[Source: This article was Published in venturebeat.com By EMIL PROTALINSKI - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill]

Google today released the Suspicious Site Reporter Extension. As its name implies, the extension lets users report suspicious sites to Google’s Safe Browsing service. Google also highlighted that Chrome recently started warning users about sites with deceptive URLs.

Google’s Safe Browsing service provides lists of URLs that contain malware or phishing content to Chrome, Firefox, and Safari browsers, as well as to internet service providers (ISPs). Google said in September 2017 that Safe Browsing protects over 3 billion devices and that the number last month increased to over 4 billion devices. The service shows warnings before users visit dangerous sites or download dangerous files.

Now Google is opening Safe Browsing for submissions. In fact, the Suspicious Site Reporter extension is a two-way street. The extension’s icon shows when you’re on a potentially suspicious site. Clicking the icon will show more information about why it might be suspicious. You can also report it for further evaluation. If the site is added to Safe Browsing’s suspicious lists, those aforementioned 4 billion devices will be protected from it.

In addition, Google released Chrome 75 earlier this month. The latest version comes with a new warning to direct users away from sites that have confusing URLs. The feature compares the URL of the page you’re currently on to URLs of pages you’ve recently visited. If the URL looks similar but isn’t identical (say, go0gle.com vs. google.com), Chrome will show a warning that helps you get back to the right domain.

“We believe that you shouldn’t have to be a security expert to feel safe on the web and that many Chrome power-users share our mission to make the web more secure for everyone,” said Chrome product manager Emily Schechter. Given today’s news, that’s fair. But if you look at the competition, Chrome could be doing more.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

[This article is originally published in searchenginejournal.com written by Dave Davies - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Joshua Simon]

As SEO professionals, we generally focus on the question, “How do I rank my page?”

An equally, if not more important question we should be asking is, “How do search engines rank pages?”

Why Search Engines Rank Webpages

Before we dive into how search engines rank webpages let’s stop for a moment and think about why they rank them.

After all, it would be cheaper and easier for them to simply display pages randomly, by word count, by freshness, or any of a variety of easy sorting systems.

The reason they don’t do that is obvious. You wouldn’t use it.

So when we ask the question about rankings, what we need to always keep in mind is that the user we are trying to satisfy is not ours, they belong to the engine and the engines are loaning them to us.

If we misuse that user, they may not return to the engine and thus the engine can’t have that as their ad revenue will decline.

I like to think of the scenario like some of the resource pages on our own site.

If we recommend a tool or service, it is based on our experience with them and we believe they will serve our visitors as well. If we hear they do not, then we will remove them from our site.

That’s what the engines are doing.

But how?

Disclaimer

I do not have eavesdropping devices at Google or Bing. Google has one sitting on my desk and another I carry around with me when I’m not at it but for some reason, the message pickup doesn’t work the other way.

I state this to make clear that the following outline is based on about 20 years of watching the search engines evolve, reading patents (or more often – Bill Slawski’s analysis of patents), and starting each day for many years by reviewing the goings on in the industry from SERP layout changes to acquisitions to algo updates.

Take what I am saying as a highly educated breakdown that’s probably about 90 percent right. If you’re wondering why I think 90 percent – I learned from Bing’s Frederic Dubut that 90 percent is a great number to use when guesstimating.

It’s Only A Simple 5 Steps – Easy

There are five steps to the complete process of ranking a page.

I am not including the technical challenges like load-balancing obviously and I’m not talking about each various signal calculation.

I’m just talking about the core process that every query needs to go through to start its life as an information request and end it as a set of 10 blue links buried beneath a sea of ads.

Understand this process, understand who it is designed to serve, and you will be on your way to thinking properly about how to rank your pages to their users.

I also feel it’s necessary to note that the words used for these steps are mine and not some type of official name. Feel free to use them but don’t expect any one of the engines to use the same terminology.

Step 1: Classify

The first step in the process is to classify the query coming in. The classification of the query gives the engine the information it needs to perform all of the following steps.

Before complex classification could take place (read: back when the engines relied on keywords instead of entities) the engines basically had to apply the same signals to all queries. As we will explore further below, this is no longer the case.

It’s in this first stage that the engine will apply such labels (again, not a technical term but an easy way to think about it) to a query such as:

  • YMYL
  • Local
  • Unseen
  • Adult
  • Question

I have no idea how many different classifications there are but the first step the engine would need to make is to determine which apply to any given query.

Step 2: Context

The second step in the ranking process is to assign context.

Where possible, the engine needs to take into account any relevant information they have on the user entering the query.

We see this regularly for queries, even those we don’t ask. We see them here:

google weather

And we see them here:

google mobile apps

The latter, of course, being an example of where I didn’t specifically enter the query.

Essentially, the second stage in the process is for the engine to determine what environmental and historical factors come into play.

They know the category of the query, here they apply, determine or pull the data related to elements deemed relevant for that query category and type.

Some examples of environmental and historical information that would be considered are:

  • Location
  • Time
  • Whether the query is a question
  • The device being used for the query
  • The format being used for the query
  • Whether the query relates to previous queries
  • Whether they have seen that query before

Step 3: Weights

Before we dive in let me ask you, how sick are you of hearing about RankBrain?

Well, buckle up because we’re about to bring it up again but only as an example of this third step.

Before an engine can determine what pages should rank they first need to determine which signals are most important.

For a query like [civil war] we get a result that looks like:

america civil war

Solid result. But what happens if freshness had played a strong role? We’d end up with a result more like:

google search america civil war

But we can’t rule out freshness. Had the query been [best shows on netflix], I’d care less about authority and more about how recently it was published.

I hardly want a heavily linked piece from 2008 outlining the best DVDs to order on their service.

So, with the query type in hand as well as the context elements pulled the engine can now rely on their understanding of which of their signals applies and with which weightings for the given combinations.

