Job fair is a highly-competitive place. You got to put your best foot forward in order to land in the job of your dreams, and if you just recently got out of college, then it would be a lot tougher fight since you need to “dress to impress” to land that very first job.

 

According to research, 48% of fresh graduates don’t have any job lined up right after graduating and this rate is increasing significantly year by year. To make it much more difficult, job market is getting more competitive than ever and since it is a competition, the competent and the aggressive are the most likely winners. Not only competence makes one a winner, you got to have an ounce of aggressiveness as well. Aggressive job hunters do not let the job call on them, they seek it – in the job fair. With proper approach, you will surely have a satisfactory result in your job hunting.

 

There was once this guy that I knew, Ben, who was laid off from his job. Not willing to just sit around the house and wait for something to happen, he searched the internet for a job. One week later, he found out that there will be a Tech Fair to be held in his area. He decided to attend it since he landed his last job at a fair.

 

Convinced with the potentials of the career fair, he armed himself by gathering helpful information on how to prepare the necessary papers so he can avoid the common resume mistakes that many overlooked as well as the kind of documents to attach with it. The next day, Ben set out with high confidence and hope. His confidence, however, was shattered when he saw the long queue of job applicants waiting to be ushered in. This was entirely different from his previous experience.

 

Not willing to give up, he kept wearing his courage and patiently waited in line. He saw familiar faces, friends, and even former coworkers. To kill the time, and also to properly prepare himself, he started asking questions regarding what was going on inside the fair and how to deal with it. Willingly, some of his friend, who were veterans of the career fair system, gave him these helpful tips on how to survive the highly competitive world of job fairs.

 

1. Go Straight to The List

 

As soon as you get inside, your priority should be the list of participating companies. From that list, choose the companies that interest you. Rather than spending your precious energy from wandering from booth to booth, find a place where you can go over the list.

 

2. Do A Quick Homework

 

On a listing sheet, which are usually being handed out and provided, check the job openings in the company of your interest. You may use a computer, if available, to look up the companies of interest.

 

3. Plan Your Route

 

Get a floor map of the venue. This is usually found at the entrance or at the reception table. Find the location of the companies of your interest on the map and plan your route so as to save time and energy.

 

4. Keep Yourself Calm, Energized and Enthusiastic

 

Try to make an impression to the company representative that you are highly interested in their company. Strike up a friendly conversation with a representative about the company and be a good listener.

 

5. Approach The Decision Maker

 

If possible, try talking to the hiring manager of the most senior of the team. There may be lots of useful information from recruiters or human resources personnel regarding the company, but the hiring manager is certainly the one with the most influence.

 

6. During Interview, Do Not Sell Yourself Short

 

Tell the interviewer about your strengths and what you can contribute to the company when hired. Companies are greatly interested in your potentials. Prepare a short statement about yourself and your credentials without being conceited. Two minutes is sufficient for this. The key to successful interview is capturing the interviewer’s interest.

 

7. Follow Up is Important

 

So try to ask for the name of the person you can call or write to. If you can ask for a business card, so much better.

 

8. Redundancy is Okay

 

When making a follow up through a letter, always re-attach your resume even if they already asked it on the job fair event. Two copies of each as you will be addressing the human resources office and the hiring manager. Mention in your letter that you have already met the company’s representative and been interviewed during the job fair. Reiterate once more your strengths and potentials and what you can contribute to the company’s welfare when hired.

 

9. Phone Them Up

 

One week is long enough waiting time to follow up through phone. You may inquire regarding the statues of your application.

 

10. Limit Not Yourself

 

Do not focus on one opportunity. Use the power of the internet to do research on other participating companies. Check to see if these companies have additional openings. In doing so, you can plan your job hunting well.

 

 

Author:  Junie Lou Rutkevich

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/

Categorized in News & Politics

In a Blogpost yesterday, Google rebuffed antitrust charges by the European Union accusing the search giant of monopolistic practices with its Android operating system.

