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Written By Bram Jansen

A lot more people are concerned about privacy today than used to be the case a few years ago. The efforts of whistleblowers like Edward Snowden have a lot to do with this. Things have changed now that people realize just how vulnerable they are when browsing the web. When we say things have changed we mean people are starting to take their online privacy more seriously. It does not mean that the threats that you face while browsing has reduced. If anything, they have increased in number. If you still don’t look after your online privacy, there’s no time to think about it anymore. You have to take action now.

5 reasons to protect online privacy

1- Hide from government surveillance

Almost all countries of the world monitor the online activity of their citizens to some degree. It doesn’t matter how big or developed the country is. If you think that your government doesn’t look into your online privacy at all, you’re deluding yourself. The only thing that varies is the extent to which your internet activity is monitored and the information that is recorded.

2- Bypass government censorship

There are large parts of the world where internet is not a free place. Governments censor the internet and control what their citizens can and cannot access and do on the internet. While most people know about The Great Firewall of China and the way middle-eastern countries block access to social networking and news websites, the problem is there are a lot more countries.

3- Protect your personal data

You use the internet to share a lot of personal data. This includes your private conversations, pictures, bank details, social security numbers, etc. If you are sharing this without hiding it, then it is visible to everyone. Malicious users can intercept this data and make you a victim of identity theft quite easily. While HTTPS might protect you against them, not all websites use it.

4- Hiding P2P activity is important

P2P or torrenting is a huge part of everyone’s internet usage today. You can download all sorts of files from P2P websites. However, many of this content is copyrighted and protected by copyright laws. While downloading copyrighted content for personal usage is legal, sharing it is illegal. The way P2P works you are constantly sharing the files as you download them. If someone notices you downloading copyrighted content, you might be in trouble. There is a lot of vagueness when it comes to copyright laws, so it’s best to hide your torrent activity. Even those in Canada have to use P2P carefully. The country provides some of the fastest connections but is strengthening its stronghold on P2P users.

5- Stream content peacefully without ISP throttling

When you stream or download content, your ISP might throttle your bandwidth to balance the network load. This is only possible because your ISP can see your activity. You are robbed of a quality streaming experience because of this. The solution is to hide your online activity.

Online privacy is fast becoming a myth, and users have to make efforts to have some privacy on the internet. The best way to do this is to use a VPN, for they encrypt your connection and hide your true IP address. But be careful when you choose a VPN. If you don’t know how to choose the best VPN, visit VPNAlert for the detailed solution. Or choose a VPN that does not record activity logs and does not hand over data to the authorities, otherwise all your efforts will be for naught.  

Published in Internet Privacy

FILE - CIA Director Mike Pompeo testifies before a Senate Intelligence hearing during his nomination process, in Washington, Jan. 12, 2017.

WASHINGTON — If this week’s WikiLeaks document dump is genuine, it includes a CIA list of the many and varied ways the electronic device in your hand, in your car, and in your home can be used to hack your life.

It’s simply more proof that, “it’s not a matter of if you’ll get hacked, but when you’ll get hacked.” That may be every security expert’s favorite quote, and unfortunately, they say it’s true. The WikiLeaks releases include confidential documents the group says exposes “the entire hacking capacity of the CIA.”

The CIA has refused to confirm the authenticity of the documents, which allege the agency has the tools to hack into smartphones and some televisions, allowing it to remotely spy on people through microphones on the devices.

Watch: New Generation of Hackable Internet Devices May Always Be Listening

Screenshot 1

WikiLeaks also claimed the CIA managed to compromise both Apple and Android smartphones, allowing their officers to bypass the encryption on popular services such as Signal, WhatsApp and Telegram.

For some of the regular tech users, news of the leaks and the hacking techniques just confirms what they already knew. When we’re wired 24-7, we are vulnerable.

“The expectation for privacy has been reduced, I think,” Chris Coletta said, “... in society, with things like WikiLeaks, the Snowden revelations ... I don’t know, maybe I’m cynical and just consider it to be inevitable, but that’s really the direction things are going.”

