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If you follow discussions about the Internet of Things, you’ve probably heard this stunning prediction at least once: The world will have 50 billion connected devices by 2020. Ericsson’s former CEO Hans Vestburg was among the first to state it in a 2010 presentation to shareholders. The following year, Dave Evans, who worked for Cisco at the time, published the same prediction in a white paper.

Today, that figure has arguably done more than any other statistic to set sky-high expectations for potential IoT growth and profits. Remarkably, those projections weren’t even close to the highest of the time—in 2012, IBM forecasted 1 trillion connected devices by 2015. “The numbers were getting kind of crazy,” recalls Bill Morelli, a market research director for IHS Markit.

Now it’s 2016, and we’re nowhere near 1 trillion IoT devices, or even 50 billion for that matter. The current count is somewhere between Gartner’s estimate of 6.4 billion (which doesn’t include smartphones, tablets, and computers), International Data Corporation’s estimate of 9 billion (which also excludes those devices), and IHS’s estimate of 17.6 billion (with all such devices included).

Since they first made their projections, both Ericsson and Evans have lowered their expectations from 50 billion for 2020: Evans, who is now CTO of Stringify, says he expects to see 30 billion connected devices by then, while Ericsson figures on 28 billion by 2021. Other firms have adopted similar tones: IHS Markit projects 30.7 billion IoT devices for 2020, and Gartner expects 20.8 billion by that time (excluding smartphones, tablets, and computers). Lastly, IDC anticipates 28.1 billion (again, not counting those devices).

Meanwhile, the popular 50 billion figure continues to be widely cited. Even Evans is a bit surprised by its lasting power. “I think people do tend to latch onto numbers that seem really hard to fathom,” he says. “Fifty billion is pretty staggering.”

Forecasting the future is no easy task, and there’s nothing unusual or wrong about analysts and companies revising their projections. However, IoT forecasts are especially large with significant variability among firms and over time, skewing tens of billions of units in either direction.

At the same time, any market with such potential girth dazzles entrepreneurs and investors. For comparison, 18.6 billion microcontrollers were shipped in 2014, and 10.4 billion RFID tags will be shipped this year. Given the forecasts, IoT is expected to top them all. “I don't think we’ve seen this type of market size before, to be honest,” says Vernon Turner, a senior IoT analyst for IDC.

Peter Middleton, a research director at Gartner involved in the firm’s IoT forecasts, says future IoT projections are intended to create “market efficiency,” helping companies make smart choices about whether they should enter a new area and informing venture capitalists as they decide where to place their investments. Earlier this week, Intel executive Venkata Renduchintala emphasized the company’s enthusiasm for IoT in a keynote at its annual developers’ forum.

Still, it would seem the practical utility of IoT estimates is limited if they have the potential to be revised by many billions of units. Turner at IDC says such variation and fluidity of these numbers is typical of early estimates focused on nascent markets. The point, he suggests, is to think of the estimates as a general signal, rather than focus on the specific numbers.

There are many reasons why projections from different firms may change over time, or simply not match up in the first place. Each company starts with its own definition of IoT and refines its methods over time.

To begin, many collect annual sales data from manufacturers that produce connected devices, or components such as semiconductors, as well as from companies that sell and ship those products to customers. Then firms subtract a percentage of devices to account for those that will be replaced or thrown out each year. When added to estimates from past years, that leaves the firms with the “install base,” or approximate number of connected devices in use at a given time.

Some firms include other variables, such as the amount of money that companies spend annually on information technology. Evans factors in industry growth rates based in part on Moore’s Law, the longstanding prediction that the number of transistors in an integrated circuit doubles every year or two, and Metcalfe’s Law, which states that the utility of a network increases with each new device that connects to it.

Firms often have no real way to know how many devices that are sold and shipped actually wind up connected to the Internet, so some conduct consumer and business surveys to gauge how devices are used. Morelli at IHS Markit estimates 90 percent of communications devices (including smartphones) are switched on, but perhaps only 50 percent of cars and accessories are ever connected.  

Janna Anderson, an expert in emerging technologies at Elon University, says there is a degree of self-interest at play in projections, too. In 2013, she helped the Pew Internet Project survey more than 1,600 experts about what the IoT might look like in 2025. Not surprisingly, she found that “those who are marketing it and those whose bottom line is somehow impacted by enthusiastic predictions are more likely to make them.”

