[This article is originally published in blog.hubspot.com written by Dharmesh Shah - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Rebecca Jenkins]

If you’re like me, you probably use Google many times a day. But chances are unless you're a technology geek, you probably still use Google in its simplest form.

If your current use of Google is limited to typing in a few words and changing your query until you find what you’re looking for, I am here to tell you that there’s a better way -- and it’s not hard to learn.

On the other hand, even if you are a technology geek and can use Google like the best of them already, I still suggest you bookmark this article of Google advanced search tips. Then, you’ll then have the tips on hand when you're ready to pull your hair out in frustration watching a neophyte repeatedly type in basic queries in a desperate attempt to find something.

The following Google advanced search tips are based on my own experience and things that I actually find useful. I’ve kept the descriptions of the search tips intentionally terse, as you’re likely to grasp most of these simply by looking at the example from Google anyway.

Here's an overview of some of the most useful Google search tricks. You'll be an expert Google searcher in no time.

31 Google Advanced Search Tips

1. Explicit Phrase

Let's say you're searching on Google for content about inbound marketing. Instead of just typing inbound marketing into the Google search box, you will likely be better off searching explicitly for the phrase. To do this, simply enclose the search phrase within double quotes.

Example Search: "inbound marketing"

2. Exclude Words

Let's say you want to search for content about inbound marketing, but you want to exclude any results that contain the term advertising. To do this, simply use the - sign in front of the word you want to exclude.

Example Search: inbound marketing -advertising

3. This OR That

By default, when you conduct a search, Google will include all the terms specified in the search. If you're looking for any one of one or more terms to match, then you can use the OR operator. (Note: The OR has to be capitalized).

Example Search: inbound marketing OR advertising

4. Words in the Text

If you want to find a webpage where all the terms you're searching for appear in the text of that page (but not necessarily beside each other), type in allintext:followed immediately by words or phrases.

Example Search: allintext:vermont ski house lake

5. Words in the Text + Title, URL etc.

If you want to find a webpage where one term appears in the text of that page and another term appears elsewhere on the page, like the title or URL, then type in that first term followed by intext: followed immediately by the other term.

Example Search: neil diamond intext:red sox

6. Words in the Title

Want to find a webpage with certain words contained in the title (but not necessarily beside each other)? Type in allintitle: followed immediately by words or phrases.

Example Search: allintitle:wine club

7. Words in the TItle + Text, URL, etc.

Want to find a webpage where one term appears in the title of that page and another term appears elsewhere on the page, like in the text or the URL? Type in that first term followed by intitle: immediately followed by the other term.

Example Search: flu shot intitle:advice

8. Words in the URL

If you want to find pages with your search query mentioned in the URL, type allinurl: immediately followed by your search query.

Example Search: allinurl:hubspot blog

9. How to Search Within a Website

Often, you want to search a specific website for content that matches a certain phrase. Even if the site doesn’t support a built-in search feature, you can use Google to search the site for your term. Simply use the site:somesite.commodifier. (Read this blog post to learn how to do this in more detail.)

Example Search: site:www.smallbusinesshub.com "inbound marketing"

10. Related Search

If you want to find new websites with similar content to a website you already know of, use the related:somesite.com modifier.

Example Search: related:visual.ly

related-google-search.png

11. A Page That Links to Another Page

Let's say you want to search for every website that cites a BuzzFeed article on their website. To do this, use the link: command, immediately followed by the name of a page. Google will give you all pages that link to BuzzFeed's official website. The more specific the URL is, the fewer, more pointed results you'll get.

Example Search: link:buzzfeed

12. Similar Words and Synonyms

Let’s say you want to include a word in your search, but also want to include results that contain similar words or synonyms. To do this, use the ~ in front of the word.

Example Search: "inbound marketing" ~professional

13. Word Definitions

If you need to quickly look up the definition of a word or phrase, simply use the define: command. You can listen to the word's pronunciation by pressing the megaphone icon.

