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Google Cloud launched a new Internet of Things management service today called Google Cloud IoT Core that provides a way for companies to manage IoT devices and process data being generated by those devices.

A transportation or logistics firm, for example, could use this service to collect data from its vehicles and combine it with other information like weather, traffic and demand to place the right vehicles at the right place at the right time.

By making this into a service, Google is not only keeping up with AWS and Microsoft, which have similar services, it is tapping into a fast-growing market. In fact, a Google Cloud spokesperson said the genesis of this service wasn’t so much about keeping up with its competitors — although that’s clearly part of it — it was about providing a service its cloud customers were increasingly demanding.

That’s because more and more companies are dealing with tons of data coming from devices large and small, whether a car or truck or tiny sensors sitting on an MRI machine or a machine on a manufacturer’s shop floor. Just validating the devices, then collecting the data they are generating is a huge undertaking for companies.

Google Cloud IoT Core is supposed to help deal with all of that by removing a level of complexity associated with managing all of these devices and data. By packaging this as a service, Google is trying to do a lot of the heavy lifting for customers, providing them with the infrastructure and services they need to manage the data, using Google’s software services like Google Cloud Dataflow, Google BigQuery, and Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine. Customers can work with third-party partners like ARM, Intel and Sierra Wireless for their IoT hardware and Helium, Losant or Tellmeplus for building their applications.

Photo: Google Cloud

While the company bills itself as the more open alternative to competitors like AWS and Microsoft Azure, this IoT service is consistent with Google’s overall strategy to let customers use both its core cloud services and whatever other services they choose to bring to the process, whether they are from Google itself or from a third party.

 

 

The solution consists of two main pieces. First there is a device manager for registering each of the “things” from which you will be collecting data. This can be done manually through a console or programmatically to register the devices in a more automated fashion, which is more likely in scenarios involving thousands or even tens of thousands of devices.

As Google describes it, the device manager establishes the identity of a device and provides a mechanism for authenticating it as it connects to the cloud, while maintaining a configuration for each device that helps the Google Cloud service recognize it.

The second piece is a “protocol bridge,” which provides a way to communicate using standard protocols between the “things” and the Google Cloud service. It includes native support for secure connection over MQTT, an industry-standard IoT protocol, according to the company.

Once the device is registered and the data is moved across the protocol bridge, it can flow through processing and eventually visualization or use in an application.

Source: This article was published techcrunch.com By Ron Miller

Categorized in Search Engine

There is no doubt that Google is a multidisciplinary company. It ranges from the internet search engine, with which it started, until the manufacture of smartphones and tablets. A diversification of businesses that, in the end, has a positive impact on its reputation as a company.

Recently it was known that Google was starting to stick its nose in the food business, today we tell you that Google wants to get into the business of job portals and for that, it is preparing to launch Google Hire.
Google Hire, the portal where Google wants you to find employment.

It seems that the US company is in the process of creating a service called Google Hire. This would be a job portal where you can search and offer work. It will facilitate contact between companies and potential workers.

There is still no official confirmation from Google, but this service could see the light soon, since the website has been operational for a long time. Although at present it is impossible to know any details about it with complete accuracy.

This idea of the job portal is not new as we can find similar services as LinkedIn and InfoJobs, which have been operating for some time. This project is part of the company’s business division, led by Diane Green.

Despite this, we have our doubts about Google Hire, since experience tells us that Google does not like copying. When the company borrows ideas from others, it always tries to go a step further to differentiate itself, so it would not be rare to see some Artificial Intelligence implemented in Google Hire.

At the moment, we will wait for more data to know, is there something special about Google Hire or would it be simply an employment portal.

Source : hitechgazette.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Internet privacy was once again thrust into the limelight recently when President Donald Trump signed a bill that would allow internet service providers to sell your browsing history to third parties like advertisers.

As much as the news rekindled concerns around internet privacy, little has actually changed. The signed bill is generally keeping things as they are. The outrage comes from the fact that the bill is rolling back an Obama-era measure to prevent ISPs from tracking and selling your browsing history, which didn't have time to take effect before he left office.

Still, some of you may be looking for ways to browse the web privately, and one of the most prominent solutions is to use a virtual private network, or VPN, which cloaks your online activity.

Here's what VPNs are, what they do, and what to look out for if you're an average person using the internet.

 

A VPN essentially hides your internet activity from your internet service provider, which means it has nothing to sell to third parties.

A VPN essentially hides your internet activity from your internet service provider, which means it has nothing to sell to third parties.

If the internet is an open highway, VPNs act like a tunnel that hides your internet traffic. The VPN encrypts your internet traffic into a garbled mess of numbers that can't be deciphered by your ISP or a third party. 

Most VPNs also hide identifying details about your computer from ISPs.

Most VPNs also hide identifying details about your computer from ISPs.

Any device that's connected to your ISP's network has an IP address, which looks like a series of numbers. Many Americans have multiple devices, so ISPs use IP addresses to see which device has accessed which websites and where.