Middleton at Gartner, who publishes one of the most conservative IoT estimates available, also believes boosterism plays a role in some analyses. “It's human nature,” he says. “If you're a participant in the industry, and you’re launching new products, there’s a lot of enthusiasm that builds and a lot of hype.”

One of the puzzling things about IoT estimates is that they attempt to anticipate demand for devices that have largely not yet been invented or commercialized. At this point, even the strictest definitions of IoT remain fuzzy because companies are still working on the technologies and business cases. “Will connected pets be a thing of the future? No one knows,” Evans says.

 

 

In fact, IoT skeptics often point to Bluetooth-enabled toasters as an example of senseless connectivity that will only ever be used by a handful of early adopters. But Evans is confident that entrepreneurs will find many millions of practical ways to serve customers through the IoT in due time. “I think technology needs to solve real problems, and if it doesn't solve real problems in the real world, it's probably a gimmick and will die on the vine,” he says.  

Though past estimates haven’t exactly panned out, Bob Heile, standards director for the Wi-SUN Alliance and chair of IEEE 802.15 (a working group for wireless personal area networks), says the general trend that early IoT analysts predicted has proven true. There are more and more connected devices today than five or 10 years ago, even if they’re being connected at a slightly slower rate. “What I do know, because the trend is absolutely undeniable, is more and more things are getting the ability to communicate and connect to something else,” he says.

As the next 10 billion IoT devices come online, the industry will face some formidable challenges, such as ensuring the security of its devices, powering billions of sensors, and handling all the resulting e-waste. Despite those issues, Evans isn’t bashful about anticipating an even bigger future. “I could see trillions of connected things, ultimately,” he says.

Author: Amy Nordrum
Source: spectrum.ieee.org

Categorized in Internet of Things

Are you interested in making your job search more effective moving forward? If so, then it doesn’t hurt to observe what others avoid to boost their effectiveness.

Here are 9 things effective job seekers don’t do in their job searches. Carefully read them. Upon reading them, you’ll know what habits you should avoid or remove for a smarter job hunt.

1. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Underrate The Impact of Their Attitudes.

Effective job seekers don’t proceed without attitude reflection daily. Why? Because they know their attitudes matter in their job search processes.

“Maintaining a positive attitude,” says Harry Urschel, Job Search Coach and Writer, in one of his post, “is one of the most difficult yet most important things you can do for a successful job search. It affects every other aspect of your search and will have a dramatic impact on how you are perceived by potential employers.”

So, one of the best things you can do is step back and reflect on your attitude. Are you pushing through positively or negatively? Are you allowing the frustration, associated with looking for a job, get you down?

Please know your decision influences the way you manage your job search. And, if you want to get through this process with your sanity, then you must foster a positive attitude. A few ways to stay positive in a challenging job hunt include: keeping hope alive, moving onward after rejections, and building your skills through activity.

2. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Sacrifice their Health and Well-Being.

Effective job seekers don’t sacrifice their well-being for long hours of job searching. These job seekers know they must take care of themselves, if they want to get through their job hunts effectively.

Without taking care of yourself, you’ll reach the point of exhaustion. And, you’ll stretch yourself too thin.

Several healthy ways to take care of yourself are:

  • Feeding Your Body.
  • Quenching Your Thirst.
  • Getting the Sleep You Need Every Night.
  • Staying Physically Active.
  • Taking Breaks When Necessary.
  • Engaging in a Hobby.

There’s an urgency to land a job, but you must still take care of yourself.

3. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Focus on Full-Time Hours.

You might’ve heard the saying: “looking for a job is a full-time job.” Right? Well, effective job seekers know this isn’t solid advice.

They don’t focus on meeting so many hours a week. They know a full-time (40 hours/week) job search affects your well-being and effectiveness. There’s no way to keep going, in this way, without experiencing burnout, frustration, and inefficiency.

When you don’t set limits in your job hunt, it consumes you. It takes up your full day, if you allow it. This isn’t healthy for someone out of work and already dealing with unemployment.

