Source: This article was Published ifsecglobal.com By John Mason - Contributed by Member: Grace Irwin

Google voice search makes finding what you need even easier.

Just say “OK Google,” tell your phone or tablet what you want to find, and you’ll get results. Or use the microphone icon in your browser.

There’s even an official Chrome extension that combines voice search with Google Docs dictation, so you can type a document without touching a keyboard.

It’s really cool technology, but like most convenient tech, there are some tradeoffs.

In this case, the biggest trade-off is privacy. Voice search comes with some “features” that you might not be aware of, and privacy enthusiasts find those features a bit worrying. (Fortunately, you can mitigate them with a few clicks if you know where to look; we’ll get to that in a moment.)

First, let’s talk about how Google voice search is changing human-computer interaction.

Google Voice Search: The future of search

For years, Google has been making it easier to find the information you want on the internet. Extremely refined algorithms, sophisticated tracking and scoring, and integration with a variety of other services all remove barriers to getting great search results.

Voice search is an extension of that. If you can’t – or just don’t want to – type your query, all you need to do is speak it and Google will take a look. You can use it to search other search engines (like DuckDuckGo, which is much more privacy-focused), Wikipedia, YouTube, Wolfram Alpha, and a wide variety of other sites.

Google Assistant, a more powerful companion to simple voice search, will help you find photos, send text messages, keep your shopping list, and even order products.

It’s clear that Google is betting heavily on voice technology, and that it’s working. A 2018 survey by Stone Temple found that 16% of people prefer to use voice search over any other method.

And 60% used voice search at least some of the time. Users also took advantage of voice tech for sending texts, making calls, getting directions, and setting reminders.

Google stores every voice command that you’ve ever given your device

Why do so many prefer voice-enabled apps? Mostly because it saves time. Over 60% said that they use voice because it’s fast. But the fact that it’s accurate, doesn’t require typing, and results in an audio answer were mentioned, too.

The past few years have seen increased usage of voice search and other voice-enabled technologies, and it’s unlikely to slow down any time soon. Google is leading the way in making it easier for users to interact with their devices using their voice.

But this convenience has a cost that many people aren’t aware of: privacy.

Why privacy advocates are wary of Google Voice Search

Most people using Google’s voice products without much thought. They say “OK Google,” or hold down the home button on their device, and start talking. When they’re done with the search, they forget about it.

But Google doesn’t.

It stores every voice command that you’ve ever given your device, plus a few seconds of audio before you gave the command. Which means that Google is always listening through your phone. They might not be saving everything you say near the device, but they’re always listening.

And much of it is saved. In fact, you can see how much. Head to myactivity.google.com and you’ll see the data that Google has stored. If you’ve used voice search recently, you should be able to find a record of it and even listen to the stored audio.

It’s a little unnerving, hearing the things you said to your phone played back to you from your computer

It’s a little unnerving, hearing the things you said to your phone played back to you from your computer, and knowing that it’s coming from Google’s servers.

And, of course, we all know what Google does with your information that’s stored on its servers: analyzes it and uses it to serve you ads. That, combined with the fact that your phone is always listening and ready to record audio, has privacy enthusiasts worried.

What you can do to protect your privacy from Google Voice Search

The most obvious thing you can do to mitigate the privacy concerns of using Google voice search is to simply not use it. If you turn Google Assistant off, it won’t be listening, and it won’t be recording anything.

To turn it off, open Google Assistant, then tap the blue icon in the upper-right corner. Hit the three dots in the upper-right corner of the resulting screen and select Settings. Tap the name of your device, and move the slider for Google Assistant to the off position.

Of course, that means you won’t be able to use the full power voice search. And that’s inconvenient. But if you’re concerned about privacy, it might be worth it.

Especially because Google’s voice search capabilities may not work very well when you’re using a VPN. And using a high-quality, secure VPN is one of the most important things you can do to keep your mobile data safe.

If you want to keep using voice search, you can tell Google to stop recording and storing what you say. You can do this by going to myactivity.google.com, selecting Activity Controls from the sidebar menu, and scrolling down to Voice & Audio Activity. Click the slider to pause it.

This will prevent the storage of your voice searches and activity. That means Google won’t be using it to target ads . . . but it also means that it won’t be as good at recognizing your voice, have as much data for learning speech recognition, or learn things that might help it solve your problems.

But it’s a step in the right direction for privacy.

Weigh the options

Unfortunately, keeping your data secure means not getting as many benefits from Google’s voice-recognition technologies as you might otherwise. So you’ll have to weigh the pros and cons of privacy versus the convenience of Google voice search and similar services.

