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The new standard, called Global Privacy Control, will let you activate a browser setting to keep your data from being sold.

A group of tech companies, publishers, and activist groups including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla, and DuckDuckGo are backing a new standard to let internet users set their privacy settings for the entire web.

“Before today, if you want to exercise your privacy rights, you have to go from website to website and change all your settings,” says Gabriel Weinberg, CEO of DuckDuckGo, the privacy-focused search engine.

That new standard, called Global Privacy Control, lets users set a single setting in their browsers or through browser extensions telling each website that they visit not to sell or share their data. It’s already backed by some publishers including The New York Times, The Washington Post, and the Financial Times, as well as companies including Automattic, which operates blogging platforms wordpress.com and Tumblr.

 

Advocates believe that under a provision of the California Consumer Privacy Act, activating the setting should send a legally binding request that website operators not sell their data. The setting may also be enforceable under Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation, and the backers of the standard are planning to communicate with European privacy regulators about the details of how that would work, says Peter Dolanjski, director of product at DuckDuckGo. At the moment, the official specification of the standard specifies that it’s in an experimental stage and “currently not intended to convey legally binding requests,” but that’s expected to change as legal authorities and industry groups have time to react to the standard and put it into place across the web, Dolanjski says.

“It’s going to take a little bit of time for them to make the modifications and all that,” he says.

If it becomes widely accepted and helps prevent website operators and companies from building cross-site profiles of their users, the new standard could help bring an element of privacy back to the web, advocates say. Global Privacy Control could not only help internet users avoid ads that seem to follow them across the web but also potentially limit some of the other negative aspects of today’s internet experience, from filter bubbles and misinformation to discrimination based on people’s behavior and perceived demographics, says Weinberg.

“It’s all traced back to the same behavioral data profiles,” he says.

While the exact details may vary based on future regulations, the standard was designed to allow some sharing of data with service providers such as analytics companies that track web visits for individual sites—but not for building aggregate profiles of how people behave across sites. Those profiles are used by search engines, social media companies, and ad networks to discern people’s interests and demographics and target them with marketing accordingly. While that can result in people seeing more relevant ads on the internet, it’s also been a way for propagandists and fraudsters to find people they believe are vulnerable to receiving particular types of misinformation, from misleading election information to work-from-home scams.

The new setting can be activated through the configuration menu of DuckDuckGo’s browser extensions and is expected to be present in future versions of Mozilla’s Firefox browser as well as other browsers and privacy-focused extensions. Users wanting to test if the setting is activated can visit the Global Privacy Control website, which has a banner indicating whether the setting is enabled.

The concept is similar to Do Not Track, a similar feature introduced in web browsers about a decade ago but never widely observed by website operators. The difference, Weinberg says, is that Do Not Track never really had any legal teeth behind it, while Global Privacy Control is expected to be backed by California authorities under the state privacy law. It’s unclear whether people still using Do Not Track in their browsers would have the same result. Companies could argue that the setting, which some browsers turned on by default and which predates the California law, wasn’t necessarily turned on with the intention of giving notice not to sell data under the law, he says.

Even if that law only covers California residents, the builders of the standard hope that as more jurisdictions put such rules into place, website operators will choose to observe Global Privacy Control user intentions even in the potentially shrinking number of places where they’re not legally bound to do so.

“We hope that this is just a stepping stone to federal legislation,” says Weinberg.

[Source: This article was published in fastcompany.com By Steven Melendez - Uploaded by the Association Member: Wushe Zhiyang]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Tons of video search engines are out there to help you find the perfect video – or create your own. Here’s a list of the 10 best.

Video content is super popular today.

In fact, internet users spend an average of 6 hours and 48 minutes watching videos per week.

That’s a 59% increase since 2016!

What’s more, users spend on average 2.6x more time on pages with video than without.

So, why not spice up your blog with engaging, relevant videos?

The good news is there are tons of search engines you can use to find the perfect video to use in your blog or inspire you to create your own.

Here’s a list of the 10 best ones out there.

10 Video Search Engines You Should Use to Find Excellent Video Content

We all know about Google and YouTube, but have you ever heard of video search engines like Dailymotion and Metacafe?

These video search engines are gold when you learn to use them.

