Source: This article was Published cbsnews.com - Contributed by Member: Bridget Miller

Even if "Location History" is off on your phone, Google often still stores your precise location.

Here are some things you can do to delete those markers and keep your location as private as possible. But there's no panacea because simply connecting to the internet on any device flags an IP address, a numeric designation that can be geographically mapped. Smartphones also connect to cell towers, so your carrier knows your general location at all times.

To prevent further tracking

For any device:

Fire up your browser and go to myactivity.google.com . Sign into Google if you haven't already. On the upper left drop-down menu, go to "Activity Controls." Turn off both "Web & App Activity" and "Location History." That should prevent precise location markers from being stored to your Google account.

Google will warn you that some of its services won't work as well with these settings off. In particular, neither the Google Assistant, a digital concierge, nor the Google Home smart speaker will be particularly useful.

On iOS:

If you use Google Maps, adjust your location setting to "While Using" the app; this will prevent the app from accessing your location when it's not active. Go to Settings - Privacy - Location Services and from there select Google Maps to make the adjustment.

In the Safari web browser, consider using a search engine other than Google. Under Settings - Safari - Search Engine, you can find other options like Bing or DuckDuckGo. You can turn location off while browsing by going to Settings - Privacy - Location Services - Safari Websites, and turn this to "Never." (This still won't prevent advertisers from knowing your rough location based on IP address on any website.)

You can also turn Location Services off to the device almost completely from Settings - Privacy - Location Services. Both Google Maps and Apple Maps will still work, but they won't know where you are on the map and won't be able to give you directions. Emergency responders will still be able to find you if the need arises.

On Android:

Under the main settings icon click on "Security & location." Scroll down to the "Privacy" heading. Tap "Location." You can toggle it off for the entire device.

Use "App-level permissions" to turn off access to various apps. Unlike the iPhone, there is no setting for "While Using." You cannot turn off Google Play services, which supplies your location to other apps if you leave that service on.

Sign in as a "guest" on your Android device by swiping down from the top and tapping the downward-facing caret, then again on the torso icon. Be aware of which services you sign in on, like Chrome.

You can also change search engines even in Chrome.

To delete past location tracking

For any device:

On the page myactivity.google.com , look for any entry that has a location pin icon beside the word "details." Clicking on that pops up a window that includes a link that sometimes says "From your current location." Clicking on it will open Google Maps, which will display where you were at the time.

You can delete it from this popup by clicking on the navigation icon with the three stacked dots and then "Delete."

Some items will be grouped in unexpected places, such as topic names, google.com, Search, or Maps. You have to delete them item by item. You can wholesale delete all items in date ranges or by service but will end up taking out more than just location markers.

Categorized in How to

Tracking down someone's cell phone number can be difficult, if not impossible. After all, one of the reasons that people purchase a mobile phone is so they can have some measure of anonymity.

In addition, phone books do not (usually) carry listings of cell phone numbers, so there's no paper trail to follow, and cell phone numbers are unlisted – meaning that even if the number comes through on your phone screen, the person attached to it is still a mystery for the most part. 

However, that doesn't mean that finding a cell phone number listing is an impossible task. While mobile phone numbers are notoriously tricky to look up, there are a couple of tricks you can try. In this article, we're going to look at five different ways you can use the internet to potentially track down a cell phone number. 

Note: While the Web is a vast treasury of resources, not everything can be found online. Use these tips for entertainment purposes only. 

1-Try Using a Search Engine to Find That Cell Phone Number

 Search engines instantly expand your search. Google

Try a search engine. If you know the mobile phone number already, try entering it into your favorite search engine and see what comes up. If the cell phone number you are looking for has ever been entered somewhere on the Web – a blog, a public job profile – it will show up and you'll be able to track to whom it belongs to.

  • How to Pick a Search Engine: There's no set rule in place that says you have to use the same search engine every time you look for something. In fact, most search industry experts would advise you to do the exact opposite in order to get the most well-rounded results. Every search engine serves up different results, sometimes drastically so.
  • Top Ten Google Search Tricks: While Google is definitely the search engine of choice for most people, there's a lot more to it than just tracking down Wikipedia articles and finding cute cat pics. Learn how you can make your Google searches more powerful than you ever thought you could.
  • Top 10 Web Search Tricks: Do you use the same basic Web search technique every time you look for something? If you do, you're not alone...most people are "stuck in a rut" when it comes to their search habits. With a few simple tweaks, you can make your Web searches more targeted and therefore much more effective.

2-Use Social Media to Find a Cell Phone Number

 Social media sites can yield clues. filo/DigitalVision Vectors/Getty

Try social networking sites. There are literally hundreds of millions of people who are active on various social networking sites all over the world. Many people use these social networking sites to share information with each other, and yes, that does include phone numbers. Simply type the person's name into the site's search function and see what comes back.

