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Google might be the biggest but there are other search engines, too

Most people don't want three dozen search engines, especially people who are not trained internet users. Most people want a single search engine that delivers three key features:

  1. Relevant results (results you are actually interested in)
  2. Uncluttered, easy to read interface
  3. Helpful options to broaden or tighten a search

With this criteria, several of our reader favorites come to mind. These search sites should meet 99 percent of the searching needs of a regular everyday user.

Google Search

Google Search Google Search. screenshot

Google is the reigning king of 'spartan searching', and is the single most used search engine in the world. While it doesn't offer all the shopping center features of Yahoo! or the human curation of Mahalo, Google is fast, relevant, and the largest single catalogue of web pages available today. The search giant also tracks an incredible amount of information that many people don't even know they are giving out.

Make sure you try the Google 'images', 'maps' and 'news' features... they are outstanding services for locating photos, geographic directions, and news headlines. P.S. If you don't want Google to spy on you, protect yourself.

Duck Duck Go Search

DuckDuckGo search results DuckDuckGo search results. DuckDuckGo

At first, DuckDuckGo.com looks like Google. However, there are many subtleties that make this spartan search engine different.

DuckDuckGo has some slick features, like 'zero-click' information (all your answers are found on the first results page). DuckDuckgo offers disambiguation prompts (helps to clarify what question you are really asking). Plus, the ad spam is much less than Google.

Give DuckDuckGo.com a try... you might really like this clean and simple search engine.

Bing Search

Bing Search
 Bing Search. screenshot

Bing is Microsoft's attempt at unseating Google, and arguably the second-most-popular search engine today. Bing used to be MSN search until it was updated in summer of 2009.

Touted as a decision engine, Bing tries to support your researching by offering suggestions in the leftmost column, while also giving you various search options across the top of the screen. Things like 'wiki' suggestions, 'visual search', and 'related searches' might be very useful to you. Bing is not dethroning Google in the near future, no, but it is definitely worth trying.  

Dogpile Search

Dogpile Search Dogpile Search. screenshot

Years ago, Dogpile preceded Google as the fast and efficient choice for web searching. Things changed in the late 1990's, Dogpile faded into obscurity, and Google became king.

Today, however, Dogpile is coming back, with a growing index and a clean and quick presentation that is a testimony to its halcyon days. If you want to try a search tool with pleasant presentation and helpful crosslink results, definitely try Dogpile!

Yippy Search

Yippy Search Results
 Yippy Search Results. Yippy

Yippy is a Deep Web engine that searches other search engines for you. Unlike the regular Web, which is indexed by robot spider programs, Deep Web pages are usually harder to locate by conventional search.

That's where Yippy becomes very useful. If you are searching for obscure hobby interest blogs, obscure government information, tough-to-find obscure news, academic research and otherwise-obscure content, then Yippy is your tool. 

Google Scholar Search

Google Scholar SearchGoogle Scholar Search. screenshot

Google Scholar is a special version of Google. This search engine will help you win debates.

Google Scholar focuses on scientific and hard-research academic material that has been subjected to scrutiny by scientists and scholars. Example content includes graduate theses, legal and court opinions, academic publications, medical research reports, physics research papers, and economics and world politics explanations.

If you are looking for serious information that can stand up in a heated debate with educated people, then forget regular Google... Google Scholar is where you want to go to arm yourself with high powered sources!

Webopedia Search

Webopedia Search
 Webopedia Search. screenshot

Webopedia is one of the most useful websites on the web. Webopedia is an encyclopedic resource dedicated to searching technology terminology and computer definitions.

Teach yourself what 'domain name system' is, or what 'DDRAM' means on your computer. Webopedia is absolutely a perfect resource for non-technical people to make more sense of the computers around them.

Yahoo! Search (and More)

Yahoo! Search
 Yahoo! Search. screenshot

Yahoo! is several things: it is a search engine, a news aggregator, a shopping center, an email box, a travel directory, a horoscope and games center, and more.