Read on below to find a mix of familiar and new video search engines.

1. Google

We can’t leave Google out, although everyone online knows about it. It’s just too big and popular to scratch from our list.

So, what’s special about Google videos?

You can search for practically any video on Google using the Videos search bar.

First, type in your keyword on Google.

google search

Then, click Videos.

google video

Voila! You get tons of videos based on the keyword you used. It’s that simple.

2. YouTube

YouTube is the second most-visited site in the world (next to Google).

And it’s no wonder, since over 500 hours of video are uploaded on YouTube per minute!

Here’s an example of a search on YouTube for “white strawberries.”

youtube-white-strawberrie.png

If you’re feeling uninspired for your next video, head over to YouTube and type in a rare keyword.

Chances are, you’ll find a unique video on it.

3. Bing

If you’re like a ton of other people, you think of Bing as a search engine “living in the shadow of Google.”

But Bing isn’t inferior to Google, it’s just different.

For example, there’s its video platform.

Here are three amazing things you didn’t know about Bing videos:

  • They’re optimized for mobile usage.
  • They play directly from the website.
  • You can easily find paid video content.

Finding inspiring videos on Bing is super easy.

Simply type your keyword into the search engine and select Videos.

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4. Dailymotion

Dailymotion is a platform with millions of videos.

Right on its homepage, you can watch trending videos on the latest news, entertainment, music, and sports.

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Looking for something specific?

Head over to the search bar on the right-hand corner and type in your keyword.

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You can even create a personal library with all your favorite videos on the platform.

5. DuckDuckGo

If privacy is important to you and you don’t like the idea of everything you do online being recorded, you should use DuckDuckGo.

DuckDuckGo does three things for you:

  • Blocks trackers.
  • Allows you to search privately.
  • Gives you secure connections.

 duckduckgo-5e90e0dab26c9.png

Using the search engine is super easy because of its simple interface.

If you’re looking for videos, simply type in your keyword into the search field and click Videos.

duckduckgo-how-to-cut-onions-.png

Another fun thing you can do is run a search based on different countries.

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You’ll be thrilled to find out that selecting a different country gives you different video results!

For example, here are the top videos for the keyword “content marketing” in the U.S.

duckduckgo-video-search-usa.png

Now, select another country. Say, Argentina. This is what you get.

duckduckgo-video-search-argentina.png

6. Yahoo

Remember Yahoo?

Well, considering Yahoo’s search engine market share is under 2% market globally, you aren’t alone if you don’t.

 

However, just like other search engines, Yahoo makes it super easy to browse through tons of videos.

What’s interesting is that although Bing powers Yahoo’s search results, you won’t get the same video results if you enter the same keyword on both platforms.

Let’s take a look.

Here’s “marketing tips” on Yahoo.

yahoo-videos.png

And here’s “marketing tips” on Bing.

bing-video-search-marketing-tips.png

Since searching both Yahoo and Bing will give you different results, they’re each worth trying if you want to find some hidden gems.

7. Metacafe

Metacafe is the place to go to find fun, unusual videos.
metacafe.png

It offers a ton of categories to choose from including art animation, comedy, entertainment, how-to, fashion, and more.

You can also search for popular or trending videos using the search bar at the top of the page.

If you’re suffering from a creative block and you need inspiration, Metacafe is an excellent video search engine to visit.

8. Ask

Ask once used to be a popular competitor to search engines like Google and Yahoo.

Today, it’s known as a question and answer site.

But you can still search for videos on Ask.

Simply type your keyword in the search box and click Videos.

ask-.png

When you search for videos on Ask, you’ll get results straight from YouTube.

But again, you won’t get the same results as using the same keyword on YouTube.

9. Yandex

Yandex is the the Google of Russia.

It’s a massive search engine offering mail, maps, a browser, translation, images, and more.

Of course, Yandex also has a video search bar.
yandex-.png

10. Swisscows

Swisscows is a search engine that bills itself as “family-friendly.”

It also offers a unique promise to users: it doesn’t collect or store any user data.

Aside from music, images, and web content, Swisscows has a wide range of videos to choose from.

swisscows.png

How to Find Amazing Videos for Your Content

Yes, video is extremely popular today.