Some of this can certainly be accomplished manually by the many talented engineers and computer scientists employed and part of it will be handled by systems like RankBrain which is (for the 100th time) a machine learning algorithm designed to adjust the signal weights for previously unseen queries but later introduced into Google’s algorithms as a whole.

With the statement that roughly 90 percent of its ranking algorithms rely on machine learning, it can reasonably be assumed that Bing has similar systems.

Step 4: Layout

We’ve all seen it. In fact, you can see it in the civil war example above. For different queries the search results page layout changes.

The engines will determine what possible formats apply to a query intent, the user running the query and the available resources.

The full page of the SERP for [civil war] looks like:

google search america civil war layout

I’ve put an educated guess on the core factor used to determine when each element is present.

The truth is, it’s a moving target and relies on a knowledge of entities, how they connect, and how they are weighted. That’s a highly complex subject so we won’t dive into it here.

What’s important to understand in the context of this piece is that the different elements of any given search results page need to be determined more-or-less on the fly.

This is to say, when a query is run and the first three steps completed the engine will reference a database of the various possible elements to inset onto the page, the possible placements and then determine which will apply to the specific query.

An Aside: I noted above that the search results pages were generated more-or-less on the fly.

While this would be true of infrequent queries, for common queries it is far more likely that the engines keep a database of which elements they have already calculated to fit the likely user intent so as to not have to process that each time.

I would imagine there is a time limit on it after which it refreshes and I suspect that it refreshes the full entry at time of low use.

But moving on, the engine now knows the classification of a query, the context the information is being requested in, the signal weights that apply to such a query, and the layout most likely to meet the various possible intents for a query.

Finally, it’s time for ranking.

Step 5: Ranking

Interestingly, this is probably the easiest step of the process, though not as singular as one might think.

When we think of organic rankings we think of the 10 blue links. So let’s start there and look at the process thus far:

  • The user enters a query.
  • The engine considers the type of query and classifies it to understand what key criteria apply at a high level based on similar or identical previous query interactions.
  • The engine considers the user’s position in space and time to consider their likely intents.
  • The engine takes the query classifications and user-specific signals and uses this to determine which signals should hold what weights.
  • The engine uses the above data to also determine which layouts, formats, and additional data may satisfy or supplement the user’s intent.

With all this in hand and with an algorithm already written, the engine needs simply crunch the numbers.

They will pull in the various sites that can be considered for ranking, apply the weights to their algorithms, and crunch the number to determine the order that the sites should appear in the search results.

Of course, they must do this for each element on the page in various ways.

Videos, stories, entities, and information all change, so the engines need to order not just the blue links but everything else on the page as well.

In Short

The ranking of the site is easy. It’s putting everything together to do it that’s the real work.

You may ask how understanding this can help you with your SEO efforts. It’s like understanding the core functions of how your computer works. I can’t build a processor, but I know what they do, and I know what characteristics make for a faster one and how cooling impacts them.

Knowing this results in me having a faster machine that I need to update and upgrade far less often.

The same is true for SEO.

If you understand the core of how the engine function you will understand your place in that ecosystem. And that will result in strategies designed with the engine in mind and serving the real user – their user.

[This article is originally published in fastcompany.com written by JR RAPHAEL - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Grace Irwin]

Give your internet experience a jolt of fresh energy with these easily overlooked features, options, and shortcuts for Google’s browser.

These days, a browser is more than just a basic navigator for the web. It’s effectively a second desktop—a gateway to countless apps, sites, and services. And optimizing that environment can go a long way in increasing your efficiency.

Google’s Chrome, in particular, is full of hidden shortcuts, features, and power-user possibilities. Take the time to learn these tips, and watch your productivity soar.

(Note that most of the tips here are specific to the desktop versions of Chrome for Windows PCs and Macs and may not apply to the browser’s mobile variants.)

LEARN SOME HANDY HIDDEN SHORTCUTS

1. Want to open a link into a new tab in the background, so it won’t interrupt what you’re doing? Hold down Ctrl- or Cmd- and click it. To open a link in a whole new window, meanwhile, use Shift instead. (This’ll work within most areas of Chrome, by the way—including the History page and the dropdown history list within the Back button, which we’ll get to in a bit.)

2. You probably know you can press the space bar to scroll down a full page-length, but there’s another side to that shortcut: If you press Shift and the space bar together, Chrome will do the opposite and scroll up by a full page-length at a time.

3. If you ever close a tab by mistake, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-Shift-T. Chrome will reopen your most recently closed tab as if nothing had ever happened. (And you can do it multiple times, too, if there’s more than one tab you’d like to recover.)

4. When you have a bunch of tabs open and want to hang onto the entire session for later, hit Ctrl-Shift-D. That’ll let you save all your open tabs into a folder for easy future access. To restore them, right-click the folder within your bookmarks and select “Open all” or “Open all in a new window.”

save all your open tabs into a folder for easy future access

5. Skip a step and get info about any word or phrase in a page by highlighting it and then right-clicking and selecting the “Search Google” option. You can also highlight a word or phrase and drag it into Chrome’s address bar to achieve the same result—or drag it into the area directly to the right of your final tab to launch the search in a new tab instead of your current one. (Bonus tip: Those same dragging behaviors can also be used to open links.)

6. Save a link with a single click: Just click, hold down your mouse button, and drag the link up into Chrome’s bookmarks bar. Drop it wherever you want, and it’ll be there the next time you need it.

7. If you download a file and then want to move it somewhere specific, click on its tile in the download bar that appears at the bottom of the browser. You can then drag and drop whatever you downloaded directly onto your desktop or into any folder.

8. You can also drag and drop files from Chrome’s download bar directly into an online service—like Google Drive, for instant uploading, or Gmail, for inserting the file as an attachment in a new message.