In addition, one of the most popular social networking sites is Facebook, which boasts at the time of this writing more than 500 million members. It's a great source for tracking people down and, while most of the ways you can find people here are somewhat obvious, there are other informational sources within Facebook that might not be quite as easy to use. Read How to Use Facebook to Find People to learn more about how you can use Facebook to find cell phone numbers and (potentially) much, much more.

Usernames can be tracked. alengo/E+/Getty

Try searching via username. Usernames, individual identification codes/names for people accessing a computer, network, or website, are also good jumping-off points for tracking down a cell phone number. Since many people keep the same username across multiple sites, you can sometimes hit pay dirt simply by typing that username into your favorite search engine and waiting for the results. If the person has entered in their phone number somewhere on the Web underneath their username, it will come up in a search engine query.

 Quote marks can help narrow searches down. bubaone/DigitalVision Vectors/Getty

Try a niche search engine. There are a wide variety of search engines on the Web, and all of them serve up unique results. While general search engines are quite useful in most search situations, sometimes niche search engines – tools that fulfill a specific search purpose – can come in handy. People search engines can be extraordinarily useful in this regard since they search and retrieve only people-related information, which includes cell phone numbers. Type in the person's name ( use quotation marks around the name to make the search even more focused), or type in the phone number itself to find related information.

5-Finding Cell Phone Numbers Online - Not Always Guaranteed

Don't pay when you can get information free. JoKMedia/E+/Getty

You should not pay for this information. The sites that charge for the service have access to the same information you do on the Web – if you can't find it, they probably can't either.

Unfortunately, failing to find the phone number you're looking for is going to be the norm and not the exception. Mobile phone numbers are kept very private by most people and, since they are not in any kind of published directory (yet), they are next to impossible to track down. However, don't give up! Try the tips mentioned in this article, and you just might get lucky.

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Jerri Collins

Categorized in Search Engine

This is the age of influence and networking. The success of a brand or an individual highly depends on the amount of influence earned as well as the level of networks created in the meantime. Today, the best place to power up influence and build network is social media and just like web search engines, there are number of cool social media search engines that can help you or your brand to find real people, build networks, and share or gain useful information required to raise influence within your niche market.

Yes, you heard it right. There are many specific social media search engines out there designed to help you find real people and user profiles across major social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and many others.

The more people you can manage to add to your network from the same industry, your influence resultantly improves in the industry. And, there’s no better way to find people on the web other than looking for them via social media search engines.

Today, we bring you a cool list of top social media search engines that can help you find people within your industry nearby to grow your influence, reach, as well as network within the industry.

Best Social Media Search Engines to Find Real People across Top Social Networks

There is no doubt that Google is the most popular search engine on the web to find almost anything on the internet. However, even Google fails or is not up to the mark when finding people or profiles on popular social media channels.

Today, we will share some of the best social media search engines that would help you find real people as follows:

Social Mention

The first on our list is Social Mention. This web tool is systematically designed for people looking for social media contents that include blogs, microblogs, comments, bookmarks, videos, and more. With Social Mention, you can also set alerts and receive emails based on your searches for specific brands, celebrities, or company related updates. The tool is quite helpful for bloggers, who can install its real-time buzz widget on their blogs for maximum benefits.

WhosTalkin

WhosTalkin is another social media search engine that lets you explore conversations relevant to the topics that interest you. You can find updates about your favorite sport, favorite food, celebrity, or a company. With WhosTalkin, you can engage in conversations that are most relevant to the topics you like. This internet-based social media search engine tool is able to search through a number of social media networks and blogs for your favorite trending topics and conversations related your favorite celebrity, sports, food, places, videos, etc.

YoName

As the name of the search engine suggests, YoName lets you find people across different social media platforms by name. With YoName, you can search people on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, Blogger blogs, and several others using the search form. Simply enter people’s name, email address, or phone number and then hit “Yo” to get the results. Besides social media search, YoName also supports web search, business search as well as public records search.

Anoox

Well, Anoox is not exactly a social media search engine but it allows you to get information via multiple social media websites as well as find answers to your queries from real people. At Anoox, you can share & discuss with real people for the best answer, truth, and in turn more traffic to your website or profile.

BoardReader

Unlike other social media search engines, BoardReader is a search tool for community forums and boards. With BoredReader, you can easily explore popular content spread across the internet including news, articles, videos, press releases, etc.

Bing Social

After Google, Bing is the 2nd most popular search engine on the web and its social arm known as Bing Social is designed to find the latest news and trending topics shared across popular social networking channels like Facebook, Twitter, and other social media networks.

Addictomatic

Addictomatic is yet another social search tool to explore the latest news, trending topics, attractive blog posts, viral videos, and interesting pictures. This tool searches the best live sites on the internet to find the latest news, blog posts, videos, and images for you. With this tool, you can easily keep up with the latest updates on the hot trending topics, and keep up to date with the latest social media sensation on the web.

Twazzup

Twitter is a strong social media platform with lots of viral and trending news surfacing on this microblogging tool every single second as you are reading this article. Twazzup lets you search these trending news and topics across Twitter and lets you keep up with the social media buzz around the globe.