Internet users prefer watching video over reading long blocks of text.

In fact, 85% of U.S. internet users watch online video content each month.

But creating videos isn’t easy.

There are days when you simply lack inspiration and need a breath of fresh air to get your creative juices going.

When this happens, make sure to visit the top video search engines on the web.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Julia McCoy - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Search Engine

DuckDuckGo, the privacy-focused search engine, announced that August 2020 ended in over 2 billion total searches via its search platform.

While Google remains the most popular search engine, DuckDuckGo has gained a great deal of traction in recent months as more and more users have begun to value their privacy on the internet.

DuckDuckGo saw over 2 billion searches and 4 million app/extension installations, and the company also said that they have over 65 million active users. DuckDuckGo could shatter its old traffic record if the same growth trend continues.

Screenshot 5

Even though DuckDuckGo is growing rapidly, it still controls less than 2 percent of all search volume in the United States. However, DuckDuckGo's growth trend has continued throughout the year, mainly due to Google and other companies' privacy scandal.

DuckDuckGo1.jpg

On average, DuckDuckGo is getting 65 million+ searches regularly. The number is likely to be more if we add up the searches performed via DuckDuckGo's API, extensions, or apps.

DuckDuckGo search engine is based on Bing, community-developed sites such as Wikipedia, and the company has developed its own crawler to generate its index of search results.

Unlike Google, DuckDuckGo is more privacy-oriented, and they don't track what users are searching for. As a result, DuckDuckGo search results are not as up-to-date as Google or even Bing.

On the other hand, Google has championed web standards, and its search engine allegedly ignores privacy standards and tracks people across its platforms.

If you are serious about privacy, you can give DuckDuckGo a try by visiting their search homepage. You can also use DuckDuckGo by installing its extensions and apps.

[Source: This article was published in bleepingcomputer.com By Mayank Parmar - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Search Engine

An unlikely competitor enters the search engine market as Verizon Media launches its privacy-focused OneSearch.

OneSearch promises not to track, store, or share personal or search data with advertisers, which puts it in direct competition with DuckDuckGo. It’s available now on desktop and mobile at OneSearch.com.

What differentiates Verizon Media’s OneSearch from DuckDuckGo, a more established privacy-focused search engine, is the ability for businesses to integrate it with their existing privacy and security products.

 

In an announcement, the company states:

“OneSearch doesn’t track, store, or share personal or search data with advertisers, giving users greater control of their personal information in a search context. Businesses with an interest in security can partner with Verizon Media to integrate OneSearch into their privacy and security products, giving their customers another measure of control.”

Another unique offering from OneSearch is its advanced privacy mode. When enabled, OneSearch’s encrypted search results link will expire within an hour.

OneSearch’s advanced privacy mode is designed for situations where multiple people are using the same device, or if a search results link is being shared with a friend.

The full array of privacy-focused features offered by OneSearch include:

  • No cookie tracking, retargeting, or personal profiling
  • No sharing of personal data with advertisers
  • No storing of user search history
  • Unbiased, unfiltered search results
  • Encrypted search terms

Although it doesn’t sell data to advertisers, OneSearch does rely on advertising to keep its service free. Rather than using cookies and browsing history to target ads, OneSearche’s contextual ads are based on things like the current keyword being searched for.

OneSearch is only available in North America on desktop and mobile web browsers, though it will be available in other countries soon. A mobile app for Android and iOS will be available later this month.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jay Harris]

Categorized in Search Engine

In 2008, the first privacy-focused search engine emerged on the scene - DuckDuckGo. The company was the first to bring consumers a search engine designed to protect consumer privacy as they searched online. By 2018, DuckDuckGo had 16 million searches a day, and by 2019, that number had jumped to 36 million searches.

Now, more than ten years later, privacy and search continue to evolve.

Privado is a new private search engine from  CodeFuel, which allows consumers to protect their right to online privacy. Search results are powered by Bing and driven by the consumer’s search query and not by their demographics or personal data

 

“Online privacy per se is not a new issue. But what we have seen until recently, is that a relatively narrow segment of users care enough to take action, mainly tech-savvy users, who understand how companies feed off their data,” said Tal Jacobson, General Manager of CodeFuel. “With the growing number of data breaches we hear about every other day, privacy concerns have finally made it to center stage.”

