It’s been discovered that Samsung has trademarked the term “Beast Mode” in the European Union. This has led to speculations that the South Korean phone maker is planning to add that feature to the Galaxy S8 in 2017.

Although Samsung hasn’t revealed the specifications for the Galaxy S8, the handset is rumored to come with Qualcomm’s most powerful processor the Snapdragon 835 or the company’s own next-generation Exynos processor. Both of those chipsets will be built using the 10nm process, the same tech that Apple is believed to be using for the iPhone 8 next year.

Qualcomm is also believed to be working alongside Samsung in developing the Snapdragon 835, possibly making the Galaxy S8 the only smartphone capable of taking advantage of the chip’s full potential, according to Inquisitr.

This is where the rumored Beat Mode feature comes in. Samsung filed an application with the EU to trademark the term earlier this month. Part of the trademark application details that Beast Mode will cover all of Samsung’s devices including smartphones, mobile phones, application software and all of its computers, as pointed out by Forbes.

Although there’s no official explanation as to what Beat Mode actually is, rumors indicate that turning on Beast mode on the Galaxy S8 will allow the processor to perform to its maximum power, according to Android Headline. This would be somewhat an extension to Android Nougat’s Performance Mode where users are able to choose from four presets of high performance.

By turning on Beast Mode on the Galaxy S8, this will also turn off power-saving features. Users will be trading longer battery life for the best possible performance of the Snapdragon 835 or the new Exynos processor. If this is really what Samsung’s Beast Mode is for, the Galaxy S8 could possibly outperform the iPhone 8. Samsung’s Galaxy smartphones have never outperformed Apple’s iPhones, and Beast Mode appears to be the South Korean manufacturer’s way of finally changing that, as pointed out by BGR.

Right now, Beast Mode on the Galaxy S8 is all speculation. However, it wouldn’t be all too surprising for Samsung to do everything it can to redeem itself from the Galaxy Note 7 disaster.

Author:  Ken Manbert Salcedo

Source:  https://www.yahoo.com/tech/samsung-galaxy-s8-rumored-come-015105179.html

Categorized in Science & Tech

Many of our readers who switched from Android to iPhone came from the super-popular Samsung Galaxy line of phones. So, why did they switch?

When I first asked why peoples switched from Android phones for iPhones, I figured man who replied would come from having a Samsung. Samsung is popular and there are so many on the market, that the numbers just felt like they would be there. Also, given the recall on Galaxy Note 7, many people were scrambling to find replacement phones — and some of those would have to go iPhone 7.

There are other reasons too, of course. Apple has proven they can deliver iPhone software and security updates to everyone in the world, all at the same time, which is increasingly important to people. Apple also continues to focus on lifelike photography, which is what some people prefer. It's also never been easier to make the switch.

But what are the reasons that have mattered most to you?

Kendall Seabury:

Came from an explosive note 7 and I'm using a temporary 6s plus and I have a 7 plus backordered.

What made me switch was consistentsy. Apple owns the hardware and the software. Since they can do that they can perfect it. I work at a place that gets spotty wifi and terrible cell coverage. On the note 7 I'd finish a 8.5 hour shift with 20% battery. On the iPhone I leave work and I have 60% or maybe even more.

I also have an iPad so continuity is amazing. It's now making me consider a MacBook Pro.

cctpitts01:

Went from the 6s Plus to the Note7 and as you already know the issue with the battery forced me to make move and seeing that the Note7 was the only device I wanted that ran Android I went and ordered (2) 256GB iPhone 7+ because even before the issues with the battery started they were already behind with the updates and it rubbed me the wrong way that Verizon altered the Note7 and had removed features that are present on the the ATT, Sprint and T-Mobile variants. I'm done with Verizon altering devices on Android and glad they can't tinker with the iPhone.

beenzy:

I switched from a Note 7. I've always wanted to give iOS a shot, so I got an iPhone 7 and a first gen Apple watch for the price of my Note 7 refund. It's been a few weeks now, and I'm enjoying the iOS experience so far. I like the smaller former factor, and I think the watch/phone integration is much better.