This 'web portal' breadth of choice makes this a very helpful site for Internet beginners. Searching the Web should also be about discovery and exploration, and Yahoo! delivers that in wholesale quantities. (By the way, here's what happened to Yahoo! avatars and Yahoo! 360 in case you were wondering.)

The Internet Archive Search

The Internet Archive SearchInternet Archive Search. screenshot

The Internet Archive is a favorite destination for longtime Web lovers. The Archive has been taking snapshots of the entire World Wide Web for years now, allowing you and me to travel back in time to see what a web page looked like in 1999, or what the news was like around Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

You won't visit the Archive daily like you would Google or Yahoo or Bing, but when you do have a need to travel back in time, use this search site.

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Paul Gil

Published in Search Engine

When people think of search engines, the first name that comes to mind is often Google. It’s one of the most enduring brand names, and it has even worked its way into mainstream vernacular, and today many people substitute the phrase “searched online” for “Googled”. According to comScore, Inc., Google and its affiliated websites comprise 67.6% of the search engine market share in the United States, and, according to Netmarketshare 66.44% worldwide.

Though prominent, Google is not the only search engine available. There are innumerable others that provide various interfaces, search algorithms, and other unique features. Many even base their search algorithms around specific philosophies, ones that often attract brand-new audiences.

In descending order, the remaining most popular search engine companies in the United States, by market share after Google, are Microsoft (18.7%), Yahoo (10.0%), Ask Network (2.4%), and AOL (1.3%), according to ComScore report.

Likewise, according to December 2014 data, the remaining most popular search engines worldwide by market share are Baidu (11.15%), Bing (10.29%), Yahoo! (9.31%), and AOL (0.53%).

The exact data is highly variable based on who’s reporting it, and it varies even further on a month-to-month basis. But generally speaking, the ranking order does not vary much.

This list does not necessarily include the 12 most used or well-known search engines after Google; instead, it includes search engines that differ from one another in terms of history, philosophy, content, targeted audiences, and other variables. With that in mind, lets take a look at 12 of the most underrated search engines.

Bing

Based on comScore’s data, the next most powerful player in the search engine industry is Microsoft and its search engine, Bing.

Key differences between the two engines, according to the New York Times, lie in backdrop, search tools, and the amount of information offered on the immediate search page. Bing sports striking, engaging home pages, a display tool when searching for airline flights, aggregate restaurant rating badges, and more. One popular feature is its “linkfromdomain:” search term. This term allows users to see the most frequently used outgoing link from a given site. This can provide easy access to research pages or recommended sites from a trusted source.

Another operator, contains:FILETYPE, allows users to search by file type. Researchers and students with specific softwares may search specifically for PDFs, Word documents, Excel spreadsheets, different photo types, and more universal file types on a whim. This helps to rule out unnecessary documents.

bing filetype operator

Bing’s clean interface particularly excels when searching for videos. The video searches don’t integrate well with text searches on Google. On Bing, the listed videos fit neatly side-by-side in an interface that best accommodates them. This helps to cut down on the amount of time a user would spend scrolling.

Bing hasn’t been shy in comparing itself to Google, either. It has even launched a website titled “Bing It On which directly compares its search results to those of Google.

Yahoo

Another powerful competitor in the search engine market is the long-enduring Yahoo. For many, Yahoo is much more than a search engine; it’s an online Swiss Army knife.

In addition to its search engine, the Yahoo Web portal offers easy access to its news aggregator, games center, retail options, travel guide, horoscope, and other varied features. Yahoo Finance is a popular aggregate for some of the best financial news available, combining information from CNN Money, The Street, and more.

Another extraordinarily well-used feature of Yahoo is Yahoo Answers, which is a forum that allows people to phrase questions in ways the traditional search engines have difficulty handling. Other users can view questions and use their background knowledge and tailor their answers in a personalized manner.

Other popular aspects of Yahoo include easy photo sharing (facilitated by Yahoo’s purchase of Flickr), local news through Yahoo Local, and myriad entertainment options. By having all these convenient features in one place, users rarely have to venture elsewhere if they don’t want to.

