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Some users still get Edge crashes with Google as the default search engine – a workaround is to switch to Bing.

Microsoft has now offered an explanation for the bug that caused Chromium-based Edge to crash when Google was set as the default search engine – but didn't crash if Microsoft's much less popular Bing was set instead. 

The crashes were happening when users typed in the address bar. The conditions for the crash made it appear to some that there was a skirmish playing out between Google and Microsoft on the new Edge, which ships with Bing as the default search engine and strips out many Google features that are in Chrome. 

At the time, Microsoft didn't explain the cause of the crashes and why it only impacted Edge with Google as the default. However, after fixing the bug it did advise users to "revert your browser settings that you may have changed" to avoid the crashes. 

As spotted by Techdows, the Microsoft Edge team has now explained in a Reddit post that its "friends at Google" helped discover the cause of the crashes and even rolled back a recent change in Google search to mitigate the issue on Edge. 

"Our engineers found that an unrecognized token in the search suggestions JSON was causing the Edge browser to crash when typing in the address bar with Google set as the default search engine," explains MSFTMissy, a community manager for Edge. 

"We reached out to our friends at Google to see if they knew of a change that could've affected this. After investigating, they rolled back a recent update to Google's search service to help mitigate the crash on Edge.

"Thanks to the swift action on their team, we confirmed the issue was mitigated in Edge around 7:30pm Pacific. To insure we were not blocking the deployment of their changes, we had also rolled out a fix to our Stable channel."

The Microsoft Edge team is now recommending that Edge users update to version 84.0.522.52, which contains updates that address the bug. It's also rolling out these changes to Edge on the Beta and Dev channels. 

However, in a subsequent update, MSFTMissy noted that some users were still experiencing the same crashes despite being on the latest version of Edge. 

One of three workarounds is to "change your search engine back to Bing, temporarily".

Other workarounds include turning off Search Suggestions in edge://settings/search, to use Edge in InPrivate, or to sign out of the browser.

[Source: This article was published in zdnet.com By Liam Tung - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jasper Solander]

Categorized in Search Engine

With Google dominating the search engine space, you may be wondering why we need another search engine. However, giving the well-known privacy issues with Google and a couple of other major search engines like Bing and Yahoo, people are beginning to look for alternative search engines especially the ones that support their causes.

Ekoru.org is a new search engine that aims to help save our oceans by addressing two key problems, plastic pollution and CO2 levels. The promise is simple. 60% of revenue goes to partners involved with ocean cleanup and ocean reforestation. That’s right, you read correctly. Reforestation. In the ocean.

The health of our oceans is at a tipping point with unprecedented plastic pollution and damage to marine life and eco-systems. Covering 71% of our planet and containing 96% of all of our water, the health of our oceans is intrinsically linked to our future.

This search engine for the oceans was started by Australian expatriate Ati Bakush and Alison Lee a husband and wife team living in Malaysia. Bakush has 20 years of experience developing software for mobile operator networks and internet service providers, and Lee a former country marketing manager for Nike. Their combined expertise in technology and marketing in addition for their love for the environment resulted in the Ekoru.org search engine.

Like any search engine, as users submit their queries, related sponsored links may appear. If a user clicks on a sponsored link the website makes money which is then shared with it’s non-profit partners. Ekoru.org is partnering with Big Blue Ocean Cleanup to remove plastic and Operation Posidonia to reforest our oceans.

Operation Posidonia led by the University of New South Wales Australia, is working on reforesting the ocean by replanting seagrass. These hidden meadows of green under our oceans can trap carbon up to 40 times faster than tropical rainforests and produce oxygen concurrently. They are the unsung heroes in the fight against climate change. A blue carbon sink which is actually green!

Big Blue Ocean Cleanup is a non-profit with volunteer teams around the world that clean waters and coastlines of waste and plastic. When a whale dies of starvation with a belly full of plastic, we lose an important ally in the fight against climate change.

Whales are vital to the growth of phytoplankton which thrive when they relieve themselves and release a “poonami” in the ocean. Phytoplankton absorb the same amount of carbon as 4 Amazon forests and produce 50% of the oxygen in our atmosphere.