9. Should you ever find Chrome mysteriously misbehaving, remember this command: chrome://restart. Type it into Chrome’s address bar, and your browser will restart itself and restore all your tabs and windowsin a jiffy. You never know when it might come in handy.

TEACH YOUR BROWSER SOME NEW TRICKS

10. With 60 seconds of setup, you can give Chrome its own quick-access scratchpad that’ll let you jot down thoughts right within the browser—no extensions required. All you have to do is paste a snippet of code into Chrome’s address bar. Click here or on the image below to view and copy the necessary code.

jot down thoughts right within the browser

…and then save the page to your bookmarks bar for easy access. The scratchpad supports text formatting (Ctrl- or Cmd-B for bold, Ctrl- or Cmd-I for italics, and Ctrl- or Cmd-U for underlining) and even has a built-in spell check feature. Just open it and start typing—and if you want to save your thoughts for later retrieval, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-S.

The scratchpad supports text formatting

11. Chrome’s custom search engine feature has tons of untapped productivity potential. First, you can use it to create simple shortcuts to pages you visit often—anything from favorite websites to internal Chrome pages or even the scratchpad described in the previous tip. Just open up Chrome’s settings, click the line labeled “Manage search engines,” then click the “Add” command next to the “Other search engines” heading. Type the name of the page in the “Search engine” field, the shortcut you want for it in the “Keyword” field, and the page’s full URL in the “URL” field.

For instance, if you want to be able to pull up Chrome’s settings simply by typing “cs” into your address bar, you could use “Chrome Settings” as the search engine name, “cs” as the keyword, and chrome://settings as the URL. To get to your new scratchpad quickly, you could use “Scratchpad” as the search engine name, “s” as the keyword, and the full string of code from above as the URL.

12. You can also use Chrome’s custom search engines feature to create shortcuts for searching any sites you want. The trick is to first find the full URL of the site’s own search system—so if you wanted to do it for Fast Company, you’d go to fastcompany.com, click the search icon in the upper-right corner of the screen, then search for a word like “test.” The site will take you 

With that knowledge in tow, head back to Chrome’s “Manage search engines” section and click the “Add” command. This time, type “Fast Company” in as the search engine name, “fastcompany.com” as the keyword, and ”—with “%s” taking the place of the actual query—as the URL.

create shortcuts for searching any sites you want

The next time you start typing “fastcompany.com” into Chrome’s address bar, you’ll see instructions telling you to press Tab to search the site. Set up similar systems for shopping sites, Wikipedia, dictionaries and thesauruses, travel sites, or anything else you search semi-regularly, and you’ll save valuable time by skipping steps and jumping straight to the info you need.

13. Want to be able to search your email directly from Chrome’s address bar? Create a new custom search engine with the name Gmail, whatever keyword you want (either “gmail.com” or some shortened command), and “https://mail.google.com/mail/ca/u/0/#search/%s” as the URL.

14. Search Google Drive from the address bar by creating a custom search engine with “https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/search?q=%s” as the URL.

15. Speaking of Google Drive, if you move between multiple devices during the day (and at this point, who doesn’t?), make your life a little easier by telling Chrome to save anything you download to a cloud-based folder. That way, you’ll be able to find important files from your desktop, laptop, smartphone, or any other device—regardless of where the download was actually performed.

First, you’ll have to install the desktop syncing program for your cloud storage service of choice. Most services, including Google DriveDropbox, and OneDrive, offer such utilities for all the common operating systems. Once you set up the program, you’ll have a folder on your local hard drive that’s always synced to a folder in your cloud storage.

Now, head into Chrome’s settings, click “Advanced,” and scroll down to the section labeled “Downloads.” Click the “Change” command and find or create an appropriate subfolder within your cloud-synced folder. Once you’ve followed those steps on any desktop computers you want connected, anything you download will be available everywhere you work—and always accessible via the cloud service’s mobile apps as well.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HIDDEN POWER TOOLS

16. Quiet annoying sites once and for all by right-clicking their tabs (where the title is displayed) and selecting “Mute site.” This recently added option will prevent the site from playing any audio on your computer anytime you visit it.

17. Prefer to avoid leaving a trail as you navigate the web? Open Chrome’s settings, click “Advanced,” and then turn on the toggle next to “Send a ‘Do Not Track’ request with your browsing traffic,” located within the “Privacy and security” section.

18. For additional privacy, take advantage of Chrome’s out-of-the-way option to create multiple user profiles and allow guest access to your browser. That’ll let someone else use Chrome on your computer without gaining access to all of your personal data (and without gunking up your history with whatever sites they visit). Look for the line labeled “Manage other people” in Chrome’s settings to get started.

19. Chrome’s History page—accessible by hitting Ctrl- or Cmd-H or by typing chrome://history into your address bar—has a powerful yet easily overlooked feature: an always-synced list of tabs you have open in Chrome on other devices. Surf over there anytime you want to find what you were last viewing on your phone, your tablet, or another computer.

20. The Back button in Chrome’s upper-left corner does more than you might think. Click it and hold your mouse’s button down, and you’ll get a pop-up history of recent pages viewed within your current tab

a pop up history of recent pages viewed within your current tab

21. Chrome can strip all formatting from copied text as you paste it—eliminating links, fonts, colors, and anything else you might not want to carry over. Once you’ve copied some text, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-Shift-V to give it a whirl.

22. Trying to look at a website that’s down—or need to step back in time and see how a particular page looked a while ago? Type cache:website.com into Chrome’s address bar, replacing website.com with whatever URL you want.

23. Let Chrome act as your file explorer: Drag and drop any image, video, or audio file into the browser to open it right then and there—and on Windows, try typing C:\ into Chrome’s address bar to browse your hard drive’s contents.

