocker when using incognito mode.

Opera

 

operabrowser

 

Before Chrome, Opera was a popular choice among power users—a position former Opera CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner is trying to take back with Vivaldi. Opera today is really one of the more under-rated browsers around. It’s based on the same core technologies as Chrome (the Blink rendering engine and the JavaScript V8 engine), which means it can run many Chrome extensions—there’s even an extension for installing extensions from the Chrome Web Store.

Opera’s also got a few unusual features like Turbo, which saves on load times and bandwidth by compressing webpages on Opera’s servers. It’s also got a nice security feature called domain highlighting that hides most of the URL so that users can see easily and clearly if they’re on Google.com or google.com.scam.com—with scam.com being the actual website.

More recently, Opera introduced its own take on the social sidebar with one-click access to services such as WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Telegram. Like Chrome and Firefox, Opera also has its own cross-device syncing feature.

Microsoft Edge

 

microsotedge

 

Microsoft Edge is still a work in progress. You'll see below that its performance is getting better, but that’s not all there is to the browser in 2017. The Edge extensions library is tiny, its sync functionality is near nonexistent, and it doesn’t get updates nearly fast enough—though that is expected to change with the Fall Creators Update.

Despite its shortcomings, Edge has several helpful features that will appeal to some. Edge is deeply integrated with Windows 10’s inking capabilities, as well as with OneNote, making it easy to clip a webpage, annotate it, and save it to a notebook. Cortana is also a big part of Edge. You can use Microsoft’s digital assistant to quickly search for information, compare prices, or get a quick calculation.

Like Chrome, Edge has a casting feature. There’s also a nifty set-aside tabs feature to stash a collection of websites, the ability to read ebooks (great for tablets), and an MSN.com-ish new-tab page.

Benchmarks

That’s enough of an overview for our four contestants, let’s get down to business. To see which browser is worthy of your bandwidth in 2017 we used a variety of testing tools. For judging JavaScript we used JetStream, and the now unsupported Octane 2.0 and SunSpider 1.0.2 benchmarking tools. Then we turned to WebXPRT 2015 and Speedometer to challenge our browsers under simulated web app workloads.

Finally, we took a look at CPU and RAM usage. Similar to what we did in 2015, we loaded a set of 20 websites in a single window in quick succession using either a batch file or the command line depending on the quirks of the browser in question. Once all tabs began loading, we waited 45 seconds, and then checked the CPU and RAM usage. The idea was to see the amount of system resources the browser would use during a heavy workload.

One difference from 2015 is that Flash was turned off for each browser—benchmarks were done with and without the plugin in 2015. In recent years, most browser makers have de-emphasized Flash, enabling it as “click-to-play” and blocking nonessential website elements that use Flash. Since the web is moving to a Flash-free existence we decided to live the dream right now.

For these tests our rig was an Acer Aspire E15-575-33BM laptop loaded with Windows 10 Home (Creators Update), a 1TB hard drive, 4GB RAM, and an Intel Core i3-7100U. Each browser was tested over a hard line internet connection.

Edge makes big gains

Looking at both Jetstream and SunSpider, Edge won top marks by a wide margin. SunSpider has been deprecated for some time and is no longer supported, but the result was still surprising. For Octane 2.0, which is also no longer supported, Firefox and Opera vied for top spot, with Chrome the laggard by a wide margin. For this set of benchmark scores higher is better with the exception of SunSpider.

browser performance jetstream2

The JavaScript test Jetstream shows Microsoft Edge hanging tough.

browser performance sunspider

SunSpider also shows Microsoft Edge with a performance edge, loading JavaScript quite a bit more quickly than others.

browser performance octane

 

Chrome makes the poorest showing in the Octane test.

Moving on to the more modern Speedometer test, which quickly iterates through a bunch of HTML 5-based to-do lists, Chrome came out on top. Google’s Blink-based cousin Opera came in second, with Edge and Firefox way behind. The numbers were much closer for WebXPRT 2015, which uses a wide number of web apps, from photo collections to online note-taking to data sets. Edge came out on top there, while the others were closer together with only a few points separating the back three. Again, higher is better for these tests.

browser performance speedometer

Chrome narrowly edges out Opera in HTML-5-based tasks.

browser performance webxprt 2015

Edge makes another good showing in the web apps realm.

Finally, we come to the memory and CPU test. Slamming an average PC with 20 tabs of mostly media rich sites all at once is certainly going to chew up a good chunk of CPU and memory. These browsers did not disappoint in that respect.