What you should do instead is: put in a full-time effort as opposed to full-time hours. Designate time, your mornings or your evenings, for example, to job search activities. And, put forth your best efforts throughout this time.

Also, shut your job search down when it’s time. Set and keep time boundaries in place. Hallie Crawford, Career Seekers Coach, says:

“Establishing boundaries with your time can be another way to maintain balance during your {career} transition.”

4. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Underestimate the Importance of Break Time.

You might think setting aside a break time is a counterproductive activity. But, effective job seekers know it isn’t.

Nothing’s wrong with taking a break from your job search activities to rest, when you need it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests five minute breaks every hour.

You can do several things doing your break: read inspirational material, take a walk or stretch, recount the good things of the day, or get out of the house for a while.

Breaking is a good way to prevent burnout, stress, and overwhelm in your job search. But, you must be intentional about this time to avoid procrastination.

5. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Blindly Apply and Interview.

Effective job seekers don’t blindly apply and interview for jobs. They don’t walk around thinking:

“I’ll apply to (and interview for) as many jobs as I can to increase my chances of getting a job offer.”

They know better. They know you must be realistic in your job search. They also know time is too precious for wasting on mass job application submissions.

Instead of blindly applying and interviewing, you should bring intentionality into your search. Target your job search. According to Eli Amdur of Amdur Coaching and Advisory Group, a targeted job searchincludes:

  • Identifying the Business or Occupation You’re Interested In.
  • Researching the Leading Companies by Culture, Leadership, Products, and Market Positions.
  • Determining Whether You Can Grow Within Company.
  • Figuring Out Logistical Issues, such as the Commute, Working Hours, and Extra Taxes.
  • Rating Your Potential Happiness at the Targeted Company.

You prepare your application materials based on what you learn through research. You’ll also know everything you need to know before your interview.

6. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Submit “One Size Fits All” Resumes and Cover Letters.

This relates to number 4 above, but I must emphasize it here.

Effective job seekers know quality matters in their job searches. They don’t submit a “one size fits all” resume because they know you must speak directly to the needs of the job.

If you don’t tailor your materials for every job, then you don’t show your ability to perform the job.

Instead, consider the targeted job search approach already discussed. And, prepare your resumes and cover letters accordingly.

7. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Let Employment Rejections Halt their Efforts.

The longer your job search, the more rejections you receive. And, while others tell you not to take these rejections personally, I won’t. I can’t. Why? Because I’ve taken them personally in my job search.

There’s no way you can’t, when you’re putting forth your best efforts. However, you shouldn’t let these employment rejections halt your efforts.

Employers reject you, and this rejection stings. But, bounce back from these rejections and move forward. And, when you bounce back, remember the words of Liz Ryan, Founder and CEO of Human Workplace, in her Forbes article:

“You can’t squander it {i.e., your mojo} worrying about whether you’re acceptable to other people, or not. You learned something on each of your interviews and each of your recruiter calls. That’s magnificent. How else would you learn?”

8. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Stop Maturing Mentally.

Effective job seekers don’t stop learning. They use time outside of job search activities to enrich their minds.

They know this is a great investment and do so in many ways: reading books, journals, and (valuable) blogs. Listening to audios and podcasts. Volunteering or freelancing. Taking a class or two.

And, they build skill(s) while job searching. They know these skill(s) are beneficial, professionally and personally.

So to you: how will you keep enriching your mind? What skill(s) are you interested in learning? How will learn?

You make room for learning and skill-building, when you remove those extra hours of job searching. You have time to commit to a project of interest, learn, and apply what you’ve learned.

9. Effective Job Seekers Don’t Forget to Reevaluate Their Strategies Regularly.

Effective job seekers don’t embark on their job searches, without evaluating their strategies regularly. They know they must make improvements when things aren’t working out and do so.

They honestly evaluate their strategies and whether they’re getting any results. Reevaluating your job search approach involves: reviewing your goals, resumes, and activities. And, an effective job search strategy consists of many things discussed here:

  • Defining Your Job Goal with Specifics.
  • Targeting Your Job Search Approach.
  • Tailoring Your Resume and Cover Letter for Every Job.
  • Putting Forth a Full-time Effort vs. Full-Time Hours.