Search Example: define:plethora

google-word-definitions.png

14. Missing Words

Ever forgotten a word or two from a specific phrase, song lyric, movie quote, or something else? You can use an asterisk* as a wildcard, which can help you find the missing word in a phrase.

Example Search: much * about nothing

15. News in a Specific Location

If you're looking for news related to a specific location, you can use the location: command to search Google News for stories coming from that location.

Search Example: star wars location:london

16. Specific Document Types

If you’re looking to find results that are of a specific type, you can use the modifier filetype:. For example, you might want to find only PowerPoint presentations related to inbound marketing.

Example Search: "inbound marketing" filetype:ppt

17. Translations

Want to translate a simple word or phrase from one language to another? No need to go to a translation website. Just search translate [word] to [language].

Example Search: translate krankenwagen to english

18. Phone Listing

Let’s say someone calls you on your mobile number, and you don’t know who it is. If all you have is a phone number, you can look it up on Google using the phonebook feature.

Example Search: phonebook:617-555-1212

(Note: The number in this example doesn't work. You’ll have to use a real number to get any results.)

19. Area Code Lookup

If all you need to do is to look up the area code for a phone number, just enter the three-digit area code and Google will tell you where it’s from.

Example Search: 617

20. Zip Code Lookup

If you need to look up the zip code for an address, simply search for the rest of the address, including town or city name and state, province, or country. It'll return results with an area code (if applicable),

Example Search: 25 First St., Cambridge, MA

21. Numeric Ranges

This is a rarely used but highly useful tip. Let’s say you want to find results that contain any of a range of numbers. You can do this by using the X..Y modifier (in case this is hard to read, what’s between the X and Y are two periods). This type of search is useful for years (as shown below), prices, or anywhere where you want to provide a series of numbers.

Example Search: president 1940..1950

22. Stock (Ticker Symbol)

Just enter a valid ticker symbol as your search term, and Google will give you the current financials and a quick thumbnail chart for the stock.

Example Search: GOOG

23. Calculator

The next time you need to do a quick calculation, instead of bringing up the Calculator applet, you can just type your expression into Google.

Search Example: 48512 * 1.02

24. Tip Calculator

Along with a normal calculator, Google has a built-in tip calculator. Just search tip calculator and you can adjust the bill, tip %, and number of people splitting it.

Search Example: tip calculator

google-tip-calculator.png

25. Timer

Don't have a timer handy? Google has you covered. Just type in an amount of time + the word "timer," and the countdown will begin automatically

Search Example:

google-timer.png

Search Example: 20 min timer

26. Stopwatch

Search "stopwatch" and it'll bring up a stopwatch for you to start when you're ready.

Search Example: stopwatch

27. Weather

Next time you're looking for quick weather stats or a forecast for a certain area, search for weather followed by a location. Google will give you both before the first search results.

Search Example: weather Cambridge ma

weather-google-search.png

28. Sunrise & Sunset Times

If you're curious when the sun will rise and set that day at a specific location, do a simple Google search with the word sunrise or sunset along with the location name.

Search Example: sunrise acadia

29. Flight Statuses

If you type in the airline and airplane number into Google, it will tell you the flight information, status, and other helpful information.

Search Example: BA 181

google-flight-status.png

30. Sports Scores & Schedules

Want to know the latest sports scores and future schedules of your favorite teams or match-ups? Search a single team name or two team names and Google will use Google Sports to spit out scores and schedules before the first search results.

Search Example: manchester united

31. Comparing Food

Believe it or not, if you're ever curious how two types of (fairly generic) foods compare with one another, you can do a quick Google search to see how they differ in calories, fat, protein, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, and other nutrients.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was usa.kaspersky.com - Contributed by Member: Barbara Larson

Even though computers have become a constant feature of modern life, many people still don't realize the enormous risks that come from constant interaction with technology. 

Computer viruses are one of the oldest forms of malware — in other words, malicious software designed to do harm — but their ability to avoid detection and replicate themselves means that these programs will always be cause for worry. Understanding just what a virus can do to your computer is the first step to securing your system and protecting your family from attack.

