fbpx

Source: This article was published thefutureofthings.com - Contributed by Member: Issac Avila

Research is the most critical step when writing an academic paper. It’s nearly impossible for students to impress and inspire the assessor with their academic paper if it’s not well-researched. It needs to contain authentic and genuine information for credibility, and that requires a credible source with authoritative reference materials.

While most academic resources can now be easily accessed online, using search engines like Google can be quite frustrating. The reason is that popular search engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo are full of advertisements and click baits that can really deter your effectiveness. And if you’re lucky enough to find some nearly relevant information with the aforementioned search engines, you will notice that it is improperly (rarely) referenced, poorly formatted and casually presented

 

We both know that you can’t get away with citing WikiHow, Hubspot or Wikipedia in your research paper. So what’s next? You need a list of search engines for students which will provide credible and authentic scholarly material for your use and reference – and for that, we’ve got you covered. Below is a list of the top 9 Educational Search Engines for Students that you will find rich in authoritative, accurate and credible information for your academic projects and assignments.

If for some reason you still can’t find what you’re looking for or you are overloaded with other research papers or essays and still want to provide a high quality work with credible resources, you may try custom writing service like www.copycrafter.net/custom-writing. CopyCrafter company has qualified and experienced authors that will deliver high-quality custom essays or research papers on pretty much any subject area. And for now, you may try yourself, with the help of the following resources:

1.Google Scholar

Google Scholar is a free, customized academic search engine designed specifically for students, tutors, researchers and anyone interested in academic materials. It’s the most popular research search engine for students and it lists academic resources across a wide range of sources. It allows students and researchers to find credible information, research papers and search journals, and save them in their personal library.

2.iSEEK- Education

iSeek is another widely used and one of the best search engines for students, educators and scholars. It’s a reliable, smart, and safe tool for your academic research and paper writing. Since the search engine was specially designed with students, educators and researchers in mind, you will be able to find credible and relevant resources that will ultimately save your time.

3.Microsoft Academic Research

Most people can associate with Microsoft products and brands, and there is no denying that the company delivers some incredible quality and consistency in its project. Microsoft Academic Research is no exception; the search engine indexes a wide range of scientific journals and research publications from engineering and computer science to biology and social science. It has over 47 million publications written by more than 20 million authors. Microsoft Academic Research allows you to search resources based on authors, conferences, and domains.

 

4.ResearchGate

If you’re a science major, you will love ResearchGate. In fact, chances are you’ve already searched for certain academic topics in Google and ended up on the ResearchGate platform. It’s a networking site for students, researchers, and scientists and provides access to more than 100 million publications and over 15 million researchers. Other than accessing the information, the platform also lets you ask researchers questions.

5.Wolfram Alpha

Wolfram Alpha presents itself as a computational knowledge engine’ that provides results as answers. All you need is to type in the question or topic that you’re interested in like “What is the diameter of the observable universe?” and the answer will pop up. The best part is it doesn’t make you scroll through tens of pages of results. It doesn’t present search results as the other engines, but it’s great for students looking for quick, snappy answers to bits of questions as they go about their assignments and projects.

6.ScienceDirect

ScienceDirect presents itself as a leading and reliable full-text scientific database that offers access to journal publications, book chapters, and research papers. It’s one of the most popular science search engines for students with more than 20,000 books and over 2,500 journals across various scientific topics and domains. You will be able to access articles, book chapters, peer-reviewed journals and content from topics and subjects like Chemistry, Computer Science, Energy, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Engineering, Materials Science, Physics and Astronomy, Mathematics and so on.

 

7.RefSeek

RefSeek employs a minimalistic design, which doesn’t look like much at first, but there is a lot going on in the background. It’s probably the most aggressive search engines for students as it pulls from more than 1 billion journals, research papers, book, encyclopedias and web pages. It works more or less like Google, but it only focuses on or academic and scientific results without the distraction of paid links. So you can expect the most results from .edu and .org sites.