Despite its reputation, however, Chrome was tops here, using less than 40 percent CPU power, followed by Edge. The results were similar for memory with Chrome using the least. Take those impressive Edge numbers with a healthy dose of skepticism, however, as during testing the PC froze, and we couldn’t access task manager as swiftly as with the others. The fact that the whole PC slowed to a crawl suggests Edge’s numbers don’t tell the whole story. Based on that experience, power users with multiple tabs open in Edge would feel some serious pain trying to get work done.

browser performance cpu usage2

It's true that running media rich content in multiple tabs will tax your system's CPU.

browser performance memory usage

As with the CPU test, Chrome's reputation as the biggest resource hog is undeserved these days.

As for Firefox, you may notice that the browser chewed up CPU usage, but was relatively low in memory usage. The reason for that, as Mozilla reminded us, is that Firefox alone is transitioning from one browser process to four. Whereas Chrome and Edge use multiple processes for each tab. The idea behind the latter is that individual tabs running on separate processes won't take down the whole browser if they crash. That approach does use more memory, however. Mozilla is trying to find a middle ground. On the one hand, Firefox helps maintain overall PC performance under heavier workloads, but it's not great if you want dozens of sites to load as quickly as possible. 

And the winner is...

So who wins? Here’s the way we see it.

Once again, Edge gets honorable mention for making some serious gains in performance and earning some truly impressive scores. But when you factor in customizability and how Edge fared in the live site stress test, it still has some work to do—like offering a wider extension library and the ability to sync across devices. 

As in our previous showdown, Chrome continues to capitalize on these strengths, and even improves in the performance department by addressing its past resource issues, making it, once again, our first choice.

Opera again earns second place since it performed relatively well in the live stress test, and can be set up to take advantage of nearly all the same conveniences Chrome can.

As for Firefox, it’s also a fine choice. Mozilla’s browser definitely gets the job done, it’s very customizable, and its open source roots puts the browser in a league of its own.

Source: This article was published pcworld.com By Ian

Categorized in Search Engine

Opera’s latest update for its desktop browser makes its easier to stay on top of conversations from various messaging apps, by baking their services right into the app.

Fire up Opera and you’ll now be able to access Facebook’s Messenger, WhatsApp and Telegram right from the browser’s sidebar. You can switch between them whenever you like, pin the messaging tab for easier access and use shortcuts to jump from one service to the other.

Additionally, you can quickly share images to these services by dragging and dropping photos on the messenger’s icon.

I was grateful for desktop versions of these apps when they launched, because they freed me from having to pick up my phone to reply to messages ever so often. But with so many of them to juggle, the number of extra browser tabs adds up quickly. Franz, which is a free app that lets you run multiple messengers in a single window, helped a bit – but it’s nice to have all my browser tabs and chats in a single app.Opera previously added features like a built-in adblocker and a free VPN service. You can grab the latest version of Opera for Mac, Windows and Linux here.

Source: This article was published on thenextweb.com

Categorized in Science & Tech

With the introduction of Windows 10, Microsoft also introduced its latest browser Microsoft Edge that is going to replace Internet Explorer. With Edge, Microsoft is directly trying to compete against dominators like Chrome and Firefox. Although, it is still not as good as the current top browsers, but it has some great potential with many new features and customization options. It is built on the concept of offering simple interface with everything important in sight. However, when you dig deep a bit, you will find many advanced options as well.

Like everyone else, you must also be curious to find out what Microsoft Edge is hiding and how it can improve your browsing experience. To help you with your quest, we have created this list of best Microsoft Edge Tips and Tricks containing everything to take full advantage of Edge features.

Useful Microsoft Edge Tips and Tricks

1. Customize Start Page

Let’s start with the Start Page of the Microsoft Edge. Start page is the page that you see when you launch the Edge. You can decide what you want to see as soon as you launch the browser. To do this, click on the Main menu on the top right corner (it has three horizontal dots), and then click on “Settings”.

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In settings, you will find options to customize Start page under the heading “Open with”. Here you can select, Start page, New tab page, Previous page and A specific page or pages.

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2. Customize New Tab in Edge

To customize what you would like to see when a new tab is opened, click on Main menu on the right and then click on “Settings”. Now, click on the drop down menu below the heading “Open new tabs with” and choose your option.

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3. Edge Lets You Import Favorites and Bookmarks from other Browsers

For now, you can easily important bookmarks from Chrome, Firefox and Internet Explorer. To do so, click on “Hub” button on the top right corner (it has three horizontal lines on it), and then click on “Import favorites”. On the next page, just select the browsers from which you want to important bookmarks and click on “Import”.