ENHANCE YOUR ENVIRONMENT AND ELIMINATE ANNOYANCES

24. Sick of getting those pop-ups asking if some site can send notifications through your browser? Turn off site notifications entirely by opening Chrome’s settings, clicking “Advanced,” then clicking the line labeled “Content settings.” Next, find and click the line for “Notifications” and turn the toggle at the top of the page off.

25. The next time you come across a text form on a website, give yourself a little space to think: Look for the two diagonal lines in the box’s lower-right corner. Click that area and drag downward, and ta-da: You can resize the text box to make it as large as you’d like.

resize the text box to make it as large as youd likeJPG

26. Chrome extensions can be incredibly useful, but they can also create a lot of clutter in your browser’s upper-right corner. Hide the extension icons you don’t need to see by right-clicking them and selecting “Hide in Chrome menu” from the options that appear. You can also just hover your mouse over the far right side of the address bar until you see a double-sided arrow appear and then drag the address bar toward the right to extend it and hide multiple extension icons at once.

And if you ever need to get to an out-of-sight extension icon, just open the main Chrome menu (the three-dot icon to the right of the extensions). You’ll see all of the icons there.

27. While we’re talking about extensions, did you know you can create custom keyboard shortcuts for opening extensions on demand?Some extensions even allow you to create shortcuts for specific commands. Type chrome://extensions/shortcuts into your browser’s address bar to set up your own.

Categorized in Search Engine

Raising further questions about privacy on the internet, researchers from Princeton and Stanford universities have released a study showing that a specific person's online behavior can be identified by linking anonymous web browsing histories with social media profiles.

"We show that browsing histories can be linked to social media profiles such as Twitter, Facebook or Reddit accounts," the researchers wrote in a paper scheduled for presentation at the 2017 World Wide Web Conference Perth, Australia, in April.

"It is already known that some companies, such as Google and Facebook, track users online and know their identities," said Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton and one of the authors of the research article. But those companies, which consumers choose to create accounts with, disclose their tracking. The new research shows that anyone with access to browsing histories -- a great number of companies and organizations -- can identify many users by analyzing public information from social media accounts, Narayanan said.

"Users may assume they are anonymous when they are browsing a news or a health website, but our work adds to the list of ways in which tracking companies may be able to learn their identities," said Narayanan, an affiliated faculty member at Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy.

Narayanan noted that the Federal Communications Commission recently adopted privacy rules for internet service providers that allow them to store and use consumer information only when it is "not reasonably linkable" to individual users.

"Our results suggest that pseudonymous browsing histories fail this test," the researchers wrote.

In the article, the authors note that online advertising companies build browsing histories of users with tracking programs embedded on webpages. Some advertisers attach identities to these profiles, but most promise that the web browsing information is not linked to anyone's identity. The researchers wanted to know if it were possible to de-anonymize web browsing and identify a user even if the web browsing history did not include identities.

They decided to limit themselves to publicly available information. Social media profiles, particularly those that include links to outside webpages, offered the strongest possibility. The researchers created an algorithm to compare anonymous web browsing histories with links appearing in people's public social media accounts, called "feeds."

"Each person's browsing history is unique and contains tell-tale signs of their identity," said Sharad Goel, an assistant professor at Stanford and an author of the study.

The programs were able to find patterns among the different groups of data and use those patterns to identify users. The researchers note that the method is not perfect, and it requires a social media feed that includes a number of links to outside sites. However, they said that "given a history with 30 links originating from Twitter, we can deduce the corresponding Twitter profile more than 50 percent of the time."

The researchers had even greater success in an experiment they ran involving 374 volunteers who submitted web browsing information. The researchers were able to identify more than 70 percent of those users by comparing their web browsing data to hundreds of millions of public social media feeds. (The number of original participants in the study was higher, but some users were eliminated because of technical problems in processing their information.)

Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye, an assistant professor at Imperial College London, said the research shows how "easy it is to build a full-scale 'de-anonymizationer' that needs nothing more than what's available to anyone who knows how to code."

"All the evidence we have seen piling up over the years showing the strong limits of data anonymization, including this study, really emphasizes the need to rethink our approach to privacy and data protection in the age of big data," said de Montjoye, who was not involved in the project.

Source : sciencedaily.com

Categorized in Search Engine

A US House committee is set to vote today on whether to kill privacy rules that would prevent internet service providers (ISPs) from selling users’ web browsing histories and app usage histories to advertisers. Planned protections, proposed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that would have forced ISPs to get people’s consent before hawking their data – are now at risk. Here’s why it matters.

What kind of personal data do internet service providers want to use?

Your web browsing patterns contain a treasure trove of data, including your health concerns, shopping habits and visits to porn sites. ISPs can find out where you bank, your political views and sexual orientation simply based on the websites you visit. The fact that you’re looking at a website at all can also reveal when you’re at home and when you’re not.

If you ask the ISPs, it’s about showing the user more relevant advertising. They argue that web browsing history and app usage should not count as “sensitive” information.

What’s changed?

The FCC has privacy rules for phones and cable television, but they didn’t apply to internet service providers. In October 2016 the agency introduced broad new privacy rules that prevent companies such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon from collecting and selling digital information about individuals including the websites they visited and the apps they used.

The new rules – dubbed the Broadband Consumer Privacy Proposal – would require broadband providers to get permission from subscribers before collecting and selling this data. Currently broadband providers can track users unless individuals opt out. The new rules were due to come into play as early as December 2017.

“Getting these rules was probably the biggest win in consumer privacy in years. If the repeal succeeds it would be pretty bad,” said Jeremy Gillula, from the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

How could ISPs use my personal data?

They sell it to advertisers. Having all the data relating to your browsing behavior allows them to offer highly personalized targeted advertising at a premium to big brands, which are injected into your browsing experience. AT&T already tried such a program but killed it just before the FCC introduced the new privacy rules.