Aaron Moore:

This whole Note 7 fiasco really turned me off of Samsung. I went to a Iphone 7 Plus when I finally returned my second Note 7. Iphone has always had a superior OS, it's the lack of customization and other features that Androids allow that has kept me from buying an Iphone in the past few year. I am liking the speed and the battery life on the new 7 plus, and the low light camera is superior to the Note 7.

City00:

If I was going to stick with Android, it was either going to be a Google imagined phone, or I was going to get the Note 7. Well since the Note 7 became a non-factor, and, IMO, the Pixel phones are hideous, and overpriced for stock Android, I got an iPhone 7+ instead.

Devhux:

I switched from the Note 7 to an iPhone 6S Plus once the first recall happened. It took a bit of negotiating with my carrier as I had received an extra credit for trading in a previous Samsung device to get the Note.

I've had several issues with Android devices in the past and felt that I needed a change. A month in, and so far I'm very happy with my decision.

Xented:

I had an Note 7, Pixel C, and Huawei Watch. Sold on Ebay as soon as the explosive stuff with the note 7 happened.

I now have an iPhone 6S Plus (waiting on my preorder 7 Plus) , iPad Pro (9.7), and Apple Watch. The explosion incident with android was just the tipping point for me. Android is great, but so is iOS. With iOS and iPhones i know i have a quality piece of hardware that i don't have to worry about. They all work together seamlessly and I don't have to worry about support.

Pluka471:

I switched from a Note 5 and 7 to an iPhone 7 plus for a couple of reasons.

  1. OS and security updates
  2. Better and more predictable battery life. No more mystery battery drains that leave me with an almost dead phone.
  3. More polished OS and Apps with important features that work better. (granted Android is more flexible and customizable, but I believe it comes at the expense of polish).
  4. Better support from Apple. A broken screen on a Note 5 costs $250 and takes weeks to turnaround, iPhone is $129 and takes hours (many Apple stores in my area).

I hope that Google's Pixel phone matures in a couple of iterations to equalize these issues - I'm an Android fan, but for now, iPhones are more stable - even if a little restrictive and boring.

It wasn't just the Galaxy Note, though. The Galaxy S line also had people switching to iPhone.

djrakowski:

Security updates. My Galaxy S7 edge and my wife's Galaxy S7 (both on T-Mobile) didn't receive September security updates until the 1st or 2nd week of October.

ThaiBoy02:

I've been with Android since the OG Droid days. I finally decided to give the iPhone a try as I was sick and tired of hearing people say how great iOS was in general and wanted to see for myself what the deal was. I was rocking a Samsung Galaxy S6 (non edge) and was completely over the horrible battery life and late software updates so I decided to buy a iPhone 6s outright and give iOS a go. The switch was a little rough at first as I never used an iOS device before that. I have to say its nice to actually get software updates when its actually released and Google still has no answer for iMessage... Anyways I ended up recently purchasing the iPhone 7 Plus over the Pixel XL. My main reason for going with the 7 Plus is Apple supports their devices for a longer period of time.

Steve H Gotha:

I went from a Galaxy S7 Edge to 7 Plus primarily because of the water resistance, ever since I lost a phone having to jump into a pool to save my daughter I require water resistance for my phone. I can honestly say I truly appreciate both iOS and Android but as my wife and daughter have iOS devices it makes it easier for us to share stuff, and my daughter loves that she can FaceTime me now.

Bob McClenahan:

I switched back to iOS (iPhone 7 Plus) after about six months with a Galaxy S7. The camera was horrible, and I really missed iOS Messages.

 

 

ronin_cse:

I switched from a Galaxy S7 Edge. Wasn't really for any of the above mentioned reasons, I just ended up getting too annoyed by lots of little things on Android that aren't really on iOS and I didn't really need any of the pros that Android offers vs iOS.