8.Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC)

ERIC is reliable and informative online digital library that is populated and maintained by the U.S. Department of Education. The platform provides academic and educational resources for educators, students and researchers with over 1.3 million publications. Students can find materials such as books, research papers, journals, technical reports, policy papers, dissertations, conference papers and so on. The platform receives over eight million searches per month, meaning it’s a reliable and authoritative source of academic and research information.

9.The Virtual Learning Resources Center (Virtual LRC)

Virtual LRC is a search engine for college students which allows students to search and explore educational websites with authoritative and high-quality information. The search engine indexes thousands of scholarly and academic information sites ensuring that you get the most refined and relevant results. The platforms and the results you get have been organized by researchers, library professionals and teachers around the globe to ensure that students easily get resources for their projects and academic assignments.

Conclusion

The above-named directories and databases are among the most trusted and highly reputable search engines for students to find credible, authoritative and reliable academic resources. They offer information and references on all subject areas including chemistry, biology, physics, business, social science, mathematics, computer and technology and environmental science.

Categorized in Search Engine

As Google Scholar approaches its 10th anniversary, Nature spoke to its co-creator Anurag Acharya

Google Scholar, the free search engine for scholarly literature, turns ten years old on November 18. By 'crawling' over the text of millions of academic papers, including those behind publishers' paywalls, it has transformed the way that researchers consult the literature online. In a Nature survey this year, some 60% of scientists said that they use the service regularly. Nature spoke with Anurag Acharya, who co-created the service and still runs it, about Google Scholar's history and what he sees for its future.

How do you know what literature to index?

'Scholarly' is what everybody else in the scholarly field considers scholarly. It sounds like a recursive definition but it does settle down. We crawl the whole web, and for a new blog, for example, you see what the connections are to the rest of scholarship that you already know about. If many people cite it, or if it cites many people, it is probably scholarly. There is no one magic formula: you bring evidence to bear from many features.

Where did the idea for Google Scholar come from?

I came to Google in 2000, as a year off from my academic job at the University of California, Santa Barbara. It was pretty clear that I was unlikely to have a larger impact [in academia] than at Google — making it possible for people everywhere to be able to find information. So I gave up on academia and ran Google’s web-indexing team for four years. It was a very hectic time, and basically, I burnt out.

 

Alex Verstak [Acharya’s colleague on the web-indexing team] and I decided to take a six-month sabbatical to try to make finding scholarly articles easier and faster. The idea wasn’t to produce Google Scholar, it was to improve our ranking of scholarly documents in web search. But the problem with trying to do that is figuring out the intent of the searcher. Do they want scholarly results or are they a layperson? We said, “Suppose you didn’t have to solve that hard a problem; suppose you knew the searcher had a scholarly intent.” We built an internal prototype, and people said: “Hey, this is good by itself. You don’t have to solve another problem — let’s go!” Then Scholar clearly seemed to be very useful and very important, so I ended up staying with it.

Was it an instant success?

It was very popular. Once we launched it, usage grew exponentially. One big difference was that we were relevance-ranking [sorting results by relevance to the user’s request], which scholarly search services had not done previously. They were reverse-chronological [providing the newest results first]. And we crawled the full text of research articles, though we did not include the full text from all the publishers when we started.

It took years in some cases to convince publishers to let you crawl their full text. Was that hard?

It depends. You have to think back to a decade ago, when web search was considered lightweight — what people would use to find pictures of Britney Spears, not scholarly articles. But we knew people were sending us purely academic queries. We just had to persuade publishers that our service would be used and would bring them more traffic. We were working with many of them already before Google Scholar launched, of course.

In 2012 Google Scholar was removed from the drop-down menu of search options on Google’s home page. Do you worry that Google Scholar might be downgraded or killed?

No. Our team is continually growing, from two people at the start to nine now. People may have treated that menu removal as a demotion, but it wasn’t really. Those menu links are to help users get from the home page to another service, so they emphasize the most-used transitions. If users already know to start with Google Scholar, they don’t need that transition. That’s all it was.

