The Internet is massive. Millions of web pages, databases and servers all run 24 hours a day, seven days a week. But the so-called "visible" Internet—sites that can be found using search engines like Google and Yahoo—is just the tip of the iceberg. Below the surface is the Deep Web, which accounts for approximately 90 percent of all websites. As noted by ZDNet, in fact, this hidden Web is so large that it's impossible to discover exactly how many pages or sites are active at any one time. This Web was once the province of hackers, law enforcement officers and criminals. However, new technology like encryption and the anonymization browser software, Tor, now makes it possible for anyone to dive deep if they're interested.

 

Defining the Deep/Dark Web

There are a number of terms surrounding the non-visible Web, but it's worth knowing how they differ if you're planning to browse off the beaten path. According to PC Advisor, the term "Deep Web" refers to all Web pages that that are unidentifiable by search engines. The "Dark Web," meanwhile, refers to sites with criminal intent or illegal content, and "trading" sites where users can purchase illicit goods or services. In other words, the Deep covers everything under the surface that's still accessible with the right software, including the Dark Web. There's also a third term, "Dark Internet" that refers to sites and databases that are not available over public Internet connections, even if you're using Tor. Often, Dark Internet sites are used by companies or researchers to keep sensitive information private.

While many news outlets use "Deep Web" and "Dark Web" interchangeably, it's worth noting that much of the Deep is actually benign. Everything from blog posts in review to Web page redesigns still in testing to the pages you access when you bank online are part of the Deep and pose no threat to your computer or safety at large. As CNN Moneyillustrates, big search engines are like fishing boats that can only "catch" websites close to the surface. Everything else, from academic journals to private databases and more illicit content, is out of reach.

Access

Most people who wish to access the Deep Web use Tor, a service originally developed by the United States Naval Research Laboratory. Think of Tor as a Web browser like Google Chrome or Firefox. The main difference is that, instead of taking the most direct route between your computer and the deep parts of the Web, the Tor browser uses a random path of encrypted servers, also known as "nodes." This allows users to connect to the Deep Web without fear of their actions being tracked or their browser history being exposed. Sites on the Deep also use Tor (or similar software such as I2P) to remain anonymous, meaning you won't be able to find out who's running them or where they're being hosted.

Many users now leverage Tor to browse both the public Internet and the Deep. Some simply don't want government agencies or even Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to know what they're looking at online, while others have little choice—users in countries with strict access and use laws are often prevented from accessing even public sites unless they use Tor clients and virtual private networks (VPNs). The same is true for government critics and other outspoken advocates who fear backlash if their real identities were discovered. Of course, anonymity comes with a dark side since criminals and malicious hackers also prefer to operate in the shadows.

Use and Misuse

For some users, the Deep Web offers the opportunity to bypass local restrictions and access TV or movie services that may not be available in their local areas. Others go deep to download pirated music or grab movies that aren't yet in theaters. At the dark end of the Web, meanwhile, things can get scary, salacious and just plain...strange. As noted by The Guardian, for example, credit card data is available on the Dark Web for just a few dollars per record, while ZDNet notes that anything from fake citizenship documents to passports and even the services of professional hit men is available if you know where to look. Interested parties can also grab personal details and leverage them to blackmail ordinary Internet users. Consider the recent Ashley Madison hack—vast amounts of account data, including real names, addresses and phone numbers—ended up on the Dark Web for sale. This proves that, even if you don't surf the murky waters of the Dark Web, you could be at risk of blackmail (or worse) if sites you regularly use are hacked.

Illegal drugs are also a popular draw on the Dark Web. As noted by Motherboard, drug marketplace the Silk Road—which has been shut down, replaced, shut down again and then rebranded—offers any type of substance in any amount to interested parties. Business Insider, meanwhile, details some of the strange things you can track down in the Deep, including a DIY vasectomy kit and a virtual scavenger hunts that culminated in the "hunter" answering a NYC payphone at 3 a.m.