Snitch Name

Snitch Name is a white pages service for social networks. This amazing search tool is designed to search people’s profile over popular social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace, and other networks.

Blinkx

Videos are now an integral part of the social media world and Blinkx is a social media search engine dedicated to videos medium. One of the best social media search engines on the web, Blinkx is a search engine for videos with over million hours of regularly indexed online videos. This video search engine enables you to watch videos ranging from a wide variety of different categories including but not limited to news & politics, celebrity, technology, business, gaming, food, sports, and more assorted from all the major news portals and video sharing platforms.

Flickr Advanced Search

Flickr, as everyone knows, is one of the largest photo and video sharing platforms on the internet. While it lets you upload and view photos and videos on it, Flickr also lets you search for images or videos based on your topic using its advanced search tool embed with smart filters and variety of options designed to deliver accurate and effective results.

Source: This article was published geekdashboard.com By Rajeesh Nair

Categorized in Search Engine

Imagine you went to a networking event last night and met a potential business partner. You're all set to send a pleasant follow-up note but realize you've forgotten the one thing you need–their email address.

While you can find most people on various social networks–from professional ones like LinkedIn to personal ones like Facebook–email still reigns supreme as the preferred method of getting in touch. Email's more personal and professional at the same time, and your contact is all-but guaranteed to have an email address, as there are 2.9 billion email addresses in the world.

Contacting people over social media has more hurdles than sending a simple email. You might have to pay to send a LinkedIn message, or the person might not accept Direct Messages on Twitter from strangers. It's worth the trouble to just email instead.

Finding email addresses isn't always easy, though. Most people are protective of their email address, for good reason: We all hate spam. With a little investigative work, though, you can find almost anyone's email address. Here's how.

Start with Quick Email Searches

Google search for email
A Google search might be all you need to find an email

The first place you should look for email addresses is the “About” page of their company’s website. You might find anything from a brief bio to detailed contact info for every team member. Dig around a bit, and you might find email addresses in unexpected places. For instance, on Zapier's About page, you'll find team members' contact information by hovering over their photos.

Personal websites are another great place to check. If you can find a personal blog or landing page for that contact, you'll likely find an email address on their Contact page. At least, it's worth checking.

Google can help out, by finding other personal sites or the email address itself. There’s a chance your prospect's email address is listed somewhere online, so just search for their first and last name along with the word and email perhaps their company name. Google will find anywhere this combination appears.

If you can find your prospect's social media account, check their profile for contact information. Users sometimes list this information on LinkedIn or Twitter, often with a space between their email address and the domain. On Twitter, for example, use the search from operator to find an email address (e.g., email from:dannyaway).

Twitter email search

Alternately, use 3rd party Twitter search app SnapBird. It can search through all of the Tweets from your feed or followers; just enter a keyword such as “email” and the user’s name, and it’ll do the rest.

LinkedIn is also worth exploring for email addresses. It lets you export contacts and their email addresses if they’re available on their profiles, for an easy way to find addresses of anyone you're already connected with. You can also use a tool such as Lusha to find contact information for people on LinkedIn, including their corporate email address, personal email address, and phone number.

Then, there are also several “people search” websites that can be helpful, including SpokeoPeopleSmart, and Pipl. Some sites are free to use (including Pipl), while you'll need a paid subscription to unlock most people search sites' full features.

When all else fails, you can try guessing. Seriously. If you can find the naming convention the company uses perhaps from another employee at that firm (in some cases, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), you can try that format with your prospect's name and wait to see if the email bounces back. Guessing might not be efficient, but it could work.

Try an Email-Finding App

If you’ve completed your web and social media search and still can’t find a trusted email address, it’s time to use a tool designed for this email search. Fortunately, there are lots of apps just for this.

Just enter your prospect’s name along with their company name, and you’ll receive either the app’s best guess or a list of viable options. Here are the best options:

Email Generator

Email Generator

Part of your initial email search may involve entering various name and company domain combinations into Google. This is not only time consuming, but it can be frustrating considering the various combinations that can exist. That’s where Email Generator comes in. It generates over 50 popular email combinations for that name for you in seconds just from their name and company domain.

As an added bonus, Email Generator will also give you potential email variations for popular email services like Gmail and Outlook. If you’re confident that you’ve found the correct email address, consider installing Email Generator’s email tracking software, MailTrack.io, which will let you know when your email recipient opens it.

Price: Free

Mail Tester

Mail Tester

Once you've found a potential email address, use Mail Tester to see if the email address is valid. It can't tell you if that's the real email for the person you want, but it can confirm whether or not that email address exists on that domain name.

If the email address is valid, Mail Tester shows the server info it found. If it’s unable to confirm the accuracy of an email address, it will display a message stating that the company’s server doesn’t allow email verification.

Keep in mind, even if the app can’t confirm whether an email address is accurate, that doesn’t mean that there’s anything wrong with the email address. Sometimes it comes down to whether or not a company’s server will allow Mail Tester to connect to it and provide users with valid information. The only way to be 100% certain is to send an email to the address and see if you receive a bounce-back notification stating that the email address doesn’t exist.