How does Google Scholar make money?

Google Scholar does not currently make money. There are many Google services that do not make a significant amount of money. The primary role of Scholar is to give back to the research community, and we are able to do so because it is not very expensive, from Google’s point of view. In terms of volume of queries, Google Scholar is small compared to many Google services, so opportunities for advertisement monetization are relatively small. There’s not been pressure to monetize. The benefits that Scholar provides, given the number of people who are working on it, are very significant. People like it internally — we are all, in part, ex-academics.

 

How many queries does Google Scholar get every day, and how much literature does the service track? (Estimates place it anywhere from 100 million to 160 million scholarly items).
I’m unable to tell you, beyond a very, very large number. The same answer for the literature, except that the number of items indexed has grown about an order of magnitude since we launched. A lot of people wonder about the size. But this kind of discussion is not useful — it’s just 'bike-shedding'. Our challenge is to see how often people are able to find the articles they need. The index size might be a concern here if it was too small. But we are clearly large enough.

Google Scholar has introduced extra services: author profile pages and a recommendations engine, for instance. Is this changing it from a search engine to something closer to a bibliometrics tool?

Yes and no. A significant purpose of profiles is to help you to find the articles you need. Often you don’t remember exactly how to find an article, but you might pivot from a paper you do remember to an author and to their other papers. And you can follow other people’s work — another crucial way of finding articles. Profiles have other uses, of course. Once we know your papers, we can track how your discipline has evolved over time, the other people in the scholarly world that you are linked to, and can even recommend other topics that people in your field are interested in. This helps the recommendations engine, which is a step beyond [a search engine].

Are you worried about the practice known as gaming — people creating fake papers, getting them indexed by Google, and gaining fake citations?

Not really. Yes, you can add any papers you want. But everything is completely visible — articles in your profiles, articles citing yours, where they are hosted, and so on. Anyone in the world can call you on it, basically killing your career. We don’t see spam for that very reason. I have a lot of experience dealing with spam because I used to work on web search. Spam is easier when people are anonymous. If I am trying to build a publication history for my public reputation, I will be relatively cautious. 

What features would you like to see in the future?

We are very good at helping people to find the articles they are looking for and can describe. But the next big thing we would like to do is to get you the articles that you need, but that you don’t know to search for. Can we make serendipity easier? How can we help everyone to operate at the research frontier without them having to scan over hundreds of papers — a very inefficient way of finding things — and do nothing else all day long?

 

I don’t know how we will make this happen. We have some initial efforts on this (such as the recommendations engine), but it is far from what it needs to be. There is an inherent problem to giving you information that you weren’t actively searching for. It has to be relevant — so that we are not wasting your time — but not too relevant, because you already know about those articles. And it has to avoid short-term interests that come and go: you look up something but you don’t want to get spammed about it for the rest of your life. I don’t think getting our users to ‘train’ a recommendations model will work — that is too much effort.

(For more on recommendation services, see 'How to tame the flood of literature', in Nature's Toolbox section.)

What about helping people search directly for scientific data, not papers?

That is an interesting idea. It is feasible to crawl over data buried inside paywalled papers, as we do with full text. But then if we link the user to the paywalled article, they don’t see this data — just the paper’s abstract. For indexing full-text articles, we depend on that abstract to let users estimate the probable utility of the article. For data we don't have anything similar. So as a field of scholarly communication, we haven’t yet developed a model that would allow for a useful data-search service.

Many people would like to have an API (Application Programming Interface) in Google Scholar, so that they could write programs that automatically make searches or retrieve profile information, and build services on top of the tool. Is that possible?

I can’t do that. Our indexing arrangements with publishers preclude it. We are allowed to scan all the articles, but not to distribute this information to others in bulk. It is important to be able to work with publishers so we can continue to build a comprehensive search service that is free to everybody. That is our primary function, and everything else is in addition to this.