Jacobson says he strongly believes we have come very close to the privacy tipping point when people realize that this is just too much.

Tal Jacobson, General Manager, CodeFuel

“Think for a moment about the millions of parents out there, who have just heard about the accusations against TikTok secretly gathering user data and sending it to China,” added Jacobson. “Think about the Millions of users across social and search and how their data is used and abused to make more money, without their permission.”

Jacobson adds that users are waking up, and search privacy is making its way to the mainstream. “Privado enables users to realize the benefits of internet search without anxiety about their most intimate behaviors being observed and tracked.”

As consumer awareness increases around data and privacy, their actions have shifted as well. According to a data privacy and security report from RSA, 78 percent of consumers polled said they take action to limit the amount of personal information they share online.

[Source: This article was published in forbes.com By Jennifer Kite-Powell - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dorothy Allen]

Categorized in Search Engine

While there doesn’t seem to be an end yet to the US-Huawei story, the latter has gone full force in preparing for a life without Google. They have been working on something called AppGallery, the alternative to Google Play Store and Huawei Mobile Services, their replacement for Google Play Services. One important thing that seems to be missing is the all-important search, but Huawei hasn’t forgotten it. They are now testing out the Huawei Search app, which can be both good news and bad news for the rest of the world.

XDA Developers says that the testing is currently going on in the UAE but they were able to load it on the Huawei Mate 30 Pro to see what the deal is. It seems to be just a basic search app where you put in a query and it will give you search results. You get webpages, videos, news, or images. The app also gives you shortcuts to weather, sports, unit conversion, and calculator. You are also able to see your search history, give feedback, change app settings, and even supports the dark theme of EMUI 10 (their version of Android 10).

Huawei Search is operated by Aspiegel Limited, their subsidiary that is based out of Ireland. But as to what search engine powers this app, that is less certain. It doesn’t seem to match results from Google, Bing, Yahoo, DuckDuckGo, Yandex, Ask, or AOL. They may not be using a third-party search engine, and so that’s where the bad news may lie. China has been known to control the information that comes out of their Internet, and despite disassociating themselves from the supposed close ties with the government, Huawei is still a Chinese company subject to Chinese laws.

Forbes reports that this is a “potential filter” that will still be serving content to hundreds of millions of users worldwide from a company that is based “in the most highly censored country on the planet”. This is a potential concern as the Search app is a big part of the whole Huawei operating ecosystem that will be serving both Chinese and non-Chinese customers. This is one of the unintended consequences of the U.S. blacklisting the Chinese company – the potential for Huawei to “carve itself a dominant position” in this new alternative to the currently still-dominant Android/Google eco-system.

In any case, it’s still early days for the Huawei Search app and the whole Huawei Mobile Services. We might even see the U.S. backtracking on their blacklist. The question would be if Huawei would go back to Google’s loving arms or if they will continue to pursue their own platform, which will eventually result in the issues mentioned above.

 

[Source: This article was published in androidcommunity.com By Ida Torres - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google and Facebook collect information about us and then sell that data to advertisers. Websites deposit invisible “cookies” onto our computers and then record where we go online. Even our own government has been known to track us.

When it comes to digital privacy, it’s easy to feel hopeless. We’re mere mortals! We’re minuscule molecules in their machines! What power do we possibly have to fight back?

That was the question I posed to you, dear readers, in the previous “Crowdwise.”

 

Many of you responded with valuable but frequently repeated suggestions: Use a program that memorizes your passwords, and makes every password different. Install an ad blocker in your web browser, like uBlock Origin. Read up on the latest internet scams. If you must use Facebook, visit its Privacy Settings page and limit its freedom to target ads to you.

What I sought, though, was non-obvious ideas.

It turns out that “digital privacy” means different things to different people.

“Everyone has different concerns,” wrote Jamie Winterton, a cybersecurity researcher at Arizona State University. “Are you worried about private messaging? Government surveillance? Third-party trackers on the web?” Addressing each of these concerns, she noted, requires different tools and techniques.