Conclusion

Looking for a job takes time and energy, so effective job searching is vital. Hopefully, you now have a better understanding of what you should avoid while looking for a job. And, it doesn’t hurt to reevaluate your job search and make eliminations, where necessary.

Author:  Priscilla Christopher

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/

Categorized in Online Research

When a business loses momentum, it loses one of its greatest advantages. Here are five things that can stop your business dead in its tracks.

When you’re a growing business, momentum is invaluable.

It keeps your team looking forward, and thinking big. It feeds that buzz in the room – the one that isn’t directly related to the pile of crumpled coffee cups. It makes working till sunrise feel like the only decent thing to do.

In short, momentum gives your business its all-important mojo.

And you really don’t want to lose it. After all, about a third of new employers crash and burn within their first two years.

So, take heed. Here are five certified mojo killers that, given the opportunity, could seriously sap your business momentum.

1. Expanding too fast.

Growth may be your ultimate goal, but excessive, unchecked growth? That can actually put the brakes on your business – by destroying the things that, right now, makes it special: its culture, its values, its all-hands-on-deck mentality.

Top tip: As your business begins to take off, do make sure you’ve the right skills and managerial support in place – but don’t rush into hiring decisions. Every new recruit should complement and reinforce your culture. Also, take the time to regularly check your course, getting everyone together to review your shared vision and values.

2. Failing to trust your team.

If you don’t trust your people to deliver on their own, you risk making them less engaged in your business’s heroic struggle. You also risk wasting your time – time that should be spent on much more important stuff. This is a problem that’ll only worsen as your company grows.

Top tip: Share the responsibility for success with each new person you employ. Be transparent, trusting and communicative. Your people will feel empowered, happier and more motivated, and your business will feel the benefit of them firing on all cylinders – producing ideas and approaches you’d never have thought of by yourself.

3. Setting only long-term goals. 

When you launch a new product, top a thousand customers, or reach a revenue milestone, everyone feels the adrenalin kick. Those little kicks are essential to keep your business barreling forward. Super long-term, vague or non-existent goals leave people drifting, and put a slow but lethal drain on your mojo.

Top tip: One of the joys of being small is that it’s easy to communicate objectives, and keep everyone buzzing about meeting them. In addition to building momentum, setting short-term goals in each key business area – and sharing them with your team – will do two great things:

  • It’ll force you to find ways to evaluate the performance of everything you do – be it sales activity or marketing campaigns
  • It’ll keep you tweaking and perfecting your strategy

4. Taking your eyes off the customer.

Staying customer-focused sounds simple enough. But in reality, “ignoring customers” accounts for the failure of more than one in every ten startups.

Top tip: Regularly review the problem you’re helping your customers solve, and the factors – economic, social, political or technological – that can affect it. At the same time, look for related problems that you might, one day, be able to help with, too.

5. Resting on your laurels.

After a flying start, it can be tempting to take your foot off the gas – letting your business coast, while you serve your suddenly sizable customer base. Those laurels may be comfy, but resist resting on them for long. It’s vital to keep taking risks, and seizing opportunities.

Top tip: Staying full of momentum, and mojo, means staying hungry. Unless you’re reaching the absolute limit of what your business systems and resources can handle – and you’ve no way to upscale fast – you should keep marketing, innovating and driving growth.

Don’t stop ‘til you get enough. (And don’t stop then, either.)

Create the right conditions and momentum will come as naturally to your business as a rock rolling downhill. And that will keep you rolling on, even when – as every business does – you hit unexpected bumps in the road.

Source: forbes.com

Categorized in Business Research

Despite the fact that millions own an iPhone, many are unaware of some of the more amazing features hidden away in this little device. Here are a few of them! While you might know about a handful of these, several should surprise you…

1.  It tracks every location you’ve been to.

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That’s right. Your iPhone has tracked every location you’ve been at since you activated it. To see how creepy your iPhone is, go to settings, privacy, location services, system services, and check out the “frequent locations” option. It can be quite eye opening to see a complete history of everywhere you’ve been…

2. Its performance is more customizable than you think.

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Have an iPhone 4S and sick of all the stutters caused by iOS7? Go to settings, general, accessibility, and turn on the “reduce transparency” option located under “increase contrast.” Also, turn off “reduce motion.” Now, your iPhone should run about as well as it did under iOS6, with all of the software upgrades of 7!