A Computer Virus' Potential

The only real qualification for a piece of software to be labeled a "virus" is that the program has the ability to replicate itself onto other machines. This means that not all viruses pose a direct threat to your computer, but often even latent viruses will allow cyberthieves and hackers to install more damaging programs like worms and Trojans. 
Regardless of the intention of the computer virus, the program will take up some system resources while it runs. This slows down your system, even bringing your computer to an abrupt halt if the virus hogs enough resources or if there are many viruses running at the same time.

More often, the computer virus has some kind of malicious intent, either written into the virus itself or from the other pieces of malware that the virus installs. This software can take a number of harmful actions, like opening up a back door to the computer where hackers can take control of the system, or stealing confidential personal information like online banking credentials or credit card numbers. It could also direct your Web browser to unwanted, often pornographic, sites, or even lock the computer down and ask for a ransom to open it back up again. In the most severe cases, viruses can corrupt important computer files, rendering the system useless. Windows OS products are often targets of these types of vulnerabilities so be sure you're secure whether you are running the newest OS , XP, or Windows 8 - security is essential.

How to be a Savvy Computer-User

So with all the damage that a virus can do, you're sure to wonder how you can protect yourself and your family from these threats. The first step is the most obvious, and it all comes down to using your computer in a smart way. 
Ensure all your programs have the latest version of antivirus software installed. This is especially true for things like your operating system, security software and Web browser, but also holds true for just about any program that you frequently use. Viruses often take advantages of bugs or exploits in the code of these programs to propagate to new machines, and while the companies that make the programs are usually quick to fix the holes, those fixes only work if they have been downloaded to your computer. 


It's also important to avoid taking actions that could put your computer at risk. These include opening unsolicited email attachments, visiting unknown websites or downloading software from untrustworthy websites or peer-to-peer file transfer networks. To ensure that the entire family understands the risks, these procedures should be taught to everyone, and children should have their Internet use monitored to ensure they aren't visiting suspect websites or downloading random programs or files.

How to Install Virus Prevention and Detection Software

The next important step in protecting your computer and your family is to install trusted computer security software that can actively scan your system and provide virus protection. You should be warned, however, that not all security solutions are the same. 
Free antivirus software abounds on the Internet, but much of it isn't robust enough to offer complete protection or updated frequently enough to be of much use. Horrifyingly, some of this free software doesn't do anything at all and instead installs viruses, adware, spyware or Trojans when you try to download and install the program. 
If the price is a factor, the best option is to find a competitively priced Internet security solution that offers a free antivirus trial, so that you can see the software in action, and how your computer responds after being cleaned, before you make a purchasing decision. 
The hardest part about all of this is that while each day many threats are neutralized, more are then created in their place. This means that as long as there's an Internet, computer viruses will continue to be a problem. Ignoring the issue or thinking that it won't affect you is a sure way to get your computer compromised, and put your family's information or peace of mind at risk.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Source: This article was published icfj.org By Temi Adeoye - Contributed by Member: Wushe Zhiyang

In the age of digital journalism, advanced online search techniques are becoming requisite skills for successful careers in journalism. With hundreds of millions of sites indexed, Google is undoubtedly the most powerful search engine, but it’s easy to miss out on a lot of that power if we don't know the best techniques for asking questions. Although Google will almost always have answers, the goal is to find the relevant ones.

Fortunately, there are a number of search techniques that journalists (and researchers in general) can use to dramatically improve search results. Like everything in life, it requires a bit of tenacity, but it's not hard to learn. This guide is intended to help professional and citizen journalists better understand how Google works. It explains how to use a variety of search operators and techniques to narrow down search results. Let’s get started.

1. Consider Exact Phrases

Looking for a needle in a haystack? One of the most basic techniques in searching Google is to explicitly declare what you’re looking for by entering phrases in quotation marks. This is especially relevant when the phrases have three or more words in them. If you just enter a bunch of words, Google will assume those words could be in any order. But if you put quotation marks around them, then Google knows you're looking for that phrase in the exact word order, and returns results that potentially bring you closer to the right answer.