Real Risks

Thanks to the use of encryption and anonymization tools by both users and websites, there's virtually no law enforcement presence down in the Dark. This means anything—even material well outside the bounds of good taste and common decency—can be found online. This includes offensive, illegal "adult" content that would likely scar the viewer for life. A recent Wired article, for example, reports that 80 percent of Dark Web hits are connected to pedophilia and child pornography. Here, the notion of the Dark as a haven for privacy wears thin and shores up the notion that if you do choose to go Deep, always restrict access to your Tor-enabled device so children or other family members aren't at risk of stumbling across something no one should ever see. Visit the Deep Web if you're interested, but do yourself a favor: don't let kids anywhere near it and tread carefully—it's a long way down.

 Source: This article was published usa.kaspersky.com

Categorized in Deep Web

Being online is part of daily life, with Wi-Fi hotspots, mobile internet, and broadband connections spanning almost all of Britain, US and other developed countries.

While this gives us an overwhelming amount of information at our fingertips, it also exposes surprisingly large amounts of our personal information to the rest of the online world.

Depending on the websites and services you use, all manner of data from your browsing habits through to your birthday, address and marital status can be harvested from your online presence.

Even if websites, connections and devices you use do their best to hide your personal information, there are still a myriad of risks to your online privacy; we’ve selected seven to watch out for over the next 12 months.

Browse the web for any amount of time and you’ll notice adverts following you from site to site that are filled with products you may have been looking at earlier. That’s because you're being tracked.

Website cookies have historically been used to track web browsing via a piece of data inserted into your browser, but other techniques such as MAC address and account tracking can be used to see what you’ve been doing on the web.

While some people might not mind this, preferring to have adverts served up to them that are relevant to their interests, some may find it an invasion of digital privacy.

In the European Union, websites have to notify visitors that they’re using cookies and have to be transparent with any other methods they are using to follow you online.

But as data becomes more important to companies, developers and advertisers, there’s a lot more tracking going on by default.

If you’re concerned about online tracking, it’s always worth delving into the privacy settings of various services, apps and web browsers to make sure they’re set to give you the level of privacy you want. Alternatively, there all anti-tracking tools and browser extensions to keep your activity under wraps.

Whereas tracking might follow you in real-time, a variety of internet companies and services can collect your browsing data and share your computer or router MAC address with third-party advertisers and companies.

With this data companies, you have no direct interaction with can build up a pretty good profile of your internet habits and web browsing.

And this now extends to mobile apps, which in order to offer you their services will ask for access to your phone number, contacts, and other deeper phone functions.

Services like Google Maps can also track your real-time and historic location by default, which can be great if you want to know where you may have stumbled off to after a heavy Friday night. But to others could be seen as always being stalked by faceless tech companies.

While this can be the price people need to accept for free apps and services, some the data they potentially surrender may be pretty invasive.

Websites and online services that don’t have the latest and most robust security can effectively leave the information they might hold on you and the data flowing between your computer and a web server, at risk from hackers.

For example, websites using the now-outdated HTTP web communication standard, rather than the more robust HTTPS, lack an encrypted connection between a computer or smartphone and the website it connects to. This means the data flowing between the two points can be monitored by other companies or potentially snooped on and stolen by hackers for more nefarious purposes.

Furthermore, if the servers that support a website or online service are hacked, then you could find that cybercriminals have access to some of your personal credentials, not just infringing upon your privacy but also paving the way for fraud and identity theft.

To avoid such problems, it’s worth trying to only use websites with encrypted connections and making sure you have up-to-date cybersecurity software.

And while you can’t prevent a web server from being hacked,  using tools like two-factor authentication and keeping an eye out for any legitimate warnings that alert you to potential breaches of your data will help keep your personal information safer.

Smart TVs, fridges, thermostats, and speakers might seem like futuristic tech, but they can pose a threat to privacy.

