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What are your most effective sources for finding talent? Do you leverage job postings? Ask for employee referrals?

These are both successful ways to fill a position. In fact, each one can play an integral role in your recruiting.

The only downside is that they’re reactive. You have to wait for the talent to come to you, in hopes that the right candidate is among them.

What you need is the ability to aggressively seek and go after ideal candidates. You need to build an active pipeline to fill today’s requisitions, make connections for hard-to-fill roles, and prepare for future needs.

You need to be proactive.

Luckily, there are several sourcing techniques you can start leveraging right now:

Boolean Sourcing for Google

Boolean sourcing allows recruiters to search for candidate information from all over the web.

You can find resumes and cover letters that are stored within personal websites, job boards and social platforms by using a unique set of search commands.

These commands tell search engines exactly what you’re looking for, and help drill down your search results to reveal the candidates who truly align with your requisition.

Getting started with boolean sourcing is as simple as learning some basic commands. The following operators work best when used within Google.

OR The command OR will return results containing at least one of your specified keywords or phrases. For example, entering programmer OR developer OR engineer would produce results containing any of these terms but not necessarily all of them.
"" Use quotations to return sites containing the exact phrase you’re searching for. For example, the senior manager would return pages containing either of these keywords, but "senior manager" would only return pages containing that exact phrase.
- Use the minus or dash command "-" before a keyword to return pages that exclude that word. For example, if you searched "marketing -manager" your results would exclude any pages that contain the word manager.
* Use the asterisk (*) within your query to identify a placeholder or wildcard terms. For example "Master's degree in *" would return pages containing the phrase "Master's degree in Marketing," "Master's degree in Computer Science, " etc.
() Brackets are for grouping Boolean phrases, and are generally used in more complex search strings. For example, if you searched for (Engineer or "Software Developer")(CISCO OR Microsoft OR HP), your results would show pages containing any of your job title keywords that also contain one of the company keywords. This is a great combination for finding talent who has worked for one of your target competitors.
site: Use the command site: to search pages within a specific website. For example, search for Facebook profiles by entering site:facebook.com. Searching for site:facebook.com "web designers" Phoenix would return Facebook profiles containing both keywords Web Designer and Phoenix.


Use these basic commands to create more elaborate search strings and effectively find candidates through Google. By adding more criteria to your search queries, you can produce more relevant results and ultimately find the best candidates who align with your job.

Job Board Sourcing

You can also leverage most online job boards to proactively source your candidates. Look for the option to search or source the job board's resume database by using common keywords your prospects would use.

Social Sourcing

Leverage the social platforms where your prospects already spend a lot of their time. Sites like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook offer unique tools to proactively find your next great hire.

In March 2013, Facebook released Graph Search. It’s a free tool that allows anyone to use specific queries to search for individuals. Find people who work for a specific industry, near a special location or for a particular company.

Here is an example of a common Facebook Graph query:
Facebook Graph

Twitter is also a great tool for sourcing candidates. Use its search engine to identify professionals by specific keywords, phrases, and locations. The best part is that Twitter is an open network, so you’re free to connect with anyone.

You can also find candidates on LinkedIn by using the Boolean logic you’ve already learned. After you replace the italicized words with your keywords, enter this powerful search string into Google to return precise LinkedIn profiles:
site:linkedin.com "web designer" "location * Greater Phoenix Area"

Go After Your Talent

Identifying qualified candidates is the most critical part of the recruiting process. It can also be the most difficult—especially if you're waiting around for the right job seekers to apply. Instead, set yourself up for success by proactively finding them yourself.

But before you get started with methods like Boolean, job board, and social sourcing, make sure you have a clear understanding of the job you’re recruiting for and the keywords your prospects may use during their job search.

Knowing how your candidates describe themselves and which terms resonate with them will give you a head start on your proactive search for talent.

Initiate Conversation

When you finally find the candidates you’re looking for, connect with them! Send them a message about your available position and ask if they would be interested in the opportunity. For more tips on reaching out to candidates, read Candidate Sourcing: Get More Replies to Your Contact Emails.

Categorized in Research Methods

Google search is usually used in it’s non-advance form, just putting the keyword in box and hit enter. After that Google does rest of the magic. You might have heard the most polite google user, the sweet Nan who is putting “Thank you” and “please” in every google searches. Google even praises 86-year-old for polite internet searches.

