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It’s a known fact that Google, along with other major tech players like Amazon, Apple, and Facebook, is increasingly trying to grab a slice of the $3 trillion dollar healthcare industry. Now, the search giant is flexing its cloud muscle to team up with healthcare providers to make further inroads.

To that effect, Google has announced a partnership with Ascension, the second-largest health system in the US, in a deal that gives it access to personal health datasets that can be used to develop AI-based tools for medical providers.

The collaboration — dubbed “Project Nightingale” — comes a week after the company’s acquisition of fitness wearable maker Fitbit for $2.1 billion. It also corroborates earlier reports that it’s working on a Google Flights-like search tool to make it easier for doctors to find medical records.

A data-sharing partnership

Interestingly, the partnership was mentioned in Google’s July earnings call, but it came under scrutiny only on Monday after the Wall Street Journal reported that Google would gain detailed personal health information of millions of Americans across 21 states.

The report also said the data involved in the project includes patient names, dates of birth, lab results, doctor diagnoses, and hospitalization records, along with their complete medical histories.

The partnership “covers the personal health records of around 50 million patients of Ascension,” the Journal wrote.

Google confirmed the deal, adding the arrangement adheres to HIPAA regulations regarding patient data and that it will meet the necessary privacy and security requirements.

As the Journal noted, HIPAA laws make it possible for hospitals to share data with its business partners without the consent of patients, provided said information is used only to help the entity meet its clinical functions.

Healthcare as a service

“Ascension’s data cannot be used for any other purpose than for providing these services we’re offering under the agreement, and patient data cannot and will not be combined with any Google consumer data,” Google said.

Ascension, for its part, said it aims to explore AI applications to help improve clinical quality and patient safety. It’s worth pointing out that the company is not paying Google for these services.

For the Mountain View company, the data-sharing project comes with another objective: design a searchable, cloud-based platform to query patient data, which it could then market to other healthcare providers.

The legality aside, it’s not fully clear why the sharing terms would include names and birthdates of patients. But this would also mean adequate safeguards are in place to anonymize the information before it could be used to develop machine learning models for personalized healthcare.

Health privacy concerns

This is far from the first time Google’s cloud division has gone after healthcare providers. It has similar relationships with a number of hospital networks, including Dr. Agarwal’s Eye Hospital, the Chilean Health Ministry, Mayo Clinic, and the American Cancer Society.

Still, the development is bound to raise concerns about health privacy, what with the Journal stating that 150 Google employees may have access to a significant portion of the medical data from Ascension.

That’s not all. The tech giant has been scrutinized for improperly sharing patient data in the name of AI research, and has drawn flak for merging Deepmind Health with Google despite the company’s earlier promises to keep its health initiatives separate.

Given this checkered history, it shouldn’t be much of a surprise if Google — and other big tech companies — grapple with the privacy and security implications associated with handling health information when they are already in possession of enormous amounts of data about their users.

Update on Nov. 13, 9:00 AM IST: Google’s data deal with Ascension is now being investigated by the Office for Civil Rights in the Department of Health and Human Services, the Wall Street Journal reported. The OCR said it “will seek to learn more information about this mass collection of individuals’ medical records to ensure that HIPAA protections were fully implemented.”

[Source: This article was published in thenextweb.com By RAVIE LAKSHMANAN - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jennifer Levin]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Google Gravity:

Almost all of us use Google in our day to day life. Without Google we can imagine our life as easy as now.

But many times, we get bored with Google Home Page. So, if you want creative and funny Google Homepage, this article is for you.

If we compare Google with other Search Engines, we will notice that Google have number of interesting tricks which other Search Engines doesn’t have.

We will talk about the top 6 Google Magic Tricks which you can use in your spare time and amaze your friends with it as well.

Here are the Top 6 Funny Tricks of Google Gravity by which you can play with Google Home Page and make it more interesting:

1. Google Gravity


With this trick, you can move each and every element of your Google Homepage, with the help of mouse.

It is really amazing experience to play with Google Homepage.