Things like better battery life, better updates, better response, less lag, less bugs, better apps, etc...

Why did you switch to iPhone?

I find all of these answers, and the many more I received, really interesting. Now that I've seen the wide array of responses, however, it makes me want to find out even more.

So, if you switched from your Samsung Galaxy phone for an iPhone, I'd love to know why. Was it one specific reason, like the camera or privacy? Or was it a combination of reasons, from hardware to software, quality to feature set? If you haven't switched yet but are considering it, is it because of the changes made to iOS 10 or iPhone 7?

Source : http://www.imore.com/

Auhtor : RENE RITCHIE

Categorized in Science & Tech

As the rumor mill continue to churn out more interesting details about the Samsung Galaxy S8, release date speculations that emerged recently revealed that the new flagship model could hit the shelves worldwide in March 2017. A report from The Investor that went out a few days ago cited statements from unnamed various suppliers, which hinted a feasible release schedule for the Galaxy S8.

According to the publication’s sources, while still assessing the launch date for the next flagship, Samsung Electronics is eyeing to begin Samsung Galaxy S8 testing in January.

“Key suppliers are required to provide an initial batch of their parts for the Galaxy S8 from January,” according to an official from one of the suppliers.

“Full volume supplies will start in February.”

Samsung logo shown during Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge's presentation.

With this given timeline, there’s a possibility for Samsung Galaxy S8 to follow the usual release pattern of the previous flagship models, which is debuting at Mobile World Congress in February and then getting a global market release date in March.

“Considering the parts supplies, the phone launch could come in March as usual, unlike an earlier report by the Wall Street Journal,” another source working for another parts maker who wants to stay unnamed shared.

The March release date may sound good for those solid Samsung fans eager to get their hands on the Galaxy S8. But if the Wall Street Journal report that was referred in the cited quote above is to be considered, there’s a possibility for the next Samsung’s flag bearer to get a delayed debut. A post from Forbes, citing the WSJ report, linked the Samsung Galaxy S8’s potential late launch to the Galaxy Note 7 battery ignominy.

“The Wall Street Journal, citing sources close to the South Korean tech giant, is reporting that Samsung engineers still have not figured out the cause of the Note 7 battery fires, and that executives within the company are now ‘looking to delay the announcement of the Galaxy S8,’ perhaps as late as April.”

For sure, the tech world is eager to know what specifically caused the Note 7 batteries to explode. And Samsung being able to finally pinpoint the culprit will most definitely give a huge relief to their loyal followers. It is crucial especially for those waiting for the Galaxy maker’s next smartphone offering who are looking for assurance that the Korean titan will do its utter best for the same mistake not to happen again with the Galaxy S8 and other future devices.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 unveiled in a launch event.

If the Galaxy Note 7 battery issue will actually cause the late release of Samsung’s next flagship models, then, the tech company really needs to work faster to identify the root of the discontinued phablet’s problem. As according to the same Forbes report, delaying the Galaxy S8’s release “will almost certainly damage the momentum Samsung had built with the critically-acclaimed Galaxy S6 and S7.

Aside from the release date assumptions, talks about the specs and features of the Samsung Galaxy S8 are also widespread. The Korean conglomerate had already confirmed a few features to expect from the new smartphones including a “slick design” and an “improved camera,” according to a previous theT Inquisitr report.

Another major feature to get from the S8 is an AI digital assistance service and according to the latest development noted in the same Wall Street Journal report, there could be a dedicated physical button for it.

“The latest internal prototypes of the premium Galaxy S8 handset include a button on the side edge of the smartphone that would be used to launch a beefed-up virtual assistant,” the report said. But since the smartphone’s design is not final yet, it is still possible for Samsung to scrap the button idea for the AI feature, which is also rumored to be named Bixby.