So, for example, if we are interested in searching for "lagos farmers market," and we're looking for results that exactly match our query, putting the search words in quotes gives us fewer, and invariably more targeted results. In the screenshots below, searching without quotation marks returned 254,000 results, whereas the use of quotation marks reduced the results to 323, eliminating a whopping 253,677 irrelevant results.

2. Do Word Exclusion

Now, 323 results is a lot of improvement from 254,000 results. However, if we examine the results page, the first result – which is in most cases the most relevant – seems to be referring to a Lagos in Portugal. Assuming we are interested in Lagos, Nigeria, we need to find a way of excluding Portugal from our results list. To do this, we simply "minus" Portugal from the returned results by adding "-Portugal" to our search query. From the screenshot below, you can see we are able to get the returned results down by 182, to 141 results. The first result is also now a Yellow Pages link, which is most likely what we’re looking for.

3. Use Site Operators (site:)

Assuming we know for sure that the information we need is on Yellow Pages, we can further narrow our search to the specific site by using a unique operator called site. The site operator allows us to restrict search results to specified sites. In the logos farmers market example, we can reduce the results to two by specifying that Google restricts its search to yellowpages.net.ng.

4. Use Filetype Operators (filetype:)

Sometimes we are more interested in specific file types such as PDF, Word Document, Excel Spreadsheet, etc. Google gives us the power to filter search results to file types by using the filetype keyword. Using the logos farmers market example, we can narrow down to results in PDF as shown below.

Replacing filetype:pdf with filetype:xls returns results in Microsoft Excel formats, and filetype:doc returns results in Microsoft Word.

5. Choose your words, carefully

This is non-technical but very crucial. Understanding the jargon used in the targeted field will lead to better results. For example, search queries like "mortality rate" will likely return more relevant results than "death rate."

This list contains some of the most frequently used advanced search techniques. It was designed to whet your appetite and get you to rethink how you approach searching on Google. It is therefore far from exhaustive. Have a look at Google's own advanced search page and additional resources at googleguide.com by Nancy Blachman and Jerry Peek, two experts who are not affiliated with Google. Once you get your head around these techniques, try a combination of any or all to take the best advantage of this powerful search engine.

Categorized in Search Techniques

Phishing attacks are more rampant than ever before, rising by more than 162 percent from 2010 to 2014. They cost organizations around the globe $4.5 billion every year and over half of internet users get at least one phishing email per day.

The best defense companies have against phishing attacks is to block malicious emails before they reach customers with the DMARC (Domain-based Message Authentication Reporting and Conformance) standard. Brands must also work with a vendor that can offer email threat intelligence data revealing attacks beyond DMARC (e.g., attacks that spoof their brand using domains outside of the company’s control).

Unfortunately, no matter what companies do, some phishing emails will always make it to the inbox. And those messages are extremely effective—97% of people around the globe cannot identify a sophisticated phishing email. That’s where customer education comes in.

Here are 10 tips on how to identify a phishing or spoofing email. Share them externally with your customers and internally with your company.

Tip 1: Don’t trust the display name
A favorite phishing tactic among cybercriminals is to spoof the display name of an email. Return Path analyzed more than 760,000 email threats targeting 40 of the world’s largest brands and found that nearly half of all email threats spoofed the brand in the display name. 

Here’s how it works: If a fraudster wanted to spoof the hypothetical brand “My Bank,” the email may look something like:

screen_shot_2015_09_22_at_2_16_17_pm

Since My Bank doesn’t own the domain “secure.com,” DMARC will not block this email on My Bank’s behalf, even if My Bank has set their DMARC policy for mybank.com to reject messages that fail to authenticate. This fraudulent email, once delivered, appears legitimate because most user inboxes only present the display name. Don’t trust the display name. Check the email address in the header from—if looks suspicious, don’t open the email.

