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Source: This article was Published cbsnews.com - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

Even if "Location History" is off on your phone, Google often still stores your precise location.

Here are some things you can do to delete those markers and keep your location as private as possible. But there's no panacea because simply connecting to the internet on any device flags an IP address, a numeric designation that can be geographically mapped. Smartphones also connect to cell towers, so your carrier knows your general location at all times.

To prevent further tracking

For any device:

Fire up your browser and go to myactivity.google.com . Sign into Google if you haven't already. On the upper left drop-down menu, go to "Activity Controls." Turn off both "Web & App Activity" and "Location History." That should prevent precise location markers from being stored to your Google account.

Google will warn you that some of its services won't work as well with these settings off. In particular, neither the Google Assistant, a digital concierge, nor the Google Home smart speaker will be particularly useful.

On iOS:

If you use Google Maps, adjust your location setting to "While Using" the app; this will prevent the app from accessing your location when it's not active. Go to Settings - Privacy - Location Services and from there select Google Maps to make the adjustment.

In the Safari web browser, consider using a search engine other than Google. Under Settings - Safari - Search Engine, you can find other options like Bing or DuckDuckGo. You can turn location off while browsing by going to Settings - Privacy - Location Services - Safari Websites, and turn this to "Never." (This still won't prevent advertisers from knowing your rough location based on IP address on any website.)

You can also turn Location Services off to the device almost completely from Settings - Privacy - Location Services. Both Google Maps and Apple Maps will still work, but they won't know where you are on the map and won't be able to give you directions. Emergency responders will still be able to find you if the need arises.

On Android:

Under the main settings icon click on "Security & location." Scroll down to the "Privacy" heading. Tap "Location." You can toggle it off for the entire device.

Use "App-level permissions" to turn off access to various apps. Unlike the iPhone, there is no setting for "While Using." You cannot turn off Google Play services, which supplies your location to other apps if you leave that service on.

Sign in as a "guest" on your Android device by swiping down from the top and tapping the downward-facing caret, then again on the torso icon. Be aware of which services you sign in on, like Chrome.

You can also change search engines even in Chrome.

To delete past location tracking

For any device:

On the page myactivity.google.com , look for any entry that has a location pin icon beside the word "details." Clicking on that pops up a window that includes a link that sometimes says "From your current location." Clicking on it will open Google Maps, which will display where you were at the time.

You can delete it from this popup by clicking on the navigation icon with the three stacked dots and then "Delete."

Some items will be grouped in unexpected places, such as topic names, google.com, Search, or Maps. You have to delete them item by item. You can wholesale delete all items in date ranges or by service but will end up taking out more than just location markers.

Categorized in How to

Source: This article was Published thehayride.com By Bethany Blankley - Contributed by Member: Alex Grey

DuckDuckGo is a search engine that doesn’t track its users and offers a level of privacy– for free– that hasn’t existed on the Internet because of Google.

Gabriel Weinberg, CEO & Founder at DuckDuckGo gives 10 reasons why DuckDuckGo is a better, safer service for users. Below are five:

DuckDuckGo doesn’t track its users. Google does.

All of a user’s personal information: medical, financial and anything else should be private, but on Google, it’s not. On Google, your searches are tracked, mined, and packaged up into a data profile for advertisers to follow you around the Internet.”

Weinberg says, “To keep your searches private and out of data profiles, the government, and other legal requests, you need to use DuckDuckGo. We don’t track you at all, regardless of what browsing mode you are in. Each time you search on DuckDuckGo, it’s as if you’ve never been there before.”

DuckDuckGo blocks Google trackers lurking everywhere.

Google tracks users on more than just their search engine. They track everyone on YouTube, Gmail, Chrome, Android, Gmaps, and all the other services they run.
Private alternatives like DuckDuckGo can enable people to live Google-free. Google trackers lurk behind the scenes on 75% of the top million websites. Facebook is the next closest with 25%.

DuckDuckGo provides unbiased search results.

Weinberg notes that when people google information they expect to find unbiased results, but that’s not what they get. On Google, results are tailored to what Google thinks the user is likely to click on, based on the data profile its built on each user over time from tracking everything everyone does online.

Users can search without fear.

“When people know they are being watched, they change their behavior” Weinberg notes. Called the chilling effect, an MIT study found that people began searching less online after Snowden revealed they were being watched. People became afraid that their personal medical issues might be publicized. It reported:

“Suppressing health information searches potentially harms the health of search engine users and… In general, our results suggest that there is a chilling effect on search behavior from government surveillance on the Internet.”

Weinberg says, “Your searches are your business, and you should feel free to search whatever you want, whenever you want. You can easily escape this chilling effect on DuckDuckGo where you are anonymous.”

Google is simply too big, and too powerful.

Weinberg notes that Google is a monopoly, with a market cap of at least $750 billion (at the time of writing) with at least 75,000 employees that dominate search, browsing, online advertising, and more. Its tentacles are in everything tech, online and offline Weinberg warns.

Because of their size, their influence on politics is disproportionate. Last year Google outspent every other company lobbying in Washington, D.C.

DuckDuckGo is a team of 45 worldwide. Its focus is narrow: helping people take control of their personal information online. “The world could use more competition, less focus on ad tracking, fewer eggs in one basket,” Weinberg says.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published productwatch.co By Kevin Meyer - Contributed by Member: David J. Redcliff

I don’t think I’m blowing your mind when I say most sites are trying to collect your data. If you don’t have to pay for the product, you are the product — it’s the reason Movie Pass doesn’t mind taking a loss if you see more than one movie a month, though who knows how long that experiment will last.

So, if you want to protect your privacy, you will have to put in some effort. Thankfully, there are services you can use to make your job easier. And we’ll show you both which ones are efficient, and how to use them.

uBlock Origin

The very first extension you should get when you get a new device is a good ad-blocker. Not many are better than uBlock Origin. Essentially, this service will filter the content you see in your browser. Also, unlike other ad-blockers, uBlock doesn’t slow your browser down.

Furthermore, using it is a breeze. All you need to do is install the extension and let it run. The default settings are such that the standard filters for ads, privacy, and malware are active. You just need to let the extension run.

In the meantime, if you want to change the settings, you can easily do so by clicking the shield icon next to your URL bar.

BitDefender

BitDefender is one of the biggest companies that offer device protection services. In fact, if you choose to use their products, you will be one of over 500 million users they have. They offer multiple tools that can protect your computer from harm. And, more importantly for this article, they also offer online privacy tools. For example, their BitDefender VPN tool is possibly the best VPN tool you can get.

The interface is rather simple, and once you start using the tool, you will see how easy it can be to protect yourself.

Unshorten.It

Short URLs were very popular when they first came out. After all, they are a lot tidier than the usual bunch of symbols you might get. However, not long after, they became one of the serious threats to your computer’s safety. Namely, even though the link says it is going to take you to a funny site, it might just take you to a site that will mug you instead.