A lack of security standards around the Internet of Things, the collective name given to connected and smart devices, means some devices might not have encrypted connections to the servers that power their smart features or may be vulnerable to simple hacking techniques, making them ripe targets for cybercriminals.

Or alternatively, devices such as smart speakers could end up listening to you all the time, rather than just respond to an activation phrase, which, whether deliberately or not, would be a massive breach of privacy.

More regulations and standards are being created to ensure smart home devices are kept secure and the data they collect and use is done so in a fashion that does not infringe upon a user’s personal privacy. But for the time being, if you value your privacy, it’s worth selecting smart home tech that has strong security and is transparent on how the gadgets collect data.

With all the things we can do on smartphones these days, it can be easy to plough through mobile data allowances pretty quickly, which makes logging onto public Wi-Fi hotspots very tempting.

But the problem is they often have weak or no form of security or encryption, meaning that hackers can snoop on the data going between your device, the hotspot and the web.

Some hotspots have a web portal that requires you to part with your email or login via Facebook or Twitter, meaning you have to part with some of your personal details, potentially opening you up to email spam, or force you to provide permission for the Wi-Fi service to have access to your social media posts.

It's worth being vigilant with the data you have to part to get a taste of free public Wi-Fi and identify if a provider will track your activity and use your details for intrusive marketing purposes.

More privacy-conscious people should consider using a virtual private network (VPN) which encrypts your web traffic and can hide your machine’s MAC address, making it difficult for others to snoop on your activity when out and about.

Some governments carry out online surveillance and don’t really allow their citizens to web browse privately. In the UK, the Investigatory Powers Act allows government authorities to legally spy on the browsing and internet use of British citizens.

As such, the government can directly breach your online privacy if they suspect you may be involved in criminal activity, though they need to apply for a warrant to do so, which should mean the average person isn’t being spied on by MI5.

However, the Investigatory Powers Act forces internet service companies to collect metadata on their customers and hold it for twelve months, which with a warrant can be collected in bulk by a government authority and used to combat terrorism or stop organized crime.

This means data relating to your personal internet use could get sifted through as part of a law enforcement task force even if you’re no way related to an investigation, which can be seen as pretty intrusive to your privacy.

Again, the use of a VPN or a proxy server can help boost your online privacy by hiding your IP address from the prying eyes of government agents and the police.

An open Facebook profile is arguably a stalker’s dream, with all manner of personal details, from current city of residence to phone numbers and photos available to browse and swipe.

And on Twitter, many users regularly post pictures with their location tagged, all of which allows for people to know their whereabouts with relative accuracy, as well as let savvy burglars know you’re not at home.

Privacy settings have been boosted on various social media sites to limit personal data to only friends or select contacts.

But there’s still the problem of your Facebook friends or Instagram followers, with fewer privacy settings,  tagging you in pictures they have of you and your escapades, potentially exposing some of your personal activities, location, and information to their friends who maybe strangers to you.

While the use of social networking sites at their very core is the antithesis of privacy, the use of them can be more intrusive that you’d perhaps first realize.

So for people wanting to keep their profiles low-key, it's worth taking time to go through the privacy options menu of such sites, and be aware of what you’re posting and how some updates can contain a lot more personal information than you’d think.]

Thanks to living in an ever-more connected world we have a lot more useful services and information but a mouse click or tap on a phone away; the downside is it exposes some of our personal data, habits, and life to a wider world.

But before you yank out the router and delete your Netflix account, there are techniques and approaches you can use to keep yourself away from prying eyes and fraudsters.

From tweaking web browser extensions and settings to using VPNs and anonymous search engines; plenty of tools can help you enjoy the fruit of the internet without sacrificing your online privacy.

Protect your privacy with KeepSolid VPN (70% off lifetime offer)

Source: This article was published pocket-lint.com

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Cyber-crime has become one of the greatest threats to businesses, government institutions, and individuals, as hackers are constantly finding new targets and advanced tools to break through cyber defenses. As technology improves, new vulnerabilities are discovered and new obstacles challenge security professionals.