Meanwhile, Verizon attempted to insert undetectable “supercookies” into all of its mobile customers’ traffic, which allowed them to track all their browsing behavior – even if a web user was browsing in incognito mode or clearing their cookies and history. The company was sued for $1.35m by the FCCfor not getting customer permission to track them.

Do all ISPs want to harvest our data?

No, not all ISPs want to abolish the privacy protections. A list of several smaller providers – including Monkeybrains.net, Cruzio Internet and Credo Mobile – have written to representatives to oppose the decision. “One of the cornerstones of our businesses is respecting the privacy of our customers,” they said.

How does this differ from the way Google and Facebook use our data?

It’s much harder to prevent ISPs from tracking your data. You can choose not to use Facebook or Google’s search engine, and there are lots of tools you can use to block their tracking on other parts of the web, for example EFF’s Privacy Badger.

Consumers are generally much more limited for choice of ISP, in some cases only having one option in a given geographical area. This means they can’t choose one of the ISPs pledging to protect user data.

Are any rules keeping ISPs in check?

In January the major ISPs signed a voluntary set of privacy principles, pledging to insist on opt-in consent before sharing “sensitive” information such as social security numbers and opt-out choice for “non-sensitive” customer information. Unfortunately, browsing history was included as “non-sensitive”.

These principles are based on rules created by the Federal Trade Commission, which used to be able to punish ISPs for violating customers’ privacy but is prohibited from regulating common carriers.

So how can users protect their browsing history?

You need to encrypt all your internet traffic. Some websites (like the Guardian) are already encrypted – marked out with HTTPS at the beginning of the URL – but ISPs would still be able to see which websites you have visited, just not the individual pages.

To mask all of your browsing behavior you can use a VPN service (which incurs a subscription cost) or try using Tor.

“Both make everyday browsing more complicated,” Gillula said.

Author : Olivia Solon

Source : theguardian.com

Categorized in News & Politics

These 25 Google Search Tips and Tricks That Will Change the Way You Search

Google is the most widely used search engine and is the most successful company in online business today. We have actually become so accustomed to searching this mega search engine that we need Google for even the simplest chores like spell checks. However, like every year, Google comes out with different set of updates to correct its search algorithm and remove spam links.

Last year Google carried out five updates, namely, Panda, “Mobilegeddon,” Quality Update, Panda 4.2 and RankBrain. This year too, Google carried out a unnamed update in the first week of January, which Google later confirmed as a “core algo update”.

We bring you the latest 25 tricks of 2016 which will help you get the best out of Google Search.  In fact, if you are a technology geek and can use Google like the best of them already, I still suggest you bookmark this article of advanced Google search tips.

So lets begin.

1. Use quotes to search for an exact phrase or explicit search

This one’s a well-known, simple trick: searching a phrase in quotes will yield only pages with the same words in the same order as what’s in the quotes. It’s one of the most vital search tips, especially useful if you’re trying to find results containing a specific a phrase.

 

Let’s say you’re searching on Google for content about comboupdates Instead of just typing comboupdates into the Google search box as you normally do, Google will give you specific results if you type in “comboupdates.”  To do this, simply enclose the search phrase within double quotes.

2. Use an asterisk within quotes to specify unknown or variable words

Here’s a lesser known trick: searching a phrase in quotes with an asterisk replacing a word will search all variations of that phrase. It’s helpful if you’re trying to determine a song from its lyrics, but you couldn’t make out the entire phrase (e.g. “imagine all the * living for today”), or if you’re trying to find all forms of an expression (e.g. “* is thicker than water”).

For example, you want a particular song by Selena Gomez but dont remember the exact lyrics. Type in Same old* and Google Search will throw up the exact song.

2. Use an asterisk within quotes to specify unknown or variable words. Here’s a lesser known trick: searching a phrase in quotes with an asterisk replacing a word will search all variations of that phrase. It’s helpful if you’re trying to determine a song from its lyrics, but you couldn’t make out the entire phrase (e.g. “imagine all the * living for today”), or if you’re trying to find all forms of an expression (e.g. “* is thicker than water”).

3. Exclude Words by using minus sign.

Let’s say you want to search for content about techworm, but you want to exclude any results that contain the term malware. To do this, simply use the – sign in front of the word you want to exclude.

Example Search: techworm -malware

4. Search for a particular meaning

Add a hyphen in front of a word to avoid a particular search term. This comes handy when you search something and it has several meanings. Ex. Riddick –cartoon.

5. Search websites for keywords or searching inside a website

Think of the “site:” function as a Google search that searches only a particular website. If you want to see every time Techworm.net mentioned Google, use the search “Google site:techworm.net”. You can use the similar technique in Google News also.

Google News gives you the latest news published on Techworm as given in image below :

Search websites for keywords or searching inside a website

6. Search news archives going back to the mid-1880s.

Google News has an option to search over 100 years’ worth of archived news from newspapers around the world.

7. This OR That

By default, when you conduct a search, Google will include all the terms specified in the search. If you’re looking for any one of one or more terms to match, then you can use the OR operator. (Note: The OR has to be capitalized).

 8. Compare foods using “vs.”

Can’t decide between a burger or pizza for dinner?  Take Google’s help. Ex: Type “Pizza vs Burger” to get side-by-side comparisons.

Compare foods using “vs.”

9. Words in the Text

If you want to find a webpage where all the terms you’re searching for appear in the text of that page (but not necessarily beside each other), type in allintext: followed immediately by words or phrases.

Example Search: allintext: iphone 7 will show all articles related to iPhone 7

10. Filter search results for recipes.

If you search your favorite food, and then click “Search Tools” right under the search bar, you’ll be able to filter recipes based on ingredients, cook time and calories. It’s the perfect tool if you have certain dietary restrictions.

