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When you’re writing a paper or conducting a research-intensive project, you might turn to Wikipedia for a quick examination of the material. As informative and entertaining as this “collaborative online encyclopedia” can be, Wikipedia is generally not considered a credible source to cite in your college-level research papers. Even Wikipedia itself encourages readers to carefully evaluate the information because “anyone can edit the information given at any time.”

Popular search engines, such as Google and Yahoo, are often loaded with advertisements and can really hamper your effectiveness, sending you down one research rabbit hole after another. You need a list of search engines that are reliable, reputable, and free.

However, some search engines only have a citation, or index info, on articles – not the full-text.

“I recommend students search in the library databases for any articles that are not in full text in these engines, or reach out to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if they need extra help to find sources,” said Tracy Ralston, Post University Library Director. “For instance, we have access to Lexis-Nexis Academic, which has more access to statutes, law journal articles, etc. than Lexis Web. Plus, we have a huge variety of sources (journal articles, newspapers, online videos, etc.) that go way beyond these search engines.”

So, as stated on Wikipedia, “Remember that any encyclopedia is a starting point for research, not an ending point.”

With that in mind, here are … 7 of the Best Educational Search Engines for Students:

1) Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC)

One of the best deeper web search engines designed for academic research, ERIC is maintained by the U.S. Department of Education. You’ll find more than 1.3 million bibliographic records of articles and online materials just a click away. The extensive body of education-related literature includes technical reports, policy papers, conference papers, research syntheses, journal articles, and books.

2) Lexis Web

Indispensable for law students and research projects that require legal citations, Lexis Web populates this search engine with validated legal sites. It’s easy to narrow your search by site type (blog, news, commercial, government) and filter by jurisdiction, practice area, source, and file format.

3) Google Scholar

This must-have search engine for research lets you easily find relevant scholarly literature, such as books, theses, abstracts, and articles, across many disciplines and sources. Google Scholar ranks documents by taking into account the full text, where the document was published, who authored it, and how often and how recently it has been cited in other scholarly literature. Find literature from academic publishers, professional societies, universities, court opinions, and other credible organizations.

4) Microsoft Academic (MA)

Enjoy fast access to “continually refreshed and extensive academic content” from more than 120 million publications including journals, scientific papers, and conferences. Because MA is a semantic search engine, not a keyword-based one, it uses natural language processing to understand and remember the information contained in each document. It then applies “semantic inference” to glean the intent of your search and delivers rich, knowledgeable results that are relevant to your needs. MA 2.0 debuted in July 2017 and gives users even more personalized and improved search capabilities.

5) Wolfram Alpha

Find dozens of ways to put this “computational knowledge engine” to work for you. Need to compute the frequency of a musical note or better understand your brain’s anatomy? No problem. Just type in your question, and your answer immediately pops up. Not only a go-to education search engine, this fun tool is great for your downtime because it includes categories like Sports and Games and Surprises, in which you can search for jokes, tongue twisters, and famous lines.

6) iSeek Education

This targeted search engine was created for students, teachers, administrators, and caregivers, and all content is editor-reviewed. You have access to hundreds of thousands of trusted scholastic resources provided by universities, government, and reputable noncommercial sites. Numerous filters in the sidebar make it easy to quickly target your results and refine your search by topic, subject, resource type, place, and people. Instantly identify lesson plans, school subjects, activities, and grade levels.

7) ResearchGate

Science majors love this dynamic social networking site for scientists and researchers that not only provides access to the work of 13 million researchers, it lets users ask them questions. ResearchGate’s collection of publications and the frequently updated “news from our members” blog provide a vast array of works that cover timely topics including culture, the environment, politics, health, science, and space.

Source: This article was published blog.post.edu

Categorized in Search Engine

If you’re performing work that requires in-depth sources, such as academic studies or a job that requires heavy research, finding quality sources can be hard. Using bad or shaky sources to prove points can cause a lot of trouble: it brings down the strength of the work as a whole and makes it harder to prove its point. Fortunately, we live in an age of easy-access information and education, and with that comes education search engines.