The past year was followed by a number of high-impact cyber-attacks. Namely, a number of devastating, high-impact cyber-attacks like rumors that the US election was hacked, marked 2017. Apart from the rumors regarding the hacked US election, there were ransomware attacks all over the world, and of course, the Equifax breach.

Unfortunately, as challenging as it is today, cyber-security threats will likely get worse in the future, as attacks get more sophisticated. As the years pass, the global security threat outlook keeps on developing. In order to fight this threat, all business entities must understand and learn how to cope with these global cyber threats.

In 2018, these cyber threats are expected to grow at a constant rate, as more complex challenges continue to surface, and cyber criminals keep coming up with new ways of attacking secure IT systems. The following are some of the biggest internet security threats that can impact the operations of IT-powered organizations in the year 2018.

Ransomware

Over the past 12 months, we saw a huge number of ransomware attacks. Ransomware is, in fact, a relatively simple form of malware that breaches defenses and locks down computer files using strong encryption. Then, hackers demand money in exchange for digital keys, needed to unlock the data. Quite often, especially if the encrypted data hasn’t been backed up, victims pay. This has made ransomware popular with criminal hackers, who have recently started demanding payment in cryptocurrencies which are extremely hard to trace.

Google, Amazon, IBM and other big cloud operators, have hired the best digital security that will protect them from such attacks. However, smaller companies can’t afford such thing, which makes them more vulnerable. For a small-scale local business, even a single tiny breach could lead to a big payday for the hackers involved. To prevent your computer from getting hijacked, avoid clicking on unknown links, keep security software up to date, and backup everything on an external hard drive.

Attacks on Cryptocurrencies

According to the latest research, currently there are 1324 cryptocurrencies in total, and this number is expected to increase. The rapid increase in the value of some cryptocurrencies has pushed thieves into massive criminal activities against virtual currency scheme. As more people mine cryptocurrencies on their computers, cybercriminals will organize more attacks designed to steal crypto coins from users, using malware to steal funds from victims’ computers or to deploy hidden mining tools on machines.

Threats to IoT (Internet of Things)

As the value of real-time data collection advances, day-by-day, individuals and business entities are increasingly making use of IoT devices. But, unlike our traditional devices, the IoT devices pose a significant challenge and a sense of less control, simply because they are not the best protected entities, and are susceptible to hacking. That’s why protecting them is so important and will continue to do so in 2018. Millions of connected devices have little or no defense against hackers who want to gain control of them and use them to enter into a network or access valuable data. The number of cyber-attacks powered by compromised IoT devices has become a great concern of the IT security industry, which is why IoT vendors are already putting more time and effort into securing their devices.

Source: This article was published alleywatch.com By VIVENNE CARDENASS

Categorized in Internet Privacy

News flashes and sound bites are constantly calling our attention to the latest hacks or threats to our cybersecurity that seem to be filling our social media news feeds and television reporting circuits. While there are plenty of bad actors out there hell bent on doing us harm, symbiotically living in the digital ethers and layers that make up the vast web, there are companies and organizations working in the background to protect and remediate any potential disasters.

Some of these online threats pose significant harm to our lives, our businesses and our finances. Some of them are easy to detect, while others have become increasingly challenging and more sophisticated over the years. They sometimes involve massive bot-nets of millions of devices all acting in concert with one another, and sometimes they're far more individualistic in nature, with specific high-value targets that involve social engineering and location tracking to ensure that their cryptic intentions are fulfilled.

If you've ever been the victim of a phishing scam online or you've ever had someone hijack your profile or social engineer you or your employees to gain access to critical corporate information and infrastructure, or to steal any amount of money from you through methods such as Instagram money-flipping, then you know just how painful this process is. Oftentimes, we search for ways to exact our revenge, usually falling flat on its face due to the anonymity of the World Wide Web.