11. Words in the Text + Title, URL etc.

If you want to find a webpage where one term appears in the text of that page and another term appears elsewhere on the page, like the title or URL, then type in that first term followed by intext: followed immediately by the other term.

Example Search: iphone 7:techworm.net

12. Use “DEFINE:” to learn the meaning of words—slang  and current Internet acronyms included

Streamline the dictionary process by using, for example, “DEFINE: mortgage.” For words that appear in the dictionary, you’ll be able to see etymology and a graph of its use over time alongside the definition. Google will even sift the web to define slang words or acronyms. Try out “DEFINE: bae” or “DEFINE: SMH”.

13. Words in the Title

Want to find a webpage with certain words contained in the title (but not necessarily beside each other)? Type in allintitle: followed immediately by words or phrases.

Example Search: allintitle:iphone 7

14. Tilt your screen by searching “tilt.”

This is one of the fun additions built in by Google engineers. Try it out yourself here and enjoy.

15. Social tag search

If you want to search for particular Twitter handle directly. Add symbol “@” before the search term. Ex: @techworm_in

16. Words in the Title + Text, URL, etc.

Want to find a webpage where one term appears in the title of that page and another term appears elsewhere on the page, like in the text or the URL? Type in that first term followed by intitle: immediately followed by the other term.

Example Search: Zika intitle:advice

17. Searching trending topics

Add a hashtag before the search term to get the results with trending topics.

18. Words in the URL

If you want to find pages with your search query mentioned in the URL, type allinurl:immediately followed by your search query.

Example Search: allinurl: techworm

19. Search images using images.

Ever come across a photo that looks strangely familiar? Or if you want to know where it came from? If you save the image, and then search it on Google Images (with the camera button), you’ll be able to see similar images on the web.

20. Press the mic icon on Google’s search bar, and say “flip a coin” or “heads or tails.”

The feature released last month lets Google flip a coin for you when you don’t have one on hand.

21. Translate with Google

Type “translate language1 to language2” to get the Google translator working instantly for you. Ex: “translate English to French How are you”

22. Weather Search

To take a look at the weather predictions of your city, just add “weather” before the city’s name or zipcode. Ex: “weather New Jersey.”

You can also use the mic to find out the current temperature instantly. Just press the mic and say temperature, Google search will list out the temperature of your current place instantly.

23.IP address search

Just enter “IP address” in the search bar and look up your IP address instantly.

24. Check flight status

Want to check if your flight is right on time? Just enter your flight number in search bar and hit enter to the real-time flight status.

25. The love quote generator

Want a quick love quote which you can SMS or WhatsApp to your boyfriend/girlfriend. Just press the mic icon located on Google search bar and say “give me a love quote” or “I love you” and Google will give you love quotes instantly.

The love quote generator

These are the top 25 tricks you can use for best Google search results. If you like these tricks, we will be bringing out part two of this tips and tricks.

We leave you with a nice Atari Breakout game.

The legendary brick breaker game is available for easy access on Google. Just search “Atari Breakout” (without quotes) on Google Images and enjoy.

Author : Vijay Prabhu

Source : https://www.techworm.net/2016/01/top-25-tricks-of-2016-google-search-tips-and-tricks-that-you-must-know.html#top

Categorized in Search Engine

It’s easy to find text on a page with a desktop browser, with just a keyboard shortcut you’ll have a search field. This is a bit different in the world of smaller mobile screens though, and if you need to find text on a current web page with Safari for iPhone or iPod touch you’ll need to do the following instead:

This is the same with Safari for iOS 6 and iOS 5:

  • While on the page you wish to search, type the phrase or text you want to search for in the upper right corners Search box
  • With the suggestions populated, swipe down to the bottom of the suggestion list to find “On This Page (x matches) and tap on ‘Find “search text”‘

Search on Page in Safari for iPhone and iPod touch

After you type “Find” the matched search terms will be highlighted in yellow, just like in Safari on Mac OS X or Windows. When finished tap on the blue “Done” button and the search phrase will no longer be highlighted.

Find on Page in Safari for iPhone

This is the same for iPhone and iPod touch, though it’s a bit easier on the iPad, where the Find On Page item is attached to the top of the onscreen iOS keyboard.

With Apple simplifying the Safari UI within OS X Mountain Lion to include an omnibar, we should probably expect this feature in iOS to change slightly with it and adopt the same omnibar. If that happens, chances are you’ll just tap in the universal bar to perform the same functionality.

Source:  osxdaily.com

Categorized in Search Engine

I will never forget the first time I logged onto the Internet.

I was in 4th grade. My dad sat me down in front of his brand new see-through blue iMac G3 and clicked on a tiny AOL icon. A screen appeared asking for a login and password.

"I made you an e-mail address," he said while my eyes scanned the screen. I had already explored the worlds of Pokémon on my Gameboy and Mortal Kombat on Nintendo64, but this seemed like something so much more.

"What's my e-mail address?" I asked, my hands already reaching for the keyboard.

"This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.," he said. My nickname in hockey was "magnet" because I was incapable of playing my designated role on the ice. I went where the puck went, like a magnet.

From that fateful day onward, I have been a child of the Internet. This is where I was raised.

I laughed hysterically at videos on eBaum's World like "Here Is The Earth." I listened in awe as kids in my 5th grade class proclaimed they had found web sites with topless women. I spent hours reading forums with video game hacks and secret codes. I never once went to the library for a research project, instead always reverting to Google. I would sneak downstairs to the computer in the middle of the night and practically have a heart attack when AOL would start back up, the volume of the computer maxed out, sending a screeching sound all throughout my house as I connected to the Internet.