Ekoru’s commitment to the environment also extends to infrastructure with servers powered entirely by hydro-electricity. Each server is water-cooled eliminating the need for onboard fans, and natural airflows in the building mean no power-hungry air conditioning is required. Every search is as environmentally friendly as possible.

A strict privacy policy ensures that users concerned about their privacy have peace of mind. Every search is encrypted and private, and no data is stored on servers about user search activity.

Ekoru.org is already available as an option in some desktop and mobile browsers, such as Pale Moon and Monument. An easily installed browser extension is available for Chrome, Edge, Firefox, and Brave desktop to make it your default search engine. An Android application is available with an iOS version available soon.

Since launch, Ekoru.org has received a fantastic response from users around the world. Ocean lovers now have the opportunity to help their oceans through the simple act of searching. Every Ekoru search leaves a minimal carbon footprint while helping to clean and reforest our oceans. Give it a try and change your search engine to help save our oceans.

[Source: This article was published in techstartups.com - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jeremy Frink]

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was Published appuals.com By Bill Wilson - Contributed by Member: Edna Thomas

Safe Search is a built-in security feature that filets out inappropriate web content. Although it used to be quite easy to disable or enable Safe search for Internet Explorer, the default behavior has changed with the launch of Windows 10.

Even though the Edge browser includes a setting that allows users to disable Safe Search, for some users Safe Search refuses to be disabled due to a glitch, child account type or browser setting. Here’s the error message that most affected users see after being unable to disable SafeSearch:

“We’ve set SafeSearch to strict because your browser communicated your preference for a safe web browsing experience”

Some users have been reaching us with questions after being unable to disable Safe Search for Microsoft Edge and/or Internet Explorer. Whenever this issue occurs, the user is unable to disable Safe for multiple search engines including Bing, Google or Yahoo. The restriction also applies to Youtube and a few other content websites.

As per most user reports, this particular issue is either caused by an internal Edge bug or by the fact that the current account is enabled as a child account with limited privileges.

If you’re currently struggling to turn off Safe Search for Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer, this article will give you some basic troubleshooting guides. Please follow the methods below in order until you stumble upon a fix that resolves the Safe Search won’t rurn off issue.

Method 1: Turning Safe Search Off from inside the Search Engine’s Settings

Before we dig into other troubleshooting guides, let’s see if you’re trying to turn off Bing’s SafeSearch setting from the right menu. Since disabling or enabling SafeSearch is no longer done through your browser settings, you’ll need to navigate to the home page of your search engine.

Please follow the guide specific to your preferred search engine to turn Safe Search Off.

Here’s a quick guide on turning Bing SafeSearch on or off for the Bing search engine:

  1. Open Internet Explorer or Edge Browser and navigate Bing.com.
  2. Make sure you are signed in with your user account, then click on the action button (top-right corner) and click on Settings.
  3. In the Settings menu of Bing, go to the Search section and set SafeSearch to Off.
  4. Hit Save button at the bottom of the menu and see if Safe Search is now disabled when using Bing.

Here’s a quick guide on how to disable Safe Search for Google search engine:

  1. Open Microsoft Edge or Internet Explorer and access the Google Search Engine.
  2. Make sure you are logged in with your Google account and search for something.
  3. Above the search results, click on Settings and then choose to Turn off SafeSearch.
    In the event that this method wasn’t effective in disabling Safe Search, move down to the next method below.

Method 2: Apply all pending Windows updates

If the first method wasn’t effective, let’s eliminate the possibility of an internal bug. The inability to turn off Safe search is a known Windows 10 bug that Microsoft has already addressed with a couple of hotfixes.

If you’re unable to turn Safe Search off due to Windows 10 glitch, applying all the pending Windows updates will automatically resolve the issue. Here’s a quick guide on applying all the pending Windows updates:

  1. Press Windows key + R to open up a Run box. Next, type “ms-settings:windowsupdate” and hit Enter to open the Windows Update tab from the Settings menu.
  2. In the Windows Update screen, click the Check for updates button and wait until the analysis is complete.
  3. Once Windows figures out which updates need to be applied and their order, start following the on-screen prompts to apply them to your system. Keep in mind that depending on how many pending updates you have, your PC might restart several times.
  4. After every startup, return to the Windows Update screen and install every pending update until there is none left.
  5. Once all updates are installed, perform a final restart. At the next startup, see whether you are able to disable Safe Search. If the feature is still refusing to be turned off, continue down with the next method below.