Naturally, you might want to get a tool that will let you analyze the said short URLs. That is where unshorten. It comes into play. This service lets you see exactly what page you will visit if you follow the link. It will give you the description, the safety ratings, and even screenshots of web pages you might unwittingly visit.

HTTPS Everywhere

Do you want to have Internet privacy, but you are not ready to go as far as using Tor? Well, in that case, it seems like HTTPS is the right extension for you. This Chrome, Firefox, and Opera extension will let you encrypt your communications on almost all major websites. Thankfully, a lot of websites already support encryption over HTTPS. But, they tend to make it difficult to use properly. On the other hand, using HTTPS Everywhere is easy and intuitive. Overall, it is a great way to make your surfing a lot safer.

No Coin

Another danger of using unknown websites lies in the fact that many of them will use your resources to mine cryptocurrencies. In essence, these websites will hack your device and use its processing power for themselves.

Now, you might think it’s not that bad. You are only on the website for a couple of minutes at a time. But, the issue doesn’t stop there. Namely, once they do hack your device, they can keep using it for a long time after you visit their website. Thankfully, you can use No Coin to stop the websites from doing this to you. With this service, you should see noticeable improvements in your computer’s performance.

Punycode Alert

Punycode Alert is an extension that will give you a notification if you venture onto a phishing website that uses Unicode to trick you. For those who don’t know what phishing is, in layman’s terms, it is a practice of stealing someone’s information by setting up an imitation of a successful website.

Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for phishing websites to trick people out of thousands of dollars. The reason these traps are incredibly effective is that their URLs look exactly like you would expect them to. So, you might very well follow a URL that reads as “apple.com” and ends up on a completely different website. We definitely recommend using Punycode Alert to protect yourself from such websites.

LastPass

Coming up with good passwords is not easy. You might think that your birthday is as good a password as any, but that couldn’t be further away from the truth. Fact is, a lot of people use passwords that are too weak to protect their data. And the reason for that is simple – they don’t want to bother with remembering complex passwords.

That is where LastPass comes in. This tool will let you store all of your passwords and use them without having to type them out. In essence, this password manager will let you use unbeatable passwords without having to worry about forgetting them.

ProtonVPN

Using VPN services is of utmost importance if you want your data to remain safe. And ProtonVPN is one of the best providers you can find. The company behind this service created ProtonVPN to give protection to activists and journalists around the world. And, not only that, but it will also let you avoid Internet censorship and visit websites that are trying to lock you and other people from your country out.

1.1.1.1

If you don’t feel like you want to go to extremes to protect your data, but you still don’t want your DNS resolver to sell your data to advertisers, you might want to consider using 1.1.1.1. This service, in essence, is a public DNS resolver that respects your privacy and offers you a fast way to browse the web.

DuckDuckGo

The first thought that might pop into your mind when you want to search for something online is probably: “I’ll just Google it.” However, you should be aware by now that Google is not only guilty of storing your data, but it also doesn’t offer the same results to everyone. In fact, it is almost impossible to find unbiased results by using Google. However, DuckDuckGo will help you protect your privacy and give you objective search results. And, you don’t have to do a lot to make this change. Simply switch to DuckDuckGo as your primary search engine, and you are good to go.

 

Categorized in Internet Privacy

 Source: This article was published icij.org By Spencer Woodman - Contributed by Member: Dorothy Allen

Reporters are navigating a more treacherous environment than at any time in recent memory, and despite a plethora of digital tools to keep them safe – many are failing to adopt new strategies.

It’s a bleak reality: Last year alone, a record number of journalists were killed in Mexico, reporters were imprisoned in Myanmar and journalists in Turkeyfaced criminal charges en masse.

The press’s enemies have been boosted by U.S. President Donald Trump, who has lodged almost daily attacks against journalists, and many have followed his lead. Wealthy private interests have launched their own crusades: a private firm was hired to undermine New Yorker reporter Jane Mayer’s reporting on Koch Industries, and Harvey Weinstein offered big bucks to a military-grade surveillance firm to spy on reporters and their sources breaking the story of his sexual harassment.

“The World Press Freedom map is getting darker,” according to the 2017 World Press Freedom Index compiled by Reporters Without Borders, “and media freedom is under threat now more than ever.”

[Journalists] frequently disregard their sense of insecurity even when they feel unsafe in public or cyberspace.
Canadian Journalists for Free Expression

These threats are compounded by increasingly potent hacking tools falling into the hands of governments around the world and, in some cases, hackers serving government interests. This makes personal cybersecurity an essential first line of defense for reporters everywhere.

Yet many journalists are failing to utilize some of the most basic tools to keep them and their sources safe from digital attack. A recent study by the Canadian Journalists for Free Expression found that some of the most at-risk journalists “frequently disregard their sense of insecurity even when they feel unsafe in public or cyberspace.”

So what can journalists (and citizens) do to better protect themselves online? Here are five security tools that have emerged as among the most commonly recommended for reporters and news organizations as well as their sources.

1. Signal and other end-to-end encrypted apps

Phone calls and digital messaging often comprise the bulk of a journalist’s workday. But conventional lines of communication can leave the contents of conversations vulnerable to hacking. And, even if someone is not able to intercept to the contents of these chats, a hacker can still access extensive archives of related metadata, including who you talked to and when.

But there are an increasing number of options to help you communicate securely with a high degree of confidence.

As we settle into 2018, the app Signal — possibly you’ve already heard of it – is a clear favorite for secure voice calls and messaging between journalists, their editors, and sometimes their civil servant sources.

You can easily use the Signal app on your phone.

“Everyone is really enthusiastic about Signal,” said Harlo Holmes, director of newsroom digital security with the Freedom of the Press Foundation. “Right now it’s the state of the art in terms of encrypted communication.”

To the user, Signal looks and operates like a traditional chat app, and also allows you to avoid expensive international call and text fees. But Signal also offers what’s called end-to-end encryption, meaning communications can only be deciphered on the physical devices of the communicating users. Even if a government tried to compel the group of developers that administers Signal to turn over your communications, it couldn’t provide information: Signal simply has no ability to figure out exactly what you’re doing on its platform.

An increasing number of digital platforms are using end-to-end encryption, but some popular products differ from Signal in one key way: While some of these firms may not be able to access the content of your communications, they can often access valuable metadata that may reveal who you were communicating with and when. These apps also may allow users to inadvertently send messages without end-to-end encryption.

To learn more about Signal, Holmes recommends checking out the foundation’s page on Security Planner, a project of the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab.

2. Secure file storage and encrypted sharing

A large portion of our lives is often stored on our laptops and the messaging platforms, social media sites and work portals they access. For journalists, this can mean a lot of sensitive material, including leaked documents, identities of sources and unpublished story drafts.

Bill Budington a security engineer at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a group dedicated to digital privacy, points to the particularly risky situation of crossing a border and recommends a series of products and measures journalists and others can adopt to keep files safe in the most at-risk circumstances.