In an age when privacy is increasingly threatened, it’s easy to assume that all of your data will end up in Google’s hands anyway. But if you put up a bit of a fight, you just might be able to maintain a bit of control over your data.

Categorized in How to

Sales of Google Home smart speakers are considerably smaller.

Google said in a blog post this morning, “The [Google] Assistant is now available on more than 400 million devices.” When Google says “devices” it’s including Android smartphones, tablets, TVs, headphones . . . and Google Home smart speakers.

What we don’t get from the post is how many Google Home, Mini and Max speakers were sold in 2017. Four hundred million is a massive number but it’s going to be mostly Android smartphones. If Google were really psyched about the Home figures it would have called them out specifically.

We can make a crude estimate of how many Google Home devices there are in US households. Based on a review of data from NPR, Strategy Analytics, and Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, it appears that Google Home has roughly a 25 percent share of the US smart speaker market. Specifically, Strategy Analytics estimated that Google’s share of Q4 smart speaker sales was 24 percent.

Walker Sands (“Future of Retail 2017“), in a survey of 1,622 US adults, found that about 23 percent of respondents owned a smart speaker. If the results can be generalized to the broader population, then something like 56 million assistant-powered speakers are in US homes today. The survey was conducted in late Q3 or early Q4, before Christmas.

The 56 million number, therefore, feels too large. But let’s assume, post-holiday, that there are now roughly 45 to 50 million smart speaker units in US households (Alexa + Google Assistant). Using the market share estimates above, it would potentially mean there are about 12.5 million Google Home devices in US households. That may be too low, but Google Home sales in the US probably don’t exceed 20 million to date.

Google was forced to price match with Amazon, which had aggressively discounted the Echo Dot, Echo and Echo Show for the holidays. Accordingly, Google Home was selling for $79 (vs. $129) for much of the pre-holiday shopping season to match the Echo’s price of $79.

 Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Greg Sterling

Categorized in Search Engine

Google has quality raters specifically for voice search-related search results. These raters look for information satisfaction, length, formulation, and elocution.

Google has published on the Google Research blog the search quality raters guidelines, contractors guidelines to evaluate Google’s search results, specifically for the Google Assistant and voice search results. It is similar to the web search quality guidelines, but it changes in that there is no screen to look at when evaluating such results; instead you are evaluating the voice responses from the Google Assistant.

Google explained, “The Google Assistant needs its own guidelines in place, as many of its interactions utilize what is called ‘eyes-free technology,’ when there is no screen as part of the experience.” Google has designed machine learning and algorithms to try to make the voice responses and “answers grammatical, fluent and concise.” Google said that they ask raters to make sure that answers are satisfactory across several dimensions:

  • Information Satisfaction: the content of the answer should meet the information needs of the user.
  • Length: when a displayed answer is too long, users can quickly scan it visually and locate the relevant information. For voice answers, that is not possible. It is much more important to ensure that we provide a helpful amount of information, hopefully not too much or too little. Some of our previous work is currently in use for identifying the most relevant fragments of answers.
  • Formulation: it is much easier to understand a badly formulated written answer than an ungrammatical spoken answer, so more care has to be placed in ensuring grammatical correctness.
  • Elocution: spoken answers must have proper pronunciation and prosody. Improvements in text-to-speech generation, such as WaveNet and Tacotron 2, are quickly reducing the gap with human performance.

The short, only seven-page, guidelines can be downloaded as a PDF over here.

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz

Categorized in Search Engine

Google has officially launched Google Assistant as a standalone app in the iOS app store. Not only did Google announce the app at the I/O developer conference on Wednesday, but it was immediately made available for download. You can get it right here.

Earlier this week there were reports Google may be launching Assistant for iOS in the near future. Needless to say, the reports have been confirmed.

Google Assistant is arguably smarter than iOS’s own virtual assistant Siri, thanks to Google’s machine learning capabilities and its fluid integration with other Google apps.

Users of Google Assistant also have the flexibility of entering queries via voice search or by manually typing them, whereas Siri only recognizes voice commands.

However, Siri has a major advantage over Google Assistant due to the fact it is built in to iOS.

Users can just say “Hey Siri” and begin issuing commands, while the Google Assistant app would have to be manually opened every time. Siri may also be more helpful to you depending on how invested you are in Apple’s ecosystem.