“The number one thing that people can do is to stop using Google,” wrote privacy consultant Bob Gellman. “If you use Gmail and use Google to search the web, Google knows more about you than any other institution. And that goes double if you use other Google services like Google Maps, Waze, Google Docs, etc.”

Like many other readers, he recommended DuckDuckGo, a rival web search engine. Its search results often aren’t as useful as Google’s, but it’s advertised not to track you or your searches.

And if you don’t use Gmail for email, what should you use? “I am a huge advocate for paying for your email account,” wrote Russian journalist Yuri Litvinenko. “It’s not about turning off ads, but giving your email providers as little incentive to peek into your inbox as possible.” ProtonMail, for example, costs $4 a month and offers a host of privacy features, including anonymous sign-up and end-to-end encryption.

The ads you see online are based on the sites, searches, or and Facebook posts that get your interest. Some rebels, therefore, throw a wrench into the machinery — by demonstrating phony interests.

“Every once in a while, I Google something completely nutty just to mess with their algorithm,” wrote Shaun Breitbart. “You’d be surprised what sort of coupons CVS prints for me on the bottom of my receipt. They are clearly confused about both my age and my gender.”

It’s “akin to radio jamming,” noted Frank Paiano. “It does make for some interesting browsing, as ads for items we searched for follow us around like puppy dogs (including on The New York Times, by the way.)”

Barry Joseph uses a similar tactic when registering for an account on a new website. “I often switch my gender (I am a cisgender male), which delivers ads less relevant to me — although I must admit, the bra advertising can be distracting.”

He notes that there are side effects. “My friends occasionally get gendered notifications about me, such as ‘Wish her a happy birthday.’” But even that is a plus, leading to “interesting conversations about gender norms and expectations (so killing two birds with one digital stone here).”

It’s perfectly legitimate, by the way, to enjoy seeing ads that align with your interests. You could argue that they’re actually more useful than irrelevant ones.

But millions of others are creeped out by the tracking that produces those targeted ads.

If you’re in that category, Ms. Winterton recommended Ghostery, a free plug-in for most web browsers that “blocks the trackers and lists them by category,” she wrote. “Some sites have an amazing number of trackers whose only purpose is to record your behavior (sometimes across multiple sites) and pitch better advertisements.”

Most public Wi-Fi networks — in hotels, airports, coffee shops, and so on — are eavesdroppable, even if they require a password to connect. Nearby patrons, using their phones or laptops, can easily see everything you’re sending or receiving — email and website contents, for example — using free “sniffer” programs.

You don’t have to worry Social, WhatsApp and Apple’s iMessage, all of which encrypts your messages before they even leave your phone or laptop. Using websites whose addresses begin with https are also safe; they, too, encrypt their data before it’s sent to your browser (and vice versa).

(Caution: Even if the site’s address begins with https, the bad guys can still see which sites you visit — say, https://www.NoseHairBraiding.com. They just can’t see what you do there once you’re connected.)

The solution, as recommended by Lauren Taubman and others: a Virtual Private Network program. These phone and computer apps encrypt everything you send or receive — and, as a bonus, mask your location. Wirecutter’s favorite VPNTunnelBear, is available for Windows, Mac, Android, and iOS. It’s free for up to 500 megabytes a month, or $60 a year for up to five devices.

“I don’t like Apple’s phones, their operating systems, or their looks,” wrote Aaron Soice, “but the one thing Apple gets right is valuing your data security. Purely in terms of data, Apple serves you; Google serves you to the sharks.”

 

Apple’s privacy website reveals many examples: You don’t sign into Apple Maps or Safari (Apple’s web browser), so your searches and trips aren’t linked to you. Safari’s “don’t track me” features are turned on as the factory setting. When you buy something with Apple Pay, Apple receives no information about the item, the store, or the price.

Apple can afford to tout these features, explained software developer Joel Potischman, because it’s a hardware company. “Its business model depends on us giving them our money. Google and Facebook make their money by selling our info to other people.”

Mr. Potischman never registers with a new website using the “Sign in with Facebook” or “Sign in with Google” shortcut buttons. “They allow those companies to track you on other sites,” he wrote. Instead, he registers the long way, with an email address and password.