The EU said that by requiring hardware manufacturers to pre-install Google apps under “restrictive licensing practices,” Google was closing the doors to rival search engines and browsers trying to enter the market.

Google, however, says Android is an open source platform that has helped to significantly lower costs for device manufacturers that use the operating system for free — albeit after agreeing to Google’s terms.

Google also points to the fact that Apple pre-installs Apple apps on the iPhone, as does Windows. And that Android doesn’t block device manufacturers from pre-installing competing services next to Google apps, nor does it block users from deleting Google apps.

But those who have complained to the EU about Google’s restrictive contracts see it differently. One of the industry organizations that lodged a complaint, Fairsearch — which represents competitors Microsoft, Nokia and Oracle — says Google locks phone manufacturers into a web of contracts that effectively force them to install Google apps.

Apps, after all, are how phones collect user data, and that’s how Google sells ads.

Google is in the throes of two other antitrust complaints with the EU. One involves accusations that the company favors its own search results in its online shopping service over its rivals. The other alleges the online search giant abuses its market power by offering its online advertising on third-party websites that use Google’s search engine.

If the European Union concludes Google is in violation of its antitrust rules, it could fine the company up to $7.5 billion, or 10 percent of its annual revenue.

The case has similarities to when the European Commission accused Microsoft of antitrust abuses. Because Internet Explorer was bundled with Windows in 2009, regulators claimed Internet Explorer unfairly held a disproportionate share of the browser market in Europe. In the end, Microsoft paid $3.4 billion in fines.

Source:  recode.net

Categorized in Search Engine

Are you still performing competitor research like you did three, four, even five years ago? Are you crafting your (or your client’s) SEO plan the same way based on what you find? If so, then it’s time to update your strategy. The world of SEO has changed dramatically, and your competitive research should reflect that change. Here’s what you should be looking for when researching competitors, and how to use that information to create a penalty-proof SEO plan.

Links

Just because the competitor is ranking well with tons of spammy, irrelevant links doesn’t mean you should follow suit.  If they haven’t been penalized yet, they might get it in the future. Instead, find out the following.

What is Your Competitor’s Overall Strategy?

Look for the best trends in the competitor’s link building profile. Do they have lots of great guest posts on industry blogs? Do they have a strong local presence? Do major media outlets regularly mention them? These are the things you will want to emulate, not low-quality directories, blog comments, forum signatures, and over-optimized press releases.

What Are the Best Links They Have Obtained?

If you or your client has a strong website, aim to get the best links your competitor has obtained as soon as possible. Start with gathering their best links, and then go for even better ones. If Google continues to penalize websites with lots of low quality links, then the ones with fewer but higher quality links (like yours) will be able to shine through.

One easy way to spot your competitors best backlinks is by using tools likeCognitiveSEO. Their visual backlink explorer displays high quality links with larger dots.

What are the best links the competitor has obtained?

You can also use the Domain Trustworthiness graph to see the highest authority domains linking to your competitors.

Dpmain Trust Worthiness

If you prefer an exportable chart, you can filter the backlinks of your competitors by authority and only view the high authority links.

High authority link filtering

Depending on your industry, you’ll likely find the highest authority links are from .gov or .edu sites, the top blogs in the industry, media networks, and other well-respected sites.

In order to gain these links for yourself, you will need to:

  • Build relationships with the top industry blogs that will publish your content as a guest or regular contributor.
  • Build strong profiles on local sites and properly encourage customers to write reviews.
  • Sign up for HARO and similar networks that connect you to journalists so you can contribute your knowledge in exchange for a mention and a link.

Content

Gone are the days when 300 words of keyword-optimized text were all you needed to get a page ready for your target keywords. Google is not going to reward you for having thousands upon thousands of over-optimized articles on your website. They are going to reward you for having hundreds of high-quality, reader-focused blog posts. Not only that, but they are also going to reward you for having authoritative authors creating that content. When you’re researching the competitor’s content, here are the questions you need to ask.