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4. Microsoft Edge’s Reading View Clears Out Distractions

In the Reading View, all other distracting content such as ads or article suggestions on a website is stripped away, leaving you with just the article content. This is extremely handy when you just want to enjoy reading an article without any distractions.

While reading an article on the web, click on the “Book” icon on the top-left corner to activate Reading View on Microsoft Edge.

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5. Create Article Reading List on Edge

Instead of saving your favorite articles to your favorites (bookmark) and clutter the place with other saved websites, you can just save them to the reading list. When you are on an article, click on the “Star” icon at the top and navigate to “Reading list” tab. Now, just click on “Add” to add the article to the list.

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6. Share a Webpage (Link or Screenshot)

On Microsoft Edge, you can directly share a webpage with any social media site, as long as you have its app installed in your PC. For example, to share on Twitter, you must install Twitter app on your PC to get the option to share it there.

While browsing, click on “Share” button at the top right corner and select the app to which you would like to share the link. If you want to share a screenshot of a webpage instead, then click on the name of the web page in the same menu. This will open up a new menu where you can select “Screenshot” option. Once selected, you can select the social media app and a screenshot will be shared instead of the link. 

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7. Annotate a Webpage

Edge will let you write, draw or highlight content on a web page, and save or share it as you please. Click on the “Pen and Paper” icon on the top-right corner and after a short delay you will see all the options to annotate the page. Just use the options on the left to annotate and then select options from left side to save or share the page.

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8. Add a Website to the Start Menu

You can also add a website to the Start menu for quicker access with just a single click. To do so, click on the main menu icon in the Edge and select “Pin to Start” from the menu. The webpage will be pinned to Start menu Tiles.

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9. Change Theme of Edge

Microsoft Edge comes with two themes, Light and Dark. You can select the one that fits your personality better. Click on the main menu and from there, click on “Settings”. Now, just choose the theme from the drop down menu under the heading “Choose a theme”.

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10. Browse Privately in Microsoft Edge

Just like other browsers, Edge also comes with a private mode in which no traces of browsing is left on the PC. To enter private window, click on main menu and then click on “New InPrivate Window”.

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11. Flash Integration

Just like Chrome, Edge also comes with Flash player to play some flash based videos on the web. You can turn this feature ON or OFF as you may please. Just go to “Settings” from the main menu and then click on “Advanced Settings”. Here, you will find the option of “Use Adobe Flash Player”, enable or disable it as you please.

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12. Enable Home Button in Microsoft Edge

Home Button is disabled by default, to enable it, go to “Settings” from the main menu and click on “Advanced settings”. Here, just enable or disable the “Home Button”. You can also specify which page to direct to when you press the Home button.

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13. Show the Favorites Bar

For faster access to your favorite sites, it is better to show favorites bar on the main interface. To enable Favorites bar, click on the main menu and then click on “Settings”. In the settings, enable the option “Show the favorites bar”.

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14. Change Default Search Engine in Edge

Before you change the search engine, you must access the search engine in the Edge’s search bar to add it to the list of available search engines. For example, for Google you must access “Google.com” and then follow the instructions.

Now, go to settings from the main menu and click on “Advanced settings”. Here, scroll down and click on “Add new” from the drop down menu under the heading “Search in the address bar with”. Now just select the search engine and click on “Add” to make it your default search engine.

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15. Open Web pages with Internet Explorer

Edge doesn’t support Silverlight plugin, a plugin used to stream specific forms of media, graphics and animations, similar to Adobe Flash. So there is a chance sometime you might have to open a webpage with Internet Explorer to view it properly (Internet Explorer has Silverlight plugin built-in).

While on a web page, click on the main menu and select “Open with Internet Explorer” to open that page in Internet Explorer.

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16. Use caret Browsing in Edge

In caret browsing, you can navigate a website using your keyboard without any need of reaching your mouse. A text cursor will be placed on the web pages, which you can use to open links and navigate. To enable caret browsing, press “F7” key on your keyboard and confirm the prompt to start using.

17. Cortana Integration in Edge

Cortana is also integrated into Microsoft edge with her default settings. She will provide suggestions while searching and provide information right inside the search bar. She may also provide more information on a topic, if she thinks you may like to know more. We have recently listed some of the coolest Cortana Tricks that every Windows 10 user should know, give this article a read to better your Windows 10 as well as Microsoft Edge experience.