Luckily there is still faster and advance way of getting your search done without being too polite with Google. There are advance tips, tricks and technique in google which can be used to achieve the custom or filtered searches in google.

As in fast moving lifestyle everything need to be done efficiently, this is even true for Google Search.There are many hidden secret in Google search, knowing those tips, tricks and techniques can make you the master at doing Google search, as you will be able to focus on your search by narrowing it down with advanced google operators.

By getting you acquainted with these advanced searches tips and tricks we are making sure that you will be able to find the hidden information rather easily, for instance looking for a specific information or keyword in the website. Also, Searching for a specific word phrase in url or negating some of the keyword while searching will be easier for you. This kind of search is known as Google Advanced Search technique and tricks.

With these right tricks and techniques you can find right results…

Google advanced search is used for specific complex searches, which are not easily accessible through simple Google search. Advance google search option has some requirements about your desired search for a better result rather than simple one.

Example:

  • Medical universities of certain cities.
  • Searching a book with a specific title, heading, description or author.
  • Google advanced search has more accurate and filtered result than normal search. Google advanced search works on special Input queries.

Why we use advanced google search?

Google advanced search option provides more favorable results in less time.
Google advanced search helps you find accurate result.

We are going to give you a lot of google’s advanced search tips and techniques right here. These techniques will help you to find your result more accurately in a very short time.

Google Advanced search options

1. Search in Page Title

Title page tag is an HTML tag for a web page, it defines what page is about. If you are dealing with coffee machine and want to know more about your competitors in the similar domain, you can search in the page title and see what kind of product do they have.

Example

  • allintitle: ‘place your search query here’
  • intitle: ‘place your search query here’

How to use
Searching for “best coffee machine” in title page

2. Search in anchor text

Anchor text is a hyperlink text, which is shown as highlighted in a blog or web page. Like you can hyperlink a productivity technique text in your blog.
User google searches you can even search in the anchor text which is hyperlinked, this is one of the technique for SEO which is used quite heavily to gain more points from google when comes to page ranking.

Here is how you can search in anchor text
Example

  • allinanchor: ‘place your search query here’
  • inanchor: ‘place your search query here’

How to use:

3. Search in URL

If you are writing a blog, it will be good to know what are the existing blogs out there with similar keywords or title, the best to do is to search in the URL of blogs or website, you can use the bellow “allinurl” for this purpose

Example

  • allinurl: ‘place your search query here’
  • inurl: ‘place your search query here’

How to use

4. Search Missing Words

Find missing words in phrases by using star technique. Just place the star signs around the missing words.
How to use

  • better to be *pirate then*
  • What can we gain you *if we are not able to cross the abyss that separates*

5. Search Result By Time

Google “search result by time” technique allows you to find your result in a specific time period. Like if you are a follower of a blog, but you missed last month’s posts then this trick help you to find only previous one month posts.
First, search your query then after result adds “&tbs=qdr:h” at the end of SERP URL.
Example

  • &tbs=qdr:m – Results from past month,

How to use:

  • Search your result first like site: yodiz.com scrum
  • After result appearance add the code (&tbs=qdr:m) in search result url

Some other options

  • &tbs=qdr:s – Results from past sec,
  • &tbs=qdr:n – Results from past minute,
  • &tbs=qdr:h – Results from past hour,
  • &tbs=qdr:d – Results from past day,
  • &tbs=qdr:w – Results from past week,
  • &tbs=qdr:y – Results from past year,

6. Search Result by Date

You can also search your desired result in a specific date range. After searching your result place the operator bellow at the end of url.


Example

  • &tbs=cdr:1,cd_min:(Start Date),cd_max:(End Date)

How to use:

  • &tbs=cdr:1,cd_min:1/01/2010,cd_max:2/06/2012

7. Search using TO or OR

If you want to search result with several keywords then use word “TO” or “OR”.
How to use:

  • football worldcup 2009 to 2016
  • agile or scrum -rugby

8. Translate Quickly

If you need the translation of words then this simple google advanced search trick helps you a lot.
Example

  • translate [word] to [language]

How to use:

  • Translate “how are you” to spanish

9. Looking For Comparison

You can easily find comparison of two different product

How to use:

  • Italy VS Germany
  • EU vs UK

10. Exclude From Search Result

If you are searching for something and don’t want certain information appear in your search then use “-” before the keyword to excluded in search.