Yandex

Founded in Russia in 1997, Yandex has quickly risen to become the country’s premier search engine. Since 2010, it has gone worldwide and become a popular resource for those looking for easy-to-use search pages between different languages. Its translation and cross-lingual search options are featured prominently on its homepage, and it accommodates English, Russian, German, French, and smaller Eastern European languages. This allows bilingual searchers or students working on language projects to more easily find whatever it is they’re looking for.

yandex search engine

Ask

The search engine formerly known as “Ask Jeeves” was easily one of Google’s greatest competitors during the early days of the World Wide Web. Though not the hot commodity it once was, it remains popular for its accommodation of natural, colloquial language. After a user poses a question, it provides possible answers and a large list of other pertinent questions.

Ask’s historic accommodation of vernacular has, in essence, found a spiritual successor through voice commands and searches on mobile devices. Thanks to Apple’s Siri (which relies on Bing) and the Google app, there’s less stigma over voice commands, and they’re becoming more popular. With Siri, users are directly able to bypass using their other apps or search engines by just asking their phone a question.

Though Ask may have popularized the use of dialectal searches, it unfortunately is not as well-integrated with the programs that now champion them.

Dogpile

For those unsure of which search engine to use, many default to Dogpile — the engine that aggregates from pretty much everyone else.

Like Ask, Dogpile is another site with early online history and considerable brand loyalty. Search results (from Google, Yahoo, Yandex, and more) are set upon a focused interface of white and varying shades of blue. Many prefer Dogpile for its chic design, comprehensive answers, and a template that doesn’t prove too distracting or cluttered.

dogpile search engine

Its listed features include: Category Links, Yellow Pages, White Pages, Statistics Bar, Search Finder, Preferences, Spelling Correction, About Results, and Favorite Fetches. A user’s Dogpile experience is easily personalized to a user’s liking.

Yippy

Many Internet users are unfamiliar with the Deep Web. According to CNN, the Deep Web encompasses everything traditional search engines having trouble finding. Pages in the Deep Web may be relatively unconnected to other parts of the Internet or housed on private networks.

yippy search engine

Search engine Yippy (formerly Clusty) searches the Web using other search engines, but it provides results in the form of “clouds” instead of traditional search methods. This makes it more likely to find pages that would be otherwise buried or nearly impossible to find using search engines like Google or Yahoo. Though Yippy doesn’t have the ability to scour the every corner of the Deep Web (no search engine does), it is much more capable and efficient at finding pages for users with more obscure and niche tastes.

Duck Duck Go

With a name based on the popular kids’ game Duck Duck Goose, Duck Duck Go is a website that many find as approachable, user-friendly, and engaging as the game.

Duck Duck Go’s first priority is protecting user privacy. Many adults of all ages find themselves concerned over identity theft and hacking; these issues regularly appear on both local and national news. This search engine doesn’t reach into your history, email, or social media workings to drum up relevant information. Two totally different people can search the same term and get identical results.

The search engine also maintains a handy infinite scroll option (no need to click to other pages), reduced advertising spam, and prompts to help clarify a question.

EntireWeb

First launched back in 2000, EntireWeb is a search engine that requires pages to submit their websites to it for free. This results in a much less crowded search space and guarantees those who submit are less likely to be drowned out by other competition. Queries can be submitted for regular Web search, image search, or real-time search.

Blekko

Created just a few years ago in 2010, blekko (with a stylized lowercase “b”) is the search engine clearly inspired by Twitter. While Twitter (and now other social media sites) has “hashtags,” blekko has “slashtags.” When searching something in its database, blekko provides users with a series of related key words with which to narrow their search.

For instance, searching “celebrity news” on blekko turns up the slashtags for Top Results, Gossip, Magazine, and Latest. Blekko’s interface, which combines minimalist squares and a varied color palette, is considered very user-friendly.

blekko search engine results page example

Goodsearch

Recent years have seen an uptick in people’s interest in engaging technology in an ethical manner. As corporations such as Google and Microsoft continue to grow steadily more powerful, people have been better scrutinizing where their money and attention go.