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18. Some Useful Edge Keyboard Shortcuts

Edge also has some useful keyboard shortcuts that may make things a lot quicker. Below are some worth knowing:

Open History       Ctrl+H
Open Favorites  Ctrl+I
Duplicate tab Ctrl+K
Open InPrivate Window Ctrl+Shift+P
Access Reading View Ctrl+Shift+R
Cancel loading page Esc

19. Edge Privacy Settings

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To access privacy settings, go to “Settings” from the main menu and then click on “Advanced Settings”. In the advanced settings, you will find all the options that may affect your privacy under the heading “Privacy and Services”.

These options include, Offer to save Passwords, Save form entries, Send Do Not Track requests, Cortana integration, Cookies and Show suggestions as I type.

20. Last but not the least, Extensions will come to Edge soon

Microsoft promises that they will add Extensions support soon in an update. So you should not decide that Edge is not better than other browsers just because it can’t support extensions right now. Just wait a bit and soon you should be able to see some more functionality with third-party extensions.

If you think we missed out on any good feature of Edge which could have been included in our list of cool Microsoft Edge tips and tricks, feel free to let us know in comments section.

 This article was published in beebom.com

Categorized in Search Engine

I’m very privacy-minded. I’ve written quite frequently about securing your browser and network on the Mac. I figure it’s about time to give the iPhone some loving, since there are a number of ways to make sure you have a good experience browsing while keeping things private. Let’s look at some of the methods for doing that and I’ll give you my not-so-humble opinion about which one is best.

If you want to lock up your Internet security and privacy, is a Tor browser really the answer? (Image Credit: HypnoArt

First Things First, Secure Your Network

Before you do anything else, you should make sure your network is secure. This even applies to your cellular network, so you might wonder what you can do about it. One important step is to use a Virtual Private Network, or VPN.

There are plenty of commercial VPNs out there. You could go with TunnelBear, for one, or Astrill VPN. You might also choose to set up your own private VPN for your personal use.

Next, Think About a Tor Browser

If you don’t already know about it, the Tor browser is built from the ground up to anonymize your browsing experience. Tor directs Internet traffic through a worldwidefree volunteer network consisting of more than seven thousand relays, for free. It will conceal a user’s location and usage from anyone conducting network surveillance or traffic analysis. There are plenty of iOS Tor clients out there, so let’s cover a few of them.

The one thing you’ll need to bear in mind about Tor browsers is that it’s pretty common for major internet sites to blacklist them, forcing you to endure Captchas to no end. From most of my research, including a rare answer from Stack Exchange itself, this is because of the wide variety of nefarious individuals who use Tor to mask themselves as they carry out dastardly deeds on the internet. StackExchange referred to them as “spammers, trolls and psychopaths.”

Black Mesh, a VPN That Redirects You to Tor

The first one isn’t a browser at all, but one that changes settings in your iPhone so that your internet traffic redirects through the Tor network. This is a decent option, but it’s notably slower than my own VPN. I’d give this a three out of five; it does what it’s supposed to, but remarkably slower than most of us would like. To make matters worse, Mr. Whoer reports that the IP address I get through Black Mesh is infected with a Trojan. Black Mesh is available for $1.99 on the App Store.

Red Onion Tor Browser

Red Onion gets its name because Tor was originally an acronym for “The Onion Router.” It redirects your internet browsing through the Tor network, and automatically cleans up cookies when you exit the app. You can also protect your browser with a password or Touch ID, so you don’t have to worry so much about your privacy being invaded through physical access to your device. It’s not perfect, though. Red Onion defaults to use Bing as its search engine, and Google won’t work through the browser at all, in my experience. Also, when you tap inside the address field, it doesn’t highlight the text. This one, too, is blacklisted, according to Mr. Whoer. Red Onion is a 3.5 out of five, in my opinion. The app costs $1.99 on the App Store.

Secret Secure Web Browser

I’ll just call this one the Purple Onion Browser, even though a number of Tor clients have a purple icon. This is another option, and is a bit more feature-rich than some other Tor browsers. It defaults to DuckDuckGo for its search engine, which is good, and allows you to quickly change your identify, if you need to. Secret Secure Web Browser seems a bit faster than other options, but still not as quick as connecting through my VPN and using Safari. Yet again, another Tor browser that shows being infected with some sort of Trojan, and thus blacklisted. Secret Secure Web Browser is, in my estimation, a four out of five. If you want to try it out, this app is free on the App Store.

My Verdict

I’ve tried a number of other Tor browser clients, and the experience was always the same. Browsing was fine, but slow. For my own purposes, I’m going to stick with my VPN connection and use DuckDuckGo for my search engine. That prevents both my internet service provider from tracking me, as well as my search engine. That’s private enough, don’t you think?

This article was  published in macobserver.com by Jeff Butts

Categorized in Internet Privacy
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