Related...

How to use

  • SW development methodologies -waterfall
  • best agile books -site:www.amazon.com

11. Search for Differences

If you are searching difference between two words, then simply put the “ “|”” between two titles.
How to use:

  • Agile “|” waterfall

12. Quick Calculation

If you are in a restaurant and want to know about tip percentage of the bill, then this simple google advanced search calculator will help you a lot.

How to use:

  • Tip calculator

13. Online Timer

Search online timer on google by simply type timer.

14. Search for Title, Text in a Site

To Find Specific Title, Text on Site easy this trick.
Find those pages whose titles are “Agile”, text of the page is scrum and find on yodiz.com site only.

Example

  • intext:(Query) intitle:(Query) site:(Site URL)

How to use

  • intext:scrum intitle:Agile site:yodiz.com
  • intext:coffee intitle:chocolate – site:*.com

15. Search Time

If you want to know about the exact time of your location then type “time” and city name simply in google search box..

How to use
Time Oklahoma

16. Know Your IP Address

Search your IP address by just simply type IP address in google search box.
IP address

Search By Location

If you want to find a specific result like best IT universities in USA the replace this code in your search engine box. Find a specific result on a specific location:

How to use:

  • USA: “Film Schools”

17. Convert Counting

If you want to convert a big amount of counting in english then use this simple easy trick.
Example

  • Counting= Language

How to use

  • 11,200,670,000= Eleven billion two hundred million six hundred seventy thousand

18. Search Related Sites

If you are a chef and want to search other sites for recipes, or you are fond of reading blogs and searching more blogs then use this trick to find more similar sites.

Example

  • Related: ‘place your search query here’

How to use

  • Related: bestbuy.com
  • related: producthunt.com

19. Search Origin Of Word

If you are looking of any words origin then simply type Etymology before the word.

Example

  • Etymology (Word, Name, Place)

How to use

  • Etymology admiral

20. Specific Complex Search

If you want to find a result from a specific site with a specific phrase, and exclude some keywords also, and want to search in a specific time period then alter this given trick to your search.

  • Site:techcrunch.com ”mobile”-apple 2014..2015

21. Search By File Type

Find PDF documents with a specific topic.


How to use

  • filetype:pdf Scrum vs kanban
  • Filetype:doc (Search Query)
  • Filetype:ps (Search Query)
  • Filetype:doc (Search Query)
  • Filetype:xls (Search Query)
  • Filetype:ppt (Search Query)
  • Filetype:rtf (Search Query)

22. Search By Domain Extension

If you are looking a special government, educational or training site then use this technique to get more efficient way.
How to use

  • site:.org OR site:.edu OR site:.gov “cancer research”

23. Search On a Specific Site

If you want to search a specific result from a specific site then use this technique.

How to use

  • site mit.edu admissions

24. Find Recipes

If you are fond of eating or want to search any food item then use the given trick to get more accurate result.
Example
Recipe site: ‘place your search query here’
How to use

  • recipe site: ratatouille

25. Search Site Cache

If you want to search any site cache then simply type cache: now place site address.

26. Search for Exact Phrase

Use quotation marks for an exact phrase search, with same words in the same order.
Place quotation marks (“) around the phrase you’d like to search for.

How to use

  • “31 Most Common Bad SEO Mistakes and Practices To Avoid”

27. Online Stopwatch

Search online stopwatch on google by simply type stopwatch.

Source: This article was published yodiz.com By Yodiz Team

Categorized in Search Techniques

Researchers are wielding the same strange properties that drive quantum computers to create hack-proof forms of data encryption.

Recent advances in quantum computers may soon give hackers access to machines powerful enough to crack even the toughest of standard internet security codes. With these codes broken, all of our online data -- from medical records to bank transactions -- could be vulnerable to attack.

To fight back against the future threat, researchers are wielding the same strange properties that drive quantum computers to create theoretically hack-proof forms of quantum data encryption.

And now, these quantum encryption techniques may be one step closer to wide-scale use thanks to a new system developed by scientists at Duke University, The Ohio State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their system is capable of creating and distributing encryption codes at megabit-per-second rates, which is five to 10 times faster than existing methods and on par with current internet speeds when running several systems in parallel.