Goodsearch is a search engine for the charitable. Fueled by Yahoo, Goodsearch allows users to pick a cause of their choice; this can be a nonprofit organization or school. Upon selecting their target, Goodsearch will begin donating 50% of its revenue from that user to their cause. To date, Goodsearch has donated well over $11 million to a variety of sources. According to Goodsearch, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) has received more than $50,000, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has received more than $18,000 from the website.

goodsearch search engine donation exa,mple

In recent years, Goodsearch has earned the attention of many celebrities, including Zooey Deschanel, Jessica Biel, and Montel Williams.

GigaBlast

Another search engine boasting enormous social and trust capital is GigaBlast. Founded in 2000, GigaBlast is, according to its LinkedIn page, the “leading clean-energy search engine.” An impressive 90% of its energy usage comes from harnessed wind energy, and the company maintains fewer than 10 employees.

Though it’s physically small, its power is big. GigaBlast indexes well over 10 billion pages of content. As environmental issues become more prominent in public consciousness, people are more likely to turn to sites like GigaBlast.

Baidu

Though a relative unknown in the United States, Chinese search engine Baidu is a juggernaut on the international scene. It’s the top search engine in China (with 62% of search engine market share in 2013), and it is the second most popular search engine in the world.

“China’s Google,” as it is nicknamed, has been steadily growing since its incorporation in 2000, and it has recently begun courting English-speaking developers. Its features include searchable webpages, audio files, and images, a collaborative encyclopedia, and a bustling discussion forum. Thanks to its savvy smartphone integration, it has leapt past its immediate competitor, Qihoo 360, which now has only 21% of the Chinese search engine market share.

baidu-and-google

If Baidu manages to continue its domestic success abroad, it might not be long before it does become a household name in the United States.

In Conclusion

Once-popular search engines like AOL.com and InfoSeek have either died out or are now sock-puppeted by their former competitors. InfoSeek attempted to charge for searches, failed, adjusted by depending on gaudy banner advertisements, became a generic “portal,” and was finally salvaged by Google. As AOL declined after its merger with Time Warner, so did its search engine. Now it is also part of Google.

Search engines in the preceding list still thrive because they capitalize upon some distinct corner of the market. For some, that market involves corporate social responsibility (Goodsearch, GigaBlast), social trends (Blekko), privacy concerns (Duck Duck Go), or utility (Yippy, Dogpile). Giants like Google, Bing, and Yahoo largely dominate the general market, so the others have had to specialize to survive.

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/going-beyond-google-comprehensive-list-search-engines/123880/

Published in Search Engine

Well it’s been a big week for search, I think we can all agree.

If you’re a regular Google user (65% of you globally) then you’ll have noticed some changes, both good and bad.

I won’t debate the merits of these improvements, we’ve done that already here: Google kills Right Hand Side Ads and here: Google launches Accelerated Mobile Pages, but there’s a definite feeling of vexation that appears to be coming to a head.

Deep breath…

As the paid search space increases in ‘top-heaviness’, as organic results get pushed further off the first SERP, as the Knowledge Graph scrapes more and more publisher content and continues to make it pointless to click through to a website, and as our longstanding feelings of unfairness over Google’s monopoly and tax balance become more acute, now more than ever we feel there should be another, viable search engine alternative.

There was a point not that long ago when you could easily divide people between those that used Google, Yahoo, Ask Jeeves and AltaVista. Now it’s got to the point where if you’re not using Google, you’re not really using the internet properly.

Right now though maybe we should be paying more attention to the alternatives. Maybe our daily lives and, for some of us, careers shouldn’t need to balance on the fickle algorithm changes of the world’s most valuable company.

Let’s see what else is out there in the non-Google world. It’s not that scary, I promise. Although you may want to bring a coat.

Please note: this is an update of an article published on SEW in May 2014, we felt like it needed sprucing up especially many of the listed engines (Blekko, Topsy) are no longer with us.

Bing

Microsoft’s search engine is the second most popular search engine in the world, with 15.8% of the search market.