I learned how to read on the Internet. I learned how to write on the Internet. I learned how to sell things on the Internet. I learned how to forge meaningful relationships (through the World of Warcraft and chat programs like AIM) on the Internet. I watched everyday people rise to fame on the Internet. I was exposed to art I never would have seen, information I never would have learned, stories I never would have heard, people I never would have met, and ways of life I never would have considered--all because of the Internet.

And then I watched advertisements slowly clutter my favorite websites. I watched big brands buy up and take over. I watched the government step in and try to regulate our free world. And most of all, I watched this vast and distant world I considered to be a second reality slowly take over the primary.

I have watched this thing we call "The Internet" infiltrate real life, so much so that we no longer know the difference.

As someone who has, by every definition, truly "grown up on the Internet," I want to remind you of what's real and what's not. When I was 17 years old, I was e-famous through the World of Warcraft. I had more people reading my blog every single day than most professional New York Times columnists. I learned how to build a personal brand before I knew how to properly fill out a college application. And I also learned, at a very young age that on the Internet, perception is reality--and that can be both extremely powerful and extremely dangerous.

This is my open letter to "us Millennials," the demographic that has been labeled everything from lazy and over-privileged, to forward-thinking and naturally creative.

I want us to be aware of just how rare of time period we have been born into. We are the only generation that, quite literally, is the same age as the Internet. When the Internet was an infant, so were we. When the Internet hit adolescence, so did we. When the Internet went off to college, so did we. And when people started taking the Internet seriously, we graduated, stepped out into the real world, and suddenly people started taking us seriously, too.

The generation after us, they don't have this. The first toy their hands ever touched was an iPad. The generation before us didn't have this. To them, the Internet is still primarily a confusing place of which they have very little inherent knowledge. We are the only generation that has experienced life before the Internet ruled everything, but at the same time, can speak the language fluently.

That is a tremendous gift.

But I'll be honest, I think we've forgotten that.

When I log into Instagram, I see wannabe role models that I know personally, who don't have a clue what they want to do with their lives, preaching how to find "that one thing you love most in life." I open up Facebook and see people who are in no way masters of their craft selling courses on that craft. I see ad after ad of a guy standing in front of a Ferrari trying to tell me that a seven figure passive income is easily attainable in just 3 Easy Steps. I open Snapchat and watch gorgeous girls pout at the camera with this untouchable look in their eyes, and then I talk to these same girls in real life and hear them confess how insecure they are. I go to YouTube and watch guys talk about how they are shredded at seven percent body fat and "all natural," and then I go train with them they confess they just say that to market themselves.

All these things are besides the point.

What I want to talk about instead is how this distorted reality makes us feel.

And a lot of us feel like failures.

Twenty-three, 24, 25, 26 years old, a few years out of college, and the overwhelming question is, "Why aren't I a millionaire yet?" We look at what we see on the Internet and wonder why we don't have a camera crew following us around too. We wonder where our gold watches are, where our Ferrari is, when our vacation to Bali will come.

Here's what I want to say:

If you want that to be your reality, you can create it. That's the power of the Internet, and I'll be the first to advocate for that. If you want to be an influencer in your field, go partner up and collaborate with other influencers. If you want to be a thought leader, hang with the thought leaders. If you want to motivate people, go create motivational content. If you want to teach people, go create really cool stuff that teaches people.

But just like our relationship with the Internet, don't forget the life that exists outside the Internet. Don't forget that what you're portraying, you should also be living yourself.

It's our choice. We can either use the Internet and all its tools to actually create things of value, or we can fall into the dangerous trap of trying to create the perception of something that is in no way true. We have been given an invaluable opportunity here as Millennials. We are, like the Internet, old enough to be taken seriously, old enough to start companies and create movements, old enough to create true change.

But also, like the Internet, we are still comparatively young and reckless. We have just stepped out on our own in the world. We know what we know really well, while at the same time, we're not entirely aware yet of what it is we don't know.

This recklessness is what gives us the naive confidence to do great things, like create sustainable foods or find new sources of energy or invent social media platforms that connect people all over the world.

And it is also the very thing that can quickly cause us to spiral out of control.

So, to all my creatives, all my aspiring entrepreneurs, all my peers and those of us with the demographic title of "Millennial": I'd like to remind you that the author of this article, an Inc. columnist, a published writer, an editor-in-chief, is also a 25-year-old boy who just loves to write, and is writing this sitting at a coffee shop wearing a pair of jeans and a t-shirt. The air conditioning is turned on too high. My cup of coffee is empty. The girl next to me keeps coughing and I really hope she doesn't get me sick. The girl opposite me keeps making weird faces at her laptop, which makes me wonder what she's working on. The couple two tables away seem to be on a first date and are doing their best to conceal their nerves. The man who owns the coffee shop is British and listening to him talk to customers is amazing--"Aaaand what'llya be havin'?"

This is our reality.

My description and expression of it is extended into this article, shared on the Internet.

Let's all express ourselves.

But let's also not forget where that expression comes from.

Source:  http://www.inc.com/nicolas-cole/what-my-fellow-millennials-get-wrong-about-the-internet.html

Categorized in Online Research

Microsoft has been in the operating system game for decades, but now it's making a move in the web browser wars.

Microsoft Edge, the first new browser interface and engine of this decade, comes with every shipping copy of Windows 10. Microsoft says it has "tens of millions of users," but it's barely a blip on most web browser market share reports.

Even so, Microsoft has used the telemetry provided by those millions of users and an exhaustive battery of tests to prove that Microsoft Edge is actually a more battery-efficient browser than Google Chrome, Firefox and Opera.

In a pair of blog posts published on Monday, Microsoft engineers outline how the current Edge browser can save up to 53 percent of your battery life on a Windows 10 system, as compared to other web browsers like Chrome and Firefox. The second, more technical post promises that the next Edge browser, which will ship with the upcoming Windows 10 Anniversary Update, will be even more energy efficient.

