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Hillary Clinton has won the popular vote by more than 2.86 million ballots, the final tally in the US presidential election has revealed.

According to the Cook Political Report, the Democrat beat the President-elect by 2,864,974 -more than five times the margin garnered by Al Gore in 2000 when he also lost the Electoral College.

The final count comes after 304 electors voted for Donald Trump on Monday, meaning that although two electors defected, he cleared the 270-vote hurdle and will be sworn in as president next month.

Mr Trump's win ranks 46th out of 58 on the list of Electoral College votes secured by US Presidents since George Washington in 1789. His popular vote tally was more than two percentage points lower than Ms Clinton's, at 46.1 per cent against her 48.2 per cent  – or 62.98 million against 65.84 million.

Ms Clinton's tally was just under 72,000 votes shy of Barack Obama's popular vote count in the 2012 election.

Mr Trump won 30 states in the 8 November election, securing 306 of the 538 Electoral College votes – 56.9 per cent of the total.

Only 12 other elections have seen a president receive a lower proportion of Electoral College votes, including George W Bush in 2000 and 2004, and John F Kennedy in 1960.

Confirmation of Mr Trump's victory ended an acrimonious final chapter in an election cycle that saw former president Bill Clinton accuse the director of the FBI, James Comey, of costing his wife the White House, and activists flood the letterboxes of Electoral College members with pleas to abandon the Republican candidate.

Despite the pressure on electors, experts had said a Trump defeat in the Electoral College was extremely unlikely.

Dr Jacob Parakilas, assistant head of the US and Americas Programme at Chatham House, told The Independent: "A lot of this is just a reaction to how outlandish the whole election season has been.

"I think there's also a sense that because Trump won with a significant gap between the Electoral College and the popular vote, that underscores calls for the Electoral College to do something different than it normally does.

"By and large, those calls are going to fall on deaf ears."

Author :Jon Sharman

Source : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/hillary-clinton-3-million-popular-vote-donald-trump-us-election-a7487901.html

Categorized in News & Politics

Nearly two weeks after Donald Trump won the 2016 Presidential Election — and month before the Electoral College is set to vote, making the results permanent — a new movement wants to audit the November 8 vote, to investigate whether Trump won the election fair and square, or whether error and even fraud may have placed him in the White House.

One element of the vote audit movement is a Change.org online petition calling for election officials to “double-check the electronic results by conducting a ‘risk-limiting’ audit of the presidential election in every state that uses paper ballots.”

Even a United States Senator, South Carolina Republican Lindsey Graham, has called for a congressional investigation into possible election tampering, particularly by Russian intelligence agencies.

Audit Vote, #AuditTheVote, Was election rigged, Donald Trump wins election, Russian election hack, vote fraud

A vote-counting computer used to tabulate ballots in the 2016 presidential election.

The petition started by the Verified Voting Foundation seeks 75,000 signatures which will be forwarded to Secretaries of State, election officials, and state governors. As of Sunday morning, November 20, the petition had received 65,199 supporters.

“The FBI determined some months ago that hacking, originating from Russia, was having an influence on our electoral process,” the petition states. “These hackers interfered with our presidential election through attempted and successful penetration of email and voter registration databases, among other systems. This created fear, uncertainty, and doubt about the safety of our electoral processes.”

In fact, it was not only the FBI but the National Security Agency itself — the intelligence bureau responsible for America’s online and digital spying and counter-espionage efforts — which detected attempts to tip the United States election by what NSA chief Michael Rogers called “a nation state,” as seen in the excerpted interview with Rogers in the video below.

“This was not something that was done casually, this was not something that was done by chance,” Rogers said in the Wall Street Journal interview. “This was not a target that was selected purely arbitrarily.”

While Russian ties to hacked emails from the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee that were subsequently released online by the document-dumping site WikiLeaks were confirmed by U.S. intelligence agencies as well as independent investigators weeks before the election, hackers connected to the Russian government are also known to have broken into a voter registration system in Illinois.