Now that iPhone users can really compare the two virtual assistants side-by-side it will be more apparent which one is most helpful. It will be interesting to see if the new competition will encourage Apple to bring some Siri upgrades to a future iOS update.

At this time it appears Google Assistant is only available in the US app store. The company didn’t mention if or when it would be rolling out to other countries, but it did mention Australia, Canada, France, Germany and Japan would be getting support for Google Home soon. That may also be when the iOS app rolls out to further countries.

Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern

Categorized in Search Engine

Google also expected to announce integration of the Assistant into GE appliances.

Google’s developer conference kicks off tomorrow in Mountain View, Calif. One of the expected announcements, according to a Bloomberg report, is the expansion of AI and the Google Assistant to a range of other devices, including the iPhone:

At the Google I/O conference this week, the Alphabet Inc. unit plans to bring it to at least three more places: iPhones, coffee tables and kitchens. The Mountain View, California-based company is set to announce a version of its AI-powered assistant for Apple Inc.’s iPhone as soon as Wednesday, according to a person familiar with the matter.

The report says that it will be presented as a “free, standalone app” that can be downloaded from the App Store. It’s not clear whether it will be an update of the Google app or a new app called Google Assistant. The report also says that it will integrate with other Google apps installed on users’ iPhones.

Google’s Photos app will reportedly also be enhanced with more AI capabilities (it already has the Assistant baked in). Google will also enable the creation of physical “coffee table books” through the app.

Perhaps most interesting is the expected integration of the Google Assistant into home appliances made by GE:

Google is also integrating its Assistant into GE home appliances such as refrigerators, dishwashers, ovens, washers and dryers. Users will be able to ask the Assistant how many cleaning pods are left in the dishwasher, or tell it to pre-heat the oven to 350F, or ask if the laundry is clean.

Samsung is likely to do something similar with its Assistant, Bixby. Bixby may be partly or wholly based on acquisition Viv. The battle for the smart home is well underway.

Last week, AI was also front and center at Microsoft’s developer conference. The company said that AI was being integrated into all of its products, from Office to the XBox.

If the Bloomberg report is accurate (and I presume it is), the Google Assistant will join Cortana in seeking to lure users away from Siri, Apple’s digital assistant. While Siri has a built-in advantage over rivals, literally, Google Assistant on the iPhone puts additional pressure on Apple to improve Siri’s performance.

In a recent Stone Temple Consulting analysis, Google Assistant was found to be the most comprehensive and accurate vs. Alexa, Siri and Cortana.

Source: This article was published searchengineland By Greg Sterling

Categorized in Search Engine

Google has released the Google Assistant SDK to the public. This means any user can now run Google Assistant virtually anywhere, including PC, using the Google Chrome AutoVoice extension.  ( Google )

Heads up, Cortana. Google Assistant is coming to PC via Google Chrome.

The erstwhile mobile-exclusive personal assistant is coming to all devices, now that Google has made its software development kit public. Through the Google Chrome extension AutoVoice, Google Assistant can now be used on PCs. It takes time to set up, but it opens up a myriad of uses via voice commands.

AutoVoice And Google Assistant

AutoVoice developer João Dias posted in his blog a video showing him interacting with Google Assistant on his PC using AutoVoice for Chrome. According to him, because the AutoVoice extension is "always listening," users can utilize any wake-up phrase if they want to call Google Assistant. Then, they can use the normal commands they use on other Google Assistant devices.

In the video, Dias asked Assistant "Hey, Google. What can you do?" to which Assistant replied "I can do lots of things." The Assistant then offered several options such as checking the calendar, playing a music from a playlist, or reading the latest news.

The setup looks neat, but it can be quite a workload for those without technical know-how. The setup takes two steps: one, getting Assistant onto the PC; and two, syncing it with AutoVoice.

To get Assistant on PC, a tutorial is available in the XDA developers' page. Again, this is not an easy task as Google only released the SDK to developers, thus installing requires tinkering with the API and other coding stuff. For the AutoVoice, it is available online via the Google Chrome extension store.

Afterward, the setup will require one more tweaking, as some command lines must be written to install the special AutoVoice version of the Google Assistant. Thankfully, Dias shared a tutorial.

AutoVoice is a Google Chrome extension and Tasker app plugin that performs tasks via voice commands. These tasks include playing music or redirecting calls to a Bluetooth headset.

Google Assistant

Google Assistant is another name in the growing line of virtual assistants. Introduced in 2016, Google Assistant is Google's answer to Cortana, Siri, and Alexa. It debuted as part of the messaging app Allo, then moved to Google flagship phones Pixel and Pixel XL.

