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 Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: Jennifer Levin

New markup from Schema.org including HowTo, QAPage, and FAQPage can be used to potentially show your content in Google in a brand new way. Google previewed this in Singapore a couple weeks ago.

Google has confirmed with Search Engine Land that it has been testing for the past several months a new form of search results snippets — the way the search results appear to searchers. These new search snippets are in the form of FAQs or frequently asked questions, Q&A or question & answers and How-Tos.

 

Akhil Agarwal notified us about this feature on Twitter, and Google has just sent us a statement explaining the test. Here is the screenshot presented at a recent Google event in Singapore:

A Google Spokesperson told us:

We’re always looking for new ways to provide the most relevant, useful results for our users. We’ve recently introduced new ways to help users understand whether responses on a given Q&A or forum site could have the best answer for their question. By bringing a preview of these answers onto Search, we’re helping our users more quickly identify which source is most likely to have the information they’re looking for. We’re currently working with partners to experiment with ways to surface similar previews for FAQ and How-to content.

These new snippet features give more insights into what the searcher can expect from that web page before deciding to click on the search result. Webmasters should be able to mark up their content with structured data and to have their search results be eligible to have the question and answer previews shown. Similar to how supporting metadata around the number of upvotes and the Top Answer feature works.

Google will soon open up an interest form to allow publishers and webmasters to participate in the FAQ and How-to formats shown in the screenshot above.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was published searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Contributed by Member: William A. Woods

The rate at which Google shows its “People Also Ask” search suggestions, aka “Related Questions”, jumped by 34% this week.

According to data from Moz, Google’s Related Questions are now shown 43% of the time.

Dr. Pete Meyers@dr_pete

Big increase (+34%) in Related Questions ("People Also Ask") on Google SERPs last night. They're on a whopping 43% of all SERPs in the MozCast 10K data set. This number rises and falls, of course, but I've hand-checked and confirmed the increase--

To put that in a different perspective — one out of every two or three searches will now display “People Also Ask” suggestions.

 

Putting it yet another way — Related Questions are now the fourth most commonly displayed Google search feature out of all the features tracked by Moz.

As you can see in the image above, Related Questions are now shown almost as frequently as AdWords.

Just so we’re all on the same page, this feature is not the same as the “People Also Search For” suggestion box. Although the wording is similar, they are two distinctly different features.

 

This data strictly applies to the “People Also Ask” suggestion box, as seen in the example below.

What makes this feature unique is that each suggestion has a drop-down button that can be clicked on to reveal a search snippet.

Therein lies the opportunity for SEOs and site owners. With this feature now appearing more regularly, it gives content creators the opportunity to drive traffic by targeting related terms.

For example — instead of going after a highly competitive query with a new piece of content, you might want to consider other ways that question might be typed into Google.

A related question could be less competitive, giving you the opportunity to gain exposure by possibly appearing in the “People also ask” suggestions.

Since this feature usually appears near the top of the first page, ranking for a related questions suggestion could be highly valuable.

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: Carol R. Venuti

Time spent increasing meta descriptions for the longer Google search results snippets may have been wasted.

Google has confirmed that only about five months after increasing the search results snippets, it has now decreased the length of these snippets. Danny Sullivan of Google wrote, “Our search snippets are now shorter on average than in recent weeks.” He added that they are now “… slightly longer than before a change we made last December.”

Google told Search Engine Land in December that writing meta descriptions don’t change with longer search snippets, telling webmasters back then that there is “no need for publishers to suddenly expand their meta description tags.”

 

Sullivan said, “There is no fixed length for snippets. Length varies based on what our systems deem to be most useful. He added Google will not state a new maximum length for the snippets because the snippets are generated dynamically.

RankRanger’s tracker tool puts the new average length of the description snippet field on the desktop at around 160 characters, down from around 300+ characters

… while mobile characters for the search results snippets are now down to an average of 130 characters:


Here is Danny Sullivan’s confirmation:

tweet
If you went ahead and already lengthened your meta descriptions, should you go back and shorten them now? Google’s advice is to not focus too much on these, as many of the snippets Google chooses are dynamic anyway and not pulled from your meta descriptions. In fact, a recent study conducted by Yoast showed most of the snippets Google shows are not from the meta description, but rather they are from the content on your web pages.
Categorized in Search Engine

Posted June 27, 2017, at 7:21 a.m.