To use this trick, you have to perform the following steps:

Step #1: Visit “www.google.com”.
Step #2: Inside Google Search box type “Google Gravity”.
Step #3: Click on “I’m Feeling Lucky”, instead of “Google Search”.
Step #4: Now that you are on the “Google Gravity” page, move your mouse and all the elements of the Google Homepage will start falling down. You can move every element of the Google Homepage with your mouse. 

2. Google Anti Gravity


Google Anti Gravity is the most funny trick in which every element of the Google Homepage start floating.

You can move every element of the Homepage like – button, search box with the help of mouse click. This is really amazing trick.

To use this trick, you have to perform the following steps:

Step #1: Visit “www.google.com”.
Step #2: Inside Google Search box type “Google Anti Gravity”.
Step #3: Click on “I’m Feeling Lucky”, instead of “Google Search”.
Step #4: Now that you are on the “Google Anti Gravity” page, you will notice that all the element are floating like – they are on the space. You can move every element of the Google Homepage with your mouse.

3. Google Zero Gravity


Google Zero Gravity is the trick which is similar to Google Gravity but unlike it, the element of the Google Homepage will be displayed in opposite manner, like – they are displayed in mirror.

To use this trick, you have to perform the following steps:

Step #1: Visit “www.google.com”.
Step #2: Inside Google Search box type “Google Zero Gravity”.
Step #3: Click on “I’m Feeling Lucky”, instead of “Google Search”.
Step #4: Now that you are on the “Google Zero Gravity” page, you will notice that all the element are in mirror position like – they are displayed on mirror and every element will start falling as well. You can move every element of the Google Homepage with your mouse.

4. Google Underwater


The Google Underwater trick will amaze you for sure.

In this trick, the Google Homepage will be floating on the sea water and you can generate the wave on to the water with the help of your mouse.

To make this trick work, you just have to do the following steps:

Step #1: Visit “www.google.com”.
Step #2: Inside Google Search box type “Google Underwater”.
Step #3: Click on “I’m Feeling Lucky”, instead of “Google Search”.
Step #4: Now that you are on the “Google Underwater” page, you will notice that all the element of Google Homepage are floating on the water. You can use your mouse to move every element of the Google Homepage.

5. Google Sphere


With this trick, you can play with Google Homepage in a really great and amazing way.

With the help of your mouse you can make each and every element of Google Homepage to revolve around Google Logo and make a sphere with it.

It is really fun to use this trick and you should definitely use it.

To perform this trick, you have to do the following steps:

Step #1: Visit “www.google.com”.
Step #2: Inside Google Search box type “Google Sphere”.
Step #3: Click on “I’m Feeling Lucky”, instead of “Google Search”.
Step #4: Now that you are on the “Google Sphere” page. When you will move your mouse, you will notice that every element of the Google Homepage will start revolving around Google Logo.

6. Google do a barrel roll


This is the trick which is not for Google Homepage but for Google index section, where we get the results for our query.

This is really amazing trick in which you can make a Google to do a barrel roll. So, you must try it.

All you have to do is just perform the following steps:

Step #1: Visit “www.google.com”.
Step #2: Inside Google Search box type “Google Anti Gravity”.
Step #3: Click on “I’m Feeling Lucky”, instead of “Google Search”.
Step #4: After this, you will see that Google is doing a barrel roll and it is really amazing to see that.

 

Hope, you like these funny trick on Google with Google Gravity, Google Anti Gravity and Google Zero Gravity.

[Source: This article was published in thecoderpedia.com By CoderPedia - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jennifer Levin]

Categorized in Search Engine

The recent technological innovations and mobile advancements are bringing about a major change in the relationship between healthcare professionals and their patients.

Patients want faster answers to their healthcare queries and greater control over wellness programs. The growth of new healthcare applications in the market was inevitable. These technologies have enabled patients and medical professionals to communicate in a more efficient manner.

Virtual Medicine

Telemedicine and telehealth apps are making healthcare more conducive to individual wellness, less expensive, more preventive and just downright better in many areas. The five apps mentioned in this article are excellent examples of modern-day ‘virtual’ health management. By creating a more competitive marketplace for health and wellness services, these apps are collectively increasing opportunities towards better results at lower costs.