The internet of things

The problem is becoming even more dangerous as new, wired gadgets find their way into our homes, equipped with microphones and cameras that may always be listening and watching.

One of the WikiLeaks documents suggests the microphones in Samsung smart TV’s can be hacked and used to listen in on conversations, even when the TV is turned off.

Security experts say it is important to understand that in many cases, the growing number of wired devices in your home may be listening to all the time.

“We have sensors in our phones, in our televisions, in Amazon Echo devices, in our vehicles,” said Clifford Neuman, the director of the Center for Computer Systems Security, at the University of Southern California. “And really almost all of these attacks are things that are modifying the software that has access to those sensors so that the information is directed to other locations. Security practitioners have known that this is a problem for a long time.”

Neuman says hackers are using the things that make our tech so convenient against us.

“Certain pieces of software and certain pieces of hardware have been criticized because, for example, microphones might be always on,” he said. “But it is the kind of thing that we’re demanding as consumers, and we just need to be more aware that the information that is collected for one purpose can very easily be redirected for others.”

Tools of the espionage trade

The WikiLeaks release is especially damaging because it may have laid bare a number of U.S. surveillance techniques. The New York Times says the documents it examined layout programs called “Wrecking Crew” for instance, which “explains how to crash a targeted computer, and another tells how to steal passwords using the autocomplete function on Internet Explorer.”

Steve Grobman, chief of the Intel Security Group, says that’s bad not only because it can be done, but also because so-called “bad actors” now know it can be done. Soon enough, he warns, we could find our own espionage tools being used against us.

“We also do need to recognize the precedents we set, so, as offensive cyber capabilities are used ... they do give the blueprint for how that attack took place. And bad actors can then learn from that,” he said.

So how can tech-savvy consumers remain safe? Security experts say they can’t, and to remember the “it’s not if, but when” rule of hacking.

The best bet is to always be aware that if you’re online, you’re vulnerable.

Source: This article was published voanews.com By Kevin Enochs

Published in Online Research

IC Realtime introduces video search engine technology that will augment surveillance systems using analytics, natural language processing, and machine vision.

LAS VEGAS--()--PEPCOM at CES 2018 – IC Realtime, a leader in digital surveillance and security technology announces today the introduction of Ella, a new cloud-based deep-learning search engine that augments surveillance systems with natural language search capabilities across recorded video footage.

#helloella - @ICRealtime introduces Ella, a deep learning engine for #surveillance systems at #CES2018

Ella uses both algorithmic and deep learning tools to give any surveillance or security camera the ability to recognize objects, colors, people, vehicles, animals and more. Ella was designed with the technology backbone of Camio, a startup founded by ex-Googlers who realized there could be a way to apply search to streaming video feeds. Ella makes every nanosecond of video searchable instantly, letting users type in queries like “white truck” to find every relevant clip instead of searching through hours of footage. Ella quite simply creates a Google for video.

“The idea was born from a simple question: if we can search the entire internet in under a second, why can’t we do the same with video feeds,” said Carter Maslan, CEO of Camio. “IC Realtime is the perfect partner to bring this advanced video search capability to the global surveillance and security market because of their knowledge and experience with the needs of users in this space. Ella is the result of our partnership in fine-tuning the service for security applications.”

The average surveillance camera sees less than two minutes of interesting video each day despite streaming and recording 24/7. On top of that, traditional systems only allow the user to search for events by date, time, and camera type and to return very broad results that still require sifting, often taking hours of time.

Ella instead does the work for users to highlight the interesting events and to enable fast searches of their surveillance & security footage for the events they want to see and share. From the moment Ella comes online and is connected, it begins learning and tagging objects the cameras sees. The deep learning engine lives in the cloud and comes preloaded with recognition of thousands of objects like makes and models of cars; within the first minute of being online, users can start to search their footage.