These specialist search engines focus less on providing general results to a search query and more on articles from academia and news. This makes them perfect choices for someone who needs solid, citable sources without much hassle. While there’s nothing particularly “incorrect” about using a search engine like Google or Bing to perform research, using education search engines will make sure to bring up dependable, informative articles that you can cite with confidence in your work.

What kind of education search engines are out there? Let’s take a look at five examples, each with their own fortes and ways of helping you perform top-quality research for your projects.

1. Google Scholar

educational-search-google-scholar

Don’t be mistaken; this isn’t just regular Google! This is a branch off of “regular” Google searches, called Google Scholar. Instead of a general search, you can use it to search books, studies, and even court cases.

On the main page, simply enter the search terms that you’re interested in looking up. Google Scholar will then go through its database and pick out relevant examples. If your research is very time-sensitive (such as technology), you can select options on the left to change how recent you want your sources to be, up to and including the current year.

If you’re writing a piece that has a strict sourcing style, Google Scholar gives you template cites for its sources. Find the template that suits the style standard, then simply copy it directly into your citations to save yourself some time.

2. RefSeek

educational-search-refseek

Currently in a public beta, RefSeek is a pretty solid choice for general research. It takes a more website-based approach, bringing up relevant but highly dependable websites for whatever you want to research. It’s a great way to pull up multiple articles relating to a specific object. For example, if you wanted to learn about computer processors, a search brings up lots of great articles.

educational-search-refseek-example

RefSeek does more than just searching, however; if you’re studying in a specific field, RefSeek also has a “directory” page which acts as a great directory of useful websites related to education. Once you choose the category you’d like to browse, RefSeek brings up a list of productive sites to help you with your studies.

educational-search-refseek-mathematics-tools

3. Citeulike

educational-search-citeulike

Citeulike is one of the more powerful education search engines if you’re looking for papers and studies specifically. After entering a search term, Citeulike brings up all the studies it has on the topic. If an article is regarded as “trusted” by Citeulike, it will have a tick-mark next to it. You can also see groups that are interested in your search term, see quick abstracts for each article before checking the full version, and hide all the details for quicker browsing.

educational-search-citeulike-example

Once you’ve found a paper you think you’d like, clicking on it will bring you to its page. Here, you can see all the websites the paper can be found on, export the article to different formats, and generate a citation template for that paper. This makes Citeulike highly useful if you want solid, dependable studies to read though and cite on your work.

4. iSeek

educational-search-iseek

iSeek is a powerful tool for finding studies in your area of interest. Don’t be fooled by the seemingly small results list – iSeek displays results in pages of 10, and if you searched something quite scientifically popular, there’s going to be a lot of pages on the topic. If the sheer amount of results overwhelm you, you have a selection of filters to apply on the left.

educational-search-iseek-example

Each result comes with a direct link to the source, as well as an option to email results to people. The sources can also be rated out of five stars by other users which can help you locate the more important sources for your research.

5. Virtual LRC

educational-search-lrc

Virtual LRC is an interesting website for research. While it operates mostly like any other engine, the real key to working with Virtual LRC is its filtering ability. There are a few categories at the top of the page after you search; by clicking these, you can filter the results using the category you selected. For example, if you search for “coffee,” you can click on “News/Opinion” for general news articles about coffee, “Health/Medicine” to read about the current positive and negative health effects of coffee, or “History” to learn about how coffee came to be. This makes it quite a diverse engine that can be used to display topics in specific viewpoints.

Study Well, Not Hard

No matter how much you love or hate researching facts, making it an easier task is always welcome. If you’re an avid fact-hunter, hopefully these education search engines will serve you well in your studies.

Author: Simon Batt
Source: https://www.maketecheasier.com/best-education-search-engines

Categorized in Search Engine

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