Price: Free

BuzzStream

BuzzStream

BuzzStream is another fantastic app to use to boost your email search. It can find contact information (including social network profiles) for “influencers”, people who are active on social media and blogs. Once you've gotten in touch with an influencer, it will save those messages, and let you share them with your team to easily follow up.

When you need to find email addresses, simply add in the company URL and the app will display both employee email addresses and the company’s Twitter handle. If the app can’t find the email address of a specific person, it will provide you with the about and contact pages of the company as a starting point. Or, use its free email research tool to get auto-generated Google Search links that'll help you find their email address.

Price: Free 14-day trial; from $24/month for one user

Voila Norbert

Voila Norbert

Voila, Norbert is one of the simplest ways to find an email address. Just enter the first and last name of anyone you’re trying to find, along with the company’s domain name. It'll then ping the domain to show any addresses it finds that might match the name, along with reviews from users to show if the address is actually valid or not.

It works surprisingly well for finding company addresses. Keep in mind that some companies strive to keep the email addresses of their employees private, though, so if Voila Norbert isn’t given access it lets you know.

Price: Free for searching up to 50 email addresses; plans from $49/month

Voila, Norbert Zapier integrations coming soon!

Email Hunter

Email Hunter

Email Hunter lets you find email addresses right from its homepage. Just enter the company domain name into the search field, click search, and the app will find all of the publicly available email addresses for that company domain.

It also shows the number of sources found online for each email address, to add to the verification and validity of each one. That makes it an even better bet for finding email addresses that actually work.

Price: Free for searching up to 150 email addresses per month; plans from $49/month

See Email Hunter integrations on Zapier

Conspire

Conspire

Conspire is a little different from the other apps on this list. Rather than solely providing emails, it operates on the “six degrees of separation” theory. Like the game "Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon," where you try to figure out how a person would be connected to Kevin Bacon or some other celebrity, Conspire assumes you might know someone who knows someone who knows your prospective contact.

If you’d like to meet a new potential client through the people you already know, the app will show you the best possible path—based on people in your network—to reach out through. You can then connect with folks just outside of your network even if you haven’t met them by mentioning your mutual contacts.

Conspire uses data from your linked Gmail account to get a sense of your current network. It then scores each relationship to give an idea of how “strong” the connection is, using the To, From, CC, Subject and Date fields of your emails—along with your frequency of communication—to determine connection strength. This data determines how you and your contacts communicate.

Price: Free

Find an Email with a Browser Extension

Another handy way to find email addresses is with a browser extension—many of which work right inside your Gmail inbox. With just a couple of clicks, you can quickly look up an email address without opening a new app or webpage.

Rapportive (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer)

Rapportive gif

Rapportive puts contact info discovery right inside Gmail. It can be used in conjunction with an app such as Email Generator. Simply enter a few email variations into the “Send To” field when composing an email in Gmail. Hover over each email address and Rapportive will show as much profile information as possible.

For example, with a real email, Rapportive can show you the contact’s full name, profile pic, company name and location, and links to websites (both personal and professional) and social networks. That's enough to be confident that you’ve found the right email address. Or, if it doesn't find any info, you'll see a grey block which means you'll need to keep searching for the right address.

And, when you're reading emails, Rapportive will show that same contact info in the right sidebar for a simple way to learn more about your contacts.

Price: Free

Clearbit (Chrome)

Clearbit

Similar to Rapportive, this Chrome extension integrates with Gmail. However, instead of checking variations of an email address, Clearbit quickly finds email addresses from its database, along with other company and personal data. Just enter a company's name, select the correct one, then filter through the contacts it finds there.

Then, when you receive an email, Clearbit can also give you extra info about each email—something extra helpful when trying to remember how you met a contact.

Price: Free for up to 50 searches per month

See Clearbit integrations on Zapier

Datanyze Insider (Chrome and Firefox)

Datanyze Insider can find any email address with just the first and last name of the contact—no need to enter a company domain name.

To use the extension, highlight the contact’s name as it appears online (for example, in LinkedIn or the company’s about page), right click, choose “Datanyze Insider” and click “Find email”. Datanyze Insider will then ping email addresses that are most likely to be valid (based on name and company domain variations) and display the ones that appear to be valid. It also provides a percentage for how confident it is that it found the correct email address.

Price: Free

Ninja Outreach (Chrome)

Ninja Outreach searches a company's website for any mention of a contact's name that you highlight on the web page. If it doesn’t find a match, the extension will check its own database for a match. Ninja Outreach will also give you links to the prospect’s social networks, location address, and more.

Price: Free without signup to search for addresses; register for a Ninja Outreach account to get full features including contact form autofill, web app templates, and enhanced website information

Find That Lead (Chrome)

Find That Lead adds an icon next to people's names on web pages you visit, such as LinkedIn. Click the icon and the resulting pop-up menu will display the person's company name and email address. If the search isn’t successful, the plugin will display the best result it was able to find, along with a percentage score of how certain it is that the email address is accurate. It can also work with a tool such as Rapportive if you need added certainty before sending an email.