Method 3: Disabling Safe Search via the InPrivate mode

Some users have managed to disable Safe Search by using the InPrivate mode. In the instance that the Safe Search setting is locked to Strict or Moderate, you can try to modify the setting from an InPrivate mode in the Edge browser.

Here’s a quick guide on disabling Safe Search from an InPrivate window of Microsoft Edge:

  1. Open Microsoft Edge and press Ctrl + Shift + P to open a new InPrivate window.
  2. In the newly opened InPrivate window, navigate to the search engine of your choice, and follow Method 1again to disable Safe Search (while in an InPrivate window).

If disabling Safe Search from an InPrivate window wasn’t effective, move down to the final method.

Method 4: Creating a new Windows user account

Some users have finally managed to resolve the issue and disable Safe Search after creating a new Windows user account. As it turns out, Windows 10 is capable of overriding the Safe Search settings of your search engines if the active account is enabled as a child of another one.

In this case, the solution would be to create a new user account and grant it administrative privileges. Here’s a quick guide on how to do this:

  1. Press Windows key + R to open up a new Run box. Then, type “netplwiz” and hit Enter to open up the User Accounts window.
  2. In the User Accounts window, expand the Users tab and click the Add button.
  3. In the next window, click on Sign in without a Microsoft account to proceed.
  4. Then, click on Local Account and hit the Next button.
  5. Insert your account name and password and hit the Next button again to complete the process.
  6. Sign-in with your newly created user account either by logging out or by restarting your PC and see if the Safe Search won’t Turn Off issue has been resolved.

Categorized in Search Engine

We take a look at the performance and features of the big four internet browsers to see which one will serve you best in 2017.

The web browser is by far the most important piece of software on your PC—at least for most users. Unless you’re at a workstation crunching numbers or editing the next Star Wars you probably spend the majority of your computer time staring at a web app or a website.

That’s why it’s important to make sure you’ve always got the best tool for the job, and in 2017 that does not include Internet Explorer. If you still want the built-in option for Windows that would be Edge, but it’s hard to stick strictly with Edge when you’ve got other choices including Google’s Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Opera.

Let’s take a look at the four major (and modern) browsers to see how they stack up in 2017.

(If none of these internet browsers strike your fancy, head over to PCWorld's roundup of 10 intriguing alternative browsers.)

Browsers in brief

Chrome

chromelogo

The current people’s champion, Google Chrome tops the metrics charts of both StatCounter and NetMarketShare by a huge margin. Google’s browser has built a dedicated fan base thanks to its massive extensions library, and the fact that it just gets out of your way to put the focus on web content, not the browser’s trimmings.

Chrome isn’t quite as simplistic as it once was, but it’s still very easy to use. There isn’t much to Chrome except a huge URL bar—known as the OmniBar—plus a space for extensions, a bookmarking icon, tabs, and that’s it.

Yet Google still finds a way to hide all kinds of features inside the browser, including deep integration with Google’s services. This allows you to sync your bookmarks, passwords, open tabs, and more across devices. Chrome also has multi-account support if you need it on a family machine, a built-in PDF viewer, built-in Google Translate functionality, a task manager, and the always handy Paste and go context menu item.

If there’s one complaint people have about Chrome it’s that the browser eats up available memory. Our browser testing in 2015 showed that Chrome was definitely a memory beast, but two years later it fared pretty well in our tests.

Firefox

 

mozilla firefox logo

 

For users who love extensibility but want greater privacy than a Google-made browser can provide, the open source Mozilla Firefox is your best bet. Firefox paved the way for other browsers to become extensible, and while Firefox’s add-on catalog is pretty good, it now pales in comparison to the Chrome Web Store. Like Google, Firefox has a sync feature.

 

Where Firefox has really shined in recent years is with the browser’s incognito mode. All browsers have a private mode that lets you browse without any of your activity being logged in your saved history. But most of the time these private modes still allow websites to track your activity for that specific session. Firefox does away with this by including an ad and tracker blocker when using incognito mode.