His first tip: When most under threat, ditch your primary laptop or smartphone completely. If you have a burner phone or a cheap netbook that doesn’t contain sensitive data, bring this secondary device along instead while traveling.

But when burner devices aren’t an option, Budington says, “the most powerful thing” a person can do to keep devices safe at a border-crossing is to make sure the hard drive is fully encrypted beforehand – helping to ensure that only those with the device’s passphrase will be able to access its files. This step is also among the easiest – for Mac iOS and some Windows users, it can be as simple as clicking a few buttons to activate built-in encryption programs.

Even with an encrypted hard drive, hackers can attempt to “brute-force” a password, potentially gaining access to the encrypted data. (In many jurisdictions, courts and law enforcement agencies can try to compel you to turn over your password under threat of punishment, including incarceration.) An open-source program called VeraCrypt can add an additional layer of encryption, so that, even if hackers get access to your hard drive, they then must enter what amounts to a highly-fortified folder to gain access to your most sensitive information.

Yet even the most highly secured hard drive will provide little help in protecting your data when you inevitably need to transfer a sensitive document to someone else via the internet. Some of the most prominent file-sharing programs, such as Google Drive and Dropbox, do not provide what Budington calls “client-side” encryption by default.

“For cloud storage, the most important feature for secure storage is for the program you’re using to encrypt files locally on your own machine before they are uploaded to the cloud servers,” Budington told the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ). There are some services that provide local encryption prior to upload – Budington recommends SpiderOak, the Keybase filesystemtresoritand Jungle Disk.

You can learn more about device security and document storage by watching a security talk Budington gave in December.

3. Password managers

As hackers become more sophisticated, maintaining strong and up-to-date passwords that aren’t reused across different services is a must. But for reporters who use numerous online services and databases, this can become burdensome: Memorizing a series of complex and ever-changing passwords isn’t feasible and storing them in your computer or email makes them prone to fall into the hands of hackers.

Chris Walker, Digital Security Advisor at the Tactical Technology Collective, a cyber security initiative based in Berlin, recommends solving this problem with an encrypted password manager, which can both generate and store your passwords for you.

“Writing down your passwords and keeping them all in one place might not sound like a good idea at first,” Walker says, but he assures that with the right password manager, users will be more secure with fewer hassles. These apps can both generate stronger passwords and remember them for you.

KeyPass is just one Password manager available.
 
Walker recommends one tool in particular: KeePassXC, a system he describes as highly secure. “It is well maintained, free and open-source software that relies on well understood, standards-based encryption to protect your passwords,” Walker says. “It is also quite simple. It does not try to store your data online or sync between multiple devices. This simplicity helps protect KeePassXC from many potential avenues of attack.”

KeePassXC also has competitors that have been highly rated, including Lastpass, which both Securityplanner.org and online consumer guide Wirecutter recently recommended.

4. Two-factor authentication and its innovations

But Walker is quick to point out that even the most well-managed passwords must be used, when possible, alongside two-factor authentication – an extra layer of security that most often requires users to enter a temporary code that is only accessible from a personal device, usually a cell phone, in addition to their passwords. The idea is that, even if hackers have cracked your password, they still must somehow get their hands on a physical device that only you carry.

This is a basic step that should be used whenever you need to log in to an online service – including email portals, Twitter, Facebook, bank accounts and wherever else you use passwords to protect and to prevent hackers obtaining sensitive information.

One problem with this: The text messages containing these codes can be intercepted. This year may also see a growing adoption of a new sort of two-factor authentication that security engineers believe may be safer than receiving a code on your iPhone: Google is now offering to provide people at high risk of surveillance a program that requires users deploy two physical authenticator keys as a final step for unlocking an account. The devices can fit on a keychain and use USB or bluetooth technology to communicate with your computer and smartphone.

Google’s two-factor authentication requires an extra login step.

Runa Sandvik, the senior director of information security at The New York Times, is a fan of Google’s new initiative, known as the Advanced Protection Program. “I think the Advanced Protection Program (APP) is a great option for at-risk users,” Sandvik told ICIJ. “I have, personally, used APP for a few months and see no reason not to turn it on.”

For more information on Google’s APP and its physical security key, the New York Times has a good article on it and you can also visit the Google’s website. (Unfortunately, this feature isn’t free – each key costs about $20.)

5. Slack alternatives for your office

Over the past several years, new technology known widely by the brand-named Slack has pervaded American office culture. It’s part chat, part email, highly distracting and can archive everything you say and all the documents you upload. Slack has been criticized for its lack of full encryption, and, last year, a web security researcher discovered that a vulnerability in Slack’s code would allow hackers to gain access to millions of users’ private conversations – a particularly sensitive potential exposure for some, given that Slack’s private channels are infamous for encouraging fierce workplace gossip.

Slack does not offer end-to-end encryption, so the contents of your communications may be retrievable if the firm receives an order from, say, an intelligence agency or law enforcement office. Martin Shelton, a data security researcher who works with at-risk groups, says that, although Slack may be the most user-friendly service of its kind, organizations seeking a higher level of security have other options. Semaphor, designed by the tech security firm SpiderOak, is a prominent alternative to Slack. Shelton recommends it as a “nice choice for an end-to-end encrypted chat,” but notes that its “user experience is a little clunky.”

Shelton also points to Mattermost, another potentially appealing chat application for organizations on perhaps the more established side. Like Signal, Mattermost’s code is open source, meaning that anyone can inspect its architecture for vulnerabilities.

“This is great because it’s regularly audited by security researchers,” Shelton says. “You can also host it on your own server, so you know where your data is located,” Shelton notes that this last feature can, however, mean a bit more work. “News institutions will need administrators who know what they’re doing to maintain the server,” Shelton says.

As the Electronic Frontier Foundation reminds us, good data security is a process, not just a series of products. The tools above only offer a start. Some commonly used digital security products that didn’t make the list also include email encryption – which can be a pain to set up but can ensure your encrypted emails are all but impenetrable – as well as secure and private web browsing with Tor and DuckDuckGo.

For more tools and a more detailed explanation of how to use them, take a look at the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Surveillance Self-Defense project and the Citizen Lab’s SecurityPlanner.org. Threats to journalists may be building, but, luckily, so are our defenses against them.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

 Source: This article was published crixeo.com By A.J. SØRENSEN - Contributed by Member: David J. Redcliff

UNLIKE GOOGLE, THE DUCKDUCKGO SEARCH ENGINE DOESN’T TRACK YOU.

In 2006 Gabriel Weinberg sold a company for millions. A year and a half later, he founded his next project with the money: an alternative search engine named DuckDuckGo. Initially, the goal was to make it more efficient and compelling than Google by cutting down on spam and providing instant answers, similar to a Wikipedia or IMDb. The project launched in 2008, bringing Weinberg’s brainchild into public consciousness.