So, how do you go about protecting yourself from these online threats and cyber criminals who are determined to extra money and valuable information from you?

Clearly, there is no full-proof method to protect yourself. As technology evolves, so do our methods for combating these online threats. However, that doesn't mean that the threats stop. They also evolve. They get smarter, more efficient and more scalable as the near-limitless reach of the web gives them unfettered access to potential billions of dollars in crimes against unassuming individuals and businesses from across the planet.

What Are The Top Online Threats In Cyberspace? 

While there are numerous threats that exist at every turn on the internet, there are 10 very significant threats that pose malicious harm to us. Understanding what these threats are that exist on the web and learning how to combat them is integral to conducting any semblance of business or personal activity these days. Falling for these is painful to say the least, but even more so when you didn't even see it coming from miles away.

One of the biggest and most challenging uphill battles here when it comes to online threats to our security is actually determining whether or not a visitor is human. Bots that crawl the web, or that are designed to somehow infiltrate systems and drop malware generally don't behave like humans. However, this isn't always something that's straightforward. How companies go about detecting automated software and threats in cyberspace has a lot to do with their potential to fall victim to these scams.

Not only is it important to institute a good set of habits when it comes to dealing with online threats like this, but it's also important to stay in-the-know. The more informed you are, the better off you and your employees will be. It's important to note that whatever you do, threats are always evolving. Locate reputable companies that you can work with to help alleviate some of the stress that failure might cause in this arena.

#1 -- Ransomware

One of the biggest ongoing concerns and threats to our digital existences has been the proliferation and exponential rise of ransomware. You know, the type of thing that locks you out of your computer with an impending countdown that signals the digital death of your entire virtual existence. As it counts down, threatening to encrypt every last shred of data, you realize the peril that digital criminals can inflict on their unassuming victims.

Your choices? According to Tod Beardsley, Director of Research at Rapid7, a firm dedicated to thwarting these types of attacks through some of their wildly-popular software platforms such as Nexpose and Metasploit, you should never pay the criminals because you don't know the outcome of whether your information will in fact be restored, or simply vanish into thin air.

Redundant backups should be a priority for you. Backup to an external drive somewhere on your network and to the cloud through DropBox or another provider. Rapid7, which oftentimes stress tests other corporations by hacking in an effort to expose security loopholes, working to ensure that networks are safe from potential attacks, knows a thing or two about this. Companies rely on their teams to ensure that they're protected, and they're often the first phone call many make when an attack like this and others do actually happen.

#2 -- Phishing schemes

A large majority of people get caught up in phishing schemes. Phishing schemes are engineered to get you to click on things and oftentimes they seem harmless. Simply click on a link and it will go to some URL. That's it. However, as harmless as they seem, phishing schemes can lead to to a number of major online security breaches if you're not careful. By paying close attention to what you're clicking on, you'll better be able to mitigate these types of attacks.

Once you're ensnared in this type of scheme, it's hard to untangle yourself. There are phishing schemes for bank accounts, email accounts, big e-tailers and other service providers that have massive footprints. The goal? Gain access to the consumer's account to do the most damage. If you think you were the victim of a phishing scheme, and you entered in your username and password somewhere online and things didn't seem right, immediately change all your passwords.

Another important thing to note is that most people use the same (weak) password across a variety of services such as Gmail, Facebook and online banking as one example. Never do that. Always use different passwords and ensure that they're not simple passwords to begin with. If a cybercriminal gains access to one service, you don't want them gaining access to the others. You should also be changing up your passwords every few months or so.

#3 -- Man-in-the-middle (MIIM) attacks

One of the most sophisticated threats that exist online are man-in-the-middle attacks. I've seen these threats firsthand and know just how malicious they can be. Everything seems okay all the way to the final point of entry (even when using 2-factor authentication). This malware sits on your computer and waits until you've entered in all your credentials, then it actually swaps out the server that receives the communication and even communicates back to you.