3. It can work without a power button.

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Go to settings, general, accessibility, and turn on “AssistiveTouch” if your power button ever breaks. It’ll project a small icon onto the screen that’ll allow you to lock your phone without the need of a physical button! You can also turn your phone off using this as well. Don’t worry, even without a power button your phone will automatically turn on when you plug it in.

 4. You can set your phone to perform certain actions when triple clicking the home button.

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Within the aforementioned accessibility settings, there’s an option at the very bottom of the page called “Accessibility Shortcut.” From there, you can program your home button to activate zoom, assisted touch, voice over controls, and other features with a triple click.

5. You can close more than one app at a time!

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When I upgraded to iOS7, I found the app-closing procedure to be an annoying and time consuming process. No longer! Turns out you can close multiple apps at a time by swiping up with two or three fingers.

6. It can replace your leveling tool.

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Ever wish you had a level around to get those perfectly straight edges you’ve always dreamed of? Well wish no more! Your iPhone’s compass has a hidden level (ha, get it?) that you can activate by swiping to the left.

7. Its battery lasts forever on airplane mode.

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Airplane mode isn’t just for when you’re on an airplane! Use it when you need to save battery, and you’ll get a lot more life out of a single charge. Using airplane mode also allows your phone to charge faster.

8. Its performance improves when you clean its hard drive.

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Always try to leave at least two gigabytes free on your iPhone. Anything less and it will start to slow down considerably.

 9. Siri can learn!

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I had a friend who once told me Siri knows too much for her own good. Well, turns out you have the ability to teach her even more. If she ever mispronounces a word, tell her, and she’ll give you several alternate pronunciations.

10. It tracks popular apps near your location.

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There’s a little innocuous option located at the bottom of the app store called “Near Me” that’ll literally show you the most popular apps in your immediate area. Usually these will include local news apps or bus schedule apps for the town you’re in. Useful if you are in a new area!

 11. It automatically updates apps.

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This is a useful feature that arrived with iOS7. Unlike previous iterations of the software, your iPhone now downloads updates whenever they’re available. That being said, this eats up performance and battery, so if you’d like to shut it down, go to settings, iTunes & App Store, and turn off “updates,” located under “automatic downloads.”

12. It changes the contrast of background images to make text more visible.

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Afraid that the background image you want to use is too bright, thus making text too hard to read? Fear no longer. With the latest iOS update, your iPhone will automatically adjust the contrast of such images so that you can still see the clock on the lock screen and the text below your apps.

13. It allows you to take a picture using its volume buttons!

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I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen fellow iPhone owners try and hit that white circle on the screen to take a picture instead of the much more easily accessible volume buttons. Now you can be cool and start using your iPhone as if it were an actual camera too!

 14. It can tell you exactly when you received a text message.

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I was annoyed with the messaging app on the iPhone initially, because I thought it didn’t let you see what time texts arrived. This is a useful feature, mainly because it’s nice to know how long ago somebody sent you a message. Luckily for all of us, the iPhone does have this feature. To access it, simply swipe to the left in any text conversation you have. You’ll then be able to see the exact time that texts were sent and delivered.

15. It can change Siri’s gender.

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Tired of the same old Siri? Go to settings, general, Siri, and scroll down to “voice gender.” Here you can give Siri a male voice.

 16. Spotlight search is actually…useful?

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I never see anybody use spotlight search for anything, but in reality it’s quite a useful feature. Just swipe down on your homescreen to access it, and type in whatever you need. It’s more efficient to search for contacts or a certain song here than it is to open up individual apps and scroll through a hundred names or titles.

 

 17. It has caps-lock functionality.

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Tired of pressing shift before every letter you want to capitalize? I used to be, too. That was before I figured out that, by simply double-tapping the shift key, it morphs into a caps-lock key. Then, everything you write after comes out capitalized. Perfect for when you’re angry or want to add emphasis to something.

 18.  You can permanently lock your iPhone’s autofocus and exposure.

30iPhone#18

It’s super annoying when you’re trying to take a picture with your phone and it constantly readjusts its focus. To stop that insanity from occurring, simply hold your finger on the screen in the location you want to focus on (instead of tapping it). Wait for the yellow square to flash twice, and you’ll see a notification pop up that says “AE/AF lock.” Now you can take pictures without your focus and exposure constantly jumping around!