Do you see yourself working at Google Scholar for the next decade?

I didn’t expect to work on Google Scholar for ten years in the first place! My wife reminds me it was supposed to be five, then seven years — and now I’m still not leaving. But this is the most important thing I know I can do. We are basically making the smartest people on the planet more effective. That’s a very attractive proposition, and I don’t foresee moving away from Google Scholar any time soon, or any time easily.

Does your desire for a free, effective search engine go back to your time as a student at the Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur?
It influenced the problems that appealed to me. For example, there is no other service that indexes the full texts of papers even when the user can see only the abstract. The reason I thought this was an important direction to go in was that I realised users needed to know the information was there. If you know the information is in a paywalled paper, and it is important to you, you will find a way in: you can write to the author, for instance. I did that in Kharagpur — it was really ineffective and slow! So my experiences informed the approach I took. But at this point, Google Scholar has a life of its own. 

Should people who use Google Scholar have concerns about data privacy?

We use the standard Google data-collection policies — there is nothing different for Scholar. My role at Google is focused on Google Scholar. So I am not going to be able to say more about broader issues.

Source: This article was published scientificamerican.com By Richard Van Noorden

Categorized in Search Engine

Journalists frequently contact us looking for research on a specific topic. While we have published a number of resources on how to understand an academic study and how to pick a good one — and why using social science research enriches journalism and public debate — we have little on the mechanics of how to search. This tip sheet will briefly discuss the resources we use.

Google Scholar

Let’s say we’re looking for papers on the opioid crisis. We often start with Google Scholar, a free service from Google that searches scholarly articles, books and documents rather than the entire web: scholar.google.com.

 

But a search for the keyword “opioids” returns almost half a million results, some from the 1980s. Let’s narrow down our search. On the left, you see options “anytime” (the default), “since 2013,” “since 2016,” etc. Try “since 2017” and the results are now about 17,000. You can also insert a custom range to search for specific years. And you can include patents or citations, if you like (unchecking these will slightly decrease the number of results).

Still too many results. To narrow the search further, try any trick you’d use with Google. (Here are some tipsfrom MIT on how to supercharge your Google searches.) Let’s look for papers on opioids published in 2015 that look at race and exclude fentanyl (Google: “opioids +race -fentanyl”). Now we’re down to 2,750 results. Better.

img class="aligncenter wp-image-54961" src="https://journalistsresource.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Screen-Shot-2017-10-12-at-4.16.05-PM-1024x651.png?x20117" alt="" width="720" height="458" srcset="https://journalistsresource.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Screen-Shot-2017-10-12-at-4.16.05-PM-1024x651.png 1024w, / 

Unless you tell Google to “sort by date,” the search engine will generally weight the papers that have been cited most often so you will see them first.

Try different keywords. If you’re looking for a paper that studies existing research, include the term “meta-analysis.” Try searching by the author’s name, if you know it, or title of the paper. Look at the endnotes in papers you like for other papers. And look at the papers that cited the paper you like; they’ll probably be useful for your project.

 

Paywalls

If you locate a study and it’s behind a paywall, try these steps:

  • Click on “all versions.” Some may be available for free. (Though check the date, as this may include earlier drafts of a paper.)
  • Reach out to the journal and the scholar. (The scholar’s email is often on the abstract page. Also, scholars generally have an easy-to-find webpage.) One is likely to give you a free copy of the paper, especially if you are a member of the press.
  • In regular Google, search for the study by title and you might find a free version.

More tips on using Google Scholar from MIT and Google.

Other databases

  • PubMed Central at the National Library of Medicine: If you are working on a topic that has a relationship to health, try this database run by the National Institutes of Health. This free site hosts articles or abstracts and links to free versions of a paper if they are available. Often Google Scholar will point you here.
  • If you have online access to a university library or a local library, try that.
  • Directory of Open Access Journals.
  • Digital Public Library of America.
  • Subscription services include org and Web of Science.