Throughout all of this, everything seems fine. Nothing seems amiss. That's why it's such a sophisticated online threat. You almost don't know that anything is happening when it actually is happening. You have to be very wary of what you download to your computer and what reputable sources they're coming from. Virus software is not going to help you in most cases here because these threats are always evolving.

Oftentimes, MIIM attacks are a result of phishing schemes that installed latent software on your computer that sits dormant for some time until you begin accessing the proper network or until its recorded the right keystrokes. It then substitutes its own intercepted server right when you submit your credentials to login.

#4 -- Ad fraud

Online ad fraud is far more widespread than anyone could possibly imagine. This is likely one of the biggest cyber-threats that seems to go under the proverbial radar. Few people know that they've been scammed by sophisticated ad fraud systems after it's occurred. Publishers simply see views increasing and most ad platforms don't provide high specifics as far as direct views on every single ad impression or click, leaving most people in the dark.

In a recent conversation with Tamer Hassan, CTO of WhiteOps, a firm deeply entrenched in the fight against automated ad fraud, they've taken this fight to a new level by developing a platform that actively measures 500 to 2000 technical metrics to determine whether the person viewing the ad is in fact a human or a robot. This software analyzes several layers at a time and its the leading platform amidst the largest publishers in the world.

This impressive system developed by Hassan and team runs silently in the background, with no impact on the speed or latency of ad serving or delivery. In fact, most publishers are now building White Ops' software into their contracts, stating that violations in ad clicks and views from bots will result in non-payment of revenues. This human verification on the web is potentially one of the most lucrative types of fraud that so many cybercriminals are working to exploit and companies are working to protect against.

#5 -- Social media schemes 

Instagram (IG) money-flipping schemes and many others social media scams have surfaced in recent years. Considering that IG is one of the most popular social media platforms in the world, it's no wonder that unscrupulous cybercriminals are targeting individuals who are in desperate situations, looking to make a few hundred or a few thousand dollars quickly. These IG money-flipping schemes have become so widespread that the company can only take down 1 money-flipping scam for ever 3 that are being created.

In a recent conversation with Evan Blair, co-founder of ZeroFox, a firm specializing in social media security, he tells me that 70% of companies are using social media for business but that a large majority of those companies are uninformed about potential impersonations of customer service representatives or duplication of accounts and impersonation of profiles, until it's too late. In fact, there's little that many of the most popular platforms like IG can do to safeguard against the windfall of social engineering and phishing that is constantly occurring against companies at any given moment.

However, this isn't just a risk to digital security; cybercriminals are now using IG and other social media sites to physically track and harm well-to-do executives, celebrities and other high-profilers such as athletes and even politicians. Without a good system to thwart such attacks, most businesses and individuals are completely left lost in the dark. That's likely why so many of the world's leading companies and affluent individuals rely on ZeroFox's groundbreaking platform to thwart and mitigate such attacks.

#6 -- Bitcoin scams

Bitcoin scams have been on the rise recently, especially since the cryptocurrency leaves little in the way of traceable information and unlike with the banking sector, the transactions are irreversible. For those particular reasons alone, cybercriminals have been flocking to the Bitcoin platform. In fact, a large part of their criminal activity is dealt with in Bitcoins for a great majority of their malware attacks that include ransomware and other hacking initiatives.

Considering that Bitcoin valuations have been fluctuating and that there is little in the way of current regulations in the marketplace, this will only continue to get worse. Be very wary of paying for things in Bitcoin and in clicking on any URLs that look deceiving. Read the URLs thoroughly enough to ensure that it's not a variation of a popular domain name, something that hackers and cybercriminals tend to do often.

If you feel like you've been the victim of a Bitcoin scam, it's best to contact the FBI or your local law enforcement agency. Bitcoin does have built-in protections such as wallet backups and multi-signatures, but that doesn't mean that scams don't happen. Cybercriminals are getting more sophisticated by the day so be careful and avoid anything that looks suspicious.