Remote healthcare and telemedicine, reduce the costs by lowering access time, increasing preventive care and eliminating extra fuel consumption resulted by unnecessary trips to a medical institution. These applications and websites – and other similar options – truly aim to revolutionize healthcare.

1. Doctor on Demand

Doctor On Demand is a medically certified mobile application that allows video consultation with a doctor, have him write a medicinal prescription for you or simply get your questions answered.

Board-certified professionals can also treat non-emergency medical cases such as cold and flu symptoms, sports injuries, heartburn, respiratory infections and allergies, urinary tract infections as well as many pediatric issues.

They also prescribe medicine for travel purposes and refill existing prescriptions. Thanks to a new update on Doctor On Demand, you can now see a psychologist and have a stay-at-home lactation examination.

In the US, Doctor On Demand has more than 1400 state-licensed physicians. Sadly, there are states that still don’t allow medical diagnosis and prescriptions via video consultation. The government charges users a flat rate of $40 per session with doctors. Psychologist Video Visits cost $50 for a 25-minute session and $95 for 50 minutes.

2. HelloMD

Similar to online brain-assessment methods, HelloMD might not provide you with immediate medical care but it does specialize in finding specialists such as a neurologist, radiologist or chiropractor for a very specific rare health condition.

The application helps you connect with the right certified doctor or surgeon by setting up an appointment within 24 hours. The session then takes place in the online platform via video call.

The two basic purposes of HelloMD are to connect the user to the right doctor, so that you can see him or her in person for follow-up care, and to allow you quick access to specialists for second opinions. The prices can vary because the doctors set their own rates asking you to provide a credit card number to confirm the appointment, which generally occurs within a few days.

3. Microsoft HealthVault

Being extremely valuable to both individuals and families, Microsoft HealthVault is a professional online and mobile app healthcare service that allows the facility to keep your medical records safe and up to date. The information is only shareable with healthcare professionals and people you trust.

With a dedicated following for years, the application has helped many people with chronic conditions by tracking their daily health metrics such as blood sugar level, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation.

You have the option of either inputting your data manually or have it done automatically by simply connecting HealthVault to any medical device, fitness tracker, Wi-Fi bathroom scales, and other apps.

4. Epocrates

Epocrates is an amazing mobile application for pharmacists. Along with being a comprehensive archive with tons of medical information, including drug interaction checker and a pill identification tool, the app also offers a secure HIPAA compliant, texting service that allows physicians and other hospital personnel to text each other with convenience. It keeps doctors updated with important news stories and builds essential resources for clinical guidelines, ICD-10 codes, disease information and more.

5. PingMD

A secure messaging app for doctors, PingMD allows medical health experts to connect with other professionals as well as their patients. Patients usually download the application only when their doctors are using it or recommend it to them.

If your doctor ever suggests PingMD, he or she might be aiming to virtually follow your symptom progression, assist in disease management or ask follow-up questions. Similar to the telemedicine application Epocrates, PingMD is also HIPAA compliant and allows you to connect with your physicians the same way you might communicate with a friend or colleague via text messaging, image sharing and so forth. Doctors using PingMD can also set their patients up for re-examinations with other experts on the platform to get a second opinion.

Each app is individually tailored to suit the taste and workflow of the user, but together these online resources are a futuristic vision of medical care, forming a world where doctors, nurses and all health administrators have up-to-the-minute information about their patients and can communicate with each other via a simple screen tap.

Source : This article was published in corporatewellnessmagazine.com By Kamil Riaz

Categorized in Others

3D Systems Corp. (DDD), the additive manufacturing pioneer, believes the industry is on the verge of an inflection point in which it will generate volume and profits by “connecting prototyping to manufacturing.” Brean Capital’s Ananda Baruah, who has a hold rating on the tech company’s stock, highlights 3D Systems’ healthcare business as a market differentiator and driver of growth moving forward, reports Benziga.