The researchers demonstrate that the technique is secure from common attacks, even in the face of equipment flaws that could open up leaks.

“We are now likely to have a functioning quantum computer that might be able to start breaking the existing cryptographic codes in the near future,” said Daniel Gauthier, a professor of physics at The Ohio State University. “We really need to be thinking hard now of different techniques that we could use for trying to secure the internet.”

The results appear online Nov. 24 in Science Advances.

To a hacker, our online purchases, bank transactions and medical records all look like gibberish due to ciphers called encryption keys. Personal information sent over the web is first scrambled using one of these keys, and then unscrambled by the receiver using the same key. 

For this system to work, both parties must have access to the same key, and it must be kept secret. Quantum key distribution (QKD) takes advantage of one of the fundamental properties of quantum mechanics -- measuring tiny bits of matter like electrons or photons automatically changes their properties -- to exchange keys in a way that immediately alerts both parties to the existence of a security breach. 

Though QKD was first theorized in 1984 and implemented shortly thereafter, the technologies to support its wide-scale use are only now coming online. Companies in Europe now sell laser-based systems for QKD, and in a highly-publicized event last summer, China used a satellite to send a quantum key to two land-based stations located 1200 km apart.

The problem with many of these systems, said Nurul Taimur Islam, a graduate student in physics at Duke, is that they can only transmit keys at relatively low rates -- between tens to hundreds of kilobits per second -- which are too slow for most practical uses on the internet.

“At these rates, quantum-secure encryption systems cannot support some basic daily tasks, such as hosting an encrypted telephone call or video streaming,” Islam said.

Like many QKD systems, Islam’s key transmitter uses a weakened laser to encode information on individual photons of light. But they found a way to pack more information onto each photon, making their technique faster.

By adjusting the time at which the photon is released, and a property of the photon called the phase, their system can encode two bits of information per photon instead of one. This trick, paired with high-speed detectors developed by Clinton Cahall, graduate student in electrical and computer engineering, and Jungsang Kim, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke, powers their system to transmit keys five to 10 times faster than other methods.

“It was changing these additional properties of the photon that allowed us to almost double the secure key rate that we were able to obtain if we hadn’t done that,” said Gauthier, who began the work as a professor of physics at Duke before moving to OSU.

Related...

In a perfect world, QKD would be perfectly secure. Any attempt to hack a key exchange would leave errors on the transmission that could be easily spotted by the receiver. But real-world implementations of QKD require imperfect equipment, and these imperfections open up leaks that hackers can exploit.

The researchers carefully characterized the limitations of each piece of equipment they used. They then worked with Charles Lim, currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the National University of Singapore, to incorporate these experimental flaws into the theory.

“We wanted to identify every experimental flaw in the system, and include these flaws in the theory so that we could ensure our system is secure and there is no potential side-channel attack,” Islam said.

Though their transmitter requires some specialty parts, all of the components are currently available commercially. Encryption keys encoded in photons of light can be sent over existing optical fiber lines that burrow under cities, making it relatively straightforward to integrate their transmitter and receiver into the current internet infrastructure.

“All of this equipment, apart from the single-photon detectors, exist in the telecommunications industry, and with some engineering we could probably fit the entire transmitter and receiver in a box as big as a computer CPU,” Islam said.

This research was supported by the Office of Naval Research Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative program on Wavelength-Agile QKD in a AQ12 Marine Environment (N00014-13-1-0627) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Defense Sciences Office Information in a Photon program. Additional support was provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract no. DE-AC05-00OR22725, and National University of Singapore startup grant R-263-000-C78-133/731.

CITATION:  "Provably Secure and High-Rate Quantum Key Distribution With Time-Bin Qudits," Nurul T. Islam, Charles Ci Wen Lim, Clinton Cahall, Jungsang Kim and Daniel J. Gauthier. Science Advances, Nov. 24, 2017. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1701491

Source: This article was published today.duke.edu By AKARA MANKE

Categorized in Internet Privacy

You often know when you’ve just made a big mistake in your job application. You forget to attach your resume. You send the wrong version. You address your cover letter to Mr. Chris Allen—then realize there’s a strong chance Chris is a woman.

But other times, you have no idea—you may even think you’re doing everything right! In fact, there are a few common job search techniques that candidates employ over and over because they think they work well. In reality, though, these very same strategies might be standing in the way of you and that big interview.

