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Google is bringing fact check information to image search results worldwide starting today.

Google is adding “Fact Check” labels to thumbnails in image search results in a continuation of its fact check efforts in Search and News.

“Photos and videos are an incredible way to help people understand what’s going on in the world. But the power of visual media has its pitfalls⁠—especially when there are questions surrounding the origin, authenticity or context of an image.”

This change is being rolled out today to help people navigate issues around determining the authenticity of images, and make more informed decisions about the content they consume.

When you see certain pictures in Google Images, such as a shark swimming down the street in Houston, Google will attach a “Fact Check” label underneath the thumbnail.

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Is that image of a shark swimming down a street in Houston real? Google Images now has "Fact Check" labels to help inform you in some cases like this (no, it was not real). Our post today explains more about how & when fact checks appear in Google Images: https://www.blog.google/products/search/bringing-fact-check-information-google-images/ …

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After tapping on a fact-checked result to view a larger preview of the image, Google will display a summary of the information contained on the web page where the image is featured.

A “Fact Check” label will only appear on select images that come from independent, authoritative sources on the web. It’s not exactly known what criteria a publisher needs to meet in order to be considered authoritative.

According to a help page, Google uses an algorithm to determine which publishers are trusted sources.

Google also relies on ClaimReview structured data markup that publishers are required to use to indicate fact check content to search engines.

Fact Check labels may appear both for fact check articles about specific images and for fact check articles that include an image in the story.

As mentioned at the beginning of this article, Google already highlights fact checks in regular search results and Google News. YouTube also utilizes ClaimReview to surface fact check information panels in Brazil, India and the U.S.

Google says its fact check labels are surfaced billions of times per year.

While adding ClaimReview markup is encouraged, being eligible to serve a Fact Check label does not affect rankings. This goes for Google Search, Google Images, Google News, and YouTube.

 [Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Olivia Russell]

Categorized in Search Engine

Facebook  is testing a new feature that aims to keep users inside its platform when they’re looking for factual information they would otherwise turn to Google or Wikipedia to find. The company confirmed to TechCrunch it’s now piloting an updated version of Facebook Search that displays factual information when users search for topics like public figures, places, and interests — like movies and TV shows.

For example, if you type in a movie title in the Facebook search bar, you’ll be shown an information box that gives you all the details about the movie.

The information is gathered from publicly available data, including Wikipedia. But instead of requiring users to click out of Facebook to view the information, it’s displayed in a side panel next to the search results. This is similar to the automatically generated Knowledge Panel format Google uses for these same types of searches.

SocialMediaToday was the first to report the news of the pilot, citing posts from Twitter users like JC Van ZijlMatt Navarra, and Giulio S.

Facebook confirmed with TechCrunch the feature is a pilot program that’s currently running in English on iOS, desktop, and mobile web. (Users may or may not see the information panels themselves, as this is still a test.)

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We’ve found the new feature can be fairly hit or miss, however.

For starters, it doesn’t always recognize a search term as a proper title. A search for “joker,” for instance displayed a Wikipedia-powered information box for the movie. But a search for “parasite” failed to do so for the Oscar-winning title that in 2020 became the first non-English film to win Best Picture.

Meanwhile, a search for “Donald Trump” easily returned an information panel for the U.S. president, but information for many members of his cabinet did not come up when they were searched by name. Information about leading coronavirus expert Dr. Anthony Fauci came up in a side panel when the term “Anthony Fauci” was entered in the Facebook’s search box, but not when “dr. Fauci” was used as the search query.

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Google’s Knowledge Panel doesn’t experience these same problems, as it’s able to make intuitive leaps about which person, place, or thing the user is likely searching for at the time of their query.

Facebook Search will also direct users toward its own features when doing so is more beneficial, it appears. For instance, a search for “COVID” or “COVID-19” will return Facebook’s own COVID-19 Information Center at the top of the search results, not a data-powered side panel about the disease. Google, by comparison, returns a coronavirus map, case overview, and CDC information in its Knowledge Panel.

And a search for the popular game “Animal Crossing” returns its Facebook Page and the option to add it to the titles you’re tracking on Facebook Gaming, but no information panel.

In other words, don’t expect to see an information panel for all the persons, places, or things you search for on Facebook at this time.

The update follows the closure of Facebook’s previous Graph Search feature. Years ago, Facebook attempted to reinvent its search engine with the launch of Graph Search, which allowed users to find people, places, photos, and interests using Facebook data. The feature was later shut down as Facebook dealt with the backlash from major security lapses, like the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Doing so hampered investigators’ ability to catch criminals and other bad actors, BuzzFeed News noted at the time.