Opera

 

operabrowser

 

Before Chrome, Opera was a popular choice among power users—a position former Opera CEO Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner is trying to take back with Vivaldi. Opera today is really one of the more under-rated browsers around. It’s based on the same core technologies as Chrome (the Blink rendering engine and the JavaScript V8 engine), which means it can run many Chrome extensions—there’s even an extension for installing extensions from the Chrome Web Store.

Opera’s also got a few unusual features like Turbo, which saves on load times and bandwidth by compressing webpages on Opera’s servers. It’s also got a nice security feature called domain highlighting that hides most of the URL so that users can see easily and clearly if they’re on Google.com or google.com.scam.com—with scam.com being the actual website.

More recently, Opera introduced its own take on the social sidebar with one-click access to services such as WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Telegram. Like Chrome and Firefox, Opera also has its own cross-device syncing feature.

Microsoft Edge

 

microsotedge

 

Microsoft Edge is still a work in progress. You'll see below that its performance is getting better, but that’s not all there is to the browser in 2017. The Edge extensions library is tiny, its sync functionality is near nonexistent, and it doesn’t get updates nearly fast enough—though that is expected to change with the Fall Creators Update.

Despite its shortcomings, Edge has several helpful features that will appeal to some. Edge is deeply integrated with Windows 10’s inking capabilities, as well as with OneNote, making it easy to clip a webpage, annotate it, and save it to a notebook. Cortana is also a big part of Edge. You can use Microsoft’s digital assistant to quickly search for information, compare prices, or get a quick calculation.

Like Chrome, Edge has a casting feature. There’s also a nifty set-aside tabs feature to stash a collection of websites, the ability to read ebooks (great for tablets), and an MSN.com-ish new-tab page.

Benchmarks

That’s enough of an overview for our four contestants, let’s get down to business. To see which browser is worthy of your bandwidth in 2017 we used a variety of testing tools. For judging JavaScript we used JetStream, and the now unsupported Octane 2.0 and SunSpider 1.0.2 benchmarking tools. Then we turned to WebXPRT 2015 and Speedometer to challenge our browsers under simulated web app workloads.

Finally, we took a look at CPU and RAM usage. Similar to what we did in 2015, we loaded a set of 20 websites in a single window in quick succession using either a batch file or the command line depending on the quirks of the browser in question. Once all tabs began loading, we waited 45 seconds, and then checked the CPU and RAM usage. The idea was to see the amount of system resources the browser would use during a heavy workload.

One difference from 2015 is that Flash was turned off for each browser—benchmarks were done with and without the plugin in 2015. In recent years, most browser makers have de-emphasized Flash, enabling it as “click-to-play” and blocking nonessential website elements that use Flash. Since the web is moving to a Flash-free existence we decided to live the dream right now.

For these tests our rig was an Acer Aspire E15-575-33BM laptop loaded with Windows 10 Home (Creators Update), a 1TB hard drive, 4GB RAM, and an Intel Core i3-7100U. Each browser was tested over a hard line internet connection.

Edge makes big gains

Looking at both Jetstream and SunSpider, Edge won top marks by a wide margin. SunSpider has been deprecated for some time and is no longer supported, but the result was still surprising. For Octane 2.0, which is also no longer supported, Firefox and Opera vied for top spot, with Chrome the laggard by a wide margin. For this set of benchmark scores higher is better with the exception of SunSpider.

browser performance jetstream2

The JavaScript test Jetstream shows Microsoft Edge hanging tough.

browser performance sunspider

SunSpider also shows Microsoft Edge with a performance edge, loading JavaScript quite a bit more quickly than others.

browser performance octane

 

Chrome makes the poorest showing in the Octane test.

Moving on to the more modern Speedometer test, which quickly iterates through a bunch of HTML 5-based to-do lists, Chrome came out on top. Google’s Blink-based cousin Opera came in second, with Edge and Firefox way behind. The numbers were much closer for WebXPRT 2015, which uses a wide number of web apps, from photo collections to online note-taking to data sets. Edge came out on top there, while the others were closer together with only a few points separating the back three. Again, higher is better for these tests.

browser performance speedometer

Chrome narrowly edges out Opera in HTML-5-based tasks.

browser performance webxprt 2015

Edge makes another good showing in the web apps realm.