Tip 2: Look but don’t click
Hover your mouse over any links embedded in the body of the email. If the link address looks weird, don’t click on it. If you want to test the link, open a new window and type in website address directly rather than clicking on the link from unsolicited emails.

Tip 3: Check for spelling mistakes
Brands are pretty serious about email. Legitimate messages usually do not have major spelling mistakes or poor grammar. Read your emails carefully and report anything that seems suspicious.

Tip 4: Analyze the salutation
Is the email addressed to a vague “Valued Customer?” If so, watch out—legitimate businesses will often use a personal salutation with your first and last name.

Tip 5: Don’t give up personal information
Legitimate banks and most other companies will never ask for personal credentials via email. Don’t give them up.

Tip 6: Beware of urgent or threatening language in the subject line
Invoking a sense of urgency or fear is a common phishing tactic. Beware of subject lines that claim your “account has been suspended” or your account had an “unauthorized login attempt.”

Tip 7: Review the signature
Lack of details about the signer or how you can contact a company strongly suggests a phish. Legitimate businesses always provide contact details.

Tip 8: Don’t click on attachments
Including malicious attachments that contain viruses and malware is a common phishing tactic. Malware can damage files on your computer, steal your passwords or spy on you without your knowledge. Don’t open any email attachments you weren’t expecting.

Tip 9: Don’t trust the header from email address
Fraudsters not only spoof brands in the display name, but also spoof brands in the header from email address. Return Path found that nearly 30% of more than 760,000 email threats spoofed brands somewhere in the header from the email address with more than two-thirds spoofing the brand in the email domain alone.

Tip 10: Don’t believe everything you see
Phishers are extremely good at what they do. Just because an email has convincing brand logos, language, and a seemingly valid email address, does not mean that it’s legitimate. Be skeptical when it comes to your email messages—if it looks even remotely suspicious, don’t open it.

Want to learn how to block phishing threats before they reach your customers? Check out our guide, Getting Started with DMARC.

Source: This article was published blog.returnpath.com By Estelle Derouet

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Imagine you went to a networking event last night and met a potential business partner. You're all set to send a pleasant follow-up note but realize you've forgotten the one thing you need–their email address.

While you can find most people on various social networks–from professional ones like LinkedIn to personal ones like Facebook–email still reigns supreme as the preferred method of getting in touch. Email's more personal and professional at the same time, and your contact is all-but guaranteed to have an email address, as there are 2.9 billion email addresses in the world.

Contacting people over social media has more hurdles than sending a simple email. You might have to pay to send a LinkedIn message, or the person might not accept Direct Messages on Twitter from strangers. It's worth the trouble to just email instead.

Finding email addresses isn't always easy, though. Most people are protective of their email address, for good reason: We all hate spam. With a little investigative work, though, you can find almost anyone's email address. Here's how.

Start with Quick Email Searches

Google search for email
A Google search might be all you need to find an email

The first place you should look for email addresses is the “About” page of their company’s website. You might find anything from a brief bio to detailed contact info for every team member. Dig around a bit, and you might find email addresses in unexpected places. For instance, on Zapier's About page, you'll find team members' contact information by hovering over their photos.

Personal websites are another great place to check. If you can find a personal blog or landing page for that contact, you'll likely find an email address on their Contact page. At least, it's worth checking.

Google can help out, by finding other personal sites or the email address itself. There’s a chance your prospect's email address is listed somewhere online, so just search for their first and last name along with the word and email perhaps their company name. Google will find anywhere this combination appears.

If you can find your prospect's social media account, check their profile for contact information. Users sometimes list this information on LinkedIn or Twitter, often with a space between their email address and the domain. On Twitter, for example, use the search from operator to find an email address (e.g., email from:dannyaway).

Twitter email search

Alternately, use 3rd party Twitter search app SnapBird. It can search through all of the Tweets from your feed or followers; just enter a keyword such as “email” and the user’s name, and it’ll do the rest.