Price: Free for up to 10 emails per week; from $15/month for additional searches

LeadFuze (Chrome)

LeadFuze helps you build a relevant contact list. It does the tedious work for you of finding email addresses, social network profiles, and prospect details such as titles and company names for an entire list of contacts. Once you have a list you’re happy with, you can set up targeted emails and subsequent follow-up emails. To be sure you have the correct email addresses, LeadFuze includes reports to see whether your email has been viewed.

Price: Free for up to 20 leads; plans from $150/user/month

Source: This article was published zapier.com By Milveen Eke-Allen

Categorized in How to

Give me someone's name, and I'll find their personal email address. Sure, it may take some extensive digging and sleuthing, but I'll find you eventually. And I'm not paying to root you out or buying your private info from a lead gen company (though sometimes that would be easier). This is just good old fashioned, organic searching, scanning and scouring the Internet like a Web gumshoe. And not stopping until I ferret out that personal email.

How to find someone's email address [Summary]:

  1. Google Name + "Email"
  2. Google Name + Place of Work
  3. Search LinkedIn
  4. Search their company website
  5. Use Google's site search operator
  6. Use advanced Google search operators
  7. Try some "kitchen sink" queries
  8. Check social media profiles
  9. Check their personal blog
  10. Check Whois
  11. Check people search sites
  12. Message via Twitter or LinkedIn

We'll look at each of these methods in a little more detail, but first:

Why is it important to use someone's personal email address?

If you're sending out an important email that you really want to be taken seriously and improve your chances of getting an actual response, you need to go directly to the source. Sending an important, personal email to the info[at]companyX.com, or dumping it into a "Contact Us" form is a virtual black hole.

This is especially true if you're trying to get in touch with someone you don't know or you've never contacted before. Primary examples of this include:

  • Applying for a job
  • Any form of outreach, like a link request, interview request for your blog, if you're seeking media coverage for a story, etc.

What's more, by taking this extra step and getting directly to the source, you show real initiative and will distinguish yourself from the candidates applying for that same job or requesting that same link.

12 Tips and Tricks to Find Anyone's Email Address

Now, when I say "personal" email address, I'm not talking about a Gmail, Hotmail or AOL account exclusively. I'm also referring to their personal company email address, Web hosting domain email, blogger mail account, or any Web property email address I can find. Because of the depth and breadth and ubiquity of content sources on the Web, you can find contact information for pretty much anyone who has an email address, even if they don't actively promote it on their website. All you have to do is search and keep refining your searches until you strike pay dirt.

Let the Hunt Begin

1) Basic Name Queries by Googling Emails

You can start your sleuthing by running a generic search query for someone's name. But understand that this approach probably won't get you very far, unless the person you're seeking has a unique name, like say Jets WR Jerricho Cotchery. However, if that person's name is at all common, you'll need to add some distinguishing modifiers. Think of it as engaging in the long tail of name searching.

Some initial modifiers you should incorporate to narrow and refine your search are:

  • [name] + email (or) email address
  • [name] + contact (or) contact information (or) contact me

2) Name Queries with Personal Modifiers

Now, if that doesn't work, get even more granular and add any personal information you may have already or uncovered about this person in your initial search, such as:

  • [name] + "home town"
  • [name] + "company they work for"

You can even mix and match all the above modifiers. If you succeed here, terrific. Mission accomplished. But all too often, this is only the initial stage of your research, as this method yields results less than 10 % of the time. To really find who you're looking for, you'll need to go corporate.

Hunting for Company Email Addresses

3) Business Networking Search Queries

One of the best resources for finding direct contact information is through a company email network. Anyone working for an organization has an in-house email. Now, typically if you're searching for someone's direct email for a job interview, link outreach or media coverage, you likely know where they work or conduct business already. But if you're still in the dark, ZoomInfo and LinkedIn are pretty fertile grounds for harvesting personal information.

You can either search the websites internal engine or run queries in Google, like so:

  • [name] + LinkedIn
  • [name] + ZoomInfo

Notice the quick success I had with a probe of ZoomInfo.

4) Basic Company Name Queries

Now, once you get a place of business from their profile, you should visit the company website and start running queries, using the person's name in the hope that you'll find any indexed document with their email address. Most times, generic name searches yield citations (like so-and-so pitched a gem for the company softball team), not actual email addresses. So again, get more specific with modifiers.

  • [name] + email
  • [name] + contact

Adding these modifiers will really boost your chances of finding your target.

5) Basic Company Search Operators

However, if you're still coming up short, you'll need to roll up your sleeves. This is when I break out my super-sleuth hat and get creative with Google search operators. In the majority of cases, Google information retrieval yields more results than a company's internal search. If you're not familiar with search operators, read this.