Finally, we come to the memory and CPU test. Slamming an average PC with 20 tabs of mostly media rich sites all at once is certainly going to chew up a good chunk of CPU and memory. These browsers did not disappoint in that respect.

Despite its reputation, however, Chrome was tops here, using less than 40 percent CPU power, followed by Edge. The results were similar for memory with Chrome using the least. Take those impressive Edge numbers with a healthy dose of skepticism, however, as during testing the PC froze, and we couldn’t access task manager as swiftly as with the others. The fact that the whole PC slowed to a crawl suggests Edge’s numbers don’t tell the whole story. Based on that experience, power users with multiple tabs open in Edge would feel some serious pain trying to get work done.

browser performance cpu usage2

It's true that running media rich content in multiple tabs will tax your system's CPU.

browser performance memory usage

As with the CPU test, Chrome's reputation as the biggest resource hog is undeserved these days.

As for Firefox, you may notice that the browser chewed up CPU usage, but was relatively low in memory usage. The reason for that, as Mozilla reminded us, is that Firefox alone is transitioning from one browser process to four. Whereas Chrome and Edge use multiple processes for each tab. The idea behind the latter is that individual tabs running on separate processes won't take down the whole browser if they crash. That approach does use more memory, however. Mozilla is trying to find a middle ground. On the one hand, Firefox helps maintain overall PC performance under heavier workloads, but it's not great if you want dozens of sites to load as quickly as possible. 

And the winner is...

So who wins? Here’s the way we see it.

Once again, Edge gets honorable mention for making some serious gains in performance and earning some truly impressive scores. But when you factor in customizability and how Edge fared in the live site stress test, it still has some work to do—like offering a wider extension library and the ability to sync across devices. 

As in our previous showdown, Chrome continues to capitalize on these strengths, and even improves in the performance department by addressing its past resource issues, making it, once again, our first choice.

Opera again earns second place since it performed relatively well in the live stress test, and can be set up to take advantage of nearly all the same conveniences Chrome can.

As for Firefox, it’s also a fine choice. Mozilla’s browser definitely gets the job done, it’s very customizable, and its open source roots puts the browser in a league of its own.

Source: This article was published pcworld.com By Ian

Categorized in Search Engine

Microsoft says a PC running its Edge browser will last 77 percent longer than Firefox, and 35 percent longer than Chrome.

To prove its point, Microsoft has once again employed a time-lapse video of three unplugged Surface Books side by side streaming video for several hours with Chrome, Edge, and Firefox.

The Surface running Edge lasts 12 hours and 31 minutes, while the Chrome device peters out after nine hours and 17 minutes, with the Firefox unit lasting seven hours and four minutes.

Microsoft released similar video last June, again showing Edge outlasting its rivals, which prompted a reply from Google showing Chrome's battery improvements.

 

To counter any claims of bias, Microsoft has published the methodology it followed for the test. The Surface Books featured an i5-6300U processor at 2.5GHz, with 8GB RAM, and an Intel HD Graphics 520 GPU.

The devices were running Windows 10 Pro Build 15063.0 or the Creators Update, with Edge 40, Chrome 57 64-bit, and Firefox 52 32-bit. These are the newest version of each browser.

Microsoft says it gave each device the same "realistic" user setup, but switched off some key tasks that could have interfered with the tests. The display was set to 75 percent brightness, and volume was muted, while location, Bluetooth, updates, and the ambient light sensor were disabled. Quiet hours was enabled, each device was connected to a wireless network, and Windows Defender was running. Windows Battery Saver mode was set to activate at 20 percent battery and the cache on each browser was cleared.

Microsoft attributes Edge's battery performance to "encouraging HTML5 content over Flash, improving the efficiency of iframes, and optimizing hit testing".

Besides improvements to energy efficiency, Edge in the Creators Update brings feature updates, as well improvements to responsiveness and performance.

In the Speedometer browser benchmark that Google used to show 'real-world' performance improvements in Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine, Edge has seen its scores double over the past two years, according to Microsoft.