(And here’s Apple again: The “Sign in with Apple” button, new and not yet incorporated by many websites, is designed to offer the same one-click convenience — but with a promise not to track or profile you.)

My call for submissions drew some tips from a surprising respondent: Frank Abagnale, the former teenage con artist who was the subject of the 2002 movie “Catch Me if You Can.”

After his prison time, he went began working for the F.B.I., giving talks on scam protection, and writing books. He’s donating all earnings from his latest book, “Scam Me If You Can,” to the AARP, in support of its efforts to educate older Americans about internet rip-offs.

His advice: “You never want to tell Facebook where you were born and your date of birth. That’s 98 percent of someone stealing your identity! And don’t use a straight-on photo of yourself — like a passport photo, driver’s license, graduation photo — that someone can use on a fake ID.”

Mr. Abagnale also notes that you should avoid sharing your personal data offline, too. “We give a lot of information away, not just on social media, but places we go where people automatically ask us all of these questions. ‘What magazines do you read?’ ‘What’s your job?’ ‘Do you earn between this and that amount of money?’”

Why answer if you don’t have to?

A few more suggestions:

  • “Create a different email address for every service you use,” wrote Matt McHenry. “Then you can tell which one has shared your info, and create filters to silence them if necessary.” 
  • “Apps like Privacy and Token Virtual generate a disposable credit-card number with each purchase — so in case of a breach, your actual card isn’t compromised,” suggested Juan Garrido. (Bill Barnes agreed, pointing out the similar Shopsafe service offered by from Bank of America’s Visa cards. “The number is dollar and time limited.”)
  • “Your advertisers won’t like to see this, so perhaps you won’t print it,” predicted Betsy Peto, “but I avoid using apps on my cellphone as much as possible. Instead, I go to the associated website in my phone’s browser: for example, www.dailybeast.com. My data is still tracked there, but not as much as it would be by the app.”

There is some good news: Tech companies are beginning to feel some pressure.

In 2017, the European Union passed the General Data Protection Regulation (G.D.P.R.), which requires companies to explain what data they’re collecting — and to offer the option to edit or delete it. China, India, Japan, Brazil, South Korea, and Thailand have passed, or are considering, similar laws, and California’s Consumer Privacy Act takes effect on January 1.

In the meantime, enjoy these suggestions, as well as this bonus tip from privacy researcher Jamie Winterton:

“Oh yeah — and don’t use Facebook.”

For the next “Crowdwise”: We all know that it’s unclassy and cruel to break up with a romantic partner in a text message — or, worse, a tweet. (Well, we used to know that.) Yet requesting an unusual meeting at a sidewalk cafe might strike your partner as distressingly ominous.

[Source: This article was published in nytimes.com By David Pogue - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was published in computerworld.com By Jonny Evans - Uploaded by the Association Member: Joshua Simon]

Apple users who care about privacy are moving to DuckDuckGo for search. These tips will get you started with it.

Like liberty for all, privacy demands vigilance, and that’s why Apple users who care about those things are moving to DuckDuckGo for search.

Why use DuckDuckGo?

Privacy is under attack.

It doesn’t take much effort to prove this truth. At the time of writing, recent news is full of creeping privacy erosion: 

And then there’s Duck Duck Go. 

 

With Duck Duck Go, you are the searcher, not the searched

I think most Apple users know about DuckDuckGo. It is an independent search engine designed from the ground up to maintain your privacy.

It means the search service doesn’t collect information about you, doesn’t gather your search queries, and doesn’t install cookies or tracking code on your systems.

It now also provides highly accurate maps thanks to a deal with Apple that lets it use the also private-by-design Apple Maps service. To do this, the search engine is using Apple’s MapKit JS framework, which Apple created so website owners could embed maps in their sites.

Maps on DuckDuckGo are quite satisfying and will only improve as Apple introduces more detailed maps, better local business listings, and additional feature. You should see this service in action here.

How Apple Maps works on DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo added Apple Maps support at the beginning of 2019.