To make sure you have the very best chances of inching closer to your dream job, here are four common blunders—and much more effective techniques to try instead.

1. Applying To As Many Jobs As You Can Possibly Find

People often think that the job search is a numbers game. The more resumes you send out, the more likely it’ll be that someone will call you back, right?

Mmm, not really. Because applying to hundreds of jobs means you’re probably not taking the time to truly research the company and position, tailor each application accordingly and reach out to current employees who might be able to give you insider information. (And if you are? I’m jealous of how many hours you must have in a day.)

Similarly, candidates sometimes believe that applying to multiple positions at the same company ups their chances of getting called back for one of them. In reality, though this sends one of three messages: That you’re not sure what you want, that you’re desperate and you’ll take anything or that you don’t have a solid grasp on what each job entails. In any case, not a good thing.

The Fix: Think Quality, Not Quantity

Instead of applying to every semi-relevant job within a 60-mile radius, start your search by compiling a short list of dream companies and learning everything you can about them. When they have openings that fit your skill set, take the time to carefully craft your application—adjusting your resume bullets to show exactly how your experience aligns, writing a custom cover letter and asking your new contacts if they have advice for standing out.

Yes, this approach takes more time and energy than submitting your same ol’ resume at over and over, but your chances of scoring an interview will be much, much higher.

2. Applying ASAP

OK, so you’ve narrowed down your list of companies and one of them just posted a role that’s exactly in line with your skill set. Awesome! So you crank out everything as fast as possible and hit “send”—wanting to be the first application the hiring manager sees. Not only will you show just how excited you are about the job, but maybe the team will love your application so much they won’t need to interview anyone else.

News flash: This rarely does you any favors.

The Fix: Give It A Day Or So

Nine times out of 10, I have to toss the applications I receive within the first hour of posting a position because they’re incomplete. When you’re focused on speed over everything else, it’s easy to miss the details—getting names right, including additional materials and so on. It’s better to give yourself a day or two to write, rewrite and edit your materials, make sure you’ve included everything necessary and have someone else look them over. (And, again, total bonus if you get advice from a current employee.) A stellar application will be better than a not-quite-there-but-prompt one, every time.

3. Sending Your Resume To People Unsolicited

Let’s go back to those people who work at your dream companies for a second. Meeting them and getting on their radar: Good. Asking for their advice on working there: Also good. Sending them your resume unsolicited with a note that says, “Here’s my resume—let me know if you know of anything I’d be a fit for!” Surprisingly, not always the best.

Sure, in some cases, you might get lucky, but typically only in the off chance that the company is hiring for a role that meets your exact qualifications. But this move can also be construed as you asking your nice new contact (who’s already been helpful in talking to you about the company) to do the hard work for you—reviewing your resume, checking to see if any open positions are a fit and forwarding along your information.

The Fix: Apply Normally, Then Let Your Contact Know

Yes, you can (and should) ask your contact for advice before you apply. And if, in the process, he or she offers to pass your resume or a recommendation along, that’s great. But never make this assumption. Take those tips you’ve learned and then do the hard work, just like any other candidate would do. Look at a company’s jobs page, find your dream role, then submit an application with all the required pieces.

4. Sending A Great Application For A Job You’re Not Qualified For (Fingers Crossed)

Don’t get me wrong: I think everyone should apply to roles that are just a little bit of a stretch. It’s good to have reach goals—plus, you might be more qualified than you think, and with preparation and a little bit of luck, you could land an interview.

But there’s a difference between applying for a slightly-out-of-reach job and one that you’ll never get. For example: an executive-level job when you’ve got three years of experience; heading up a department team of 10 when you’ve never managed anyone; applying for a product management role because you think it sounds cool, and hey—you’ll figure it out. I’ve seen people in all of these situations think that they can make up for a lack of experience with passion and an awesome application, but the majority of the time, hiring managers think otherwise.

The Fix: Focus On The Right Reach Jobs

Again, your time is much better spent applying to roles that line up nicely with your current skills and level of experience. Spend most of your efforts on roles for which you meet a good majority of the requirements, sprinkling in a few “reach” jobs here and there.

If you’re making a bit of a leap, read Muse writer Katie Douthwaite Wolf’s advice on making sure you stand out among more qualified candidates. Or, work with a coach on a job search strategy that’ll help you get noticed.