 

The new Edge also introduces a number of key technologies for the future of the web, including the WebVR to bring the web to VR headsets, Web Payments, WebRTC, Web Authentication, and Web Assembly.

source : zdnet.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Since 2010, Microsoft has been running the Bing Rewards program: Just do your searches with Microsoft's Bing search engine, and you can earn points towards Starbucks and Amazon gift cards, Hulu subscriptions, and other such prizes.

Earn some extra cash using Edge

Now, Microsoft is rebranding the program to Microsoft Rewards, and instead of just Bing, Microsoft wants to reward you for using Microsoft Edge - the web browser that comes Windows 10, and the successor to Internet Explorer.

So long as you're actively using Microsoft Edge - characterized as having the Edge window open and actually using it to browse the web, not simply having it open in the background - you'll accumulate points that can be redeemed for prizes, up to 30 hours' worth a month.

While Windows 10 is on more than 350 million active devices, the Edge browser hasn't quite made the success that Microsoft had hoped for. Current numbers place Edge usage at a just over 4.2% of the overall browser market. So now, Microsoft wants to give users a little incentive every time they use Edge.

The catch

There's one major proviso here, too. Despite the rebranding, you need to use Microsoft Bing as your default search engine in order to reap Microsoft Rewards points. If you change your default to Google, Yahoo, or any other search engine, your points won't accumulate. If you want points, you require Bing.

Don't worry about your privacy

Finally, Microsoft says that they're only tracking your activities when Edge is open, and not what websites you're visiting or any information you're entering. Microsoft Rewards will also ask before it begins tracking Edge usage, so it won't activate without your authorization. Your privacy matters more to them than anything else, it seems.

It's all up to you!

If that's still too much for you, especially in light of past Windows 10 privacy scandals, well, you can carry on browsing the way you've been browsing. But Microsoft's aspiration to make Edge into a noteworthy market force could make it a lot easier for you to fill your pockets. Besides, Microsoft Edge may just be the best way to watch Netflix on a laptop.

Source : http://www.itechpost.com/articles/29628/20160914/microsoft-paying-people-use-edge-web-browser.htm

Categorized in Search Engine

Life is full of big decisions: getting married, buying a home, picking your default Web browser.

I’m serious. Think about where you spend the majority of your time on your computer or phone. It’s inside those four WWW walls.

“Apps will kill the Web!” prognosticators proclaimed, as if Achilles and his Greek army were invading. Yet on our app-packed smartphones and tablets, the browser is still the first stop to look something up. Not that you can always do that quickly: From typing URLs to managing tabs, our browsing problems only get worse on the small screen. On our more spacious laptops and desktops, the browser has become the home of our apps—our email, calendar, word processor, photo library and more.

If browsers have never been more important, why are you using the wrong one? Nearly 40% of computer-based Web surfers still use Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, according to NetMarketshare. You realize that browser is not only sluggish but about as secure as a camping tent, right?

I’m not saying there is a perfect browser—except for my dog, named Browser, that is. But the best one for any device should nail the four S’s: simplicity, stamina, speed and security. A fifth S would be syncing—in a perfect world, all our gadgets would share browser settings, bookmarks and history.

After testing multiple browsers on many computers and smartphones, I’ve determined which ones you should be using—and found shortcuts to use with them.

Windows Computers: Chrome or Edge
ENLARGE
PHOTO: DELL; PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

If you’re using Internet Explorer on a Windows 7 or Windows 8 computer, please stop reading and go download Google’s Chrome. Once you see how much faster and cleaner it is, you’ll want to celebrate with cocktails. Don’t worry about leaving bookmarks behind, they’re coming too. (Just follow these transfer instructions.)

Not even Microsoft wants you to use outdated Internet Explorer anymore. It’s why Windows 10 comes with Edge, a brand new browser with an intuitive, modern interface. Goodbye ugly buttons and cluttered toolbars! It’s also why choosing a browser on Windows 10 is tough.

In industry benchmarks and my own speed tests, Edge and Chrome were neck and neck for first place. Firefox and Opera—two clunky yet long-surviving third-party browsers—trailed. Internet Explorer barely placed.

Yet unlike Chrome, Edge doesn’t hog so much of a computer’s power. On a Web-browsing battery test, the Dell XPS 13 lasted an hour longer with Edge than with Chrome. When streaming Netflix, it lasted two full hours longer. And security experts say Edge is as secure as Chrome.