 

Google just went under the knife with its removal policies.

On Thursday, the search engine added private medical records to its small list of things it won’t include in its search results, according to Bloomberg. While the company has yet to release a statement on the decision, “confidential medical records of private people” is now listed under the search engine’s Removal Policies page, which confirms the decision.

Credit card numbers, images of signatures and bank account numbers are some of the other select things Google elects to keep out of its search results to prevent identity theft. The company usually doesn’t remove dates of birth, addresses and telephone numbers but will do so depending upon the situation, according to its removal policies.

 

“In the medical space, though, there is nothing more invasive towards one’s privacy than having a medical record indexed in a Google search that millions of people can see,” said Hemu Nigam, the chief executive of SSP Blue, a company that specializes in cybersecurity affairs. “This is a great move, but why did it take so long?”

Health records can show up on the Internet without patients’ consent. According to Bloomberg, in December, an Indian pathology lab accidentally uploaded the blood test information of 43,000 patients, which included names and HIV test results. Google indexed them all.

Google usually takes a hands-off approach with its content. It manually removes URLs on a case-by-case basis if there is a complaint about something that may fall under its removal policies.

But the search giant has made some adjustments the last few years. In 2015 the company bent its well-established approach and said it would accept requests to remove “revenge porn” — nude images uploaded to the internet without the subject’s consent — from its search results. Google explained that, though it believes its search should reflect the entire web, revenge porn is highly personal and emotionally damaging.

 

In another move, Google released a set of new tools in April to help combat “fake news,” allowing users to flag misleading or disrespectful content to help improve search results that come from its algorithm.

“I think there’s a definite shift happening in Google, albeit very slowly,” Nigam said. “That’s being driven by advertisers who pull their ads when they don’t like certain policies their brand. When customers complain, advertisers listen, and therefore Google listens.”

Google declined to comment for this story.

Source: This article was published bangordailynews

Categorized in Search Engine

Q: What’s the secret to getting on the first page of the Google search results? I want to create something but no one visits my site.

A: This is a big question. It’s so big, in fact, that thousands of people dedicate their careers to figuring out how to make websites stick out on the Internet. It’s vital to have a relevant and well-designed website. You may already be familiar with the term “search engine optimization,” or SEO. The best websites use keywords, social media, and searchable headers to make themselves visible. You can also use online marketing and interactive tools to draw people in. The most important thing these days is to stay active. The Internet is an ever-changing landscape, and you have to work to keep up. Click here for 10 secrets for nailing search results.

 

Shed light on the “Dark Web”

Q: I keep hearing about the “Dark Web.” But what exactly is it? How do you get to it?

A: It sounds sinister, doesn’t it? “Dark Web” might make a good title for the next Dan Brown novel. But the “Dark Web” is basically just a portion of the internet that isn’t completely public and you need special software to access. Many newbies use the terms “Dark Web” and “Deep Web” interchangeably, but they are two very different things. When you think of creepy and illegal shenanigans, you’re probably thinking of the “Dark Web.” Anyone can access this online nook if they do the extra legwork, but it's best to avoid. The “Deep Web,” on the other hand, is designed for security and privacy that the “surface” Internet does not have. The Deep Web can't be accessed by a search engine, and consists mostly of data stored on private networks of corporations. Click here to learn more about the Dark Web and the many myths surrounding it.

Holiday travelers

Holiday travelers (Photo: Tom Tingle, AP)

App lets you skip airport security lines

Q: I heard you tell a caller that she could skip the security line at airports with an app. Can you please tell me more?

A: This is correct. Before you get too excited, remember that you still have to scan your luggage and step through the metal detector, just like every other passenger. But if you’re flying internationally, you can skip through U.S. Customs and Border Protection with an app called “Mobile Passport.” If you’ve ever flown to the U.S. from another country, you know how exhausting this process can be. American entry points are some of the busiest and most thoroughly policed in the world, and the lines can be hundreds of people deep. Click here to learn how Mobile Passport will expedite this process.

 

Erase private data on old PC

Q: I am getting a new PC for Christmas. How do I make sure all my personal information is off the old one before I donate or sell it?

A: I’m so glad you asked this question, because so many people get rid of their old computers without even thinking about what’s on it. Or they delete a few files and believe that their personal information is safe. First, make sure to transfer all the information you wish to keep into the new computer. Take all the time you need for this, because you will never be able to get it again. Then you want to pull up Darik’s Boot and Nuke. Click here to find out how DBAN works, and the tricks for using it effectively.