The Inquisitr will continue to keep you updated for more release date and specs news surfacing online about the Samsung Galaxy S8.

Source: inquisitr.com

 

Categorized in News & Politics

It looks like Samsung is gearing for a comeback with the Galaxy Note 8 quick after the disaster that is the Galaxy Note 7.

Everyone lay witness to the huge crash that Samsung experienced with the Samsung Galaxy Note 7, which forced the company to do a complete recall of all units of the said model. Despite this huge failure on Samsung’s part, however, The Guardian reports that Samsung continues to lead in the global smartphone market in the third quarter of this year, still at 20 percent of the market share right before tight contender Apple.

But Samsung knows it has to shape up with the upcoming Galaxy S8, S8 Plus, and Note 8 to keep its lead in the race. With Apple’s not-so-popular iPhone 7, the playing field could still be quite even for the two smartphone giants.

The upcoming Galaxy S8, S8 Plus, and Note 8 units have sparked yet another speculation chain all over the internet because everyone knows its only a matter of time before Samsung releases an update to its smartphone and phablet lines. But before October ended, a Samsung representative spoke with CIO.

“Samsung has not officially communicated any information about a new Note lineup, so any reports referring to a new Note device are purely speculation and are not in reference to any communications from Samsung on a future Note.”

But everyone is convinced that Samsung is not yet ready to give up on the Note line. In fact, Samsung did confirm to Reuters in an official statement that customers who once owned a Galaxy Note 7 in South Korea will be able to get their hands on a Galaxy S8 or Note 8 update through an upgrade program when these models come out next year. This upgrade program will let the previous Galaxy Note 7 users to purchase Galaxy S8 or Note 8 next year for a half the price

As of date, the said upgrade program was only confirmed for South Korean owners and international patrons are hoping that Samsung will extend to them a similar upgrade program when the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy Note 8 hits the market.

“In addition to offering refunds or exchanges for a Galaxy S7 smartphone, Samsung has already offered financial incentives amounting to 100,000 won ($88.39) to affected customers in South Korea. Users in the upgrade program will need to pay only half the price of a Galaxy S7 device, rather than the full amount, before exchanging to the S8 or the Note 8,” Samsung said.

Surely, the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy Note 8 are already in development. But Tech Times confirms this news via Evan Blass, a known mobile reporter who has a knack for reporting unannounced smartphone news.

In a recent tweet, Blass confirmed that the upcoming Galaxy S8 models will ship as SM-G950 and SM-G955.

We are highly certain that SM-N950 is the model number for the upcoming Samsung Galaxy Note 8 since we know that the Note 7’s model number was SM-930, Galaxy Note 5 was SM-920, Galaxy Note 4 was SM-N910, and Galaxy Note 3 was SM-900.

A previous Inquisitr report cited Patrick Moorhead, chief analyst of Moor Insights & Strategy, who believes that the release of the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy Note 8 could be as early as January 2017.

“I think come January or March — January at CES or March at Mobile World Congress — they’ll come out with a Note 8. But it will be their high-end phone that not only goes after high-end consumers but enterprise as well.”

Surely, if Samsung has already come out with an upgrade program that involves the newer Galaxy S8 and Note 8, it’s only a matter of time before these new units get official release. With both the Note line having caught up with Samsung’s S line, Vine Report believes that the release of the Galaxy S8 and S8 Plus will be alongside the release of the Note 8.

Source:  inquisitr.com

 

Categorized in News & Politics

The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is officially dead — it exploded in popularity (teehee), but technical issues have forced Samsung to suspend the series’ annual refresh. That means that we won’t be getting any new smartphones from Samsung that come equipped with a stylus this year.

It’s a shame, because for some folks it’s the S-Pen that keeps them coming back to the Galaxy Note lineup, and it’s clear why — no one is matching Samsung in the digitized stylus game. The company even has roots in the #1 digitizer company running the show. The S-Pen’s years of refinement have resulted in an experience that increasingly blended the lines between screen and paper, and pen and, well, S-Pen.