But Weinberg didn’t realize at the time that the main reason people were wary of Google wasn’t the user experience but how the search engine tracked its users. Being the astute entrepreneur that Weinberg is, he instantly saw this as an area for an opportunity and a way to compete with one of the largest companies in the world. As a result, DuckDuckGo became the go-to search engine for privacy — long before the NSA leaks in 2013, when the government got “Snowdened,” and Facebook’s recent Cambridge Analytica scandal — all with a better user experience.

Here’s why you should consider making the move to the “Duck Side.”

1. THE SEARCH ENGINE THAT DOESN’T TRACK YOU

DuckDuckGo browser
DUCKDUCKGO

According to a micro-site connected to DuckDuckGo — DontTrack.us — Google tracks users on 75% of websites. The information gathered from your site visits and search terms can be used to follow you across over two million websites and applications. Oh, and all that private information is stored by Google indefinitely. (Hint: Don’t use Google for embarrassing searches that might cost you money during a divorce, for example. All that information can be subpoenaed by lawyers.)

Even Facebook tracks you across the internet. According to Weinberg, the social media company “operates a massive hidden tracker network.” He claims they’re “lurking behind about 25% of the top million sites, where consumers don’t expect to be tracked by Facebook.” And, as of now, there is no way to opt out of this so-called “experience.” (Don’t forget: Facebook owns Instagram.)

And since there are no digital privacy laws currently active in the United States, at the time of this writing anyway, consumers are forced to vote with their attention and time once again. As it stands now, companies are not required by federal law to share what information they collect, how it’s used, and whether or not it’s even been stolen. You’ve got to protect yourself by choosing your platforms and tools wisely.

As for DuckDuckGo, they do not track you or store your personal information. And while they do have some advertising on their platform for revenue purposes, you only see ads for what you search for — and those ads won’t stalk you around the web like a rabid spider.

2. DUCKDUCKGO IS A COMPANY WITH SERIOUS BALLS

DuckDuckGo browser
DUCKDUCKGO

Weinberg resembles a younger, techier version of Eric Bana, and he’s got the same gall of the actor/rally racer. Case in point: in 2011, Weinberg pulled a highly successful publicity stunt for his alternative search engine by strategically placing a billboard right in Google’s backyard that called out the company for tracking its users. It earned the scrappy start-up valuable press from the likes of USA Today, Business Insider and Wired.

For those opposed to Google’s handling of users’ data, the billboard represented a major burn. Of course, it’s just one of the many ways Weinberg helped his company gain users. I highly recommend Traction, a wildly useful book co-written by Weinberg and Justin Mares. It’s a must-read for any start-up founder or creative entrepreneur.

3. KEEP YOUR SEARCHES PRIVATE & EFFICIENT

DuckDuckGo browser

DUCKDUCKGO

As for working with search engines, think of all the “embarrassing searches” you wish to keep private, whatever they may be. Now imagine that Google has all that information stored indefinitely — plus, it can be held against you in a court of law. Scary stuff, right? Turns out that what you search for online can be far more sensitive than the things you openly share on social media platforms. So how can you keep that stuff private?

In 2017 DuckDuckGo was able to integrate with the Brave Browser to provide a potential solution. With most browsers, websites can still track and monitor your behavior, even while you’re in “private browsing mode.” However, with this new combination of Brave’s privacy protection features and DuckDuckGo’s private search capabilities, you can surf the web without having your search terms or personal information collected, sold or shared.

But that’s not the only thing DuckDuckGo has to offer for a more empowered user experience. Another feature the search engine has become known for are “bangs!” Here’s how they work.

DuckDuckGo browser
DUCKDUCKGO

Random example: Let’s say you want to find Camille Paglia books on Amazon. If you were to search via Google, you might type “site: amazon camille paglia.” Your results might look like this:

DuckDuckGo browser

GOOGLE

Now let’s say you do the same thing with DuckDuckGo’s bangs. In this case, you would type “!a Camille Paglia.” Here’s what you’d get:

DuckDuckGo browser

AMAZON

Bang! You’re right there on Amazon, redirected to their internal search page from DuckDuckGo.

Of course, you might be thinking, “Why not just search Amazon.com for the answer, to begin with?” Well, bangs aren’t just for searching Amazon. You can use bangs to search nearly 11,000 sites (as of this writing), including eBay, YouTube (owned by Google), Wikipedia, Instagram and more. You can even suggest new ones.

Plus, with DuckDuckGo, you can see social media profiles by searching the user’s handle, explore app stores and discover alternative apps, shorten and expand links/URLs, generate complex passwords, find rhymes, determine whether or not sites are down (or if it’s really just you), calculate loan payments, receive instant answers to questions and more — all without having to leave the search engine.

4. IT’S GROWING — FAST

DuckDuckGo browser

DUCKDUCKGO

In a sense, Weinberg has achieved his initial goal of creating a search engine that offers a more direct and spam-free user experience. It just also happens to be much more private and way less creepy than the buzzword alternatives. Perhaps that’s why it’s growing so damn fast — 10 years after launching, that is.

In fact, 2017 was a monumental year for DuckDuckGo, accounting for 36% of all searches ever conducted through the search engine. It was also during 2017 that the company achieved 55% growth in daily private searches, crossing the threshold of 20 million private searches a day. Sure, the experience isn’t as highly customized as Google’s — which relies on your personal data to fine-tune results — but this little search engine that could still manage to provide solid, relevant results without infringing on your personal privacy.

5. BALANCING THE SCALES OF GOOD & EVIL

DuckDuckGo browser

DUCKDUCKGO

When Google first started, it touted the mantra “Don’t be evil.” Curiously, it’s since changed to “Do the right thing.” It’s only now that most users have started to ask, “Do the right thing for whom?” And in light of the recent Facebook scandals, these same users are starting to wonder, “What the hell is my data actually being used for? Who does it benefit? And who actually has it?” Unsurprisingly, these are turning into the biggest questions of our time.

In the past, users assumed they had nothing to hide, and that it was even shameful to consider hiding their internet histories or online preferences. “Nobody cares about me. I’m nobody.” But to a major data company, one without constraints, how you spend your time and money, with whom, and on what sites can easily be sold to the highest bidder at your expense. So while Dax the Duck may not need to say, “We’re a source for good,” the brains behind DuckDuckGo seem to be balancing the scales in that direction anyway.

Through their donations to private organizations, as well as their micro-sites providing eye-opening data, various email campaigns to help internet users maintain their privacy, and plenty of generous content outlining the trouble with “informed consent” online, DuckDuckGo has become a force for good in the digital age. Of course, Google doesn’t have to become obsolete in the process — they still offer some remarkable services — but there need to be more alternatives if only to provide a choice. What do you want as a search engine user? And how do you want your information to be handled?

That’s the real service DuckDuckGo provides: it gives you the option to say no to track. And without real policies in place in the U.S. to protect internet users, your best bet for privacy and data protection may just be to #ComeToTheDuckSide. end

 

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published itsfoss.com By Ankush Das - Contributed by Member: Issac Avila

Brief: In this age of the internet, you can never be too careful with your privacy. Use these alternative search engines that do not track you.