Last year, Facebook also told Vice it was pausing some aspects of Graph Search to focus on improvements to keyword search instead.

Presenting “factual” information in the sidebar could also help Facebook claim it’s addressing concerns around the spread of misinformation on its platform. As a home for active disinformation campaigns, propaganda, and conspiracy theories, Facebook needs a tool that displays fact-checked, factual information. (There was a time when Wikipedia wasn’t considered a valid source of that kind of information, but we’re long past that point now!)

This isn’t the first time Facebook has tapped Wikipedia data to enhance its service. It used Wikipedia information on its community pages over a decade ago, for example.

Facebook didn’t offer additional details regarding how long it plans to test the new search feature or when it expects it to roll out more broadly.

[Source: This article was published in techcrunch.com By Sarah Perez - Uploaded by the Association Member: Daniel K. Henry]

Categorized in Search Engine

YouTube is constantly growing. This is not only a website with funny videos, but a huge platform on which we can find everything – from clips with kittens to scientific materials and entertainment in the broad sense. With each subsequent month, Google announces new solutions that the company believes are expected to affect the convenience of using the website. This time, an internal search engine will arrive, helping to find interesting videos. Only, soon, in addition to video, it will also display search results from the traditional text search engine Google.

According to one of the Reddit users, the Android version of YouTube has started displaying search results from the traditional Google search engine in the search section. After entering a specific phrase in the search bar, under the video suggestions, the most accurate Google search result is presented along with the option to go to the full list in an external Google browser or application.

Google is combining its search engine with YouTube. This time they serve us a search engine displaying traditional results that point to external sites.

GOOGLE PREPARES TO DISPLAY ITS SEARCH ENGINE RESULTS IN YOUTUBEsearch result.jpg

This change was met with quite critical feedback from commentators. They think the company wants to litter YouTube even more with sponsored material. It is also possible to say that the first search result does not always meet the expectations, and in the case of the YouTube application users are looking primarily for video materials, not a textual answer to the query.

The only question is whether Google plans to implement this functionality on a large scale. Or whether it is only testing new solutions on a fairly narrow group of users. Would you like to see results from Google in YouTube search engine? I honestly admit that it is an unnecessary function for me. If I’m looking for something on a video site, I don’t need suggestions to get out of the YouTube app. If I wanted to look for something different, I would use the existing solutions.

I don’t see the point in displaying results from a traditional search engine. So combining videos with search results does not quite appeal to me. So I hope that these are only tests and ultimately this solution will not be introduced for everyone.

[Source: This article was published in gizchina.com By ABDULLAH - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google has started rolling out a new core search algorithm update that it calls the May 2020 Core Update. The new update comes months after the search giant released the last core algorithm update back in January. The goal behind updates like these are to try and improve the quality of results that users get when they enter a search query into the site. While this is good for an end user, many sites might see their performance fluctuate as a result of the core update. To avoid its results being manipulated, Google doesn't give out the details of its routine updates, merely advising content creators to focus on quality content.

A tweet posted by Google earlier today announced that the May 2020 Core Update has started rolling out for all users. The update would, however, take about one to two weeks to fully roll out.

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Broader update to enhance Google search experience
The new update is a broad core algorithm update that would bring a list of changes to Google's search algorithms and systems. This is unlike the regular changes that the company releases incrementally to improve search results.
“Several times a year, we make significant, broad changes to our search algorithms and systems. We refer to these as ‘core updates.' They're designed to ensure that overall, we're delivering on our mission to present relevant and authoritative content to searchers,” Google noted in a blog post defining the core algorithm updates.

Apart from other changes, core updates are likely to affect Google Discover. Some sites are also expected to note drops or gains during such updates.

“We know those with sites that experience drops will be looking for a fix, and we want to ensure they don't try to fix the wrong things. Moreover, there might not be anything to fix at all,” the search giant said.

Having said that, webmasters and search engine optimisation (SEO) teams are advised to stay focussed on bringing quality content through their sites. The content should provide original information, reporting, research, or analysis along with a comprehensive description of the topic. It is also recommended to have a descriptive but not exaggerating or sensationalist headline. Furthermore, there are a list of content, quality, expertise, and comparative questions that webmasters and SEO folks should ask themselves about their content.

Drops, gains from search algorithm updates are common
It is natural that since Google makes certain changes at the algorithm level, some websites face drops, while the other ones get some gains in their traffic. There isn't any hard and fast rule to fix such impacts post an update starts rolling out. Nevertheless, it's better to consider analytics to understand ranking changes of your website.