Galaxy Note 5

If you’re one of those people and absolutely can’t go without an S-Pen or stylus these days, we’re here to help. Here are the best smartphones you can buy today that come equipped with a stylus.

Galaxy Note 5
Galaxy Note 7 Alternetives Best Android Phone with a Stylus

 

At first glance, people might still think it’s a Note 7.

Surprise! The best alternative to the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is the very device it was replacing. TheSamsung Galaxy Note 5 doesn’t come with some of the same quirks we were to enjoy on the Galaxy Note 7:

  • Iris scanner.
  • Snapdragon 820
  • IP68 Water Resistance
  • microSD slot

That said, the device does share a fair bit of other things, like it’s slick build and good looks, fast performance, and great display and camera. Oh, and we can’t forget about the digitized stylus known as the S-Pen, of course. If you absolutely can’t live without a Note, then this is the phone to buy for now. Get our full opinion on this phone in our Galaxy Note 5 review.

Galaxy Note Edge

Galaxy_Note_Edge.jpg

For all of the good things the Samsung Galaxy Note 5 has, there are a couple that people deem unforgivable. The biggest complaint from that crowd was the lack of a removable battery and microSD card. Well, the Galaxy Note Edge — or the Galaxy Note 4 if you don’t dig the Edge display — has you covered in that regard.

This phone is a bit long in the tooth by now with it being a 2014 model, but it’s still receiving modern versions of Android and should be able to hold its own for almost any task you have for it.

LG Stylo 2 V

LG_Stylo_2_V.jpg

This Verizon-only phone takes after the long-running LG Stylo / Stylus line in its form and function. It features middling specs, albiet it at an appropriate price tag at just over $200. The phone includes a stylus, though it isn’t remarkable. The writing functionality itself is limited, as there’s no pressure sensitivity or proximity-based features that the Wacom-enabled Note series provides.

But, it is smart enough to alert you when you’re moving with your phone without the stylus inserted, and the phone can bring up a quick memo box when it detects you’ve taken it from its holster. Internals also aren’t too bad with a 1.8GHz Octa-Core Snapdragon chipset, 13MP rear camera, 5MP front camera, 5.7-inch 1080p display, and more.

LG Stylo / Stylus 2 PlusLG_Stylo__Stylus_2_Plus.jpg

These 2 phones are cut from the same cloth, and both are slightly weaker variants of the LG Stylo 2 V. With a 1.4GHz chipset instead of one clocked at 1.8GHz, it’s not a huge downfall. It’s stil Octa-Core in its architecture, and all the other specs fall in line with Verizon’s latest model. And there’s also the fact that you don’t need to be a Verizon customer to use these, and European models may come with DAB+ radio support for those in that region.

LG Stylus 2LG_Stylus_2.jpg

If your budget is stretched really thin, this is your option. The Stylus 2 sticks with the familiar 5.7-inch form factor of all the models above, only its screen resolution sticks at 720p and it’s sporting a weaker 1.2GHz quad-core chipset.

The best smartphone stylus

The_best_smartphone_stylus.jpg

For those who simply can’t or won’t accept any of the options discussed above, here’s one hail mary: get yourself a capacitive stylus. There are downsides to this route:

Capacitive stylus pens typically don’t work nearly as well as pens designed for specific phones. They’ll write, but not quite as accurately and without any pen-like qualities.
You’ll need a case with a slot to store it. Or you’ll have to put it in your pocket. Or latch it onto your phone using a string. None of these solutions are pretty.
There may not be appropriate software on your phone to take advantage of it, but many note taking apps should give you what you’re looking for.
Knowing all of that, if you still want or need a stylus for your phone of choice, we’re recommending MEKO’s 2-in-1 set of stylus pens. You get 2 pens in one box, and they support removable fiber tips (2 included) and a disc tip (4 included). Fiber tips are used more for general navigation and operation, while you’ll want the disc tip for smoother and more accurate hand-writing and drawing.