Finally, consider career expert Kari Reston’s approach: “Instead of directly applying for the role that’s posted, send a speculative application to the company. Acknowledge that the position that caught your eye is geared toward someone more senior, but explain your interest and say that you’d be interested in joining the team in another capacity.”

I know—these job search techniques are done with the best of intentions! But make sure you put yourself in the shoes of the hiring manager. But applying to too many jobs too quickly, shooting too high, or expecting others to do too much won’t have the results you’re looking for. Try these simple shifts and you’ll be much more likely to get in the door for that interview.

This article was originally published on The Daily Muse

Adrian Granzella Larssen is the editor-in-chief of The Daily Muse, the award-winning daily career advice publication that's helped millions of people find and succeed at their dream jobs.

Categorized in Search Techniques

Whether you do SEO for a living or consider yourself a newbie, most people involved in search engine marketing know that there are two ways to go about it.

White hat and black hat.

White hat SEOs are the Jedi. We have tons of midi-chlorians in our bloodstreams and work for the forces of good in the universe.

This means promoting high-value content, engaging in deep keyword research to win in SERPS, and in general, promoting our websites or the websites of our clients using the methods that follow Google’s Webmaster Guidelines.

Black hat SEOs are the Sith. They are afraid that doing high-quality work to boost rankings takes too much time, so they take shortcuts that aren’t exactly laid out in Google’s best practices.

And we all know that fear is the path to the dark side. Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to suffering…

sad dog

Some of these black hat techniques can be attractive to people who are new in the SEO space! Ranking well in search engines takes a lot of time and effort, and finding ways to hack the system is understandably appealing for those new to search engine marketing.

When I was starting out, I used a few of the techniques detailed below and guess what? I got no results! My websites were all indexed correctly, but I wasn’t able to get anything to rank for meaningful searches until I learned the ways of the White Hat Jedis.

So what happens when you try to implement black hat SEO strategies? You may make slow progress for some time, but you’ll eventually get hit with a Google Penalty.

If you’ve already been hit with a penalty, it’s time to read The Definitive Guide to Recovering From a Manual Search Penalty.

What Are Google Penalties?

Penguin

The original Penguin update was launched in 2012. Google relies heavily on links from one domain to another to determine a website’s authority. The penguin update crawled the web for any website attempting to game the number of links pointing to their site.

Over 10% of search results were affected, some of which were removed from Google search results entirely.

Since then, website owners and professional SEOs have been keeping a pulse on Google’s search algorithm updates.

Panda

The Panda update is a bit different. Its goal is to filter search results to prevent “low quality” sites’ content from ranking. While the definition of “low quality” is subjective, Google has their own course on creating valuable content, so it’s easy to see what they consider to be high-quality when it comes to digital content.

What Do Google’s Penalties Do?

If your website gets hit with either a Penguin or Panda penalty from Google, the results are the same: the loss of your current ranking position in search results and a huge dip in your organic traffic. All because of a few black hat methods you used to try to promote your website.

And if your website relies heavily on organic traffic from Google, a penalty could result in a downward spiral that could put you down for good.

Black Hat Strategies to Avoid

While there are many strategies black hat SEOs use to try to game Google and rank well in search results, these are the most highly used and the most likely to get your website penalized by Google.

Links

Getting in trouble with the internal links in your website or external websites linking to you could result in a penguin penalty. Here’s what you want to avoid when it comes to links.

Buying Links

Why most people do it: Arguably the most important ranking factor is the quality and quantity of links back to a website. It’s logical to think that buying links from websites with high Domain Authorities is the easiest way to get backlinks without putting in a lot of work.

Why you shouldn’t do it: Buying links is against Google’s Webmaster Guidelines. It’s an easy way to get on Google’s bad side and receive an automatic or manual penalty. It’s unlikely you’ll get away with buying links without leaving a trail. Google tracks links that are likely purchased and those which are likely natural, so gaming Google is more difficult than you’d think.

Reciprocal Links

Why most people do it: When Website A offers to link to Website B, Website A might think it’s a good idea to ask Website B to link back to them as well. That way, they get a bit of link juice in return.

Why you shouldn’t do it: If there’s a purpose for both websites to link to each other, such as a partnership, then reciprocal links make sense. But if the entire purpose of the two-way link is “link juice,” you run the risk of getting penalized.