So finally, Windows 10 PC buyers don’t need to download a new browser? Not exactly. Edge is still too rough around the...edges. Since it’s new, Web developers haven’t really focused on it, so Web apps can be slow or erratic. Plus, it doesn’t support feature-adding extensions. In Chrome, I use a calendar, to-do list and tab manager. Microsoft is adding extensions in the next version.

I suggest you use Chrome on Windows 10. The exception: Edge will eke out better performance on underpowered Windows 10 laptops and tablets.

Mac Computers: Safari or Chrome

Google’s Chrome has long been my default browser on Apple laptops, but my tests all proved this was a poor life decision. Apple’s Safari consistently scored 10% to 15% higher on speed tests. On systems with the weakest processors, like the new MacBook, Chrome occasionally rendered the system unusably slow.

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PHOTO: APPLE; PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

 

Yet again, the less-taxing browser led to noticeably better battery life. On a Web surfing test with the MacBook and a 13-inch MacBook Pro, Safari provided one more hour of battery life than Chrome. In a Netflix streaming test, the results were even more drastic: When streaming “Daredevil” on the MacBook Pro, Safari beat Chrome by two hours.

Chrome may be the top browser on the market, but its power hunger can make you want to avoid it entirely. Chrome product management director Rahul Roy-Chowdhury says Mac and Windows performance has become a big area of focus. Before every Chrome update, thousands of tests are run on many different Mac and Windows devices, he says.

On more powerful desktops or laptops, I’d still likely opt for Chrome. In the latest Mac OS X release, El Capitan, Safari has borrowed most of Chrome’s best features—including pinned tabs—yet Chrome still has a larger variety of extensions. Chrome is also easier to use when you’ve got dozens of tabs fighting for your attention, thanks to those tiny website icons appearing on each tab.

Some may be wary of using Chrome because of Google’s use of private data to improve its search experiences. But keep in mind that if you use Google’s search or other services in any browser, you’ll likely log in and be tracked anyway. Google provides full details onwhat Chrome does and doesn’t collect here. Most browsers, including Chrome, do have no-tracking privacy modes.

 
iPhone and iPad: Safari
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PHOTO: APPLE; PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
 
 
There are loads of things I love about third-party browsers for the iPhone or iPad. I love how Dolphin lets you swipe to see your open tabs. I love Opera Mini’s data-saving features. I love the simple layout on Chrome and Firefox.

 

But Apple doesn’t let you change your default browser, so none of that matters. Whenever you click a link in your email or text messages, Safari and only Safari will launch. Apple says it helps maintain an integrated experience. (Also, third-party iOS browsers including Chrome have to use Safari’s browsing engine, so there aren’t performance advantages to using them.)

So yes, Safari is the best browser to use on the iPhone and iPad. If you also use Safari on your Mac, you can easily sync your tabs, bookmarks and other settings across devices. Hit the tab button and scroll down to see them listed.

 
Android Smartphones, Tablets: Chrome

On Android, since Google supports changing your default browser, your choices are vast. In addition to Chrome and Opera, there’s Firefox, Dolphin and Puffin—not zoo animals, actual browser options.

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PHOTO: SAMSUNG GALAXY S7; PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

In speed tests, Firefox, Puffin and Opera often beat Chrome, yet I didn’t find those speed improvements to outweigh Chrome’s superior interface and Android integration: For easy access, your tabs can even appear alongside open apps in the app switcher.

Additionally, if you’re also using Chrome on your laptop or desktop, it seamlessly syncs your open sites, settings and passwords with your phone or tablet. (On Samsung phones, make sure you’re using Chrome and not Samsung’s own browser.)

Chrome has a data-saver feature, like the others, which compresses and optimizes parts of a site while you’re on a cellular connection. Chrome, however, doesn’t support ad or content blockers on mobile. If that’s important to you, try Firefox, my second pick for Android users.

Write to Joanna Stern atThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Source : http://www.wsj.com/articles/find-the-best-web-browser-for-your-devices-a-review-of-chrome-safari-and-edge-1462297625?mod=ST1

 

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Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

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