The Russian hackers also entered at least one other state’s voter database — and in theory could have penetrated many more which have yet to be detected. Once inside, the hackers could have altered voter information to create fake registrations and alter voting patterns.

Audit Vote, #AuditTheVote, Was election rigged, Donald Trump wins election, Russian election hack, vote fraud

Russian President Vladimir Putin, suspected of engineering manipulation of the presidential election that tipped the vote to Donald Trump.

According to Alexandra Chalupa, a consultant to the DNC investigating the Russian hacks, told the Gothamist news site that in Pennsylvania, especially, the voting results appeared strange, with between 50 and 75 percent of provisional ballots rejected. Even more alarming, “a large number of voters who voted for a Republican president and senator, but voted for Democrats down the rest of the ballot.”

“That’s not usually the pattern,” Chalupa said.

Trump ended up beating Clinton in Pennsylvania by a mere 57,588 votes — less than one percentage point — winning the state’s crucial 20 electoral votes, despite the fact that Pennsylvania had voted for the Democrat in six consecutive presidential elections.

A new Twitter hashtag, #AuditTheVote, appeared on Saturday, and one of the hashtag creators, Melinda Byerley, explained that the purpose was to collect public information and data that could either verify or disprove claims of election tampering and fraud.

“This is not about (Hillary Clinton) or (Donald Trump),” Byerley wrote. “This is about national sovereignty and a potential foreign breach of our voting system. “America is a beacon to the world for free and fair elections. Our ability to remain a superpower rests on the trust the world has in us.”

Author:  Jonathan Vankin

Source:  http://www.inquisitr.com/

Categorized in News & Politics

I tried to give you my best advice in the title of this article and if you are reading this, you chose not to take it. So please reconsider.

If you are having some strong dis-ease following the Presidential Election in the USA, you might want to think some more about what I am suggesting. Don’t read another article about the Election. For that matter don’t listen or watch anything related to the Election either. For goodness sake don’t write anything about the Election at all. That suggestion should be the easiest for you to follow, because I am writing this for you.

Now as to your dose of not consuming or producing any Election thoughts, that varies by weight of your post-election emotional burden. Some of you might want to wait about a decade before taking a peek at what happened next. For most that won’t be necessary.

News and views that you can’t use, can give you the blues.

We are built to detect threats, act quickly to reduce them and to save energy by calmly accepting some risk and discomfort related to there being nothing we can do about somethings at the moment.

Being exposed to more and more news and what could or should be done about this or that can make one quite jittery, particularly if most of it doesn’t give you a clue as to what you can specifically do. Viewing the news and checking out new views can trigger, “should I prepare to fight, prepare to run, prepare to hide and breathe softly and deeply?” If the news does not contain much direction regarding your particular situation, you may just freeze and seek further news and views. Things can get increasingly chilly.

If you are following news on the political climate like some people follow weather reports and forecasts you might want to stop that. The weather can indeed hit people where they live. Forecasts can inform as when to run or hide or seek higher ground, but usually not. Some people have a friend or family that live some place that a weather forecast has under a rotating cloud, but these people probably don’t need to be warned about that. Having nobody that is near the forest fire or in the hot lava’s path doesn’t stop some people from being good citizens of the world by feeling a duty to keep current about the state of such affairs, but they do so at an emotional cost that often goes unnoticed. When the report comes on about the earthquake, even if you calculate that you are thousands of miles from the epicenter quickly, your brain still spent some milliseconds sensing if your foundation was shaking.

Like weather reports, political news can rile you up with no need or no place to go.

For instance if you see yourself in some oppressed class that Donald Trump is reportedly not fond of, you may feel a need to stay informed as to Mr. Trump’s plans. If you have heard of Wikileaks and aren’t sure that all the information provided there was made up by the Russians, you might be bracing yourself for what will be revealed upon the release of the next batch of leaks, not having close to processing the thousands and thousands of leaks already revealed.

Wanting more and more news and opinions can even rewire your brain which makes it much more difficult to process information and more difficult to see big pictures. Some of these big pictures are obvious and obviously important and go completely unseen due to news and views distraction.

News that you can and want to use can get lost in the Breaking News.