Footer Links

Why most people do it: A backlink from the footer of another website is seen as valuable because it’s a link back from every page on their website. Because all pages contain a footer, when you add the link just once, it’s like adding a backlink from every page on that site.

Why you shouldn’t do it: Similar to reciprocal links, if there’s a purpose, like telling readers who built the site, then it makes sense to include it. If the link is purely included to gain authority, is from a completely disconnected website or contains non-branded anchor text, the risk of a penalty is real.

Hidden Links

Why most people do it: By hiding text or links, some people think that you can include lots of links back to your site without Google even knowing about it.

Why you shouldn’t do it: Googlebots are smart and know when your website has any hidden text or links. Having hidden links is bad, but the double whammy comes in the fact that Google crawlers can see a different website than your visitors. That’s a big no-no and is one of the easiest ways to get penalized and drop in the rankings.

Comment Spam

Why most people do it: Some websites allow users to add a comment below a post, and sometimes those comment sections allow links. This is an easy way to link back to your site, right?

Why you shouldn’t do it: Wrong. Linking back to your site in the comment forms of other websites is spammy and something Google doesn’t want to see. In Google’s eyes, links should be earned through quality and valuable content, not posted in a comment form in just a few seconds. If you can add something to the conversation and a link back to your site in a comment is relevant and brings value to the readers, then it’s probably OK to include it. If not, try something a little less black hat.

Anchor Text Overuse

Why most people do it: Most SEO beginners are susceptible to this. When trying to rank a page or post for a specific search phrase, they try to link back to their websites using related anchor text. For example, someone trying to rank “brand new sailboats for sale” would link back to their website with 100 links, all with the anchor text, “brand new sailboats for sale.”

Why you shouldn’t do it: Again, Google sees what you’re trying to do. You’re attempting to rank well for a specific search phrase by using contextual anchor text. In the past, this worked pretty well! But not so much today. Google prefers branded anchor text instead of keyword anchor text — it’s more natural to link back using the anchor text, “Marty’s Boat Emporium,” because it’s more natural and suggests the link validates trust.

Malicious Backlinks

Why most people do it: To be clear, nobody does this to themselves on purpose. Nobody attempts to get links back to their website from malicious websites. Unfortunately, there are many black hat SEOs, spammers, and hackers out there who embrace the dark side and will try to damage another site by linking to it from a site that is spammy or even unindexed.

Why you shouldn’t do it: When a site that Google deems is spammy links to your site, it can hurt your ranking. If you see links from precarious websites coming to your website, it’s most likely they didn’t pick your site specifically, and they link to everyone. If you do find that there are suspicious websites linking to your website, use the Google Search Console Disavow Tool to ask Google to ignore the link.

Content

Publishing content that doesn’t provide any real value to your website visitors is grounds for a panda penalty. Here’s what to avoid when it comes to content.

Duplicate Content / Content Theft

Why most people do it: Producing high-quality, valuable content takes a lot of time and effort. For that reason, some people think they can take content published on another website and reuse / repurpose it on their own. Now your website can have great content without the pain of producing original content, right?

Why you shouldn’t do it: Not quite. Google is very particular about duplicate content and, in general, doesn’t like to see the exact same content spread across multiple domains. If you find a piece of content that you think your audience would find really valuable, it is possible to republish that article on your website as long as you have the permission of the original author and fully disclose the fact that it’s being republished. But if you’re thinking about blatantly copying content from another site, you’ll run the risk of a Google penalty.

Over-Optimization / Keyword Stuffing

Why most people do it: This is another common error for those new to the SEO world. Some people think that the more they optimize a page, the better their page will rank, so they include ten H1 tags and repeat the keyword phrase they’re trying to rank for over and over again.

Why you shouldn’t do it: This actually used to work. In 2000, if you wanted to rank for “purple elephant,” all you had to do was include the phrase “purple elephant” a few times in your title, a few times in your H1 tags, and ad nauseam in your content. But in 2017, Google is looking for the content that provides the most value to searchers. That means over-optimizing is out and focusing on giving the most comprehensive answer to a user’s queries is in.

Hidden Content

Why most people do it: Similar to hidden links, some people think they can include content that’s the same color as the background of the site. They do this to include textual keyword phrases in the website without affecting their users’ experience.

