fbpx

Google boasts that its latest update to Google Translate has given it the biggest leap of the past decade in natural language translation.

Google Translate might not be as good as humans at translating language, but the search giant's recent work using neural networks to improve speech recognition and computer vision has made it hard to beat in machine translation.

The latest update to Google Translate utilizes Google's Neural Machine Translation (NMT) system for translating phrases, which is rolling out to eight language pairs.

Google actually announced NMT in September in a paper describing how it's using neural networks to close the gap between human and machine translation. However, until now it had only switched on NMT for Chinese to English translations.

The system still makes some mistakes, such as dropping words or failing to understand a person's name, but it has allowed Google to cut errors by 55 to 85 percent in several languages.

It also improved Translate's ability for contextual translation by analyzing a phrase or paragraph rather than a single word to reconstruct a more grammatically correct and natural translation.

Google has now rolled out neural machine translation for eight language pairs "to and from English and French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Turkish". The feature is enabled in Google Search, as well as in the Translate app and website.

 

These language pairs cover 35 percent of Google Translate queries, but Google plans to eventually enable NMT support for 103 languages.

"With this update, Google Translate is improving more in a single leap than we've seen in the past 10 years combined," Google Translate product lead Barak Turovsky said.

Turovsky also notes that developers can also access its Google Cloud Platform Translation API to give their apps some of the features that enabled NMT.

Just like Microsoft, Google is betting the future of computing lies in machine learning and to woo new enterprise customers to its cloud platform, it announced the new Cloud Jobs API to help business match recruits with career openings.

Google also announced its new Google Cloud Machine Learning Group would be headed up top machine-learning researchers, Stanford professor Fei-Fei Lie, and Jia Li, formerly a top exec at Snapchat.

Author:   Liam Tung

Source:  http://www.zdnet.com/

Categorized in Search Engine

Google has said that mobile visits to travel sites now represent 40 percent of total travel traffic. Responding to this shift in consumer behavior, Google is introducing a range of new mobile hotel and flight search tools.

Google will now let mobile users filter hotel search results by price or rating (I captured the screens below this morning). In addition, Google says that hotel search will respond to more precise queries such as, “Pet-friendly hotels in San Francisco under $200.”

Google hotel filters

Mobile users will also see new deal labels when a room rate is below traditional price levels. This is similar to a feature that Google previously offered with desktop hotel search results. The company will also provide money-saving “hotel tips.” They appear to be based on travel date flexibility:

We may show Tips to people when they could save money or find better availability by moving their dates slightly. For example, you may see a Tip like, “Save $105 if you stay Wed, Jul 13 – Fri, Jul 15.“

Finally, Google will now offer airfare price tracking. Users can track fare changes on specific routes, airlines and dates. Travel searchers will then receive email alerts and Google Now notifications when prices “either increase or decrease significantly.”

Starting now, these changes will roll out first in the US and later across international markets.

Source:  http://searchengineland.com/google-offers-new-hotel-search-filters-deal-labels-airline-price-notifications-253817

Categorized in Search Engine

Now, I do not know if authorship was ever a ranking signal but I assume Google tested it to see if it should be. And we now know Google said it is safe to remove authorship markup from your pages and they also said they don't know who authored something on your site.

But Google has said over the years, I remember Matt Cutts calling out certain authors as awesome and can help your site rank for stuff if you get them to write for you. But I guess that was tested and it didn't play into Google's definition of what is quality content.

John Mueller addressed the question again on Friday's Google Hangout on Google+. He said that Google doesn't know who wrote the article on your site and even if you do have a great writer, write something on your site, it might not be something great that he wrote. So each article needs to "stand on their own," John said.

He said this at the 36:41 minute mark.
Question:

Previously, you said you didn't know really who wrote an article. Does it mean it's not a ranking factor who created content? Danny Sullivan is a great author. If he guest-posted on my blog, wouldn't you think the article would be great because it's made by him?

Answer:

Probably we wouldn't know that. I mean maybe the article is great and it would rank essentially on its own or based on kind of the feedback that we see from users with regards to recommendations like links. But just because a well-known author publishes on someone else's blog doesn't automatically make that blog post really relevant. So it might be that Danny Sullivan post something on some totally random blog and we don't realize that and other users don't realize that, then that's something that might my kind of get lost like that.

 

So that's also something we're just because one person person wrote it doesn't necessarily mean that the quality will always be really high. So we shouldn't like assume that just because it has maybe Danny Sullivan's author markup on that page that this article is suddenly really valuable and should be raking very high. So from from that point of view at these pages these articles that are written by people they really have to be able to stand on their own.

So I guess, maybe, Google tested to see if who writes something is a good ranking signal? Or maybe, SEOs faked authorship and killed it and Google couldn't use it?

Source:  https://www.seroundtable.com/google-dropped-authorship-as-a-ranking-signal-why-22364.html

Categorized in Search Engine

The world’s highest-capacity undersea Internet cable, a 9,000-kilmetre link between the US and Japan backed by Google has been activated.

The fibre cable, which can transport data at 60 terabits per second (60 million Mbps) is expected to be a significant boost to trans-pacific Internet speeds.

Google is one of six companies behind the project, alongside Asian telecoms groups. Google’s Urs Holzle said it had “more [capacity] than any active subsea cable.”

Stephen Lam / Getty Images

Demand for faster Internet speeds and extra capacity is increasing as more devices go online and amid the growth of cloud Internet services, which Google is a significant player in.

Almost all international Internet traffic runs via undersea cables, but in the Internet’s earlier days much of the traffic was via satellites.

The $390 million “Faster” cable system will connect to hubs in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland and Seattle, and two points in Japan.

Google is also backing a project to build a cable between Florida and Brazil due to be finished by the end of the year, while Microsoft and Facebook recently announced a trans-atlantic cable between Virginia Beach and Bilbao in Spain.

“Faster is one of just a few hundred submarine cables connecting various parts of the world, which collectively form an important backbone that helps run the Internet,” Holzle said.

Laying the cable under the sea requires specially-designed ships which can lay up to 125 miles per day. Although the optical fibres that transport data are extremely thin, the cables have to be reinforced with layers of tubing, steel wires and plastic to prevent damage.

The cables have become a target for shark attacks, with sharks possibly drawn to the electromagnetic signals running through them. Shark attacks forced Google to reinforce parts of its cable infrastructure with a special Kevlar coating in 2014.

Source:  http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world/google-launches-9000-km-long-undersea-internet-cable-between-japan-and-the-us

Categorized in Search Engine

airs logo

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.

Follow Us on Social Media

Finance your Training & Certification with us - Find out how?      Learn more