Overwhelming people with news is consciously used tool of propagandists. New news doesn’t just sell advertising and the goods and services advertised, it draws attention away from unsolved problems to the delight of those profiting from these problems.

You may think that giving yourself a news blackout or constriction as being unpatriotic or not what a social justice warrior does. Think again. There can be great value in contemplating what you already know or what you already think that you know. Compare what you’ve heard with your personal experience. Question the sources of information you believe and ask yourself how you would judge information from a source you don’t trust, if you did trust that source.

Resist seeking news to avoid your friends knowing something that you haven’t heard yet. Your friends will probably like you better for giving them the opportunity to be the ones to let you know the latest, then they will think of you as a moron for not knowing.

Notice if you have a tendency to get interested in collecting more an more news that supports your views and delight in being more and more and more convinced that you are right and the wise guy where you work is wrong. Maybe you have collected enough ammunition for awhile.

If seeking more news is making you feel more relaxed about accepting things that you have no immediate plans to do much about, keep seeking. If seeking news is energizing you to bond closer with friends and family, or is energizing to do something to express what you have come to believe in, keep seeking. If you believe strongly in something that you have been recently questioning, make seeking that a priority.

If you are finding that your post-election news seeking has eroded some of your seeking of sports score, fashion trends, pictures of what your friends had for dinner last night, the latest hilarious videos that have gone viral, what the humidity might be tomorrow, that might be a good thing.

Source:  goodmenproject.com

Categorized in News & Politics

CALIFORNIA: The tech giant Google has announced that starting today (8 November), it will display the 2016 presidential election results directly on Google Search.

The information on election results will be available in 30 different languages and will be out as soon as polls close. The tech giant also said that YouTube will live-stream election result coverage from various news organisations such as NBC, PBS, Bloomberg and more. The live-streaming coverage will begin at 7pm ET on 8 November (12am GMT, 9 November).

election-video

Google VP of engineering Shashi Thakur said, “Starting when the polls close on Election Day, you will be able to find U.S. election results integrated right into your Google searches in over 30 languages around the world. You’ll also be able to see detailed updates and results of the Presidential, Senatorial, Congressional, Gubernatorial races as well as state-level referenda and ballot propositions.”

Thakur said that in comparison to the 2012 elections, Google has noted a 233% rise in traffic for “how to vote”. Additionally, people in the “battleground states” such as Philadelphia, Ohio, North Carolina and Florida have been “actively searching” for “where to vote,” indicating a high voter interest and possible turnout in 2016 presidential elections.

Source:  arynews.tv

Categorized in Search Engine

Stay informed on election day.

As soon as the polls close on Tuesday, Nov. 8,Google GOOG 1.26%  will display continuously updated election results through its search engine the company said. The search giant plans to show up-to-the-minute information detailing the progress of multiple U.S. election day races and other referenda to anyone who queries for “election results.”

Google said it would deliver the updates every 30 seconds in more than 30 different languages, according to a blog post by Shashi Thakur, vice president of engineering on the Google search team. Included in the briefings are the presidential, senatorial, congressional, and gubernatorial races, as well as other ballots throughout the U.S.

Here’s a glimpse of what the search tool should look like, per the blog post:

election-video

The rundown includes real-time statistics on the matchup between Hillary Clinton, the Democratic contender for the White House, and Donald Trump, the Republican candidate. Alongside details of the tug-of-war for the executive office are key numbers concerning open legislative seats, battleground states, and the top two political parties (blue for Democrats, red for Republicans).

Although this is not the first time that Google has offered informational tools during an election, this year marks a notable increase in the company’s efforts to meet consumer demand as more people turn to the web—and increasingly their smartphones—for news. Google said that it had seen traffic for the search term “how to vote” more than triple in the past four years, up 233% from 2012.

In addition to the political précis that will appear on election day (above), Google has already debuted tools detailing how to registerhow and where to vote, and info on who is running—including an election-themed Google Doodle.