Since then, it has introduced a set of compelling improvements to how it works, thanks to Apple’s framework. You now get the better implementation of Maps in your search, including the benefit of local search results. Additional enhancements include:

  • Map re-querying: You can now refine search queries within the expanded maps view. You can also zoom in and out or move around the map to find other results that match your search.
  • Local autocomplete: You will be provided with search suggestions as you type based on the local region visible on your map. Type fuel in a map of the Arizona desert, and you can see how many miles you’ll need to walk if your fuel runs out.
  • Dedicated Maps tag: Look at the top of a search result, and you’ll find a Maps tab, which joins the images, videos, news, and meanings tabs.

There’s even a Dark Mode that is enabled when you switch to DuckDuckGo’s dark theme – when you switch, you’ll see the embedded Apple Maps also do so.

(Switch to the dark theme in the search engine’s settings, which you’ll find here. You can also discover much more information on how the search engine protects your privacy, primarily by not collecting it in the first place.)

How do they ensure your privacy when running map and address-related searches? DuckDuck Go explains:

“With Apple, as with all other third parties we work with, we do not share any personally identifiable information such as IP address. And for local searches in particular, where your approximate location information is sent by your browser to us, we discard it immediately after use.”

How to set DuckDuckGo as default search on Apple devices

There are two ways to use DuckDuckGo rather than Google for search:

1. You can visit the DuckDuckGo.com website and use search in your browser there.

2. You can also change your Mac, iPhone or iPad’s default search service in order to use the far more private alternative. I think most readers know about this, but just in case:

  • On a Mac: Safari Preferences>choose the Search tab and choose DuckDuckGo in the drop-down list of search engine choices.
  • On iOS/iPad OS: Settings>Safari and select DuckDuckGo from the options provided in the Search Engine section. You need to do this for all your devices individually.

Once you change your default search engine, all the searches you make in the future will be made using the more private service. You may even want to switch to using MeWe as a social network to replace Facebook while you’re at it.

Up next…

“We believe there should be no trade-off for people wanting to protect their personal data while searching,” the search engine explains. “Working with Apple Maps to enhance DuckDuckGo Search is an example of how we do this and pushes us further in our vision of setting a new standard of trust online.”

This is all well and good, but how do they see this experience extending itself in the future?

I am not currently in possession of a working crystal ball, but here are two realistic and possible ways the service could be extended:

  1. Imagine how cool this would be with the addition of Apple’s delightfully lag-free Look Around Street View-killer.
  2. Imagine how embedded AR experiences could also become part of what’s on offer through the search service.

Why not? We know Apple takes this stuff seriously. It is surely only a matter of time until it declines Google for search.

Like liberty for all, privacy demands vigilance. Be vigilant.

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was published in lifehacker.com By Mike Epstein - Uploaded by the Association Member: Joshua Simon]

The internet, as a “place,” is constantly growing. We build more and more webpages every day—so many, in fact, that it can feel as if certain corners of it are lost to time.

As it turns out, they may only be lost to Google. Earlier this year, web developer-bloggers Tim Bray and Marco Fioretti noted that Google seems to have stopped indexing the entirety of the internet for Google Search. As a result, certain old websites—those more than 10 years old—did not show up through Google search. Both writers lamented that limiting Google’s effective memory to the last decade, while logical when faced with the daunting task of playing information concierge to our every whimsical question, forces us to reckon with the fact that, when you use Google for historical searches, there are probably more answers out there.

 

As a BoingBoing post based on Bray’s points out, DuckDuckGo and Bing both still seem to offer more complete records of the internet, specifically showing web pages that Google stopped indexing for search. If you’re looking for a specific website from before 2009 and can’t find it, either one is a solid first step. If that doesn’t work, it’s always possible someone else who needed the same page you were looking for saving it as an archive on the Wayback Machine.

But what about broad questions? Questions where you don’t already know the answer? Historical research from the early web? There are other, more specialized options for that. A Hacker News forum post suggests a couple of search engines. Million Short, which allows you to run a search and automatically skip the most popular answers to probe deeper into the web. Wiby.me is a “search engine for classic websites,” made to help people find hobbyist pages and other archaic features of the internet.

The Hacker news thread also brings up Pinboard, a minimalist bookmarking service similar to Pocket, which has a key feature for archivists: If you sign up for its premium service—$11 per year—Pinboard will make a web archive of every page you save. If you’re looking at older, unindexed material, such a tool can make it easier to go back to specific parts of the older internet that you may want or need to recall again.