It was then deployed to other Android platforms, including Android Wear. This April, it was made available for developers when its SDK was made public.

Touted as a next-gen version of Google Now, which is basically a voice-activated Google search, Google Assistant adds interaction to the one-way feature of Now. Via voice commands, it can perform simple tasks like suggesting restaurants, playing music, opening up calendar reminders, and opening apps.

Source: This article was published on techtimes.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Amigo, a white robot the size of a person, uses information gathered by other robots to move towards a table to pick up a carton of milk and deliver it to an imaginary patient in a mock hospital room at the Technical University of Eindhoven, Netherlands, Wednesday Jan. 15, 2014. A group of five of Europe’s top technical universities, together with technology conglomerate Royal Philips NV, are launching an open-source system dubbed “RoboEarth” Thursday. The heart of the mission is to accelerate the development of robots and robotic services via efficient communication with a network, or “cloud”. AP

VANCOUVER, Canada — Intelligent machines of the future will help restore memory, mind your children, fetch your coffee and even care for aging parents.

It will all be part of a brave new world of the not-so-distant future, in which innovative smart machines, rather than being the undoing of people — as some have long feared — actually enhance humans.

That was the vision outlined at the prestigious TED Conference by experts who say technology will allow people to take on tasks they might only have dreamed of in the past.

“Super-intelligence should give us super-human abilities,” Tom Gruber, head of the team responsible for Apple’s Siri digital assistant, said during an on-stage talk Tuesday night.

Smarter machines, smarter humans

“As machines get smarter, so do we,” Gruber said.

“Artificial intelligence can enable partnerships where each human on the team is doing what they do best,” he told the popular technology conference.

Gruber, a co-creator of Siri and artificial intelligence research at Apple, told of being drawn to the field three decades ago by the potential for technology to meet people’s needs.

“I am happy to see that the idea of an intelligent personal assistant is mainstream,” he said.

Now he has set his sights on smart machines, and is turning the thinking about the technology on its head.

“Instead of asking how smart we can make our machines, let’s ask how smart our machines can make us,” Gruber said.

Already smart personal assistants are taking hold, pioneered by the likes of Apple’s Siri.

South Korean giant Samsung created Bixby to break into the surging market for voice-activated virtual assistants, which includes Amazon’s Alexa, Google’s Assistant and Microsoft’s Cortana.

Amazon appears to have impacted the sector the most with its connected speakers using Alexa. The service allows users a wide range of voice interactions for music, news, purchases and connects with smart home devices.

Remembering everything

Gruber envisions artificial intelligence — AI — getting even more personal, perhaps augmenting human memory.

“Human memory is famously flawed — like, where did the 1960s go and can I go there too?” Gruber quipped.

He spoke of a future in which artificial intelligence remembers everyone met during a lifetime and details of everything someone read, heard, said or did.

“From the tiniest clue it could help you retrieve anything you’ve seen or heard before,” he said.

“I believe AI will make personal memory enhancement a reality; I think it’s inevitable.”

Such memories would need to be private, with people choosing what to keep, and be kept absolutely secure, he maintained.

Surefooted robots

Boston Dynamics robotics company founder Marc Raibert was at TED with a four-legged SpotMini robot nimble enough to frolic amid the conference crowd.

He smiled but would not comment when asked by AFP about the potential to imbue the gadget with the kind of artificial intelligence described by fellow speakers.

Raibert did, however, note that the robots are designed to be compatible with new “user interfaces.”

Current virtual assistants have been described as a step into an era of controlling computers by speaking instead of typing or tapping screens.

“I think it won’t be too long before we’re using robots to take care of our parents, or help our children take care of us,” Raibert said.

The ‘gorilla problem

Not everyone at TED embraced the idea of a future in which machines are smarter and more capable than humans, however.

Stuart Russell, a University of California at Berkeley computer sciences professor, referred to the situation as the “gorilla problem” in that when smarter humans came along it boded ill for evolutionary ancestors.

“This queasy feeling that making something smarter than your own species is not a good idea,” said Russell, co-author of the book Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach.

As an AI researcher he supported research in the technology.

Russell now advocates programming machines with robotic laws to govern their behavior — and ensure cannot end up working against human interests.

He gave the example of a robot being told to simply fetch coffee.

A machine not constrained by proper principles might decide that accomplishing the task required it to defend against being shut down and remove all obstacles from its path by whatever means necessary.

Russell counseled robot principles including altruism, humility, and making a priority of human values.