 19. It has a built in back button.

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Unlike a lot of android phones, the iPhone has no dedicated back button. To essentially achieve the same effect, however, just swipe your finger from the left edge of your screen to the right. It’ll take you back to the page you were previously on.

 20. It can give each of your friends a custom vibration.

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Tired of the standard vibration notification for text messages? To add a little spice to your texting life, go to contacts, find someone, and hit edit in the top right corner. Then go down to vibration, tap default, and scroll down to “Create New Vibration.” There you can craft a unique buzz for each of your coolest friends!

 21. It can regulate your data usage.

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Nowadays data’s a precious resource (since cell companies hate the idea of unlimited anything). If you have an app that’s chewing up a considerable amount of your monthly allotment, go to settings, cellular, and check out the list entitled “use cellular data for.” There you can turn off data for certain apps. Once you do that, they’ll only update over Wi-Fi.

 22. You can program it to turn on “Do Not Disturb” during certain hours of the day.

30iPhone#22

You probably knew about your iPhone’s Do Not Disturb setting, found in the control panel. However, what you can also do is customize it so that it turns on during specific portions of the day. Go to settings, Do Not Disturb, and check the “scheduled” option. This will allow your phone to automatically turn DND on from say 12:00AM to 8:00AM so that you aren’t bothered with anything while you sleep.

 

 23. It can appease your impeccable grammar standards.

30iPhone#23

Ever wanted to use one of those fancy em or en dashes while texting somebody? Well, you can. All you have to do is hold the dash key, and it will give you those two as an option. Now there’s no excuse to write poorly, even on a phone!

 24. It can take rapid bursts of photos.

30iPhone#24

Ever see something amazing, whip out your phone to take a shot, and come away disappointed with the result? Lower the chances of that by taking multiple shots at a time. To do this, just hold the camera button. This feature works best on the 5S due to its blazing processor, though you can still use this feature (at a slower pace) on the 4S (I’ve tested it).

 

 25. It refreshes all of your apps in the background.

30iPhone#25

Otherwise known as “background app refresh,” this feature allows all of your apps to update themselves when you aren’t using them. In other words, a news app will pull in updated articles even when you aren’t actually using the app. While it can be a nifty feature, it also uses up battery and processor power, so if you want it off just go to settings, general, background app refresh, and swipe it off there.

 26. It can tell if any planes are flying above you.

30iPhone#26

Although you can’t always see them, there’s always a bunch of planes flying right above your head at any given moment. Just ask Siri “planes overhead,” and he or she will give you a little table with all of the planes in the air roughly above your current location.

 27.  It can read your e-mail for you.

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Siri is more useful than most give her (it?) credit for. One of the other things she can do is read your e-mail, which can be a godsend if you’re driving or otherwise occupied. Just ask something like “read my latest e-mail.” You can even ask if you’ve received a message from a specific person, and Siri will check and read them aloud if you did.

 

28. It can delete your mistakes with a simple shake.

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Make a typo? Apply the wrong filter to a photo? Just shake your phone, and much like an etch-a-sketch, or control-Z on a PC, it’ll erase the last thing you did.

29. It charges faster if you use a power adapter supposedly meant for the iPad.

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The iPad’s power adapter is rated at 12W as opposed to the iPhone’s 5W, thus your phone will charge faster with the former rather than the latter.

 30. It can show you your e-mail drafts.

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I always wondered why my iPhone never let me review my e-mail drafts. Turns out that it does, only it’s tucked away in an arcane way, meaning that most won’t find it on their own. Basically, all you do is go to your inbox and hold the new message button down (it’s located in the bottom right corner). Instead of taking you to a page where you can write a new e-mail, it’ll show you a list of your drafts, which can be incredibly useful if you were crafting a nice message and your e-mail app suddenly crashed or your phone lost power, etc.

 

Which of these did you find to be the most surprising? Know about any other incredible things iPhones can do? Let me know in the comments below!

Source:  lifehack.org

Categorized in Science & Tech

Actually taking those steps to starting your own business is far different than just saying you want to be a business owner. Not everyone can do it, there are extreme highs and lows that you’ll experience and there are certain things that only entrepreneurs can understand.