MONTH CHROME INTERNET EXPLORER FIREFOX SAFARI MICROSOFT EDGE OTHER

July, 2015 27.82% 53.13% 12.03% 5.09% 0.14% 1.79%
August, 2015 29.49% 50.15% 11.68% 4.97% 2.03% 1.69%
September, 2015 29.86% 49.19% 11.46% 5.08% 2.41% 2.00%
October, 2015 31.12% 48.20% 11.28% 5.01% 2.67% 1.72%
November, 2015 31.41% 47.21% 12.24% 4.33% 2.90% 1.91%
December, 2015 32.33% 46.32% 12.13% 4.49% 2.79% 1.95%
January, 2016 35.05% 43.82% 11.42% 4.64% 3.07% 2.00%
February, 2016 36.56% 40.85% 11.68% 4.88% 3.94% 2.08%
March, 2016 39.09% 39.10% 10.54% 4.87% 4.32% 2.09%
April, 2016 41.71% 36.61% 10.06% 4.47% 4.73% 2.42%
May, 2016 45.63% 33.71% 8.91% 4.69% 4.99% 2.07%

Jason Weber, Microsoft's director of program management for Microsoft Edge, explained that different web browsers consume energy in very different ways, much like cars don't all consume gas in the same way. Some are more efficient than others. Some run like they're always in the city while others operate in a more efficient highway miles mode.

Weber contends that Chrome is a city driver. "When you’re browsing the web with Chrome, like city miles, it wakes up, sprints to next stop light, stops and then sprints to next stop light. It's one way to get through city, but uses a lot of gas," he said.

According to Weber, Chrome and Firefox are constantly talking to the operating system. He described it as waking up roughly 60 times a second (and sometimes up to 250 times a second).Edge takes advantage of its deeper integration with the operating system to wake less frequently, he claimed.

"Edge never wakes itself up ... We tell the OS that. 'Hey, we have work to do and you [the OS] tell us when it’s most efficient to do that work," said Weber.

For example, when you touch the screen of your Windows 10 touchscreen computer, the hardware wakes up, sends a message to the web browser on screen. If it's Chrome, Chrome then tells Windows 10 it needs to animate the screen to scroll up or down. With Edge, you can scroll the web page without, Weber said, waking it up. The OS is already there, ready to do the graphical work.

How do you know?

Having hours of more battery life on your laptop because you chose Edge over Chrome sounds amazing. But why should we trust these claims? Testing technology battery life is notoriously difficult. You have to have multiple test beds, with vanilla set-ups, nothing extraneous running in the background that could impact battery consumption and perfectly repeatable test scripts. Compounding this is the challenge of testing web page battery consumption. Every page is different and most of what consumes power happens in the background.

Weber acknowledged the challenge, but told me Microsoft had figured out a few ways to accurately test Web browser battery consumption. The team combined lab tests, telemetry from millions of Edge users, and a run-down test that it captured on video.

The lab tests were particularity impressive. They included 200 PCs, a mini, in-lab Internet, systems connected to voltage meters, and special computers with power-measurement chips built right onto the motherboard.

The video showed particularly impressive power gains. At one point, the system running Microsoft Edge ran 70 percent longer than the one running Google Chrome.

Next Level

Whether or not you believe Microsoft, the company is already busy ramping up power efficiency for the next, big Microsoft Edge release, which will arrive as part of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update later this summer.

According to a technical blog post by Microsoft Edge Program Manager Brandon Heenan, the Anniversary Update will address JavaScript access in background tabs. Instead of allowing JavaScript to continuously run in hidden tabs, it will slow it down to running once per second.

They're also re-architecting how Edge handles animations by removing duplicate frames at the beginning and end of loops.

However, no change may be more welcome that what the team plans to do with Flash. The Anniversary Update will make Flash a separate process and the system will pause any unnecessary Flash operations. It will also stop Flash if it becomes unstable, without impacting the rest of the browser session.

Source:  http://mashable.com/2016/06/20/microsoft-edge-battery-life/#81O68D2GhOqt 

Categorized in Online Research

Performing an SEO audit? Contributor Max Prin demonstrates how to find all of a website's indexed subdomains using a simple (and free) Chrome plugin.

An SEO audit is rarely limited to the www (or non-www) version of a website. When looking for potential duplicate content, it’s often important to know how many subdomains exist and, more importantly, how many of them are indexed by Google.

The good old search operators

An easy way to find indexed subdomains is to use search operators.

Start with “site:” and the root domain.

sudmains-01

 

2. One by one, remove each subdomain (including: “www”) from the results with the “-inurl:” operator.

sudmains-02

3. When there are no more results for Google to return, your query with the search operators should include all subdomains indexed.

However, this technique has its limits. It’s unlikely that the site you’re auditing has as many subdomains as wordpress.com, but you may come across a site with several dozen subdomains. This can potentially cause the following issues:

The process can be long, especially if it needs to be done for several domains.
You might get Google “captchas” along the way.

The size of queries is limited (around 30 keywords). Thus, if your query is too long (too many -inurl operators), you will get a 400 error page from Google.Once you’re done, you still need some editing to create a nice list of subdomains to work with.

The solution: a simple Chrome extension, by Google

This extension, Personal Blocklist (by Google), will make your life easier. It allows you to “block” domains from appearing in your search results.The key here is that the extension operates at the subdomain level and stores the domains in a list.

1. Once added to Chrome, start with the same “site:domain.com” search command.

2. Under each result now appears a “Block subdomain.domain.com” link.

3. Click on each link until your result page is empty.

sudmains-05

4. You’re almost done! Simply click on the extension icon, then “export,” then copy/paste into Excel.

Enjoy!

Source:  http://searchengineland.com/quickly-find-export-subdomains-indexed-google-251370

Categorized in Search Engine
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