Bing homepage

 

But why should you use Bing? Lifehacker has some great articles where they try to convince themselves as much as anyone else why Bing is a serious contender to Google. Plus points include:

  • Bing’s video search is significantly better than Google’s, giving you a grid of large thumbnails that you can click on to play or preview if you hover over them.
  • Bing often gives twice as many autocomplete suggestions than Google does.
  • Bing can predict when airfares are about to go up or down if you’re searching for flights.
  • Bing also has a feature where if you type linkfromdomain:[site name] it will highlight the best ranked outgoing links from that site, helping you figure out which other sites your chosen site links to the most.

Also note that Bing powers Yahoo’s search engine.

DuckDuckGo

The key feature of DuckDuckGo is that it doesn’t retain its users’ data, so it won’t track you or manipulate results based on your behaviour. So if you’re particularly spooked by Google’s all-seeing, all-knowing eye, this might be the one for you.

DuckDuckGo homepage

There’s lots more info on DuckDuckGo’s performance here.

Quora

As Google gets better and better at answering more complicated questions, it will never be able to match the personal touch available with Quora.

quora

Ask any question and its erudite community will offer their replies. Or you can choose from any similar queries previously asked.

Dogpile

Dogpile may look like a search engine you cobbled together with clip-art, but that’s rather the point as it pulls in and ‘curates’ results from various different engines including Google, Yandex and Yahoo, but removes all the ads.

Dogpile Web Search

Vimeo

Of course if you’re going to give up Google, then you’ll also have to give up YouTube, which can be a terrifying prospect. But there is an alternative. And a pretty good one at that… Vimeo.. The professional’s choice of video-sharing site, which has lots of HD video and no ads.

otis the cat reviews in videos on Vimeo

 

Yandex

This is a Russian portal, offering many similar products and services as Google, and it’s the dominant search engine in Russia.

As you can see it offers results in a nice logical format, replete with favicons so you can clearly see the various channels for your branded queries.

search engine watch on Yandex

Boardreader

If you want to get into the nitty-gritty of a subject with a variety of different points of view away from the major publications, Boardreader surfaces results purely from forums, message boards and, of course, Reddit.

Boardreader Forum Search Engine

Boardreader Forum Search Engine

WolframAlpha

WolframAlpha is a ‘computational knowledge engine’, or super clever nerd to you and me. Ask it to calculate any data or ask it about any fact and it will give you the answer. Plus it does this awesome ‘computing’ thing while it thinks about your answer (which can take a short while.)

what really killed the dinosaurs Wolfram Alpha

It’s not always successful, you have to practice how to get the best from it. But at least it’s aware of the terrible 90s television show The Dinosaurs.

IxQuick

Another search engine that puts its users’ privacy at the forefront. With IxQuick none of your details are stored and no cookies are used. A user can set preferences, but they will be deleted after 90 days of inactivity.

Ixquick Search Engine

Ask.com

Oh look… Ask Jeeves is still around. Also he’s no longer a Wodehousian butler, but a computer generated bank manager. Weird.

Ask Jeeves

It’s still a slightly mediocre search engine pretending to be a question and answer site, but the ‘Popular Q&A’ results found on the right hand side are very handy if Jeeves himself can’t satisfy your query. And what a good use of the right-hand side space, huh Google.

SlideShare

SlideShare is a really handy place to source information from presentations, slide decks, webinars and whatever else you may have missed from not attending a conference.

 

You’ll also be surprised what information you can find there.

hamburgers on SlideShare

Addict-o-matic

“Inhale the web” with the friendly looking hoover guy by creating your own topic page, which you can bookmark and see results from a huge number of channels in that one page (including Google, Bing News, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr).

Addictomatic Inhale the Web

 

Creative Commons Search

CC Search is particularly handy if you need to find copyright free images for your website (as discussed in this post on image optimisation for SEO). Just type your query in then click on your chosen site you want to search.

CC Search

Giphy

Because really, when it comes down to it, we could imagine a worse dystopian future than one in which we all communicate entirely in Gifs.

GIPHY homepage

 

Source : https://searchenginewatch.com/2016/02/25/say-goodbye-to-google-14-alternative-search-engines/

Published in Search Engine

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