The last core algorithm update that Google brought to its search engine took place in January. The company had also introduced a new design for desktop searches around the same time that faced some backlash from users initially.

[Source: This article was published in gadgets.ndtv.com By Jagmeet Singh - Uploaded by the Association Member: Deborah Tannen]

Categorized in Search Engine

Despite their seemingly simple goals, search engines like Google are actually very complex beasts, and the results they deliver up to users on a silver platter are the result of very complex algorithms. In very basic terms, when you type a keyword into a search engine like Bing or Google, its sole goal is to find you the best possible result for your needs. The problem in this case is what these search engines consider the best result when you consider there are hundreds of thousands of pages that may contain some kind of relevance to your search term on the internet. In this article, we take a look at how Google brings users such accurate results (most of the time, anyway).

What goes into bringing you the right results

Every SEO agency in Melbourne knows that there are a few things that Google will rely on to deliver you what you need. The first of these is search intent. This is basically to say that Google wants to leave you satisfied with the result you’re given, so to basically satisfy your intent and search goals. This is actually a very difficult ask, as the search terms a user may put in could be very open to interpretation. For example, a question could be related to a need to find very basic information, very detailed information, methods (such as recipes), or to buy a product. What Google delivers when you search for something is usually what most users want to see when they type in that search term. For this reason, this is something quite important to keep in mind if you’re planning on implementing keywords into your own website. Next up we have relevancy: although you’ll be linked to a page that Google finds relevant, the search engine also takes into consideration the relevance of the entire website. Consistency is something that Google values very highly, so if the rest of the website provides information that isn’t all over the place, it will rank it higher. This is because if the content isn’t consistent, Google can’t determine what it’s actually about, so it can hardly recommend it!

Other things Google factors into your search results

It’s not just relevancy to your core enquiry that Google is interested in. It wants the results it brings to you to be of a high quality, which is why content quality is factored into the search results as well. Although what determines quality can be highly subjective, there are a few things that Google keeps in mind when it delivers you those juicy results. The first thing it keeps in mind is the length of the content – large pieces can often be determined as being detailed, which is exactly what many people want when searching for information. Detailed shouldn’t mean that the piece isn’t easy to read, so breaking up the content with small paragraphs, relevant headings and images are also very valuable, as these elements are generally very useful for people looking for informative content. Finally, Google will take into consideration the authority of the website. For Google, authority translates as trustworthiness – if Google has knowledge that the website is reliable, it will be much happier sharing the content. The primary way that Google processes trustworthiness is through backlinks, which involves sites linking to other sites in order to vouch for their quality. When Google sees this linking, it attaches authority to the linked site.

Figuring Google out

Although we have a basic understanding of how the Google algorithms work, a lot goes into what pops up into your search. For this reason, if you’re searching for something – or even trying to elevate your site through the rankings – keeping the above information in mind will give you a pretty hefty head start!

[Source: This article was published in hometownstation.com By KHTS - Uploaded by the Association Member: Clara Johnson] 

Categorized in Search Engine

While there doesn’t seem to be an end yet to the US-Huawei story, the latter has gone full force in preparing for a life without Google. They have been working on something called AppGallery, the alternative to Google Play Store and Huawei Mobile Services, their replacement for Google Play Services. One important thing that seems to be missing is the all-important search, but Huawei hasn’t forgotten it. They are now testing out the Huawei Search app, which can be both good news and bad news for the rest of the world.

XDA Developers says that the testing is currently going on in the UAE but they were able to load it on the Huawei Mate 30 Pro to see what the deal is. It seems to be just a basic search app where you put in a query and it will give you search results. You get webpages, videos, news, or images. The app also gives you shortcuts to weather, sports, unit conversion, and calculator. You are also able to see your search history, give feedback, change app settings, and even supports the dark theme of EMUI 10 (their version of Android 10).

Huawei Search is operated by Aspiegel Limited, their subsidiary that is based out of Ireland. But as to what search engine powers this app, that is less certain. It doesn’t seem to match results from Google, Bing, Yahoo, DuckDuckGo, Yandex, Ask, or AOL. They may not be using a third-party search engine, and so that’s where the bad news may lie. China has been known to control the information that comes out of their Internet, and despite disassociating themselves from the supposed close ties with the government, Huawei is still a Chinese company subject to Chinese laws.