So what you'll do now is search Google, using the Google Search Operator Query "site:companywebsite.com" as your root and sprinkle in modifiers, like so:

  • site:companywebsite.com + [name] + email
  • site:companywebsite.com + [name] + contact

6) Advanced Company Search Operators

Pretty much every organization has a unique, yet uniform company email addresses structure, which you can leverage in your search efforts, using advanced search operators. For example, at WordStream our email structure is “first initial + This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.">This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.." But since each company has their own format, you'll need to play around with a host of possible email address structures using the root search operator.

Note: Use the standard format here "@," I'm using [at] so as not to activate hyperlinks.

  • site:companywebsite.com + ken.lyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + kenlyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + klyons [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + ken [at] companyname.com
  • site:companywebsite.com + ken_lyons [at] companyname.com

It's important to mention here that the information you're seeking with these queries will be bolded in the meta tags text snippets, like so:

Find anyone's email site search operators

An example search engine results page (SERP) with results displayed
for site-search operation results 

I'd say this method yeilds results 80% of the time for me.

7) Random Kitchen Sink Queries

However, if you're still coming up short, you can drop the company search operator root and pound away with random combinations of the above suggestions. 99% of the time, this is very effective. For example, here's a random query I ran for a faculty member at Boston University (note: name is blurred for privacy):

Find anyone's email search by email domain

Notice my query: "BU [person's name] @bu.edu." It's kind of nonsensical, but nevertheless this query combination succeeded where the other techniques failed, yielding this person's email address. Point being, at this stage, I throw everything at the wall to see what sticks.

Even More Options to Find an Email Address

8) Social Networking Profile Queries

Another avenue you can explore for personal information are social media profiles. I've had the most success with social sites like Twitter. And chances are that employing the original basic queries that I mentioned above will display if this person has a Twitter profile.

  • [name] + Twitter

9) Personal Website or Blog Search Operators

Very often, my Web sleuthing reveals a personal website that I didn't know existed. Also, people include their personal websites or their blogs on their Twitter or LinkedIn profiles. This provides you a whole new channel to explore to find contact info for them. If you do find a personal site or blog, there's often have a contact page or even their email address listed right on the site somewhere. Even still, I prefer a direct line to that person. So if you've explored the site and come up short, navigate back out to Google and run some advanced search operators.

  • site:personalblog.com + [name] + email
  • site:personalblog.com + [name] + contact
  • site:personalblog.com + ken.lyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + kenlyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + klyons [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + ken [at] personalblog.com
  • site:personalblog.com + ken_lyons [at] personalblog.com

10) Whois Search

If you're still coming up empty after a deep dive of their personal website or blog, go to Network Solutions and run a Whois search for their domain registration data for an email address. 60% of the time, you'll find a personal email address here.

11) People Search Sites

Another resource for finding personal contact information are websites such as 123PeopleSearch, Intelius, and PeopleSmart. I've had great luck in the past using this type of free people search to locate the hard-to-find, and some sites allow you to search across multiple countries for personal contact info.

However, your mileage may vary from one search provider to another, and these days, it's getting harder and harder to find reliable, up-to-date information on these sites. As the Web has matured, many of these sites have either gone out of business or offer sub-par results. Sure, you might luck out, but be prepared for a mixed bag in terms of results.

It's always worth checking free people search sites as part of your research, but relying solely on sites like this is a mistake. 

12) If All Else Fails

Okay, if all else fails, you may have to resort to alternative, less "direct" methods like emailing your target through LinkedIn, or @-ting them on Twitter and asking them to follow you back so you can DM them and ask for contact information (if they're willing). For me, these are usually last-ditch efforts, which I've resorted to only a handful of times after if I've exhausted all of the other options I detailed in this post. But even though I prefer to send an email to someone's personal account, shooting them an unsolicited LinkedIn message to me is still far better than an info[at]companyX.com black hole.

Point being, 99% of the time if you're dogged, persistent, relentless and love the thrill of the chase like me, then ain't nothing gonna' stop you from finding the personal contact information you seek.

Happy email hunting!

Source: This article was published wordstream.com By Ken Lyons

Categorized in Research Methods

Journalists frequently contact us looking for research on a specific topic. While we have published a number of resources on how to understand an academic study and how to pick a good one — and why using social science research enriches journalism and public debate — we have little on the mechanics of how to search. This tip sheet will briefly discuss the resources we use.

Google Scholar

Let’s say we’re looking for papers on the opioid crisis. We often start with Google Scholar, a free service from Google that searches scholarly articles, books and documents rather than the entire web: scholar.google.com.

But a search for the keyword “opioids” returns almost half a million results, some from the 1980s. Let’s narrow down our search. On the left, you see options “anytime” (the default), “since 2013,” “since 2016,” etc. Try “since 2017” and the results are now about 17,000. You can also insert a custom range to search for specific years. And you can include patents or citations, if you like (unchecking these will slightly decrease the number of results).