Google – unquestionably being the best search engine out there, makes use of powerful and intelligent algorithms (including A.I. implementations) to let the users get the best out of a search engine with a personalized experience.

This sounds good until you start to live in a filter bubble. When you start seeing everything that ‘suits your taste’, you get detached from the reality. Too much of anything is not good. Too much of personalization is harmful as well.

This is why one should get out of this filter bubble and see the world as it is. But how do you do that?

You know that Google sure as hell tracks a lot of information about your connection and the system when you perform a search and take an action within the search engine or use other Google services such as Gmail.

So, if Google keeps on tracking you, the simple answer would be to stop using Google for searching the web. But what would you use in place of Google? Microsoft’s Bing is no saint either.

So, to address the netizens concerned about their privacy while using a search engine, I have curated a list of privacy oriented alternative search engines to Google. 

Best 8 Privacy-Oriented Alternative Search Engines To Google

Do note that the alternatives mentioned in this article are not necessarily “better” than Google, but only focuses on protecting users privacy. Here we go!

1. DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo is one of the most successful privacy oriented search engines that stands as an alternative to Google. The user experience offered by DuckDuckGo is commendable. I must say – “It’s unique in itself”.

DuckDuckGo, unlike Google, utilizes the traditional method of “sponsored links” to display the advertisements. The ads are not focused on you but only the topic you are searching for – so there is nothing that could generate a profile of you in any manner – thereby respecting your privacy.

Of course, DuckDuckGo’s search algorithm may not be the smartest around (because it has no idea who you are!). And, if you want to utilize one of the best privacy oriented alternative search engines to Google, you will have to forget about getting a personalized experience while searching for something.

The search results are simplified with specific meta data’s. It lets you select a country to get the most relevant result you may be looking for. Also, when you type in a question or searching for a fix, it might present you with an instant answer (fetched from the source).

Although, you might miss quite a few functionalities (like filtering images by license) – that is an obvious trade-off to protect your privacy.

2. Qwant

best privacy oriented search engine

Qwant is probably one of the most loved privacy oriented search engines after DuckDuckGo. It ensures neutrality, privacy, and digital freedom while you search for something on the Internet.

If you thought privacy-oriented search engines generally tend to offer a very casual user experience, you need to rethink after trying out Qwant. This is a very dynamic search engine with trending topics and news stories organized very well. It may not offer a personalized experience (given that it does not track you) – but it does feel like it partially with a rich user experience offered to compensate that in a way.

Qwant is a very useful search engine alternative to Google. It lists out all the web resources, social feeds, news, and images on the topic you search for.

3. Startpage

best privacy oriented search engine

Startpage is a good initiative as a privacy-oriented search engine alternative to Google. However, it may not be the best one around. The UI is very similar to that of Google’s (while displaying the search results – irrespective of the functionalities offered). It may not be a complete rip-off but it is not very impressive – everyone has got their own taste.

To protect your privacy, it lets you choose it. You can either select to visit the web pages using the proxy or without it. It’s all your choice. You also get to change the theme of the search engine. Well, I did enjoy my switch to the “Night” theme. There’s an interesting option with the help of which you can generate a custom URL keeping your settings intact as well.

4. Privatelee

best privacy oriented search engine

Privatelee is another kind of search engine specifically tailored to protect your online privacy. It does not track your search results or behavior in any way. However, you might get a lot of irrelevant results after the first ten matched results.

The search engine isn’t perfect to find a hidden treasure on the Internet but more for general queries. Privatelee also supports power commands – more like shortcuts – which helps you search for the exact thing in an efficient manner. It will save a lot of your time for pretty simple tasks such as searching for a movie on Netflix. If you were looking for a super fast privacy oriented search engine for common queries, Privatelee would be a great alternative to Google.

5. Swisscows

best privacy oriented search engine

Well, it isn’t dairy farm portfolio site but a privacy-oriented search engine as an alternative to Google. You may have known about it as Hulbee – but it has recently redirected its operation to a new domain. Nothing has really changed except for the name and domain of the search engine. It works the same way it was before as Hulbee.com.

Swisscows utilizes Bing to deliver the search results as per your query. When you search for something, you would notice a tag cloud on the left sidebar which is useful if you need to know about the related key terms and facts. The design language is a lot simpler but one of its kind among the other search engines out there. You get to filter the results according to the date but that’s about it – no more advanced options to tweak your search results. It utilizes a tile search technique (a semantic technology) to fetch the best results to your queries. The search algorithm makes sure that it is a family-friendly search engine with pornography and violence ruled out completely.

6. searX

best privacy oriented search engine

searX is an interesting search engine – which is technically defined as a “metasearch engine”. In other words, it utilizes other search engines and accumulates the results to your query in one place. It does not store your search data being an open source metasearch engine at the same time. You can review the source code, contribute, or even customize it as your own metasearch engine hosted on your server.

If you are fond of utilizing Torrent clients to download stuff, this search engine will help you find the magnet links to the exact files when you try searching for a file through searX. When you access the settings (preferences) for searX, you would find a lot of advanced things to tweak from your end. General tweaks include – adding/removing search engines, rewrite HTTP to HTTPS, remove tracker arguments from URL, and so on. It’s all yours to control. The user experience may not be the best here but if you want to utilize a lot of search engines while keeping your privacy in check, searX is a great alternative to Google.

7. Peekier

best privacy oriented search engine

Peekier is another fascinating privacy oriented search engine. Unlike the previous one, it is not a metasearch engine but has its own algorithm implemented. It may not be the fastest search engine I’ve ever used but it is an interesting take on how search engines can evolve in the near future. When you type in a search query, it not only fetches a list of results but also displays the preview images of the web pages listed. So, you get a “peek” on what you seek. While the search engine does not store your data, the web portals you visit do track you.

So, in order to avoid that to an extent, Peekier accesses the site and generates a preview image to decide whether to head into the site or not (without you requiring to access it). In that way, you allow less websites to know about you – mostly the ones you trust.

8. MetaGer

best privacy oriented search engine

MetaGer is yet another open source metasearch engine. However, unlike others, it takes privacy more seriously and enforces the use of Tor network for anonymous access to search results from a variety of search engines. Some search engines who claim to protect your privacy may share your information to the government (whatever they record) because the server is bound to US legal procedures. However, with MetaGer, the Germany-based server would protect even the anonymous data recorded while using MetaGer.

They do house a few number of advertisements (without trackers of course)- but you can get rid of those as well by joining in as a member of the non-profit organization – SUMA-EV – which sponsors the MetaGer search engine.

Wrapping Up

If you are concerned about your privacy, you should also take a look at some of the best privacy-focused Linux distributions. Among the search engine alternatives mentioned here – DuckDuckGo – is my personal favorite. But it really comes down to your preference and whom would you choose to trust while surfing the Internet.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published rankred.com - Contributed by Member: Jennifer Levin

Google tends to be a giant gorilla in the room during all SEO discussion. The reason behind this is its dominating market share – according to netmarketshare, Google holds more than 90% of mobile and tablet and around 80% of desktop global search engine market share.