That’s not going to solve any dilemma that requires pressure sensitivity or anything else a proper stylus like the S-Pen can provide, but there you have it. It’s even affordable at a cool $15 for that package.

Otherwise, Here’s hoping a proper Samsung Galaxy Note sequel exists somewhere in Samsung’s future.

Source : phandroid

Categorized in Science & Tech

Well, that's a relief. 

Samsung's initial pleas for customers to stop using and return their Galaxy Note7 devices with faulty batteries weren't particularly fruitful, but now that the recall is official and replacement devices are arriving en masse, the plan is working. 

Approximately half of recalled Note7 devices have already been exchanged, Samsung announced Thursday. 

"Samsung Electronics America, Inc. announced today that about half of all recalled Galaxy Note7 phones sold in the U.S. have been exchanged through Samsung’s voluntary recall. Additionally, 90 percent of Galaxy Note7 owners have been opting to receive the new Galaxy Note7 since the phones became widely available on Wednesday, September 21," the company's press release said. 

Note that this is only the U.S. — there's still a good number of faulty Note7s in other parts of the world. Up to 2.5 million defective Galaxy Note7 phones were shipped worldwide; approximately 1 million of those were in the U.S. 

After a slew reports of batteries catching fire, Samsung reacted and advised customers not to use the devices, later issuing an official recall. The company also pushed a firmware update to faulty devices, which warns users the phone should be turned off and returned immediately.

Many companies and organizations — including the New York City subway and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission — warned or outright forbid people from using Note7 phones until they exchange them for a new, properly working device. 

Source : http://mashable.com/

Categorized in Science & Tech

After weeks of urging consumers to return and exchange their Galaxy Note7 phones, Samsung, in partnership with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), has officially recalled the phones over defective batteries that could potentially explode.

 

Up to 1 million Note7 phones sold are affected in the U.S., but only about 130,000 device owners have returned their devices.

Samsung's now diligently urging ordering all Note7 owners who purchased a phone prior to Sept. 15 to return the phone and get a replacement. So if you're one of those owners and haven't done so, please do. You really, really don't want your Note7 to accidentally incinerate your car, burn you or blow up on any planes or trains.

The recall has effectively declared affected Note7 phones extremely dangerous to own. 

One of the reasons why so many Note7 owners may not have returned their devices could be related to limited stock for replacements. There are many reports that replacements weren't available and some users may have been hesitant to get loaner S7 and S7 Edge devices until new shipments arrived.

 

The process for getting replacements was also confusing. Consumers trying to return their devices to carriers were either told they didn't have replacements and didn't know when there would be any, or told to contact Samsung, in which the Korean electronics giant would then tell consumers they'd need to contact their carriers.

That confusion has only frustrated Note7 owners more.

How to see if your Note7 is affected
 

Obviously if you purchased a Note7 prior to Sept. 15, you should return and exchange it. But perhaps you got one as a gift or you're reading this story at a much later date and want to know if you have a phone that could explode.

To find out, locate your IMEI or serial number (Apps > Settings > About Phone  or General Management > Status IMEI information or Serial number, or find it on the back of your phone) and then enter it into Samsung's database here.

Replacements coming by Sept. 21

Following the proper Note7 recall, Samsung now says it'll have replacements for the affected U.S. phones as soon as next week.

"To our Note7 owners, if you have not yet replaced your original Note7, please, please power it down and return it," Tim Baxter, Samsung Electronics America president and COO, said in anapology video. "New Note7 phones will be available for exchange no later than next Wednesday, Sept. 21. Visit Samsung.com for more information."

A source close to Samsung tells Mashable the company is preparing an ample supply to replace faulty phones.