Forbes reports that this is a “potential filter” that will still be serving content to hundreds of millions of users worldwide from a company that is based “in the most highly censored country on the planet”. This is a potential concern as the Search app is a big part of the whole Huawei operating ecosystem that will be serving both Chinese and non-Chinese customers. This is one of the unintended consequences of the U.S. blacklisting the Chinese company – the potential for Huawei to “carve itself a dominant position” in this new alternative to the currently still-dominant Android/Google eco-system.

In any case, it’s still early days for the Huawei Search app and the whole Huawei Mobile Services. We might even see the U.S. backtracking on their blacklist. The question would be if Huawei would go back to Google’s loving arms or if they will continue to pursue their own platform, which will eventually result in the issues mentioned above.

[Source: This article was published in androidcommunity.com By Ida Torres - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google published a new Search Console training video all about how to use the index coverage report.

Google’s Daniel Waisberg explains how to use Search Console to learn which pages have been crawled and indexed by Google, and how to deal with any problems found during that process.

First, the video gives an overview of the different components of the index coverage report and how to read the data included in them.

What’s Contained in the Index Coverage Report?

Search Console’s index coverage report provides a detailed look at all pages of a website that Google has either indexed or tried to index. The report also logs all errors Googlebot encountered when crawling a page.

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The index coverage report is made up of the following components:

  • Errors: These are critical issues that prevent pages from being indexed. Errors could include pages with the ‘noindex’ directive, pages with a server error, or pages with a 404 error.
  • Valid with warnings: This section includes pages that may or may not be shown in search results depending on the issue. An example is an indexed page that’s blocked by robots.txt.
  • Valid: These are indexed pages that are eligible to be served in search results.
  • Excluded: These are pages that are intentionally not indexed and won’t be included in search results.

On the summary page of the index coverage report you will also see a checkbox you can click to show impressions for indexed pages in Google search.

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How Should I Use The Index Coverage Report?

It’s recommended that site owners start by checking the chart on the summary page to learn if the valid pages trend is somewhat steady. Some amount of fluctuation is normal here. If you’re aware of content being published or removed you will see that reflected in the report.

Next, move onto reviewing the various error sections. You can quickly identity the most pressing issues because they’re sorted by severity. Start at the top of the list and work your way down.

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Once you know what needs to be fixed you can either fix the issues yourself, if you feel comfortable doing so, or share the details with your developer who can make code changes to your website.

After an issue has been fixed you can click on “Validate Fix” and Google will validate the changes.

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How Often Should I Check the Index Coverage Report?

It’s not necessary to check the index coverage report every day, Google says, because emails will be sent out whenever Search Console detects a new indexing error.

However, if an existing error gets worse, Google will not send out an email notification. So it’s necessary to check on the report at least once in a while to make sure nothing is going from bad to worse.

Those are the basics of the Search Console index coverage report. See the full video below:

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Robert Hensonw]

Categorized in Search Engine

This was a pretty busy week, we may have had a Google search algorithm update this week and maybe, just maybe, Forbes got hit hard by it. Google is probably going to revert the favicon and black ad label user interface, lots of tests are going on now. Bing hides the ad label as well, it isn’t just Google. I posted a summary of everything you need to know about the Google feature snippet deduplication change, including Google might be giving us performance data on them, images in featured snippets may change, Google will move the right side featured snippet to the top and until then it stopped deduplicating the right side feature snippets. Google Search Console launched a new removals tool with a few set of features. Google may have issues indexing international pages. Google says they treat links in PDFs as nofollowed links but that contradicts earlier statements. Google said schema markup will continue to get more complicated. Google said do not translate your image URLs. I shared a fun people also ask that looks like an ad, but is not an ad. Google Assistant Actions do not give you a ranking boost. Google is still using Chrome 41 as the user agent when requesting resources but not for rendering. Google Ads switched all campaign types to standard delivery. Google My Business suspensions are at an all time high. Google Chrome is testing hiding URLs for the search results page. Google is hiring an SEO. I posted two vlogs this week, one with Thom Craver and one with Lisa Barone. Oh and if you want to help sponsor those vlogs, go to patreon.com/barryschwartz. That was the search news this week at the Search Engine Roundtable.

Make sure to subscribe to our video feed or subscribe directly on iTunes to be notified of these updates and download the video in the background. Here is the YouTube version of the feed:

Search Topics of Discussion:

 [Source: This article was published in seroundtable.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Olivia Russell]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google is enhancing its Collections in Search feature, making it easy to revisit groups of similar pages.