Healthcare as a Successful Vertical

After a healthcare event hosted by the Rock Hill, S.C.-based company, the Brean analyst noted that 3D Systems’ healthcare business accounts for 27% of the firm’s overall sales, with an organic growth rate of 10% to 20% throughout 2015.Wrote Baruah in an analyst note: “We came away understanding 1) that the HC business itself could be in the process of growing into a legitimately material business on its own, and 2) more fully grasping DDD's strategy of leveraging the holistic platform capabilities of the HC vertical by applying it to the other target verticals of aerospace, automotive, and general industrial.”

Analyst: 3D 'Better Positioned Than Market Estimates'

After the 3D-printing industry boomed a few years back, 3D Systems and long-time rival Stratasys Ltd. (SSYS) experienced a significant slump and lack demand in the consumer segment. The current 3D-printing industry revival has been supercharged by the entrance of larger firms HP Inc. (HPQ) and General Electric Co. (GE) as the industry moves towards 3D printing for industrial manufacturing.

Baruah believes that 3D Systems is better positioned to gain amid this large-scale industry transition than the market estimates, as the firm works on developing “end-to-end solutions and ecosystems across verticals.” The analyst indicates that 3D Systems’ healthcare vertical is a prime example of how the firm can cultivate a vertical businesses and apply the platform to other key verticals moving forward, such as aerospace, automotive, defense and general industrial.

 

Author:  Shoshanna Delventhal

Source:  http://www.investopedia.com/news/brean-capital-sees-bright-future-3d-systems-healthcare

Categorized in Science & Tech

Although the medical field has made many strides, at the end of the day, doctors are also prone to human mistakes. As a way to prevent human error, IBM Watson‘s cognitive technology is being developed to read and scan a patient’s medical images. This way, Watson has the ability to direct the attention of a doctor.

Watson will also have the ability to pull up a patient’s past medical history to diagnose a condition and come up with a faster treatment plan. For example, if a patient has a tumor, Watson will be able to identify it then utilize a patient’s past medical history to come up with a plan.

IBM is just one of the many companies trying to merge data and technology to assist the field of healthcare. Doctors may be able to do more with another set of eyes.

Author:  JIWON KIM

Source:  https://www.psfk.com/2016/12/ibm-watson-wants-to-be-your-doctor-human-error.html

Categorized in Science & Tech

While robots and computers will probably never completely replace doctors and nurses, machine learning/deep learning and AI are transforming the healthcare industry, improving outcomes, and changing the way doctors think about providing care.

Machine learning is improving diagnostics, predicting outcomes, and just beginning to scratch the surface of personalized care.

Imagine walking in to see your doctor with an ache or pain. After listening to your symptoms, she inputs them into her computer, which pulls up the latest research she might need to know about how to diagnose and treat your problem.  You have an MRI or an xray and a computer helps the radiologist detect any problems that could be too small for a human to see. Finally, a computer looks at your medical records and family history and compares that with the best and most recent research to suggest a treatment protocol to your doctor that is specifically tailored to your needs.

Industry analysts IDC predict that 30 percent of providers will use cognitive analytics with patient data by 2018.  It’s all starting to happen, and the implications are exciting.

Diagnosis

CBI insights identified 22 companies developing new programs for imaging and diagnostics. This is an especially promising field into which to introduce machine learning because computers and deep learning algorithms are getting more and more adept at recognizing patterns — which, in truth, is what much of diagnostics is about.

An IBM-backed group called Pathway Genomics is developing a simple blood test to determine if early detection or prediction of certain cancers is possible.

Lumiata has developed predictive analytics tools that can discover accurate insights and make predictions related to symptoms, diagnoses, procedures, and medications for individual patients or patient groups.

Treatment

IBM’s Watson has been tasked with helping oncologist make the best care decisions for their patients.  The Care Trio team has developed a three-pronged approach that helps doctors devise and understand the best care protocols for cancer patients.