Categorized in How to

[Source: This article was Published in exchangewire.com By Mathew Broughton - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin]

Talk about Google, along with their domination of the digital ad ecosystem, would not be on the lips of those in ad tech were it not for their original product: the Google Search engine.

Despite negative press coverage and EU fines, some estimates suggest the behemoth continues to enjoy a market share of just under 90% in the UK search market. However, there have been rumblings of discontent from publishers, which populate the results pages, about how they have been treated by the California-based giant.

 

This anger, combined with concerns over GDPR and copyright law violations, has prompted the launch of new ‘disruptive’ search engines designed to address these concerns. But will these have any effect on Google’s stranglehold on the global search industry? ExchangeWire details the problems publishers are experiencing with Google along with some of the new players in the search market, what effect they have had thus far, and how advertisers could capitalize on privacy-focused competition in the search market.

Google vs publishers

Publishers have experienced margin squeezes for years, whilst Google’s sales have simultaneously skyrocketed, with parent company Alphabet’s revenue reaching USD$36.3bn (£28.7bn) in the first quarter of 2019 alone. Many content producers also feel dismay towards Google’s ‘enhanced search listings’, as these essentially scrape content from their sites and show it in their search results, eliminating the need for users to visit their site, and in turn their monetization opportunity.

Recent changes to the design of the search results page, at least on mobile devices, which are seemingly aimed at making the differences between ads and organic listings even more subtle (an effect which is particularly noticeable on local listings) will also prove perturbing for the publishers which do not use Google paid search listings.

DuckDuckGo: The quack grows louder

Perhaps the best-known disruptive search engine is DuckDuckGo, which markets itself on protecting user privacy whilst also refining results by excluding low-quality sources such as content mills. In an attempt to battle against privacy concerns, and in recognition of anti-competitive investigations, Google has added DuckDuckGo to Chrome as a default search option in over 60 markets including the UK, US, Australia and South Africa. Further reflecting their increased presence in the search market: DuckDuckGo’s quack has become louder recently, adding momentum to the recent calls to transform the toothless ‘Do Not Track’ option into giving more meaningful protections to user privacy, as originally intended.

 

Qwant: Local search engines fighting Google

Qwant is a France-based search engine which, similar to DuckDuckGo, preserves user privacy by not tracking their queries. Several similar locally-based engines have been rolled out across Europe, including Mojeek (UK) and Unbubble (Germany). Whilst they currently only occupy a small percentage (~6%) of the French search market, Qwant’s market share has grown consistently year-on-year since their launch in 2013, to the extent that they are now challenging established players such as Yahoo! in the country. In recognition of their desire to increase their growth across Europe, whilst continuing to operate in a privacy-focused manner, Qwant has recently partnered with Microsoft to leverage their various tech solutions. A further sign of their growing level of gravitas is the French government’s decision to eschew Chrome in favour of their engine.

Ahrefs: The 90/10 profit share model

A respected provider of performance-monitoring tools within search, Ahrefs is now working on directly competing with Google with their own engine, according to a series of tweets from founder & CEO Dmitry Gerasimenko. Whilst a commitment to privacy will please users, content creators will be more interested in the proposed profit-share model, whereby 90% of the prospective search revenue will be given to the publisher. Though there is every change that this tweet-stage idea will never come to fruition, the Singapore-based firm already has impressive crawling capabilities which are easily transferable for indexing, so it is worth examining in the future.

Opportunity for advertisers

With the launch of Google privacy tools, along with stricter forms of intelligent tracking prevention (ITP) on the Safari and Firefox browsers, discussions have abounded within the advertising industry on whether budgets will be realigned away from display and video towards fully contextual methods such as keyword-based search. Stricter implementation of GDPR and the prospective launch of similar privacy legislation across the globe will further the argument that advertisers need to examine privacy-focused solutions.

Naturally, these factors will compromise advertisers who rely on third-party targeting methods and tracking user activity across the internet, meaning they need to identify ways of diversifying their offering. Though they have a comparatively tiny market share, disruptive search engines represent a potential opportunity for brands and advertisers to experiment with privacy-compliant search advertising.

Categorized in Search Engine
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