Hardware agnostic, Ella also solves the issue of limited bandwidth for any HD streaming camera or NVR. Rather than push every second of recorded video to the cloud, Ella features interest-based video compression. Based on machine learning algorithms that recognize patterns of motion in each camera scene to recognize what is interesting within each scene, Ella will only record in HD when it recognizes something important. By learning from what the system sees, Ella can reduce false positives by understanding that a tree swaying in the wind is not notable while the arrival a delivery truck might be. Even the uninteresting events are still stored in a low-resolution time-lapse format, so they provide 24x7 continuous security coverage without using up valuable bandwidth.

“The video search capabilities delivered by Ella haven't been feasible in the security and surveillance industry before today,” said Matt Sailor, CEO for IC Realtime. “This new solution brings intelligence and analytics to security cameras around the world; Ella is a hardware agnostic approach to cloud-based analytics that instantly moves any connected surveillance system into the future.”

Ella works with both existing DIY and professionally installed surveillance and security cameras and is comprised of an on-premise video gateway device and the cloud platform subscription. Ella subscription pricing starts at $6.99 per month and increases with storage and analysis features needed for the particular scope of each project. To learn more about Ella, visit www.smartella.com.

For more information about IC Realtime please visit http://www.icrealtime.com.

For more information on Camio please visit https://camio.com.

About IC Realtime

Established in 2006, IC Realtime is a leading digital surveillance manufacturer serving the residential, commercial government, and military security markets. With an expansive product portfolio of surveillance solutions, IC Realtime innovates, distributes, and supports global video technology. Through a partnership with technology platform Camio, ICR created Ella, a cloud-based deep learning solution that augments surveillance cameras with natural language search capabilities. IC Realtime is revolutionizing video search functionality for the entire industry. IC Realtime is part of parent company IC Real Tech, formed in 2014 with headquarters in the US and Europe. Learn more at http://icrealtime.com

Connect with IC Realtime on Facebook at www.facebook.com/icrealtimeus or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/icrealtime.

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Source: This article was published businesswire.com

Published in News & Politics

Searching video surveillance streaming for relevant information is a time-consuming mission that does not always convey accurate results. A new cloud-based deep-learning search engine augments surveillance systems with natural language search capabilities across recorded video footage.

The Ella search engine, developed by IC Realtime, uses both algorithmic and deep learning tools to give any surveillance or security camera the ability to recognize objects, colors, people, vehicles, animals and more.

It was designed with the technology backbone of Camio, a startup founded by ex-Googlers who realized there could be a way to apply search to streaming video feeds. Ella makes every nanosecond of video searchable instantly, letting users type in queries like “white truck” to find every relevant clip instead of searching through hours of footage. Ella quite simply creates a Google for video.

Traditional systems only allow the user to search for events by date, time, and camera type and to return very broad results that still require sifting, according to businesswire.com. The average surveillance camera sees less than two minutes of interesting video each day despite streaming and recording 24/7.

Ella instead does the work for users to highlight the interesting events and to enable fast searches of their surveillance and security footage. From the moment Ella comes online and is connected, it begins learning and tagging objects the cameras see.

The deep learning engine lives in the cloud and comes preloaded with recognition of thousands of objects like makes and models of cars; within the first minute of being online, users can start to search their footage.

Hardware agnostic, the technology also solves the issue of limited bandwidth for any HD streaming camera or NVR. Rather than push every second of recorded video to the cloud, Ella features interest-based video compression. Based on machine learning algorithms that recognize patterns of motion in each camera scene to recognize what is interesting within each scene, Ella will only record in HD when it recognizes something important. The uninteresting events are still stored in a low-resolution time-lapse format, so they provide 24×7 continuous security coverage without using up valuable bandwidth.

Ella works with both existing DIY and professionally installed surveillance and security cameras and is comprised of an on-premise video gateway device and the cloud platform subscription.

Source: This article was published i-hls.com

Published in Search Engine
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