“You are probably better off with a machine that is like this,” Russell said.

“It is a first step in human compatibility with AI.” CBB

This article was  published in technology.inquirer.net

Categorized in Science & Tech
File photo: Scott Huffman, Engineering Director at Google, speaks about Google Assistant during the presentation of new Google hardware in San Francisco, California, U.S. October 4, 2016. (REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach)
 

How in the world did we manage to survive for a few millennia without voice-activated virtual assistants? I mean, it wasn't that long ago that we drove around without being able to ask our phones for driving directions. But now the idea of being unable to do that is downright scary.

More recently, if you needed to find a fact, you typed into Google and thousands of answers popped up, almost instantly. If you wanted to read movie or restaurant reviews, tap tap tap. You typed your search and got answers.

But just a few years after iPhone's voice-activated Siri came onto the scene and spawned voice-activated assistants like Microsoft's Cortana and Amazon's Alexa, everyday life without our virtual assistants seems, well, hard.

Tip within a tip: Amazon Alexa has skyrocketed in popularity over the past few years, but many owners still don't know everything this virtual assistant is capable of. 

If you're an Android phone user, great news. There's a new way to get help. Google Assistant, the voice-activated assistant you may already be using on Google Home and other devices, is rolling out to hundreds of millions of Android phones.

It has been available on Google's Pixel phone. But now it's expanding to other Androids. Some systems require your phone to be running on the

Android Marshmallow operating system or the upcoming Nougat operating system.

So, what's all the buzz about Assistant? Here are five things Google Assistant can do that'll make you love your Android even more. (Keep reading for a bonus tip you can do with Assistant!) Note: To activate Google Assistant on your Android, hold down the home button and say, "OK Google."

1. Manage tasks

If you use your phone for everything from texting to setting your alarm clock to using its calendar so you can time-block your day, you probably have sore thumbs. For many smartphone users, you still have to type in many of those functions.

With Google Assistant, you can talk to text, set reminders and more. "Google, I parked in Lot 3 section 4S." "OK. I'll remember that."

Tip within a tip: Google Assistant will help you get more use out of your phone, but it won't improve your phone's overall performance. If your phone isn't working as well as it used to, it may be time to do a quick cleanup. Click here for 3 great apps to tune up your smartphone so you can get back to business.

2. Plan your day

Google Assistant earns its name when you need it most. Say you're driving along a strange, dark highway. You're feeling uneasy, so you want to get to the nearest hotel or coffee shop. You might say, "Google, where's the closest hotel?" It will tell you and give you directions.

Assistant does a lot more than that. It can remind you of your flight's confirmation number, give you public transportation directions and make dinner reservations.

3. Be entertained

If you like listening to music or podcasts on YouTube Music or Google Play, just ask Google Assistant to set you up. "Play my favorite songs."

Tip within a tip: Listening to podcasts on Android has always required third-party apps. Click here for a full review of the best options out there.

4. Find photos

You've probably taken hundreds or thousands of photos in the past year. If you have, you know the hassle of trying to find snaps you took weeks, months or years ago. Have Google Assistant help you out. "Find photos of my trip to New York City."

5. Get an answer

One of the best things about virtual assistants and old-fashioned typed searches is that you can ask just about any question and get an answer. Try it.

Type something like, "How many square feet are in an acre?" Or, "What's the square root of 2,341?" Or, "How much do I tip for $63?" You get answers.

Google Assistant works the same way, except you speak. "How do I say, 'No sugar in my coffee' in Spanish?"

Bonus: Control your home

You can use Google Assistant to control the smart devices in your house. If, for example, you want to turn down the temperature or turn on the lights before you get home, just tell Google Assistant to take care of it.

One more thing. If you're already using Google Assistant on other devices, such as Google Home, you'll find that it works a little bit differently on different devices. But there are several functions that work on all Google Assistant-enabled devices. These include listening to the news, setting your alarm, checking traffic conditions, getting weather alerts, translating words into other languages, and more.

This article was  published in Komando.com by Kim Komando

 

Categorized in Search Engine

Good news for anyone with an Android phone that isn't a Pixel: Google Assistant is rolling out to more phones, new and old. That means many more of us will be able to take advantage of Google's latest and smartest AI. There are some things both the Google Assistant and Siri are excellent at — like pulling up emails or showing photos you've taken in the last week in a specific city (Apple really seems to be catching up to Google in the image analysis department).

Image: David Nield/Gizmodo

But there are some things Google just does better. So stop with the Apple envy and read about some of the key areas where Google Assistant has the edge over Apple's own digital AI.