1. You are always thinking about work. Even on holiday

You are so passionate about your business that you’ll never switch off. Every sign you walk past, every conversation you hold there’ll be an idea buzzing around your head.

2. You understand that there is no reward without risk

Leaving behind a steady job to pursue life as an entrepreneur is a risk in itself and you understand that you’ll have to take more risks along the way to experience the considerable rewards.

3. You feel that people are always there to second guess your success

No matter how successful you are there will always be people who second guess your success and try to pull you down.

4. You understand that your loved ones share the load

The life of an entrepreneur is unpredictable and comes with a certain amount of stress. Your loved ones share these feelings and experience the same ups and downs as you.

5. You understand that you have to become a leader

Whether to lead yourself, employees or suppliers, you understand that you need to become a strong leader. The way to achieve this is through effective leadership development.

6. You’ll constantly be faced with people who just don’t get you

Entrepreneurs are unique. Our drive and determination isn’t something people will always understand.

7. You will never find it easy to fire someone

You understand more than anyone how important a regular income is. This is why you’ll never find it easy to fire someone, even if they deserve it!

8. You think that nothing ever happens fast enough

You want things done now and it can feel like suppliers and employees are just slowing you down.

9. You hate tax time

You never want to have to pay tax and getting your books in order is an unwanted task.

10. You will grow to love your accountant

You want to spend as little time on paperwork as possible and your accountant will help.

11. You are involved in every area of the business

You are the sales, marketing, finance and operations teams all rolled into one.

12. You know when a risk is worth taking

It can be scary but you know that a calculated risk could result in immense reward.

13. You are never ill enough not to work

Time is money and you don’t have time to be sick and take time off.

14. You will always think of wacky ways to motivate staff

A happy workforce is a productive workforce and you’ll work you hardest to motivate your staff.

15. You sometimes question your life

When things are tough you’ll think about going back to employment. 10 minutes later you’ll be an entrepreneur again.

16. You don’t have regular working hours

What’s a 9 to 5?

17. You always want to move onto the next big thing

Ideas are constantly flowing through your mind and you want to put them into practice ASAP.

18. You accept that some ideas are crazy

You’ll have 99 crazy ideas but understand that just one needs to be perfect.

19. You don’t do later. You want things done now!

Why would you put things off until later? You can wake up a little earlier and get extra work done now.

20. You constantly write down ideas

Whether it’s on an iPad or the napkin in a restaurant. If you have an idea you are going to make a note of it.

21. You never stop being an entrepreneur

Wherever you go, somehow you think about work.

22. You constantly promote yourself

Every new person you meet is a potential business contact and you’ll take advantage of that.

23. You never have enough money

Even if you are making millions, you’ll never have enough funding. Your next idea is always bigger than the last.

24. Your personal social media accounts are packed full of business stuff

You are so proud of your achievements that you’ll turn to social media to keep everyone informed.

25. You don’t fear failure

Failures just brings you closer to success and you are never afraid to fail. It’s the inner drive and sheer determination that sees you through and those are attributes that never leave.

26. You have no greater feeling than success

The chance to succeed and make something of yourself is what gets you out of bed in the morning. Furthermore, you visualise what you could become in the short/long term therefore that encourages you to accomplish great things.

27. You feel like you can conquer the world

When you achieve something you feel like you can do anything and that next achievement will always be bigger. The ambition is what focuses you and it’s the constant target that ensures you progress in your project and strive toward success.

28. You can struggle with love

Work will always come first and some people don’t get that, which can make it hard to find love. Prioritization can hurt other factors in your life –  but if you don’t prioritize then you’re not disciplined enough to succeed as an entrepreneur.

29. You are restless

You don’t sleep as much as you used to and if you take a few days away from work you are itching to get back. With the constant focus on success it’s very hard to switch off from work. Taking your work back home is also not an unusual thing for entrepreneurs.

30. You are determined

Entrepreneurs have something in their blood and even when times are tough, they wouldn’t be defeated.