Why you shouldn’t do it: Again, Googlebots know when your website has any hidden text or links. Google’s priority is the users, and hidden content definitely counts as a bad user experience because it’s something bots can see but your visitors can’t. This is a big no-no and is one of the easiest ways to get penalized.

Security

While having an unsecured website can’t technically get you a Penguin or Panda penalty, it could result in the loss of your valuable rankings.

Hacked Website

If your website gets attacked or injected with malicious code and Google finds out, they can block your website for people using their search engine.

Not only will this cause you to lose the trust of anybody who visits your site from organic search, but it will cause your website to drop in the rankings just like a Penguin or Panda penalty would.

While it’s true you may receive a notification through Google Analytics that your site has been hacked, it still could mean a real penalty for your website in search results if Google knows your site contains malicious code.

To Wrap It Up

It should seem obvious that when it comes to black hat SEO, the numbers just don’t add up. Produce high-value content, follow Google’s Webmaster Guidelines, and most importantly, don’t be in a rush.

Do yourself a favor and become a Jedi, not a Sith. It will pay off in the long run.

Author:  Joe Howard

Source:  https://www.searchenginejournal.com/11-black-hat-techniques-can-kill-seo-campaign/180601

Categorized in News & Politics

One of the keys to building credibility with search engines is to keep creating fresh content. But not every website owner has time to create the quantity of quality content favored by search engines or like-minded thought leaders. Here are ideas to speed up the content-generating process without sacrificing quality.

Avoid fluff

Rule No. 1 when trying to produce several 500-1,000 word articles per week is to not fall into the trap of creating fluff that doesn't benefit anyone. Users certainly won't keep coming back to your site if all you give them is useless information. So, make sure your content is original and has some value to readers.

Start with outlines 

Outlines are the best way to map out the focus of an article and how it logically leads to a conclusion or important point. You can begin simply through brainstorming sessions in which all you do is write down the most powerful keywords relating to your content.

Then use these words to build phrases, which become headings that summarize paragraphs. Headings naturally flow into sentences that open paragraphs, followed by primary and secondary support sentences. It helps if you've already done research and have key facts in front of you. The outline process should only take about 10 minutes. 

Collect a list of ideas

Collecting ideas before you even begin the process of writing is the first thing that you should do even if you end up using only a small percentage of those ideas. Show your readiness to collect content ideasas they come, so that they are at your fingertips when you need them. This can be done using your notebook or your smartphone.

Schedule your writing tasks

To speed up your content writing, conduct brainstorming sessions for multiple headlines and ideas at once and categorize topics into themes or the manner you want to group your content. Then, list them according to your content writing schedule. Give yourself your own writing assignments. Waste no time in putting your content ideas on your editorial calendar for the upcoming weeks or months, all at once.

Research in advance

Advanced planning allows time to conceptualize what you will be writing the week before. This allows you time to research before you actually start writing. Once you make this a habit, it will prevent you from getting side-tracked during the critical phase of first-round of writing. When researching, you will probably come across ideas that you may want to write about later. It’s advisable to keep them for the future.

Show zero-tolerance towards distractions

Social media and net-surfing are common distractions while you write content. Try using tools that won’t allow you to access social sites while writing. Multi-tasking is another big distraction, as it doesn’t work, and saps your productive abilities.

Refrain from self-editing as you write

The initial copy of your content could be rather sloppy, replete with errors and typos, and voluminous at times. However, you are advised to refrain from self-editing as you write. Editing comes much later. Write your content in chunks and do it quickly without thinking too hard. Once the initial copy is ready, you can think about the perfect conclusion and the heading.

Make an audio recording

Since most humans can speak faster than they write or type, it's helpful to just record yourself saying what you want to say. Then go back and transcribe it and edit it so that it flows better for a reader. Perhaps the audio will be listenable enough to publish on the site as well. If you talk at a pace of 120 words per minute, it's possible to create a thousand-word soundtrack in less than ten minutes. 

Outsource content 

The final piece of the puzzle to crafting vast amounts of content quickly is to do what many professional media outlets are doing these days (in case you are using dictation software or recording content): outsourcing content to professionals or freelancers who do transcription work based on your specifications, while maintaining the confidentiality of the file, and charge within your budget. 

Author:  Beth Worthy

Source:  http://www.business.com/

Categorized in News & Politics
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