The CareEdit tool helps teams create clinical practice guidelines that document the best course of treatment for different types of cancers. CareGuide uses the information from CareEdit into a “clinical decision support system” to help doctors choose the right treatment plan for an individual patient. And CareView is an analysis tool that can evaluate the outcome of past clinical decisions and identify patients who received different treatments than the recommendations. This kind of retrospective can help doctors refine their guidelines, closing the circle back to the CareEdit tool.

The team hopes that the Care Trio will improve clinical outcomes and increase survival rates for cancer patients while still reducing treatment costs for providers. The first version is currently being deployed at a large cancer treatment center in Italy.

In a completely different field, Ginger.io is developing an app to remotely deliver mental health treatments. The app allows people to analyze their own moods over time, learn coping strategies that have been developed by doctors, and access additional support as needed.

Follow up care

But the advances don’t stop with diagnosis or treatment.

One of the biggest hurdles in health care is hospital readmittance. Doctors around the world struggle with how to keep their patients healthy and following their treatment recommendations when they go home.

AiCure is using mobile technology and facial recognition technologies to determine if a patient is taking the right medications at the right time to help doctors confirm that the patient is taking their medications and alert them if something goes wrong.

NextIT is developing a digital health coach, similar to a virtual customer service rep on an ecommerce site. The assistant can prompt questions about the patient’s medications and remind them to take the medicine, ask them about symptoms, and convey that information to the doctor.

The Caféwell Concierge app uses IBM’s Watson’s natural language processing (NLP) to understand users health and wellness goals and then devise and provide the right balance of nudges and alerts so users can meet their targets and the app can reward them.

And this is just the beginning.  As these technologies develop, new and improved treatments and diagnoses will save more lives and cure more diseases. The future of medicine is based in data and analytics.

Source : http://www.forbes.com/

Categorized in Online Research

 

The tech titan wants to change the future of healthcare. But first, it needs to come up with a useful product.

 

Glucose-monitoring contact lenses for diabetics, wrist computers that read diagnostic nanoparticles injected in the blood stream, implantable devices that modify electrical signals that pass along nerves, medication robots, human augmentation, human brain simulation -- the list goes on.

That's not an inventory of improbable CGI effects from the latest sci-fi movie, it's a list of initiatives being tackled by Alphabet's (NASDAQ:GOOG)(NASDAQ:GOOGL) Google Life Sciences research unit, recently rebranded Verily.

For those who appreciate The Motley Fool's affection for William Shakespeare, "verily" is Shakespearean-era word that means "truly," or "confidently." As in: "I verily believe that sweater is the ugliest one I have ever seen."

Confidence certainly exemplifies Google. Verily was hatched from Google X, the company's secretive lab for oft-nutty projects, such as space elevators, teleportation, and hoverboards. Google X also launched Google Glass, which was undoubtedly a super-cool device, but wasn't received well by its intended market, to put it mildly.

With that kind of background, what are the chances Verily will unleash something that will change healthcare? Are good things about to flow? Or -- courtesy of the Bard of Avon -- is Verily merely a tale full of sound and fury, signifying nothing? Let's look at Verily's current financial situation and then check out the prospect of a marketable product that could move Google's needle.

A pound of flesh, but no blood


Like the moneylender in the Merchant of Venice, Verily demands a pound of flesh from its parent each quarter. Alphabet, Google's newfangled conglomerate, doesn't break out the performance of subsidiaries, but last quarter's earnings report offered a view into costs and output.

Verily is a subsidiary lumped under Other Bets with Google's broadband business and smart home company. Revenue from Other Bets doubled to $185 million from $74 million in the year-earlier period, and rose 11% sequentially. Costs also increased: Operating losses widened to $859 million from $660 million a year ago and moved up 7% from the previous quarter.

Despite the costs incurred, it's certainly not bleeding its parent dry. After all, Google has an almost endless supporting budget, and if any of Verily's projects pan out, what's being expended now will look like pocket change.