Google said that YouTube, its video division, would stream live coverage from a number of news outlets as well, including NBC, PBS, MTV, Bloomberg, Telemundo, and The Young Turks starting at 7 p.m. ET on Tuesday. “From the ballot box to tomorrow’s late-night returns, we hope Google’s tools help guide you through Election Day in a simple, clear and informative way,” Thakur said.

Source: fortune.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Staff and Wire Reports

Need to know how to find your polling place?

Simple: Just Google “How to vote” and the results will be localized for you according to where you are

And if you want to see the important issues on the ballot in each state including yours beyond the presidential election visit here.

And, for hours of the polls state-by-state including yours visit here.

It’s the age of digital information on election day.

TVs are so last century. News outlets are using Facebook Live, Snapchat, YouTube and other tools to offer live coverage of Election Day in ways not possible four years ago.

It’s a fitting close to an election season that has played out on Twitter and Facebook as much as it has on the nightly news, with debates live-streamed online and candidates barbing on social media.

Here’s your online guide for Tuesday. All times are Eastern.

FIND YOUR POLLING PLACE AND MORE

Unless you’re one of the millions of Americans who have already voted, it’s a good idea to find out where to cast your ballot, preferably before Tuesday. Googling “how to vote” will take you to localized results that include the times the polls are open and any requirements such as an ID. You can also type into google “where do I vote” and then enter your address to locate your polling place.

Facebook’s elections tool will show you what’s on your ballot and where various candidates stand on key issues. The information comes from the nonpartisan group Center for Technology and Civic Life, which also generates some of the data for Google searches such as “what’s on my ballot.” To get started, go to https://www.facebook.com/elections/yourplan (you’ll need a Facebook account).

SNAP AWAY

Snapchat users will be able to see “live stories” on the app — showing people at the polls, election results, acceptance and concession speeches and election night celebrations. In the U.S., users will see overlays they can add to their snaps.

FACE-OFF ON FACEBOOK

NowThis, a news outlet aimed at millennials, will have video coverage on its Facebook channel. Comedian Jordan Carlos will host the stream, called “No Sleep til POTUS.”

CNN will have live coverage with reporters in battleground states, as well as drone shots of voting locations and international reaction throughout the day. Each hour from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. will be streamed from a different location. After 6 p.m., the network will continue Facebook Live streams from various locations, including watch parties and, again, battleground states.

The Washington Post is planning live programming on its Facebook page beginning at 7 p.m. The show will include commentary and updates from Post reporters, including those at campaign headquarters for both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

The New York Times will also stream election coverage on its Facebook page, beginning at 4:30 p.m., from locations such as polling stations, college campuses and election viewing parties.

Other news outlets with live streaming plans include Univision, PBS NewsHour, the Daily Caller, ABC News and Vox.

TWITCH ALONG WITH TWITTER

Twitter is partnering with BuzzFeed News for a live stream from BuzzFeed’s New York headquarters. The stream will begin at 6 p.m. Twitter says segments will include critiques of traditional news outlets and how they are covering the election, as well as live reports from BuzzFeed journalists at various locations throughout the U.S. and elsewhere.

Source:  oxfordeagle.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Americans are heading to the polls to choose a new president after one of the most rancorous election campaigns the country has seen.

Voting gets under way in earnest on the East Coast from 06:00 EST (11:00 GMT), though some villages in New Hampshire have already polled.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump criss-crossed America in a hectic last-minute campaign push for votes.

Results should begin emerging late on Tuesday night, US time, from 04:00 GMT.

Both candidates have held rallies in the battleground states of North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

Mrs Clinton urged voters to back a "hopeful, inclusive, big-hearted America" while Mr Trump told supporters they had a "magnificent chance to beat the corrupt system".

Polls give Democrat Mrs Clinton a four-point lead over Republican Mr Trump.

A record number of Americans - more than 46 million - have voted early by post or at polling stations.

There are signs of a high turnout among Hispanic voters, which is believed to favour Mrs Clinton.

The rivals held the final rallies of their campaigns after midnight - Mr Trump in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and Mrs Clinton in Raleigh, North Carolina.

"Today the American working class is going to strike back, finally," said Mr Trump, pledging to reverse job losses.