However, it isn’t the only option. There are literally tons of search engines on the web. Some of them focus on tech news or research paper, while some provide a single line answer instead of listing millions of pages.

We would like to present you some of the most advanced alternatives to Google that will help you find what Google might not. We are not saying they are better than Google, but some of them are good at performing specific searches. Because our aim is to uncover the things you might not aware of, we haven’t included some big players like Bing, Baidu and Yahoo search.

18. StartPage

startpage

StartPage was the first search engine to allow users to search privately. None of your details are recorded and no cookies are used, unless you allow it to remember your preferences. It also provides a proxy for those who want to not just search, but browse the internet with full privacy.

In 2014, the company released a privacy-protecting email service, called StartMail. As of 2015, the search engine reached its record daily direct queries of 5.7 million (28-day average).

17. BoardReader

BoardReader is a very useful resource for any type of community research, as it searches forums and message boards. Users can either look for content on the forums or for forums related to the specific topic.

The front-end looks quite simple, exactly what forum search engine should look like, but on the back-end, they run a robust data business by selling off user’s data to advertising companies.

16. Yippy

Founded in 2009, Yippy is a metasearch engine that offers a cluster of results. It’s search technology is used in IBM Watson Explorer (a cognitive exploration and content analysis platform).

With Yippy, you can search different types of content, including news, images, blogs, government data, etc., and filter the results category wise or flag any inappropriate content. Like Google, it lets you view cached web pages and filter results by sources or tag clouds. Also, there is a preview link on each result that shows how content looks like, on the same page.

15. FindSounds

FindSounds is the perfect search engine for finding sound effects for personal or commercial use. Just filter the results before you begin, using the suitable checkboxes. You can search anything by category, from animal to vehicle sound effects, and the search engine will return you detailed results, along with file format, length, and bit-rate information.

Overall, searching sound effects using google is always an option, but FindSounds is the perfect sound engine to speed up your search and get the specific element you are looking for.

14. SearchCode

SearchCode is a free source code and documentation search engine that finds code snippets from open source repositories. It has indexed more than 20 billion lines of code, from projects on Google code, Github, Sourceforge, GitLab, Bitbucket, Codeplex and more.

Most web crawlers face difficulties while searching for special characters used in the code. SearchCode overcomes this issue and lets you search for code by method name, variable name, operations, usage, security flaws and by special characters much faster than other code search engines.

13. GigaBlast

GigaBlast is an open source search engine, written in C and C++ programming language. As of 2015, they had indexed more than 12 billion web pages and received billions of queries per month. It provides search results to other companies like Zuula, Blingo, Clusty, and Snap.

GigaBlast allows you to search with certain customizations and optional parameters, for instance, searching by exact phrase, terms, filetypes, languages and much more.

12. KidRex and Kiddle

KidRex and Kiddle are both child-safe search engine that keeps out age-inappropriate content unfit for consumption for children. Although they are powered by Google Custom Search (utilize Google SafeSearch), they maintain their own database of inappropriate keywords and websites.

The interface of KidRex features hand-drawn crayon and colored marker design, whereas, Kiddle is written in the characteristic colorful Google Style, with a red droid alien on the top waiting to answer your queries.

Also, you will find search results are slightly modified. For instance, if you search Narendra Modi, the search engine would return web pages from sites like famousbirthdays.com, britannica.com, instead of Wikipedia and news websites. The aim is to provide the simple and easy-to-read content that kids could understand without putting a lot of effort.

11. MetaGer

MetaGer is German-based metasearch engine, developed on 24 small-scale web crawlers. It focuses on user’s privacy and makes searches untraceable by leaving no footprint behind. Also, it integrates a proxy server so that users can open any link anonymously from the search results while keeping their IP address hidden from the destination server. This eliminates the chances of advertisers to target you for ads.

The results are obtained from 50 different search engines. Before presenting final results of the query, they are filtered, compiled an sorted.

10. Libraries.io

This is an open source search engine for finding software development project, including new frameworks, libraries, and tools. It monitors more than 2.5 million open source libraries across 34 different package managers.

In order to collect the library information, the website uses the dominant package manager for each supported programming language. Then, it organizes them by the package manager, programming language, license (MIT or GPL), and by keyword.

9. Creative Commons Search

This search engine is extremely useful for bloggers and authors who need content that could be reused in a blog post or commercial applications. It allows users to search for images and contents that are released under the creative commons license.

The website provides social features, allowing users to build and share lists, as well as add tags to the objects in the commons and save their searches. It also offers some useful filters such as, find images that can be used for commercial purpose or images that can be modified and reused, or search within tags, title and creator.

8. IxQuick

IxQuick is the metasearch engine that provides the top 10 results from different search engines. In order to rank the results, it uses a ‘star system’ that awards one star to each result that has been returned from a search engine. Therefore, results returned from the most search engines would be at the top.

IxQuick doesn’t store your private details – no history, no query is collected. However, it uses only one cookie, known as ‘preference’, to remember your search preferences for future searches, which automatically gets deleted if you don’t use visit IxQuick for 90 days. Moreover, with around 5.7 million searches per day, the network is growing very fast and currently supports 17 languages.

7. Dogpile

Yet another metasearch engine that gets results from multiple search engines (including Google, Bing, and Yahoo) and directories and then presents them combined to the user. There is an advanced search option that lets you narrow down searches by exact phrase, date, language, and adult content. Also, you can set your own preference and customize default search settings.

In addition to that, Dogpile recommends related content based on the original search term, keeps track of the 15 most recent searches, and shows recent popular searches from the other users.

6. Internet Archive

It’s a nonprofit digital library that aims to provide universal access to all knowledge. Internet Archive consists of websites, music, images, videos, software applications and games, and around 3 million books that fall under public domain.

As of 2016, Internet archive had 15 petabytes of data, advocating for a free and open Internet. Its web archive, known as Wayback Machine, allows users to search for iterations of a website in the past. It contains more than 308 billion web captures, making it one of the world’s largest digitization projects.

5. Yandex

Yandex is the largest search engine in Russia with nearly 65% of Russian market share. According to the Comscore, it is the fourth largest search engine in the world with over 150 million searches per day as of 2012.

Yandex features a parallel search that shows results from main web index as well as specialized information resources, including blogs, news, image and video webpages, and eCommerce sites. In addition, the search engine provides supplementary information (like sports results), and contains spell checkers, autocomplete functionality and antivirus that detects malicious content on web pages.

4. WolframAlpha

WolframAlpha is a computational knowledge engine that answers factual questions from externally sourced curated data. It does not provide a list of web pages or documents that might contain the specific answer you are looking for. Instead, you get a one-word or one-line, and to-the-point answer.

