The domain name of your website needs to be catchy and descriptive of the content that one would find by visiting. It needs to be memorable and easy to type by even the most novice of Internet users. Although you might have the perfect name for your site in mind, there are several ways that it could be detrimental to your purposes. Once you pay to register a domain, there may be no going back. What can you do to avoid making mistakes when registering a domain?

Things to avoid when registering domain names

Depending on how long you pay for the registration of your domain, it may be the name of your website for several years. In most cases, you may not be able to change this once it has been registered. Pay attention to how you’re setting up your website in order to avoid embarrassments or errors.

Too long to type

You don’t want a domain name that takes too long to type. Even if your company has an excessively long name, it would be better to condense it for Internet use. For example, a company named “Bob’s Coffee House and Internet Cafe” would be considered too long. This could be condensed in ways such as, “BobsCoffee.com” or abbreviations such as, “BCIC.com.” Once visitors are on the website, you can then have the full name of the company displayed.

Play on words

Some domain names have innocent enough intentions. However, domains don’t normally separate specific words in order to promote the site. Some names can be assumed to mean one thing and not something else. For example, a website for pens, named “penisland.com” could be viewed as something less innocent. The popular tech-help website of “ExpertsExchange.com” can also be misread as something else entirely. In some cases, a play on words such as this may not be realized until much later. If you can avoid such word play, it may be better for your site.

Improper TLD extension

The Top Level Domain extensions are also important when considering the name. Although the most common TLDs end with .com, .net or .org, there is currently a wide list to choose from. Some extensions have specific requirements such as living in Asian countries when registering .asia names. Many people associate the extension with what the website delivers. For example, .org is usually associated with organizations and non-profit establishments while .gov is associated with government websites.

Names which are too focused

Generalizing what your business does may be more pertinent for those looking for your content. For example: If you serve award winning chicken at your restaurant, you may be tempted to use “BestChicken.com.” However, you then alienate those individuals looking for the steak and other foods you may serve. Not everyone likes the taste of chicken and someone may be looking for information regarding steak. If you serve many different foods, a better domain name would be, “CookedDelicacies.com.” Although, it may be better if you could use the restaurant’s name as it will help in online branding and marketing.

Brainstorm other ideas

Before you’re ready to register a domain, brainstorm and come up with different variants. This will help in case the name you’re looking for is unavailable. Many people have spent quite a bit of time looking at the computer screen as they try to come up with a name that hasn’t been taken yet. This is where a thesaurus can come into use as you find similar words in order to create a unique site. Having a short list such as this could save you a lot of time while helping you find the names you want to use instead of automated suggestions.

Spellcheck

Before you submit your order to register a name you want to use, always spellcheck. All too often, website owners will submit an order and register a name that has been misspelled. While some people will simply use the domain name anyway, others may be more inclined to make another purchase to get the name they want. Instead of owning a single domain, these individuals now have two. Take a moment and make sure the name is exactly how you want it spelled.

Hyphens

Although domain names can use hyphens, it’s best if you could avoid these at all costs. Many professionals believe that a hyphen makes the site look cheap and unorganized. There have also been studies performed where hyphenating the domain name to accentuate keywords had no real effect in search engines. In fact, these sites performed poorly against sites with the same name without a hyphen.

What to look for when setting up a domain name

By taking some time and planning out the strategy of your website before registering a domain name, you can optimize the chances for future success. From the marketing aspect of your site to using specific keywords, it can all play into how well the site will perform.

Social marketing

If you could match your website to a social media handle, you can begin to create an even flow of cross marketing. For example, the Twitter handle “@google” is related to the popular search engine “google.com.” Matching the social media aspect to your website may help strengthen the online reputation of your site.

Keywords

Try to use at least one keyword in your domain that refers to what you’re trying to accomplish. Although it may not play a part in optimization techniques, it can still help people identify your content. It helps visitors relate what to expect within your site. A domain named, “ChadsFishEmporium.com” would prompt potential visitors to believe that it’s a website related to fish. Would you trust a site named “Fax.com” or “CarFax.com” when looking for automobile information?

Site preservation

People will often use the TLD extension of a site in order to ride on the coattails of the success of someone else. Instead of .com, someone could use your site’s name using a .net. If an unsuspecting visitor uses the .net extension instead of your .com, the other website owner could steal your traffic. This is why many people will purchase various extensions and have them redirected to the primary website.