Still too many results. To narrow the search further, try any trick you’d use with Google. (Here are some tipsfrom MIT on how to supercharge your Google searches.) Let’s look for papers on opioids published in 2015 that look at race and exclude fentanyl (Google: “opioids +race -fentanyl”). Now we’re down to 2,750 results. Better.

img class="aligncenter wp-image-54961" src="https://journalistsresource.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Screen-Shot-2017-10-12-at-4.16.05-PM-1024x651.png?x20117" alt="" width="720" height="458" srcset="https://journalistsresource.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Screen-Shot-2017-10-12-at-4.16.05-PM-1024x651.png 1024w, / 

Unless you tell Google to “sort by date,” the search engine will generally weight the papers that have been cited most often so you will see them first.

Try different keywords. If you’re looking for a paper that studies existing research, include the term “meta-analysis.” Try searching by the author’s name, if you know it, or title of the paper. Look at the endnotes in papers you like for other papers. And look at the papers that cited the paper you like; they’ll probably be useful for your project.

Paywalls

If you locate a study and it’s behind a paywall, try these steps:

  • Click on “all versions.” Some may be available for free. (Though check the date, as this may include earlier drafts of a paper.)
  • Reach out to the journal and the scholar. (The scholar’s email is often on the abstract page. Also, scholars generally have an easy-to-find webpage.) One is likely to give you a free copy of the paper, especially if you are a member of the press.
  • In regular Google, search for the study by title and you might find a free version.

More tips on using Google Scholar from MIT and Google.

Other databases

  • PubMed Central at the National Library of Medicine: If you are working on a topic that has a relationship to health, try this database run by the National Institutes of Health. This free site hosts articles or abstracts and links to free versions of a paper if they are available. Often Google Scholar will point you here.
  • If you have online access to a university library or a local library, try that.
  • Directory of Open Access Journals.
  • Digital Public Library of America.
  • Subscription services include org and Web of Science.

For more on efforts to make scholarly research open and accessible for all, check out SPARC, a coalition of university libraries.

Related...

Citations as a measure of impact

How do you know if a paper is impactful? Some scholars use the number of times the paper has been cited by other scholars. But that can be problematic: Some papers cite papers that are flawed simply to debunk them. Some topics will be cited more often than others. And new research, even if it’s high-quality, may not be cited yet.

The impact factor measures how frequently a journal, not a paper, is cited.

This guide from the University of Illinois, Chicago, has more on metrics.

What else?

Here’s a useful source of new papers curated by Boston Globe columnist Kevin Lewis for National Affairs.

Another way to monitor journals for new research is to set up an RSS reader like Feedly. Most journals have a media page where you can sign up for press releases or newsletters featuring the latest research.

Source: This article was published journalistsresource.org By David Trilling

Categorized in How to

What You Need to Know About Finding an Email Address

Did you misplace an email you desperately need? Whether it's a business contact or an old high school friend, there are several ways to go about tracking down someone's email address. Employ these five strategies to find any email address you're looking for. 

Use Social Media

Browsing through pictures on a phone
Google/cc

Searching Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or LinkedIn could quickly lead you to the email address you're looking for.

Search each those the social media websites directly to find users. Details such as age, high school, and hometown—if you know them—are particularly helpful on social media sites.

Even if a person's page isn't public on Facebook, users sometimes allow their email address to remain public. That way,  someone who isn't a "friend," can still contact them. More »

Close up of silhouetted male hand typing on laptop keyboard
Andrew Brookes/Getty Images

Sometimes a good old-fashioned web search can help you locate someone's email address. Use a large and extensive search engine such as Google to garner the best results.

Putting the person's name in quotes often narrows the search. However, if the individual you're looking for has a common name, like "John Smith," you're going to need some additional information.

You could launch a search, like this: "John Smith" + "Brooklyn, New York." The more information you have, the better. If you know where the person works, their hometown, or place of business, be sure to add that information to your search terms. More »

Laughing architects at conference table in office.
Thomas Barwick/Getty Images

It may have a scary name—Hidden Web, Invisible Web, Dark Web—but it contains a treasure-trove of information if you just know where to look. There are plenty of less-well-known search engines that are designed to search the Dark Web, including Internet Archive Wayback Machine, Pipl, Zabasearch, and others. Some require registration and some may offer only limited information without a fee. Remember where you are, and don't be eager to enter your payment information. More »

Check Web Directories or White Pages 

Phil Ashley/Getty Images

From public records to the white pages, there are email address directories that you can find on the internet. Once on these sites, such as Whitepages, you can use search engines that help you find an individual's email address. 

It's helpful if you know the city and state where a person lives or works.  More »

Guess Somebody's Email Address

Cup and balls guessing game.
Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Most organizations do not let people choose email addresses freely but instead assign them by name. You can take advantage of that by assuming the email address using some syntax guessing. Of course, you have to know where the person works.

Try separating the individual's first and last name with a period. If you look on a company's email directory and everyone's email starts with their first initial and the first six letters of their last name, you can try this combination.