Earlier, in New Hampshire, he told supporters: "We are just one day away from the change you've been waiting for all your life.

"Together we will make America wealthy again, we will make America strong again, we will make America safe again and we will make America great again."

Mrs Clinton told her audience that they did not "have to accept a dark and divisive vision of America".

She looked forward to "a fairer, stronger, better America. An America where we build bridges, not walls. And where we prove conclusively that love trumps hate".

Election day follows a bitter campaign during which the candidates have traded insults and become mired in a series of scandals.

At a star-studded event in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Mrs Clinton was joined on stage by celebrities Bruce Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi as well as her husband Bill, President Obama and his wife Michelle.

Earlier Mrs Clinton said in a radio interview that if she won she would call Mr Trump and hoped he would play a "constructive role" in helping to bring the country together.

At his rally in Scranton in the same state, Mr Trump insisted the momentum was with his campaign.

The businessman described Mrs Clinton as the "most corrupt person ever to seek the presidency", referring to an FBI investigation into Mrs Clinton's use of a private email server while she was serving as secretary of state between 2009 and 2013.

On Sunday Mrs Clinton's campaign received a boost when the FBI said newly discovered emails sent by an aide showed no evidence of criminality.

Election day voting began just after midnight in the small New Hampshire village of Dixville Notch, where seven votes were cast - four for Mrs Clinton, two for Mr Trump and one for the libertarian Gary Johnson.

Results are expected some time after 23:00 EST (04:00 GMT on Wednesday) once voting ends on the West Coast. State projections will not be available until polling ends - in most states between 19:00 EST (24:00 GMT) and 20:00 EST (01:00 GMT).

Americans are also voting for Congress. All of the House of Representatives - currently Republican controlled - is up for grabs, and a third of seats in the Senate, which is also in Republican hands.

US election: The essentials

Meanwhile Mr Trump's campaign manager Kellyanne Conway sought to allay international anxiety about the Republican candidate in a BBC interview on Monday.

She said criticism from abroad "does not reflect why Donald Trump is running and who he would be on the global stage".

French President Francois Hollande has said the billionaire made him "want to retch".

It follows a series of sex assault allegations made against Mr Trump, which he denies, and the emergence of a recording of him making obscene remarks about women.

Mr Trump has also been accused of stoking xenophobic sentiment after vowing to ban Muslims from entering the US, describing Mexicans as "rapists" and saying he would build a wall along the US southern border to stop illegal immigration.

Source : bbc

Categorized in News & Politics

Many think the value of the dollar will initially sink against the currencies of developed countries such as the UK, Japan and Switzerland if Trump edges the contest.

The mighty US dollar has been gradually strengthening against most other currencies since May 2016.

This is mainly because the American economy has been performing relatively well (compared with much of Europe and Japan), with employment growing quite strongly.

This momentum has increased expectations of another interest rate hike by the American central bank, the Federal Reserve, which has supported the value of the currency.

Yet the dollar index, which measures the value of the greenback against a basket of global currencies, has slipped slightly in the past week.

This coincides with a tightening of the polls and the higher implied possibility of a Donald Trump victory.

So what will happen to the greenback after the result of the election is announced?

We look below at the two scenarios.

Hillary Clinton wins….

A victory for the experienced Democrat politician is expected to prompt a dollar rally.

Since she was cleared by the FBI of wrongdoing in relation to her emails at the weekend the dollar has already strengthened. 

This trend is expected to continue if Clinton wins the White House.

Notwithstanding her tacking to the left on economic policy in her Presidential campaign to gain the votes of disaffected Americans, few expect any economic policy shocks from Clinton.

Donald Trump wins…

Here the impact is vastly more uncertain – both in the short-term and medium term. 

Many analysts think the value of the dollar will initially sink against the currencies of developed countries such as the UK, Japan and Switzerland if Trump edges the contest.

It will also probably fall against the euro, the second most important global currency.

But some think the dollar could strengthen against developing nation currencies – such as the Mexican peso –  due to anticipation that Trump will push through new protectionist trade policies, which will damage their economies.