For example, “google.net” is automatically redirected to “google.com” when someone types it into their browser. Many website owners don’t put much thought into protecting their sites from such extension hijacking. If you can afford to do so, buying your domains with those various TLDs can help protect your site from those looking to cash in on your success.

The integrity of your domain name will play a prominent role in how well the site will perform on the Internet. Take the time to develop a domain name that is effective and logical for what you wish to accomplish. It will directly affect your online reputation.

Source:  http://internet.com/domains/registering-a-domain-name-mistakes-not-to-make/

 

Categorized in Internet Ethics

Is the Net inherently unethical, or does it simply make it too easy for users to act immorally? Either way, tech too often brings out the worst in even the best of us.

Some people see the Internet as a mirror held up to our culture. If it is, the mirror shows us in an unflattering light.

From newsroom staffers caught off guard on camera in a private moment gone viral on YouTube to dorm room trysts streamed live online, people have no shame about the despicable content they post on the Web. Respect and courtesy are quaint, outdated notions to these Internet citizens.

The people charged with protecting us from such abhorrent behavior not only fail to prevent it, they tacitly or explicitly encourage these breaches in morality because it means more page views, more customers, and more money. For example, YouTube's Community Guidelines state that the company works 24 hours a day, seven days a week to find and remove content that violates its ethical standards. Yet the same poor-taste, non-age-restricted videos appear there week after week, month after month.

Unfortunately, it isn't just misguided college kids or mean-spirited news junkies who propagate these crimes against fairness and human kindness. At a company I worked for, I discovered a senior executive had plagiarized about a dozen different Web sites in a report he had written for a client. He had copied the material directly from the sites and pasted it into his document, changing only a word or two here and there. (In a future post, I'll describe how I inadvertently discovered the plagiarism.)

Nowhere in the document had he mentioned that the material was taken from these sites. When I brought this serious breach of ethics to his attention, he replied, "Don't worry about it."

I told him I was worried about it and insisted he cite in the report the origin of the material. Ultimately, links to the pages from which he "borrowed" were inserted into the document, and a paragraph was added to state that much of the text was taken directly from the sites--though the material appeared without quote marks and without the explicit permission of the sites themselves.

The author of the report is a noted and well-respected scientist. I can only assume that the temptation of stealing the material was too great for him to pass up. If such an esteemed, well-regarded individual succumbed to the Internet's siren song of immorality without a second thought, have we lost the battle to preserve ethics in the online world once and for all?

Internet codes of ethics through the years

In January 1989, the Internet Advisory Board issued a memo titled Ethics and the Internet (RFC 1087) that focused primarily on the need to protect the U.S. government's "fiduciary responsibility to the public to allocate government resources wisely." These guidelines were intended to protect the government's investment in the Internet infrastructure from disruption or lack of access resulting from "irresponsible use."

The five activities proscribed by this code were seeking unauthorized access, disrupting the intended use of the Internet, wasting resources, corrupting data, and compromising the privacy of users. The Computer Ethics Institute has since devised the Ten Commandments of Computer Ethics (PDF), which take a much broader approach.

10 13 10 Ethics1

Along with admonitions not to steal computer resources, use computers to steal or to "bear false witness," or use proprietary software without paying for it is a commandment stating that "thou shalt not appropriate other people's intellectual output." I was delighted to see the last of the 10 commandments:

"Thou shalt always use a computer in ways that ensure consideration and respect for your fellow humans."If this last commandment were actually enforced, the YouTube video archive would be considerably smaller.

Pleas for netiquette go unheeded

At the dawning of the Web in 1994, Virginia Shea released the Core Rules of Netiquette, which later became a book and Web site. As Shea points out, the rules describe good online manners and don't address the legal issues entailed in appropriate use of the Internet. However, she states in rule No. 2, "Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life," that any illegal activity is bad Netiquette.

If you're charged with educating students about Internet ethics, the University of Illinois offers Scenarios for Teaching Internet Ethics, which cover such topics as employers reading their employees' e-mail without permission, social-network users posting negative comments about people, and even writers copying material from Web sites and pasting it into their own reports without attribution.