For example, if the addresses at the company website are all in the format This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., John Smith's would be This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. However, if you see on the website that that This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. belongs to the CEO, it's more than likely that an employee named Emma Osner's email address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..More »

 Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Heinz Tschabitscher

Categorized in How to

Google has created a new search engine called Poly, which is designed for finding 3D objects to use in apps with virtual and augmented reality capabilities.

If you’re developing for AR and VR, you need 3D objects in your apps— full stop. Now you can build on others’ work with 3D objects discovered in Poly.

Poly is integrated with Google’s Tilt Brush and Blocks tools, and allows for direct uploads of OBJ files.

”Whether you’re creating an intense space walk in VR or a serene garden of AR flowers, you’ll find the ingredients you need in Poly.”

Poly contains thousands of models to discover, which are absolutely free to use. Objects found in Poly can be modified by the end-user, or used as-is.

‘Liking’ an object will allow you to import it into either the Tilt Brush or Blocks tools, where you can then “remix” it and build upon it.

While Poly has been designed for developers, anyone can use it to view 3D objects in their mobile or desktop browser.

The 3D objects can also be downloaded as animated GIFs, which do nothing more than spin in circles.

Another thing you can do with these objects is view them in VR with Cardboard or Daydream View.

One thing Poly cannot do, which perhaps maybe it should, is utilize AR technology to place an object in the room with you.

Maybe that’s something that will be added in the future. AR and VR are still in their infancy, so Poly will likely evolve over time as the technology matures.

Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern

Categorized in Search Engine

If your iPhone has been stolen or lost, Apple offers a free tool to help you get it back. And, even if you can't get it back, you can prevent a thief from getting at your personal data.

To do this, you need Find My iPhone, a free service that's part of iCloud, that uses your phone's GPS and Internet connection to help you locate it on a map and take certain actions. No one wants to need this article, but if you do, these instructions will help you use Find My iPhone to locate a lost or stolen iPhone.

What You'll Need

How to Use Find My iPhone to Find or Erase Your Phone

As already mentioned, you MUST have the Find My iPhone service set up on your device before it was stolen. If you did, go to https://www.icloud.com/ in a web browser. 

There's also a Find My iPhone app (link opens iTunes) that you can install on another iOS device to track yours. This article covers using the web-based tool, though using the app is pretty similar. If your iPhone or iPod touch (or iPad or Mac) is missing, follow these steps to try to recover it:

  1. Log in to iCloud using the account you used when setting up Find My iPhone. This is probably your Apple ID/iTunes account.

  1. Click on Find iPhone under the web-based tools offered by iCloud. Find My iPhone immediately begins trying to locate all the devices you have it enabled on. You'll see onscreen messages as it works.

  2. If you have more than one device set up for Find My iPhone, click All Devices at the top of the screen and select the device you're looking for.

  1. If it locates your device, Find My iPhone zooms in on the map and shows the location of the device using a green dot. When this happens, you can zoom in or out of the map, and view it in standard, satellite, and hybrid modes, like in Google Maps. When your device is found, a window appears in the right corner of your web browser. It lets you know how much battery your phone has and offers a few options.

  2. Click Play Sound. This is the first option because sending a sound to the device is best when you think you've lost your device nearby and want help finding it. It can also be helpful if you think someone has your device but is denying it.  

  3. You can also click Lost Mode. This allows you to remotely lock the device's screen and set a passcode (even if you hadn't previously set up a passcode). This prevents a thief from using your device or accessing your personal data.

    Once you click the Lost Mode button, enter the passcode you want to use. If you already have a passcode on the device, that code will be used. You can also enter a phone number where the person who has the device can reach you (this is optional; you may not want to share this information if it's been stolen). You also have the option to write a message that is displayed on the device's screen. 

  1. If you don't think you'll get the phone back, you can delete all data from the device. To do this, click the Erase button. You'll see a warning (basically, don't do this unless you're absolutely sure you want to). Click the box that says you understand what you're doing and click Erase. This will delete all the data on your phone, preventing the thief from accessing it.

    If you get the device back later, you can restore your data from backup.

  2. If you think your device is on the move, click the green dot representing your phone and then click the rounded arrow in the pop-up window. This updates the device's location using the latest GPS data.

    What To Do If Your iPhone Is Offline

    Even if you have set up Find My iPhone, your device may not show up on the map. Reasons for why this may happen include that the device:

    • is turned off or out of battery
    • isn't connected to the Internet
    • has had its Location Services disabled.

    For more on that situation, read Why Is Find My iPhone Not Working?

    If Find My iPhone isn't working for whatever reason, you have a handful of options:

    • ​Check the Notify Me When Found box. Find My iPhone will let you know when your device next connects to the Internet so you can find it
    • The three options – Play Sound, Lost Mode, and Erase – are available. Use whichever you want and the next time the device is connected to the Internet, the option you picked will happen 
    • Choose Remove from Account if you've sold or given away the device and don't want it to show up in Find My iPhone anymore.

    Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Sam Costello

    Categorized in How to

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