Similar to the activity cards in search results, introduced last year, Google’s Collections feature allows users to manually create groups of like pages.

Now, using AI, Google will automatically group together similar pages in a collection. This feature is compatible with content related to activities like cooking, shopping, and hobbies.

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This upgrade to collections will be useful in the event you want to go back and look at pages that weren’t manually saved. Mona Vajolahi, a Google Search Product Manager, states in an announcement:

“Remember that chicken parmesan recipe you found online last week? Or that rain jacket you discovered when you were researching camping gear? Sometimes when you find something on Search, you’re not quite ready to take the next step, like cooking a meal or making a purchase. And if you’re like me, you might not save every page you want to revisit later.”

These automatically generated collections can be saved to keep forever, or disregarded if not useful. They can be accessed any time from the Collections tab in the Google app, or through the Google.com side menu in a mobile browser.

Once a collection is saved, Google can help users discover even more similar pages by tapping on the “Find More” button. Google is also adding a collaboration feature that allow users to share and work on creating collections with other people.

Auto-generated collections will start to appear for US English users this week. The ability to see related content will launch in the coming weeks.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Matt Southern - Uploaded by the Association Member: Logan Hochstetler]

Categorized in Search Engine

It’s not paid inclusion, but it is paid occlusion

Happy Friday to you! I have been reflecting a bit on the controversy du jour: Google’s redesigned search results. Google is trying to foreground sourcing and URLs, but in the process it made its results look more like ads, or vice versa. Bottom line: Google’s ads just look like search results now.

I’m thinking about it because I have to admit that I don’t personally hate the new favicon -plus-URL structure. But I think that might be because I am not a normal consumer of web content. I’ve been on the web since the late ‘90s and I parse information out of URLs kind of without thinking about it. (In fact, the relative decline of valuable information getting encoded into the URL is a thing that makes me sad.)

I admit that I am not a normal user. I set up custom Chrome searches and export them to my other browsers. I know what SERP means and the term kind of slips out in regular conversation sometimes. I have opinions about AMP and its URL and caching structure. I’m a weirdo.

As that weirdo, Google’s design makes perfect sense and it’s possible it might do the same for regular folk. The new layout for search result is ugly at first glance — but then Google was always ugly until relatively recently. I very quickly learned to unconsciously take in the information from the top favicon and URL-esque info without it really distracting me.

...Which is basically the problem. Google’s using that same design language to identify its ads instead of much more obvious, visually distinct methods. It’s consistent, I guess, but it also feels deceptive.

Recode’s Peter Kafka recently interviewed Buzzfeed CEO Jonah Peretti, and Peretti said something really insightful: what if Google’s ads really aren’t that good? What if Google is just taking credit for clicks on ads just because people would have been searching for that stuff anyway? I’ve been thinking about it all day: what if Google ads actually aren’t that effective and the only reason they make so much is billions of people use Google?

The pressure to make them more effective would be fairly strong, then, wouldn’t it? And it would get increasingly hard to resist that pressure over time.

I am old enough to remember using the search engines before Google. I didn’t know how bad their search technology was compared to what was to come, but I did have to bounce between several of them to find what I wanted. Knowing what was a good search for WebCrawler and what was good for Yahoo was one of my Power User Of The Internet skills.

So when Google hit, I didn’t realize how powerful and good the PageRank technology was right away. What I noticed right away is that I could trust the search results to be “organic” instead of paid and that there were no dark patterns tricking me into clicking on an ad.

One of the reasons Google won search in the first place with old people like me was that in addition to its superior technology, it drew a harder line against allowing paid advertisements into its search results than its competitors.

With other search engines, there was the problem of “paid inclusion,” which is the rare business practice that does exactly what the phrase means. You never really knew if what you were seeing was the result of a web-crawling bot or a business deal.

This new ad layout doesn’t cross that line, but it’s definitely problematic and it definitely reduces my trust in Google’s results. It’s not so much paid inclusion as paid occlusion.

Today, I still trust Google to not allow business dealings to affect the rankings of its organic results, but how much does that matter if most people can’t visually tell the difference at first glance? And how much does that matter when certain sections of Google, like hotels and flights, do use paid inclusion? And how much does that matter when business dealings very likely do affect the outcome of what you get when you use the next generation of search, the Google Assistant?

And most of all: if Google is willing to visually muddle ads, how long until its users lose trust in the algorithm itself? With this change, Google is becoming what it once sought to overcome: AltaVista.

Read More...

[Source: This article was published in theverge.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill]

Categorized in Search Engine
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