LinkedIn is also worth exploring for email addresses. It lets you export contacts and their email addresses if they’re available on their profiles, for an easy way to find addresses of anyone you're already connected with. You can also use a tool such as Lusha to find contact information for people on LinkedIn, including their corporate email address, personal email address, and phone number.

Then, there are also several “people search” websites that can be helpful, including SpokeoPeopleSmart, and Pipl. Some sites are free to use (including Pipl), while you'll need a paid subscription to unlock most people search sites' full features.

When all else fails, you can try guessing. Seriously. If you can find the naming convention the company uses perhaps from another employee at that firm (in some cases, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.), you can try that format with your prospect's name and wait to see if the email bounces back. Guessing might not be efficient, but it could work.

Try an Email-Finding App

If you’ve completed your web and social media search and still can’t find a trusted email address, it’s time to use a tool designed for this email search. Fortunately, there are lots of apps just for this.

Just enter your prospect’s name along with their company name, and you’ll receive either the app’s best guess or a list of viable options. Here are the best options:

Email Generator

Email Generator

Part of your initial email search may involve entering various name and company domain combinations into Google. This is not only time consuming, but it can be frustrating considering the various combinations that can exist. That’s where Email Generator comes in. It generates over 50 popular email combinations for that name for you in seconds just from their name and company domain.

As an added bonus, Email Generator will also give you potential email variations for popular email services like Gmail and Outlook. If you’re confident that you’ve found the correct email address, consider installing Email Generator’s email tracking software, MailTrack.io, which will let you know when your email recipient opens it.

Price: Free

Mail Tester

Mail Tester

Once you've found a potential email address, use Mail Tester to see if the email address is valid. It can't tell you if that's the real email for the person you want, but it can confirm whether or not that email address exists on that domain name.

If the email address is valid, Mail Tester shows the server info it found. If it’s unable to confirm the accuracy of an email address, it will display a message stating that the company’s server doesn’t allow email verification.

Keep in mind, even if the app can’t confirm whether an email address is accurate, that doesn’t mean that there’s anything wrong with the email address. Sometimes it comes down to whether or not a company’s server will allow Mail Tester to connect to it and provide users with valid information. The only way to be 100% certain is to send an email to the address and see if you receive a bounce-back notification stating that the email address doesn’t exist.

Price: Free

BuzzStream

BuzzStream

BuzzStream is another fantastic app to use to boost your email search. It can find contact information (including social network profiles) for “influencers”, people who are active on social media and blogs. Once you've gotten in touch with an influencer, it will save those messages, and let you share them with your team to easily follow up.

When you need to find email addresses, simply add in the company URL and the app will display both employee email addresses and the company’s Twitter handle. If the app can’t find the email address of a specific person, it will provide you with the about and contact pages of the company as a starting point. Or, use its free email research tool to get auto-generated Google Search links that'll help you find their email address.

Price: Free 14-day trial; from $24/month for one user

Voila Norbert

Voila Norbert

Voila, Norbert is one of the simplest ways to find an email address. Just enter the first and last name of anyone you’re trying to find, along with the company’s domain name. It'll then ping the domain to show any addresses it finds that might match the name, along with reviews from users to show if the address is actually valid or not.

It works surprisingly well for finding company addresses. Keep in mind that some companies strive to keep the email addresses of their employees private, though, so if Voila Norbert isn’t given access it lets you know.

Price: Free for searching up to 50 email addresses; plans from $49/month

Voila, Norbert Zapier integrations coming soon!

Email Hunter

Email Hunter

Email Hunter lets you find email addresses right from its homepage. Just enter the company domain name into the search field, click search, and the app will find all of the publicly available email addresses for that company domain.

It also shows the number of sources found online for each email address, to add to the verification and validity of each one. That makes it an even better bet for finding email addresses that actually work.