Author: James Timpson
Source: http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1zkqNa/www.lifehack.org/articles/work/30-things-only-entrepreneurs-would-understand.html/?_notoolbar&_nospa=true

Categorized in Business Research

While announcements regarding Android, self-driving cars and Google Fiber get more publicity, nothing has arguably been more important to Google's business than the improvements the company has been making to its mobile search engine and the search ads that run against mobile queries. Parent Alphabet's (GOOGL) second-quarter results show those improvements are still paying huge dividends.

Three months after selling off on a first-quarter miss, Alphabet is up over 4% after handily beating analyst estimates. Revenue rose 21% annually (25% excluding forex) to $21.5 billion, an improvement from the first quarter's 17% growth. Adjusted EPS rose 20%, to $8.42.

The sales growth pickup was fueled by a 21% increase in Google segment revenue to $21.3 billion. That, in turn, was driven by a 24% increase in Google sites ad revenue to $15.4 billion -- mobile search and YouTube are behind most of the growth -- and a 33% increase in "Google other" revenue, which covers businesses such as Google Play and Nexus and Chromecast hardware lines, to $2.2 billion. The Google network sites business, which sells ads on third-party sites and has been stung by Facebook's rapid ad sales growth, grew just 3%, to $3.7 billion.

Google's paid clicks -- the number of ad clicks or views on which the company recorded revenue -- rose 29% annually for the second quarter in a row. Paid clicks on Google sites rose an impressive 37% thanks to strong mobile search and YouTube ad growth; paid clicks for network sites were flat.

A shift toward mobile search and YouTube ads is still coming at the cost of lower ad prices: Cost per click fell 7%, courtesy of a 9% drop on Google sites and an 8% drop on network sites. But it only fell 1% sequentially, and the annual drop is better than the first quarter's 9% and the fourth quarter's 13%.

Restrained spending under CFO Ruth Porat remains the other big driver of Alphabet's strong financial performance. Adjusted operating expenses rose 15% annually, easily trailing revenue growth of 21%. And capital expenditures fell 16%, to $2.1 billion, which (along with revenue growth) helped free cash flow rise 53%, to $7 billion. Capex will probably start rising again soon, given Google's infrastructure needs, but for now it's a major tailwind.

"There's a story where basically the revenue went up, the expenses went down dramatically -- that was really really fabulous," said Jim Cramer, TheStreet's founder and manager of the Action Alerts PLUS portfolio, which owns Alphabet.

Google's strong ad growth wouldn't be possible if not for the investments it has made to make sure its search services remain a valuable utility to consumers in an app-dominated smartphone landscape. Those efforts include optimizing results based on location and device type, indexing the content of mobile apps and even (through its AMP initiative) improving the performance of third-party mobile web pages. Many of those efforts leverage Google's unmatched search data and machine learning algorithms; on the earnings call, Google chief Sundar Pichai said over 100 Google teams are using machine learning.

The growth also wouldn't be possible without improvements made to Google's core AdWords search ad platform. Over the past year, the changes have included creating more effective shopping and travel ad formats, letting mobile users pay for advertised items on Google's site, supporting larger ad headlines and descriptions, allowing ads to be customized based on location and providing a better interface for marketers running AdWords campaigns.

One weak spot in the second-quarter report: Traffic acquisition costs rose as a percentage of revenue for both Google sites and network ad sales. That was attributed to mobile search growth -- Google is believed to make considerable payments to Apple (AAPL) for the right to be the default search engine for Mobile Safari, and lesser payments to carriers and Android manufacturers -- and growing adoption of programmatic (automated) ad-buying platforms by advertisers.

Also, Alphabet's "Other Bets" reporting segment, which covers businesses such as Google Fiber, the Nest/Dropcam smart home unit, the Calico anti-aging drug unit, and Alphabet's self-driving car efforts, reported an $859 million operating loss, up 30% annually. Revenue, much of which is believed to come from Nest/Dropcam, rose 150%, but still only amounted to $185 million.

But for now, markets are willing to give Alphabet a pass for the losses incurred by Other Bets' long-term projects. At least while Google's core business keeps defying the law of large numbers and making mobile monetization fears look quite misplaced.

On Friday morning, Alphabet shares were trading up 3.9% to $795.64.

https://www.thestreet.com/story/13657296/4/mobile-search-and-youtube-are-letting-alphabet-defy-the-law-of-large-numbers.html

Categorized in Others

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