In addition, while some Verily ventures may seem frankly nuts, they might have actual potential. A recent joint venture with U.K. drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE:GSK) will use implants that create electrical pulses to help the body heal itself. The collaborators have agreed to spend up to $716 million over seven years, with GSK holding 55% of the joint venture and Verily 45%. It's a new field, called bioelectronic medicine. Despite the quasi-scientific sound of this endeavor, early studies reported in peer-reviewed journals have shown positive results in treating rheumatoid arthritis.

SanofiAbbVie, and Biogen have also teamed up with Verily over the past few years. Big pharma hopes to tap into Google's data analysis tools, as well as license Verily's miniaturized medical devices (after they are developed), to tackle various disease targets. In a slightly different kind of venture, Johnson & Johnson has inked a deal with Verily to develop medical robots.

The less you speak of your greatness, the more shall I think of it

None of these ventures have led to a useful product yet. Meanwhile, Verily has been skewered by multiple scientists for not critically assessing the actual potential behind its various moonshots. "One needs to balance how much these toys are used mostly for marketing and giving a sense of a company really working on something impressive -- the brave new world -- or if we're talking about something that will have clear and immediate clinical impact. The latter is very hard to imagine," said Dr. John Ioannidis, a professor of disease prevention at Stanford University, commenting on Verily's projects.

In the blink of an eye

In light of that, what about one of Verily's oldest initiatives? Looking back to 2012, the life sciences unit was originally developed to create "smart" contact lenses whose super-cool images were appearing all over the internet a scant two years ago. Designed to measure blood glucose levels, the lenses featured sensors and chips the size of flecks of glitter and a wireless antenna thinner than a human hair.

On the face of it, a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) lens seems to meet Ioannidis' criteria of having a "clear clinical impact." Better yet: it has an investable thesis. Verily and its big pharma partner Novartis (NYSE:NVS) are aiming straight at the $10 billion diabetes monitoring market. With this kind of market, the project was clearly capable of becoming a needle-moving revenue generator.

Look a little deeper, though, and the view is cloudier.

DexCom(NASDAQ:DXCM) Executive VP Steve Pacelli pointed out, "Lots of companies have tried and failed noninvasively to sense glucose in tears. You can measure glucose in tears, but the concentration is a lot lower, there's going to be huge time lag issues; the consistency of measurement is going to be a challenge."

There's a bigger problem. Both Dexcom and Medtronic(NYSE:MDT) have continuous glucose monitors on the market, but both face a major hurdle. The FDA does not consider continuous glucose monitoring -- from any device -- accurate enough to prescribe insulin dosing by itself. While CGM devices are being used, their market is very limited, since they are only allowed to be used as supplemental devices.

Google's CGM lens will face the same FDA hurdle -- assuming this product comes out of the lab.

The long and short of it

Apple, Microsoft, Intel -- virtually all the tech titans, in fact -- are now pursuing major initiatives in healthcare. A confluence of factors, such as digitization of records, machine intelligence, genetic engineering, and rapid advances in medical equipment, have made the field ripe for disruption from data-enabled, mobile-based, and miniaturized devices.

Even more enticing are the opportunities to massively grow revenue. The tech giants are billion-dollar companies, but healthcare spending is approaching $3 trillion annually in the U.S. alone. Looking globally, the World Health Organization estimates the annual expenditure at $6.5 trillion.

Bottom line: Despite the big carrot enticing it, Google has yet to come up with anything that can lay claim to changing healthcare. Although Alphabet could be a potentially interesting addition to your healthcare portfolio, it should be added with the understanding that there are many other pure-play companies with a much clearer path and investing thesis than Verily.

Still, let's allow Shakespeare to have the final word. While the bard makes an unlikely investment guru, he had plenty of useful things to say that have lasted through centuries, including: "Though this be madness, yet there is method to it."

In other words, it may be that hidden within Google's craziness lies the seed of something that could still astonish us. And no matter what, we can be sure of one thing: The ultimate search engine will keep grabbing headlines with its latest moonshots. After all, we're talking about Google.

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Source : http://www.fool.com/investing/2016/09/03/how-google-plans-to-reinvent-healthcare.aspx

 

Categorized in Search Engine

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