The Drive PX2 board.

The Drive PX2 board. (Photo: Nvidia)

Signs hard drive is failing

Q: I know when my car runs out of gas it won’t go anymore. How do you know if your hard drive is failing?

A: That’s a good metaphor, but a failing hard drive is a little more serious than just running out of gas. It’s more like the “check engine” light coming on, or even the car stalling out for no reason. Like that aging clunker, a computer will usually show signs of age, like software glitches, a noisy fan, or just really slow operations. Most people will want something more precise, which is why your motherboard has its own monitoring system. Click here to learn how to instantly assess your hard drive’s health.

Looking for more ways to protect your privacy or make money online? Be sure to listen or download my podcasts, or click here to find it on your local radio station. You can listen to the Kim Komando Show on your phone, tablet or computer. From buying advice to digital life issues, click here for my free podcasts.

Copyright 2016, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation's largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today's digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Author : Kim Komando

Source : http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/columnist/komando/2016/12/16/kim-komando-q-and-a/95495672/

Categorized in Search Engine

QUESTION: What’s the secret to getting on the first page of the Google search results? I want to create something but no one visits my site.

ANSWER: This is a big question. It’s so big, in fact, that thousands of people dedicate their careers to figuring out how to make websites stick out on the internet. It’s vital to have a relevant and well designed website. You may already be familiar with the term “search engine optimization,” or SEO. The best websites use keywords, social media, and searchable headers to make themselves visible. You can also use online marketing and interactive tools to draw people in. The most important thing these days is to stay active; the internet is an ever-changing landscape, and you have to work to keep up.

 

Q: I keep hearing about the “Dark Web.” But what exactly is it? How do you get to it?

A: It sounds sinister, doesn’t it? “Dark Web” might make a good title for the next Dan Brown novel. But the “Dark Web” is basically just a portion of the internet that isn’t completely public and you need special software to access. Many newbies use the terms “Dark Web” and “Deep Web” interchangeably, but they are two very different things. When you think of creepy and illegal shenanigans, you’re probably thinking of the “Dark Web.” Anyone can access this online nook if they do the extra legwork, but it's best to avoid. The “Deep Web,” on the other hand, is designed for security and privacy that the “surface” internet does not have. The Deep Web can't be accessed by a search engine, and consists mostly of data stored on private networks of corporations.

Q: I heard you tell a caller that she could skip the security line at airports with an app. Can you please tell me more?

A: This is correct. Before you get too excited, remember that you still have to scan your luggage and step through the metal detector, just like every other passenger. But if you’re flying internationally, you can skip through U.S. Customs and Border Protection with an app called “Mobile Passport.” If you’ve ever flown to the U.S. from another country, you know how exhausting this process can be. American entry points are some of the busiest and most thoroughly policed in the world, and the lines can be hundreds of people deep.

 

Q: I am getting a new PC for Christmas. How do I make sure all my personal information is off the old one before I donate or sell it?

The Drive PX2 board.

The Drive PX2 board. (Photo: Nvidia)

A: I’m so glad you asked this question, because so many people get rid of their old computers without even thinking about what’s on it. Or they delete a few files and believe that their personal information is safe. First, make sure to transfer all the information you wish to keep into the new computer. Take all the time you need for this, because you will never be able to get it again. Then you want to pull up Darik’s Boot and Nuke.

Q: I know when my car runs out of gas it won’t go anymore. How do you know if your hard drive is failing?

A: That’s a good metaphor, but a failing hard drive is a little more serious than just running out of gas. It’s more like the “check engine” light coming on, or even the car stalling out for no reason. Like that aging clunker, a computer will usually show signs of age, like software glitches, a noisy fan, or just really slow operations. Most people will want something more precise, which is why your motherboard has its own monitoring system.

Learn about all the latest technology on the Kim Komando Show, the nation's largest weekend radio talk show. Kim takes calls and dispenses advice on today's digital lifestyle, from smartphones and tablets to online privacy and data hacks. For her daily tips, free newsletters and more, visit her website at Komando.com.

Author : Kim Komando

Source : http://www.freep.com/story/tech/2016/12/20/how-get-top-google-search-results/95607162/

Categorized in Search Engine
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