There might well also be serious volatility in the dollar if Trump prevails because so little is known about his likely economic policy or who his economic advisers would be.

Signals of major domestic tax cuts or big spending pledges in the following weeks and months could have large impacts on the value of the greenback – but, rather like Trump himself, it is very hard to say in which direction the dollar would move.

Source : independent

Categorized in News & Politics

Who is winning the vote right now - and who will win out come election day? Will we see President Donald Trump or President Hillary Clinton? Based on data from RealClearPolitics, here are our latest predictions and an estimate of the final electoral college result.

Will Hillary Clinton win?

Clinton has been ahead almost continuously in the Telegraph's poll of polls, which takes an average of the last five published on RealClearPolitics.

US presidential poll trackerAverage of the last five polls, based on a four-way raceTrumpClintonMar '16May '16Jul '16Sep '16Nov '163540455055Wednesday, Feb 3, 2016

Will Donald Trump win?

The presidential campaign has seen Donald Trump, once a Republican outsider, close the gap on Clinton before falling back after a series of controversies.

Trump has briefly pulled ahead a couple of times - first on 19 May. His polling threatened to consistently overtake Clinton in September, but fell back after a series of allegations.

How does the presidential election work?

Each of the 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, has a set number of electoral college votes to award a candidate, based on the number of members of Congress it has. This is roughly in line with population. Except in Maine and Nebraska, votes are on a winner-takes-all basis.

This system matters, as the popular vote is less important than the electoral college vote. Clinton's campaign should be buoyed by big Democratic states such as New York, New Jersey, Illinois and California, and these populous states could lead her to victory with their large number of electoral college votes.

The states to watch

Swing states – states that often switch between Democrat and Republican in different elections – are also important.States like Arizona, Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Virginia have the power to swing the election. So far, neither Trump nor Clinton has a significant lead in these crucial states.

How could demographics impact the US election?

Age, race, gender and education are all big dividing points in the presidential race, with polling showing that men and whites are backing Trump while women and ethnic minorities support Clinton.

Race has always been a huge dividing line in the US election, and the clash between Trump and Clinton is no different. Just 17 per cent of Hispanics and three per cent of black people back Trump, according to recent polling.

This could prove significant in this election. For example, Hispanics account for more than a fifth of the population in four key swing states.

Education is another big demographic division in the race - and there's a reason why Trump said he "loved the poorly educated".

Among high school graduates or those with a lower level of education, Trump has the backing of 44% - compared to the 36% who support Clinton.

This could prove significant in the swing states of Georgia and Nevada, which both have a high proportion of people failing to graduate from high school.

We've mapped out each candidate's road to the White House hereand you can keep up with what to look out for in the US Senate and House of Representatives elections with our handy guide.

Source : telegraph

Categorized in News & Politics

You’re fed up with this presidential election campaign, and so am I. So this will be my last article about it.

And I want to end on a high note. So as the race goes down to the wire, let me offer some comfort to tens of millions of decent American Never-Trumpers who view Tuesday’s nail-biter with terror.

Pass this on to your terrified friends. Cut this out and stick it on your fridge till Wednesday if need be.

The message? Don’t be too despondent. Don’t be too worried. Even if Donald Trump wins, look on the bright side.

Sure, he could somehow, miraculously, turn out OK (That’s not the way to bet, but it could happen). But even if he’s an utter disaster, as common sense suggests, it still won’t be all bad.

Here are seven good things that could still happen.

1. Sales! You want bargains? You want cheap food and rent, cheap vacations, and cheap items in the stores? A President Trump should be great for that. He’s promising trade wars with our major partners. As we learned in the 1930s, that’s a terrific recipe for an economic depression — and if you still have any money, depressions are a terrific recipe for cheap prices. After the 1930 version of Donald Trump, the famous Smoot-Hawley tariff, the U.S. consumer price index collapsed by 25% over three years. Servants got cheap, too, on account of all the unemployment. Good times!