1) Getting instant answers from the web

Image: Screenshots Some of Google's instant answers might be on the dubious side but Google Assistant seems better at pulling nuggets of information from the web. It correctly responded to "who won the Best Director Oscar?" and "who wrote The Body In The Library?" with Damien Chazelle and Agatha Christie respectively.

Siri, in contrast, gave us a list of movies (not including La La Land) for the answer to the first question, and listed the results of a Bing search for the second (which, to be fair, included Agatha Christie in the snippet previews). Obviously Siri gets a lot of questions right too, but Google Assistant seems to be ahead here.


2) Finding places nearby

Image: Screenshots Both Siri and Google Assistant do a decent enough job of finding restaurants, bars, and other kind of businesses nearby, but Google's app came out on top in our tests, not just on the places it returned, but on the interface: results are presented in a simple carousel and you can quickly jump to a Google Maps view.

Over on Siri the results list is more difficult to parse and appears to cast a wider net. Your mileage may vary depending on your location and the data these apps have to work with, but where we're from Google Assistant is currently more useful.


3) Remembering what you've already said

Images: Screenshots Out of the gate Google Assistant promised smart, contextual responses, so if you asked follow-up questions it would respond sensibly. However it wasn't always as smart as we would have liked, and Siri is now just as good at dealing with those follow-up questions, so you can ask both apps for the weather in Sydney, then say "and New York?" and get the right answer.

Where Google Assistant still has the edge is remembering stuff about you (predictably enough for a Google service). Tell the Google Assistant your favourite soccer team, and it remembers that information; Siri just lists soccer fixtures. It's not a huge feature, but now you don't have to out yourself as a Manchester United fan at the bar, and instead can just ask "how did my favourite team do?"


4) Speaking in foreign languages

Images: Screenshots Google Assistant is just more loquacious than Siri full stop, but one area where this really comes in handy is with getting short phrases translated. Ask Google Assistant to say "how are you?" or "what's the time?" in Spanish and you get the answers read back to you with authentic accents.

Siri simply searches Wolfram Alpha for a translation, so it doesn't really work for phrases and you don't get the added bonus of hearing the pronunciation. If you're a long way from home and need to find a bathroom, then Google Assistant is far more helpful (provided you have a decent data plan).


5) Going beyond being an assistant

Images: Screenshots Google Assistant is much more than an assistant, despite the name: it will read you poetry, tell you a joke, or play a game with you. At the moment Siri can't do any of those things, and returns a rather evasive response (though to give it credit, it will direct you to the App Store if you ask to play a game).

It's perhaps a sign of Google's ambition for its new Assistant app, as a whole new interface for the web and your phone rather than just an add-on. It's also fair to say it's still more rough around the edges than Siri is, but Apple's got its work cut out if it wants to keep pace with what Google's doing.

Author : David Nield

Source : gizmodo.com.au

Categorized in Search Engine

Google Assistant can now tell you more about what it means to “get lit” while drinking “small batch IPAs” and wearing the hottest in men’s fashion.

The Verge reports around 20 conversation actions or services were added to Google Assistant over the past few weeks. Notably, the virtual assistant has been enhanced with a beer guide, a slang dictionary, and information about men’s fashion.

The latest additions seem to be centered around fun, The Verge believes, providing further examples of what Google Assistant is now able to do:

”Narwhal Bacon will serve up random facts and posts shared on Reddit, while Able Style will tell you men’s fashion tips. Hop over to the Able Style website while Google Assistant is talking to you and you can see suggested wardrobe visuals live onscreen. Wardrobe recommendations are made based on local weather, and in the future will be based on your preferences.”

Also in this update are controllers for more Internet of Things (IoT) devices from Home Bond, Quick Remote, and Stringify.

Though Google Assistant is available on a slew of new Android Devices, the Allo messaging app, and several Android Wear devices — the third-party actions mentioned in this post are only available on Google Home.

This latest update sees Google Assistant’s conversation actions exceeding the 100 mark, making it possible to speak with around 105 third-party services. For a complete list of Google Assistant actions, go to “More settings” in the Google Home app and click on “Services.”

Author : Matt Southern

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-assistant-can-now-tell-slang-beer-mens-fashion/187745/

Categorized in Search Engine
Page 1 of 2

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

airs logo

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Newsletter Subscription

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.
Please wait

Follow Us on Social Media

Book Your Seat for Webinar GET FREE REGISTRATION FOR MEMBERS ONLY      Register Now