Who are the authors?

If author rank isn’t playing a role in rankings now, it certainly will be in the future (according to Matt Cutts at least). A part of your competitor research should be focused on who the authors of the competitor’s content are, and how strong are they as authors. Find their Google+ profiles and look at the other sites they’ve written for, how often they are creating content, how many followers they have on Google+, and how much engagement they receive on their Google+ posts.

One tool that can help with this process is the SEOchat Author Links Crawler(free, but currently in beta). You can use it to see what authors are linking to specific sites in order to connect with influential people in your industry. Reach out to them and see if you can get them to create content for you.

What is the length of the average piece of content?

While length isn’t everything, it can certainly help you determine how in-depth competitors go with their content. If their content ranks well in search, and it is generally 1,000 – 2,000 words per piece, but your content or your client’s is only 500 – 600 words per piece, you might want to look into creating more extensive pieces of content.

How much engagement do they receive?

Does social engagement with content have anything to do with rankings? Maybe, especially if you consider that the more a piece of content is shared on social networks, the more likely bloggers and journalists are to pick it up and link to it on their own websites. See if you can follow the promotional strategy for some of the competitor’s top pieces of content. Who tweeted it, how it was shared on Facebook, where it was bookmarked, and what sites linked to it? Answering those questions can help you build a sound promotional strategy for your content, or your client’s.

One tool that can help you see the content that receives the most engagement on social media – Twitter in particular – is Topsy. Use the following URL and replace searchenginejournal.com with your competitor’s domain.

http://topsy.com/s?q=site%3Asearchenginejournal.com

You will then see their content links along with the number of tweets each link has received.

Topsy Engagement Analytics

You can click on each piece of content to see who tweeted it, and then do a search on Google for the title of the post to find out other networks the article has been shared upon or linked. This will help you identify their promotional strategy.

Social Media

Having a strong social media presence can be a great asset, especially since you don’t want to put all of your eggs in an organic search basket. If social media isn’t a part of your competitor research, then make sure it does! Ask the following questions.

What networks do the competitors use?

Not what networks do competitors have a profile on, but what networks do they actively use. You’ll generally find that most are active on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, and Pinterest (usually in that order). Also be on the lookout for any niche-specialized social networks and forums that the competitors are using on a regular basis. To find this out, you can simply use Google to search for the competitor’s name – their top social profiles will generally come up in the first couple of pages.

How many followers / fans do they have?

Do you need 1,000 fans, 10,000 fans, or a million fans? Find out by seeing how many people the competitors have in their social networks. If you’re looking for a selling point of why a business should be on social media, this number could play an important role as it shows the number of potential customers that can be found on social media.

Aside from visiting each of the competitor’s social profiles and noting their audience size, one great tool to use to quickly see a group of competitor’s followers and fans is Rival IQ. It allows you to compare the size of your competitor’s audience on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

Follower Analysis

You can also use tools like TwitterCounter to see the growth of your competitor’s Twitter following over the time span of up to three months for free, or up to six months with a preview of their premium service by paying with a tweet.

Twitter counter follower growth

One of the things this will quickly reveal is if your competitor has had any major growth spikes, which is sometimes indicative of a purchase of followers.

Of course, don’t stop there…

How much quality engagement do they receive?

Anyone can buy fans and followers. They can even buy engagement. But they can’t buy true interactions. If you are looking to craft your social media strategy based off of how competitors are using social media, be sure that you are modeling yours and your client’s on a competitor that is receiving true engagement from their audience.

How often do they update each of their networks?

This revolves back to content, except in this case, it’s social media content. How many times do competitors update each of their social networks, and how do they do it? Do they ask questions, post links, and/or share photos and videos? And most importantly, what types of updates get the most engagement from their audiences?

You may not be able to tell their ROI, but there’s a good chance that the more exposure they get on a status update, the more likely that update is to convert compared to one with little to no response.

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/new-rules-competitive-research/79615/

Categorized in Online Research

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