#7 -- Social engineering

Social engineering isn't a new threat. In fact, criminals have been using social engineering hacks in person for ages now. However, when it comes to fraud and other crimes occurring online, this threat is certainly on the rise. With the layer of anonymity that the internet affords, it's no wonder that social engineering works so well in this medium. Most aren't that careful about who they interact with or what type of information that they give out or expose online.

It's not inherently difficult for a criminal to Google the web to find information about a person in an effort to social engineer a scam against them. They can discover their occupation on LinkedIn, their family members or children on Facebook, where they are through Instagram or what they're talking about on Twitter. They can then work to infiltrate those profiles and take over a person's entire social media presence, and use that control to take over email accounts and eventually bank accounts and so on.

It's important to be very careful about who you interact with and what information you expose to the general public. Utilize the privacy features on platforms like Facebook or Twitter and be sure not to share too much personal information on platforms like Instagram. If you do, make your profiles private so that not everyone can track your every movement.

#8 -- Targeting employees to compromise corporate networks

Another major online threat involves directly targeting employees to compromise corporate networks. Since some employees act as the gatekeepers into their corporate networks, there's no surprise that this is on the rise. For example, a large part of the wire fraud that occurs happens because cybercriminals successfully target the right employees to compromise the company's corporate network, allowing them almost unfettered access and approval to steal millions of dollars with ease.

Vulnerable employees also act as a gateway into a corporation's email servers, files and databases, where these cybercriminals can do massive amounts of damage. Employees need to be very careful on social media networks about who they interact with or through what phishing schemes that they click on and unknowingly provide credentials to. ZeroFox's game-changing software helps to alleviate a large part of this worry for most large companies, but not everyone is proactive enough to engage in their services.

Without using a company like ZeroFox, most corporations have no idea about what threats exist out there to their employees or their networks, and it really is one of the most revolutionary platforms that exists out there. Either way you cut it, employee education is a must here to ensure any potential attacks are thwarted before they even begin.

#9 -- Tracking movements for physical targeting

One massive online threat that exists, which can also help put your physical safety into peril, is the tracking of movements through social media and other channels. For consumers, this is an enormous risk, especially for those individuals that aptly portray a lavish lifestyle, traveling around the world. When cybercriminals know that you aren't home, it's simple for them to break into your home and steal your belongings.

You don't need to be uber-wealthy in order to be targeted. Criminals will target all types of individuals through social media channels, able to see when they're home and when they aren't. If you go on vacation, be careful of what information you're sharing and whether or not your profile is public or private. If you don't have home security systems installed and don't want to be a victim of a crime, be very wary about what you share.

Much of this remains common sense, but our physical security can also be put at risk if criminals know where we're going and learn what our routines and schedules might be. They can use that information to do all sorts of bad things to us, virtually and physically, so be very careful.

#10 -- Customer service interception

One of the gatekeepers to any company are their customer service representatives. They are one of the most proliferous category of employees who are interfacing with the clients on a daily basis. However, as skilled as they might be at their jobs, they are often unaware of the online threats that most cybercriminals pose when interacting through a number of mediums. In fact, cybercriminals are known to replicate profiles and post throughout social media to draw attention to unassuming individuals.

They do this in an effort to gain access to accounts, alter the awareness of the general public and to funnel or filter payments and other inquiries that might otherwise alert companies to something that's amiss. This is an enormous threat to businesses, and those without a system like ZeroFox or something similar, will most likely be unaware until the very last moment that a crime actually occurs.

Not only is this bad financially speaking, but it's also bad for a company's reputation. When a customer is angry, they often don't care whether they were speaking to an imposter or the actual company's representative themselves. At that point, it's usually too late to put out the fire. If you're a business and you're serious about your company's online security through social media channels, it's important to invest in a platform to help you mitigate such attacks.

 Source: This article was published forbes.com By R.L.Adams,

Categorized in Internet Privacy

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