For more on efforts to make scholarly research open and accessible for all, check out SPARC, a coalition of university libraries.

Related...

Citations as a measure of impact

How do you know if a paper is impactful? Some scholars use the number of times the paper has been cited by other scholars. But that can be problematic: Some papers cite papers that are flawed simply to debunk them. Some topics will be cited more often than others. And new research, even if it’s high-quality, may not be cited yet.

The impact factor measures how frequently a journal, not a paper, is cited.

This guide from the University of Illinois, Chicago, has more on metrics.

What else?

Here’s a useful source of new papers curated by Boston Globe columnist Kevin Lewis for National Affairs.

Another way to monitor journals for new research is to set up an RSS reader like Feedly. Most journals have a media page where you can sign up for press releases or newsletters featuring the latest research.

Source: This article was published journalistsresource.org By David Trilling

Categorized in How to

Here's something that's happened to most college students: It's 20 minutes before your final paper is due, and you haven't written a bibliography yet.

This situation, and everything that precedes it, is going to be more difficult if you don't know about Google Scholar. Google's customized search engine and tool for students and academics of all stripes was created by Anurag Acharya, a former academic who joined Google's web-indexing team in 2000. Scholar allows you to search journals, save sources to your personal library and, yes, get quick citations.

Advertisment

become-an-internet-research-specialist

Although Scholar celebrated its 10th anniversary in November, many students still don't know about it unless they talk to a librarian, and the navigation toolbar on the main Google page doesn't link to it. To help you out, just in time for finals, we've put together a quick guide to studying, saving and citing.

finals1

1. Search for journal articles.

The first thing you need to know about Google Scholar is that it works essentially like a regular ol' search engine — to get the best results, you should be as specific as possible. Scholar is designed to return a combination of the most relevant and most cited pages, meaning you'll get what's been cited most by other academics (which are usually the most informative, reliable sources).

Keep in mind that Scholar can search both the title and article content for search terms, even if the content is locked to subscribers.

Google Scholar Searchgenderroles2

Keep in mind that Scholar can search both the title and article content for search terms, even if the content is locked to subscribers.

Once you've navigated to a results page, you'll see information about the author, publisher and date for each entry. You'll also see the location of the entry (for example, Google Books or JSTOR) and a link that says "other versions," from which you can navigate to other webpages on which the article has appeared. A link on the left side of the page will link directly to the article and indicated its format (HTML, PDF, etc.).

2. Build (and search) libraries.

As you look through the results, you can save articles to your library. Once you add something to the library, you can view a comprehensive info sheet of the article, including the abstract, and put it under a label to organize it with similar sources.

googlescholarlibraryautism

For book entries, click "more," and you'll see a link that reads "Library Search." This link will take you to the Worldcat.org page for that book, from which you can enter your ZIP code and check if you can find the book at your nearest library.

arthur

3. Set up alerts.

For students researching current events or developing medical discoveries, keeping up with the latest academic literature adds yet another task to an already difficult project. Scholar gives you the option of setting up alerts when there are new results for a specific search term (such as "Russia Ukraine conflict"), so you can stay updated when there new articles and books publish. 

 

4. Read through case law.

lawschool

On the Google Scholar homepage, you can choose to search articles of case law. This tool is most helpful for students in law school, but can also be used by high school students studying civics or U.S. government, and college students majoring in history or political science. You can limit your search to decisions from the Supreme Court, as well as search the federal, state and circuit courts.

law

5. Get quick citations.

Along with the other links under a Google Scholar search result, you'll find the Cite button. A box will pop up with citations in different formats based on the article type, which you can easily copy and paste into a Word document or import into the citation managers that Google links in the box. This is a great feature for students who dread taking more than 10 minutes to complete their bibliographies or works cited.

citations

citations2

Source : Mashable

Categorized in Search Engine

airs logo

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.

Follow Us on Social Media

Finance your Training & Certification with us - Find out how?      Learn more