It is written in Wolfram programming language (contains over 15 million lines of code) and runs on more than 10,000 CPUs. It is based on a computational platform known as Wolfram Mathematica that encompasses numerical computation, computer algebra, statistics and visualization capabilities.

3. Ask.com

Launched in 1996, Ask.com is a question answering-focused web search engine. Despite its age, Ask is still very active. They have coupled their search-system with robust questions and answer system with billions of online content.

As of 2014, the website had 180 million global users per month (with a larger user base in the US), and to date, its mobile app has been downloaded over 40 million times. They acquired a social networking site, Ask.fm, where people can ask questions with the option of anonymity. ASKfm handles around 20,000 questions every minute.

2. Ecosia

Ecosia donates 80% of its profit to plant trees and supports full financial transparency. As of October 2017, the website has reached the milestone of 15 million trees planted. In 2015, the company was shortlisted for the European Tech Startups Awards under the ‘Best European Startup Aimed at Improving Society’ category.

The search result(s) of Ecosia is powered by Bing and Ecosia’s own search algorithms. The company claims that it takes 45 searches to fund the planting of the single tree, and they assure that algorithms can easily detect fake clicks and invalidate them. Currently, it’s the default search engine of Vivaldi, Waterfox, and Polarity web browser.

1. DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo is the best alternative option available out there. The search engine doesn’t collect any of your personal information or store your history. They don’t follow around you with ads because they have nothing to sell to advertisers.

DuckDuckGo doesn’t provide personalized results – all users will see the same results for a given search query. Rather than returning thousands of results, it emphasizes on returning the best results and extracts those results from more than 400 sources. It’s a smart search engine (uses semantic search technique like Google) that depends on a highly evolved contextual library for intuiting the user’s intent.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was published ebizmba.com - Contributed by Member:Dorothy Allen

Here are the top 15 Most Popular Search Engines as derived from our eBizMBA Rank which is a continually updated average of each website's U.S. Traffic Rank from Quantcast and Global Traffic Rank from both Alexa and SimilarWeb."*#*" Denotes an estimate for sites with limited data.

 Google1 | Google

1 - eBizMBA Rank | 1,800,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 1 - Quantcast Rank | 1 - Alexa Rank | 1 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

bing2 | Bing
33 - eBizMBA Rank | 500,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 8 - Quantcast Rank | 40 - Alexa Rank | 43 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

search.yahoo3 | Yahoo! Search
43 - eBizMBA Rank | 490,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 8 - Quantcast Rank | *56* - Alexa Rank | *67* - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

baidu4 | Baidu
54 - eBizMBA Rank | 480,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | *150* - Quantcast Rank | 4- Alexa Rank | 9 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

ask5 | Ask
205 - eBizMBA Rank | 300,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 329 - Quantcast Rank | 110 - Alexa Rank | 177 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

search.aol6 | Aol Search
273 - eBizMBA Rank | 200,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | *350* - Quantcast Rank | 276 - Alexa Rank | *194* - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

duckduckgo7 | DuckDuckGo
392 - eBizMBA Rank | 150,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 421 - Quantcast Rank | 505 - Alexa Rank | 251 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

wolframalpha8 | WolframAlpha
1878 - eBizMBA Rank | 35,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 1773 - Quantcast Rank | 1817 - Alexa Rank | 2044 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

yandex9 | Yandex
2190 - eBizMBA Rank | 30,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 3228 - Quantcast Rank | 2120 - Alexa Rank | 1221 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

webcrawler10 | WebCrawler
2955 - eBizMBA Rank | 25,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 1137 - Quantcast Rank | 2289 - Alexa Rank | 5438 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

search11 | Search
3021 - eBizMBA Rank | 20,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 221 - Quantcast Rank | 4513 - Alexa Rank | 4330 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

dogpile12 | dogpile
4053 - eBizMBA Rank | 12,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 3075 - Quantcast Rank | 4604 - Alexa Rank | 4479 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

ixquick13 | ixquick
4415 - eBizMBA Rank | 11,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 5563 - Quantcast Rank | 4590 - Alexa Rank | 3091 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

excite14 | excite
6873 - eBizMBA Rank | 8,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | *6900* - Quantcast Rank | 6782 - Alexa Rank | 6938 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

info15 | Info
7172 - eBizMBA Rank | 7,000,000 - Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 3938 - Quantcast Rank | 7566 - Alexa Rank | 10013 - SimilarWeb Rank | Last Updated: May 1, 2018.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published blog.kissmetrics.com By Jonathan Cabin - Contributed by Member: Issac Avila

Have you ever been looking for something but didn’t know where to find it? If that something is online, then your search is over (or just about to begin). The following are 40 advanced and alternative search engines that you can use to find just about anything on the Internet. Use them to follow discussions about your industry, monitor your online reputation, and much more!

General Search

To start off our search adventure, let’s look at some general search engines beyond the top three.

DuckDuckGo

Concerned about online privacy? DuckDuckGo prides themselves as being the search engine that does not track or personalize your searches and results. They even offer handy visual guides on Google tracking and filter bubbling. And if you’re an iOS user, you can set DuckDuckGo to be the default search engine in Safari. It’s also an option for Safari on MacOS.

Search Encrypt

Looking for an alternative to DuckDuckGo? Give Search Encrypt a try. Like DuckDuckGo, they are a privacy-based search engine. It includes a general search function, as well as image and video search.

Ecosia

Want trees planted while you search? That’s what Ecosia does! Simply run your normal searches and Ecosia will use its surplus income to conservationist organizations that plant trees. And you don’t have to sacrifice low-quality results to do good – Ecosia uses Bing and their own search algorithms.

Dogpile

If you want results from the top three search engines, but don’t want to go to them individually, try Dogpile. It’s results are pulled from the top three search engines “without all the mess.”

Blekko

Want spam free search results? Blekko‘s mission is to provide a differentiated, editorial voice in search. They look for quality over quantity, source-based authority over link based, removes sites whose primary purpose is monetization over information and uses human curating through the use of user tags.

WolframAlpha

Looking for a search engine based on computation and metrics? Try WolframAlpha. It will give you website data, historical information by date, unit conversions, stock data, sports statistics, and more. You can see examples by topicto learn more.

Gigablast

Want an open source search engine? Check out Gigablast. While it doesn’t always get things right, it does provide a retro look, results return quickly, and a feature similar to the now-defunct Google Instant.

Social Network Specific Advanced Search

Need to find something specific on one of the top social networks? Here are some great advanced search pages.

Facebook Search

Want to see a particular search across different areas of Facebook? Use Facebook Advanced Search. When you type in your query, click on the “see more results” link at bottom of the suggestions. Then use the filters on the left to see results within people, pages, places, groups, and more.

LinkedIn People Search

If you want to find some new connections on LinkedIn, use the Advanced People Search. This will let you narrow down your results by the above plus relationship and language. Premium members will have access to additional search filters including groups, company size, years of experience, and more.