Chris MacDonald maintains the EthicsWeb.ca site, which includes a list of Applied Ethics Resources for businesses, media, health care providers, researchers, government agencies, and computer professionals. Unfortunately, many of the links on the site are no longer active. I hope this doesn't indicate a loss of interest on the part of those sites' developers. It certainly can't be for lack of a need for such resources.

The fight for an ethical Internet may be a lost cause, if only because people's moral compasses appear to be irreparably damaged. Several years ago, a person I worked for instructed me and my co-workers to lie to writers about assignment due dates in an attempt to receive the assignments in a more timely manner.

Another former boss put my name on an e-mail he wrote to the columnists who worked for us, because he knew the columnists would be more willing to accept what the message proposed if they thought it came from me rather than from him. In both cases, I refused to comply.

I'm starting to think there are no ethics in business--my own experience does not refute this assertion. It could be that the lack of negative consequences for immoral, unethical behavior is perceived as tacit approval of such activities. In this regard, I believe the bard may have had it wrong: conscience definitely does not make cowards of us all.

Source:  http://www.cnet.com/news/the-internet-and-the-death-of-ethics/

Categorized in Internet Ethics

Definition of Computer Ethics

Ethics are a set of moral principles that govern an individual or a group on what is acceptable behaviour while using a computer. Computer ethics is a set of moral principles that govern the usage of computers. One of the common issues of computer ethics is violation of copyright issues.

Duplicating copyrighted content without the author’s approval, accessing personal information of others are some of the examples that violate ethical principles.

Internet Ethics for everyone

Internet ethics means acceptable behaviour for using internet. We should be honest, respect the rights and property of others on the internet.

Acceptance

One has to accept that Internet is not a value free-zone .It means World Wide Web is a place where values are considered in the broadest sense so we must take care while shaping content and services and we should recognize that internet is not apart from universal society but it is a primary component of it.

Sensitivity to National and Local cultures

It belongs to all and there is no barrier of national and local cultures. It cannot be subject to one set of values like the local TV channel or the local newspaper we have to accommodate multiplicity of usage.

While using e-Mail and chatting

Internet must be used for communication with family and friends. Avoid chatting with strangers and forwarding e-mails from unknown people /strangers.We must be aware of risks involved in chatting and forwarding e-mails to strangers.

Pretending to be someone else

We must not use internet to fool others by pretending to be someone else. Hiding our own identity to fool others in the Internet world is a crime and may also be a risk to others.

Avoid Bad language

We must not use rude or bad language while using e-Mail, chatting, blogging and social networking, We need to respect their views and should not criticize anyone on the internet.

Hide personal information

We should not give personal details like home address, phone numbers, interests, passwords. No photographs should be sent to strangers because it might be misused and shared with others without their knowledge.

While Downloading

Internet is used to listen and learn about music,It is also used to watch videos and play games we must not use it to download them or share copyrighted material. We must be aware of the importance of copyrights and issues of copyright.

Access to Internet

The internet is a time-efficient tool for everyone that enlarges the possibilities for curriculum growth. Learning depends on the ability to find relevant and reliable information quickly and easily, and to select, understand and assess that information. Searching for information on the internet can help to develop these skills.

Classroom exercises and take-home assessment tasks, where students are required to compare website content, are ideal for alerting students to the requirements of writing for different audiences, the purpose of particular content, identifying and judging accuracy and reliability. Since many sites adopt particular views about issues, the internet is a useful tool for developing the skills of distinguishing fact from opinion and exploring subjectivity and objectivity.

Ethical rules for computer users

Some of the rules that individuals should follow while using a computer are listed below:

Do not use computers to harm other users.

Do not use computers to steal others information.

Do not access files without the permission of the owner.

Do not copy copyrighted software without the author’s permission.

Always respect copyright laws and policies

Respect the privacy of others, just as you expect the same from others.

Do not use other user's computer resources without their permission.

Use Internet ethically.

Complain about illegal communication and activities, if found, to Internet service Providers and local law enforcement authorities.

Users are responsible for safeguarding their User Id and Passwords. They should not write them on paper or anywhere else for remembrance.

Users should not intentionally use the computers to retrieve or modify the information of others, which may include password information, files, etc..

Source:  http://infosecawareness.in/students/internet-ethics

Categorized in Internet Ethics

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