2. Money! If you’re holding a ton of cash in your portfolio — and especially things like euros, Swiss francs, and gold bullion — Trump could be your ticket to the big time. This year’s Brexit shock, for example, caused a plunge in the British stock market and a collapse in the pound. After Smoot-Hawley more than 85 years ago, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 80%. What a bargain — for smart people who still had money. If history is any guide, a Trump victory could be bad for a lot of suckers, but great for you.

Polls Show Clinton Close in Georgia, but Not Texas

(1:45)

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are pushing their message to new states in an attempt to broader their potential pickups. New WSJ/NBC News/Marist polls fill in more of the gaps in the election picture. WSJ national politics editor Aaron Zitner explains. Photo: AP

3-Opportunity! It doesn’t stop there, either. Nothing’s better for the savvy investor or the ruthless entrepreneur than lots of volatility. That’s where you get the easy bargains, and chances over and again to make the big money. And what could make volatility more likely than giving power to an ignorantarrogant, petulant man with contempt for the separation of powers and zero impulse control? Those of us in the media will be in fat city. Personally, I’m going to launch a side business peddling conspiracy theories. Apparently Trump supporters are so gullible that they’ll buy anything. Let the bad times roll.

4. Laughs! If Trump is the disaster that his own words and actions lead us to expect, it’s going to be hilarious watching all the pseudo-respectable people who helped him into power — from Neville Chamberlains like Charles Krauthammerand John Kasich to the outright quislings like Paul Ryan — bleat and whine that it’s “not their fault.” I may even get some laughs tuning in to Sean Hannity from time to time — just to watch him eat the world’s largest crap taco.

5. More laughs! That’s not all. It’ll also be hilarious listening to Trump’s fanbase come up with one enraged excuse after another to avoid taking the blame. Oh, this disaster is really “Obama’s fault.” Oh, that snafu is really down to “Nancy Pelosi.” Oh, this war with France “would have happened anyway.” Oh, Trump’s actually been a disaster because “he’s really a liberal.” Oh yeah — and if there’s a financial crisis or an economic slump, watch the euphemisms fly. “Goldman Sachs is manipulating the market! No, wait — the Rothschilds! A global cabal! The liberal elite! George Soros!” (Can I hear an “Elders of Zion?”)

Melania Trump calls for respectful civil discours

Melania Trump campaigned for her husband, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, on Thursday in Pennsylvania, emphasizing her advocacy for women as first lady and calling for respectful civil discourse. Photo: AP

6. Justice! Maybe, just maybe, this will be the moment the far right in this country finally gets nailed for all their crimes. They wriggled out of “America First” and McCarthyism,Iran-Contra and the Iraq War. They cheered for Donald Rumsfeld, whose outrages as defense secretary included a gigantic self-dealing contract at the taxpayers’ expense. Enough is enough. I want to see these people pay for what they’ve done to America — for all the lives lost, the liberties trashed, and the livelihoods destroyed. And yes, I know I should feel sympathy for blue-collar Trumpists. But I won’t. These people are grown ups. They had all the facts. No matter their legitimate grievances, this was not the answer. If they vote for a guy who makes their own lives worse, they will have no one to blame but themselves.

7. Freedom! Finally, but maybe foremost: Isn’t it about time the Blue States stood up for themselves and took back what’s theirs? We pay most of the bills in this country — including those of the South and the West. And yet we give the Red States at least half the power. It’s nuts — especially as they are the opposite of grateful. If Trump wins on Tuesday it will be thanks to all the Red States — just like Bush-Cheney in 2000 and 2004. Maybe, just maybe, this will finally cause Blue Staters to wake up and see the light. Our false “union” makes no sense: The Red States don’t want to be dragged into the 21st century against their will - and we don’t want to be dragged back to the 1930s (or the Middle Ages). A full-scale divorce is probably out of the question, alas. But at least we might start fighting. Maybe we’ll finally start fighting for a rational Blue State agenda — like cutting federal taxes, raising state taxes – and bringing all our blue dollars home.

Call me a cynic. Call me a dreamer. But there’s a silver lining to every cloud. Even, potentially, one shaped like Donald Trump.

Source : marketwatch

Categorized in News & Politics
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