LinkedIn Job Search

LinkedIn offers job seekers an Advanced Job Search to find jobs using the above information plus experience level and industry. Premium members can narrow their search down further by the salary offered.

LinkedIn Answers Search

LinkedIn Answers is a great way to gain exposure and build authority in your industry. Use the Answers Advanced Search to find the perfect questions to answer.

Twitter Search

Twitter’s Advanced Search is a great way to find better results on Twitter. It is especially great for businesses looking for a local audience by allowing them to filter their results using the Near this place field.

Social Search

The following search engines will allow you to search one or more social networks in one place and gain additional data about the results.

Keyhole

Keyhole allows you to search for hashtags, keywords, @mentions, and URLs. Want to see how your latest blog post was shared across social networks? Just select URL on Keyhole and put in the URL and you’ll see who has shared it.

Social Mention

Social Mention allows you to search across multiple types of networks including blogs, microblogs, bookmarks, comments, events, images, news, and more.

Buzzsumo

Use Buzzsumo if you have a topic in mind and want to see which articles on the web were most shared for that particular search. There is a paid version that can give you access to more tools for each topic.

Forums

Want to participate in forums in your industry? Use this search engine to find results specifically on forums.

Boardreader

BoardReader allows you to search forums and narrow results down by date (last day through last year) and language.

Blogs

Find industry related blogs and posts using the following search engines.

Regator

Regator allows you to search for blogs and posts on any topic, then narrow down your results by posts with audio or video, date range, topic, and domain.

Documents, eBooks, and Presentations

If you’re looking for documents, eBooks, presentations, or other similar file types, try the following searches.

Google Advanced Search

Google Advanced Search allows you to search for specific types of documents. Looking specifically for PDFs? Set that as your criteria. Want to search for Word docs or Powerpoint presentations? Then tell Google to find those file types.

Scribd

Scribd is the largest social reading and publishing network that allows you to discover original written content across the web. Sort results by category, language, length, file types, upload date, and cost (free or for sale).

SlideShare

SlideShare is the largest community for sharing presentations. If you missed a conference or webinar, there’s a good chance the slides from your favorite speakers are here.

Image Search

Looking for beautiful images? Try these image search engines – note that you must gain permission to use any images you find unless they are specifically marked as Creative Commons licensed.

Flickr

Flickr offers an advanced search screen that allows you to find photos, screenshots, illustrations, and videos on their network. You can also search within Creative Commons licensed content.

Pinterest

The ultimate image platform, Pinterest allows you to search for anything visual – clothing, cars, floors, airplanes, etc and pin it to your favorites. Just be sure you don’t steal copyright work. You will need to have an account before you can begin searching.

Bing

Bing offers an image search that starts out with the top trending images, then leads to images which can be filtered by size, layout, and other criteria. They also display tabs above the results with related search queries.

Google

Google Advanced Image Search allows you to get even more specific about the images you are looking for, including specifying whether they are faces, photos, clip arts, or line drawings. You can also search within images labeled for reuse commercially and with modifications.

TinEye

Have you seen an image around the web and want to know where it came from? That’s what TinEye is for. Just put your image in the search box and TinEye will find where that image has been seen from around the web.

Creative Commons Media

Need to find media created by others to use on your website? Try these Creative Commons searches.

Creative Commons

Looking for only images that you can repurpose, use for commercial purposes, or modify? Try the Creative Commons Search which will allow you to look through multiple sources including Flickr, Google Images, Wikimedia, and YouTube.

Wikimedia

Wikimedia Commons has over 12 million files in their database of freely usable images, sound bites, and videos. Use the search box or browse by categories for different types of media.

Video Search

Looking for a video to embed on your website or simply entertain you? Try these video search engines that look across multiple sources to find what you need.

Yahoo

Yahoo Video Search allows you to search through video content from their own network, YouTube, Dailymotion, Metacafe, Myspace, Hulu, and other online video providers for videos on any topic.

360Daily

360Daily allows you to go beyond YouTube to find videos on any topic from hundreds of sites including big names like YouTube and Hulu. If you’re looking for video, you’ll likely find it here.

AOL Video Search

AOL Video aggregates the days best clips from around the web, but you can also use it as a search engine.

Google Video

With Google Video Search you’ll be able to search for videos on any topic and filter your results by duration, the date when uploaded, video source, and much more.

Website Data & Statistics

Looking for information about your favorite brands and websites? Try out these search engines for data and statistics.

CrunchBase

CrunchBase offers insight into your favorite online brands and companies. Listings will tell you people who are associated with a company, contact information, related videos, screenshots, and more.

SimilarWeb

SimilarWeb allows you to search for website or app profiles based specific domains or app names. Domains with a high volume of traffic will have data including total regional visitors per month, pageviews online vs. mobile, demographics, sites similar audiences like, and more.

BuiltWith

Curious to see what technology your favorite sites use and usage trends of that technology? BuiltWith allows you to search for domains and see the technology they use, including analytics, content management systems, coding, and widgets. You can also click on any of the products to see usage trends, industries using the technology, and more.

Advanced Google

Can’t get away from Google, but want to get more out of it than a simple Google.com search? Try these advanced Google search features.

Google Advanced Search

Looking for something specific? Try Google Advanced Search or use Advanced Operators in your search queries.

Google Scholar

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Categorized in Search Engine

The company’s revamped app and browser extension will block ad tracking networks from companies like Google and Facebook

DuckDuckGo is launching updated versions of its browser extension and mobile app, with the promise of keeping internet users safe from snooping “beyond the search box.”

The company’s flagship product, its privacy-focused search engine, will remain the same, but the revamped extension and app will offer new tools to help users keep their web-browsing as safe and private as possible. These include grade ratings for websites, factoring in their use of encryption and ad tracking networks, and offering summaries of their terms of service (with summaries provided by third-party Terms of Service Didn’t Read). The app and extension are available for FirefoxSafariChromeiOS, and Android.

The ability to block ad tracking networks is probably the most important feature here. These networks are used by companies like Google and Facebook to follow users around the web, stitching together their browsing history to create a more accurate profile for targeted advertising. DuckDuckGo says its software will “expose and block” these trackers when it can find them. Although, in the cat and mouse game of advertising vs. privacy tech, it won’t always be able to catch them all.

DuckDuckGo has long been a small fish in a big pond (or should that be a small duck), but its pitch to users continues to prove popular. At the beginning of 2017, it celebrated 10 billion searches since its creation in 2009. This figure now stands at 16 billion — an increase of more than 50 percent in less than a year.

According to DuckDuckGo CEO Gabriel Weinberg, this shows the appetite for privacy online is only getting stronger. And, says Weinberg, the more people that use tools like DuckDuckGo’s, the more tech companies will be forced to reconsider their business model. “We’ll collectively raise the Internet’s privacy grade, ending the widespread use of invasive tracking,” writes Weinberg. It’s ambitious, to say the least.

Source: This article was published theverge.com By James Vincent

Categorized in Search Engine
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