Without an IP address, your devices wouldn't be able to communicate with the websites you want to look at, and you wouldn't be able to browse the internet.

VPN services hide the IP addresses on the devices you use with the VPN and replace them with IP addresses from one of their servers, which can be located anywhere in the world. So if you're in the US but are connected to a VPN server in Europe, ISPs will see the VPN's European server's IP address instead of your device's.

 

Can't ISPs track my browsing history through the VPN's IP address?

They could if you were the only user on that VPN server. But several users are usually using the same VPN IP address, so they can't determine whether a browsing history belongs to you, specifically. It's like searching for a needle in a stack of needles.

VPN services aren't perfect.

By using a VPN, you're still switching the trust of your privacy from your ISP to your VPN service. With that in mind, you need to make sure the VPN you use is trustworthy and doesn't store logs of your browsing history.

Certain VPN services say they don't log your browsing activity and history while you're connected to their servers. It means ISPs or a third party can't retroactively check your browsing history, even if it could decrypt the VPN's encryption "tunnel," which is unlikely in the first place.

For an extra layer of protection, choose a VPN whose servers are based outside the US. That protects against the possibility of legal entities in the US trying to access your browsing history through court orders.

They can slow down your internet speed.

The "internet" travels incredibly quickly around the world, but it's still bound by the laws of physics.

Since VPN services reroute your internet traffic through one of its servers somewhere around the globe, your internet speed could be slightly reduced.They essentially make your internet traffic take a longer route than it usually would, which means things can take longer to load.

The further away the VPN server is from your location, the longer the distance your internet traffic has to travel, which can end up in slower internet speeds. 

Most free VPN services may not be enough to protect your privacy.

Many free VPN services simply hide your IP address and don't encrypt your data, and it's the encryption part that protects your privacy more thoroughly.

You have to pay extra for privacy.

Paying extra for a premium VPN service on top of your internet bill so you can browse privately isn't very appealing. 

Should you get a VPN?

Should you get a VPN?

By getting a VPN in light of the recent events, you're preventing your ISP from tracking your activity and selling your browsing history to a third party to make more money out of your subscription. 

Some people don't want their browsing history to be seen by ISPs, nor do they want it to be sold to advertisers, even if it isn't tied to you personally. Some ISPs have said they value their customers' privacy and don't track their activity, but some of their language surrounding this subject can be vague.

Secondly, it seems fair to be recompensed for providing, albeit involuntarily, your precious browsing histories, as advertisers covet them to find out what you're interested in and show you targeted ads. If my ISP is making money out of selling my browsing history, I'd expect my monthly internet bill to be reduced, as I'm technically providing my ISP a service by browsing the web and exposing my interests. 

The likelihood of this happening, however, is uncertain and perhaps unlikely considering it's now an ISP's "right" to sell your browsing history to third parties. There's no law out there that forces ISPs to compensate their customers for providing their browsing histories, so don't expect them to anytime soon.

In a way, you can't blame the ISPs.

In a way, you can't blame the ISPs.

ISPs can see which sites you're visiting, anyway, because they can tell what internet traffic is going through which IP address. From their point of view, they might as well make money out of it. There's certainly a market for browsing histories, and after all, a business is in the business of making money.

Still, not everyone is comfortable with having their activity tracked at all — or having to opt out versus opting in — even if they have a squeaky-clean, legal web-browsing history.

 

Author: Antonio Villas-Boas
Source: businessinsider.com

Categorized in Internet Privacy

The ads, which are also being tested on desktop, feature service area maps.

Google’s home services ads are finally showing on mobile. The ads for local service providers such as locksmiths, plumbers, handymen and, more recently, HVAC services and electricians, had been briefly spotted last month on mobile, but they now appear to be prevalent across the California markets where the program is active.

The mobile ad format features a swipeable carousel of listings that feature a map of the service area where the advertiser operates. Here are examples on iOS (left) and Android.

google-home-services-ads-mobile-11-21-16

 

Because the businesses typically cover the entire metro area, the maps are identical in most of the ads. An exception, shown in the screen shot on the right below, is somewhat confusing. The same area is covered by both advertisers, but it is just slightly different; however, it’s not clear what the differences are without having to click through on both.

Google appears to be testing the service area format on desktop as well. Below is a comparison of two formats seen today. The first is the format that has been running for some time, which includes thumbnail head shots of the service providers. The result for “San Diego plumber” shows the service area format. The map reflects the service area covered when you hover over each ad.

google-home-services-ads-desktop-headshots-11-21-16

Standard format featuring pictures of the service providers

google-home-services-ads-desktop-service-area-11-21-2016

 

Service area format being tested

The other update is the inclusion of a “Google guaranteed” tag in each the ads. Spotted by The SEM Post, the verification tells consumers, “This pro is backed by the Google guarantee, which means they’re licensed, insured and pre-screened. Any job you book with them is guaranteed to be done right or your money back.” To participate in the Home Services Ads program, advertisers must go through a background check and verification process.

Author:  Ginny Marvin

Source:  http://searchengineland.com/

Categorized in News & Politics

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