"To those of you who love the Note, the most loyal members in our Samsung family, we appreciate your passion and patience," Baxter said. "We take seriously our responsibility to address your concerns about safety. And we will work every day to earn back your trust through a number of unprecedented actions and with the extraordinary support of our carrier partners, suppliers and United States Consumer Products Safety Commission."

 

U.S. Note7 owners have three options according to Samsung:

1. Exchange your current Galaxy Note7 device with a new Galaxy Note7 as approved by the CPSC available no later than Sept. 21, 2016; or

2. Exchange your current Galaxy Note7 for a Galaxy S7 or Galaxy S7 edge and replacement of any Note7 specific accessories with a refund of the price difference between devices; or

3. Contact your point of purchase to obtain a refund.

Additionally, Samsung's also throwing in a "$25 gift card, in-store credit, in-store accessory credit or bill credit from select carrier retail outlets" for those who exchange their devices as a consolation bonus for any trust lost.

Samsung's also provided websites and contact information regarding how to exchange Note7 phones at U.S. carriers (AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, Verizon, U.S. Cellular) and at Best Buy on its website as well.

What about stickers and software updates and new battery icons?

There are several reports that Samsung is labeling new Note7 with different batteries with an "S" sticker on the packaging, issuing software updates that limit the charging of affected Note7 phones to 60 percent and giving new phones green battery icons instead of white ones.

However, none of that will happen in the U.S. In a phone call, Justin Denison, senior vice president of product strategy and marketing at Samsung Electronics America told Mashable that there are currently no plans for those specific initiatives — which are being taken by Samsung in other regions — planned for America.

At the current time, the company is focusing on its protocols with the CPSC and checking if devices have faulty batteries through IMEI and serial numbers. 

All new Note7 phones including replacements will be verified through authorized sellers as safe through its database; Note7 phones with IMEIs or serial numbers that are flagged in the database as faulty will not be sellable.

Additionally, the company is using a multitude of channels and social media platforms, including sending customers emails and notifications via the Samsung Plus app, to blast the recall information. In addition, it has produced print and radio spots to get users to take the recall seriously.

Samsung is planning further initiatives, but declined to elaborate beyond the fact that they'll be forthcoming.

Denison reiterated to Mashable that the company is putting safety as its top priority.

Source : http://mashable.com/

Categorized in Science & Tech

Samsung's exploding phone crisis is getting worse.

 

A 6-year-old boy was rushed to the hospital in Brooklyn, New York on Saturday after a Galaxy Note7 caught fire in his hands, according to a report in the New York Post

"The child was watching videos on the phone when the battery exploded," Linda Lewis, the boy's grandmother, told the newspaper. She later said he has since been released from the hospital.

 

This may be the first injury caused by the defective phones, though Samsung says it knows of at least 35 instances of the Note7 battery exploding or catching fire.

Samsung is working with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission to officially recall the device, but the incident in Brooklyn suggests that may be too little, too late. If the Note7 is your only device, you're up the creek without a paddle: You could exchange the device with your carrier, but if you don't have time for the hassle, are you supposed to go about your business without a working phone? Good luck with that in 2016 — especially if you're traveling, as the Federal Aviation Administration has warned against using the phone on planes.

Besides, Samsung and carriers haven't provided clear information about what customers should do with their Note7 phones. Initially, carriers said to reach out to Samsung directly. Then, Samsung asked customers to circle back with their carriers. And no one seems to know when replacement Note7 phones might hit the market — at least based on conversations I've had with Verizon as a Note7 owner myself. (Womp womp.)

 

Your best bet right now is to go to your service provider — Verizon, AT&T, whatever — and exchange the phone for a different model entirely. The only problem there is that the Note7 was dubbed the best smartphone you can buy today before it got all explodey, so anything you sub in will be a downgrade.

Meanwhile, a little company called Apple is launching a shiny new line of iPhones on Friday. Good timing.

Source : http://mashable.com/2016/09/12/samsung-note7-explodes-brooklyn/#5fcpymSdSmqT

Categorized in Science & Tech

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