Price: Free for searching up to 150 email addresses per month; plans from $49/month

See Email Hunter integrations on Zapier

Conspire

Conspire

Conspire is a little different from the other apps on this list. Rather than solely providing emails, it operates on the “six degrees of separation” theory. Like the game "Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon," where you try to figure out how a person would be connected to Kevin Bacon or some other celebrity, Conspire assumes you might know someone who knows someone who knows your prospective contact.

If you’d like to meet a new potential client through the people you already know, the app will show you the best possible path—based on people in your network—to reach out through. You can then connect with folks just outside of your network even if you haven’t met them by mentioning your mutual contacts.

Conspire uses data from your linked Gmail account to get a sense of your current network. It then scores each relationship to give an idea of how “strong” the connection is, using the To, From, CC, Subject and Date fields of your emails—along with your frequency of communication—to determine connection strength. This data determines how you and your contacts communicate.

Price: Free

Find an Email with a Browser Extension

Another handy way to find email addresses is with a browser extension—many of which work right inside your Gmail inbox. With just a couple of clicks, you can quickly look up an email address without opening a new app or webpage.

Rapportive (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer)

Rapportive gif

Rapportive puts contact info discovery right inside Gmail. It can be used in conjunction with an app such as Email Generator. Simply enter a few email variations into the “Send To” field when composing an email in Gmail. Hover over each email address and Rapportive will show as much profile information as possible.

For example, with a real email, Rapportive can show you the contact’s full name, profile pic, company name and location, and links to websites (both personal and professional) and social networks. That's enough to be confident that you’ve found the right email address. Or, if it doesn't find any info, you'll see a grey block which means you'll need to keep searching for the right address.

And, when you're reading emails, Rapportive will show that same contact info in the right sidebar for a simple way to learn more about your contacts.

Price: Free

Clearbit (Chrome)

Clearbit

Similar to Rapportive, this Chrome extension integrates with Gmail. However, instead of checking variations of an email address, Clearbit quickly finds email addresses from its database, along with other company and personal data. Just enter a company's name, select the correct one, then filter through the contacts it finds there.

Then, when you receive an email, Clearbit can also give you extra info about each email—something extra helpful when trying to remember how you met a contact.

Price: Free for up to 50 searches per month

See Clearbit integrations on Zapier

Datanyze Insider (Chrome and Firefox)

Datanyze Insider can find any email address with just the first and last name of the contact—no need to enter a company domain name.

To use the extension, highlight the contact’s name as it appears online (for example, in LinkedIn or the company’s about page), right click, choose “Datanyze Insider” and click “Find email”. Datanyze Insider will then ping email addresses that are most likely to be valid (based on name and company domain variations) and display the ones that appear to be valid. It also provides a percentage for how confident it is that it found the correct email address.

Price: Free

Ninja Outreach (Chrome)

Ninja Outreach searches a company's website for any mention of a contact's name that you highlight on the web page. If it doesn’t find a match, the extension will check its own database for a match. Ninja Outreach will also give you links to the prospect’s social networks, location address, and more.

Price: Free without signup to search for addresses; register for a Ninja Outreach account to get full features including contact form autofill, web app templates, and enhanced website information

Find That Lead (Chrome)

Find That Lead adds an icon next to people's names on web pages you visit, such as LinkedIn. Click the icon and the resulting pop-up menu will display the person's company name and email address. If the search isn’t successful, the plugin will display the best result it was able to find, along with a percentage score of how certain it is that the email address is accurate. It can also work with a tool such as Rapportive if you need added certainty before sending an email.

Price: Free for up to 10 emails per week; from $15/month for additional searches

LeadFuze (Chrome)

LeadFuze helps you build a relevant contact list. It does the tedious work for you of finding email addresses, social network profiles, and prospect details such as titles and company names for an entire list of contacts. Once you have a list you’re happy with, you can set up targeted emails and subsequent follow-up emails. To be sure you have the correct email addresses, LeadFuze includes reports to see whether your email has been viewed.

Price: Free for up to 20 leads; plans from $150/user/month

Source: This article was published zapier.com By Milveen Eke-Allen

Categorized in How to

We know that our smartphones are capable of doing just about anything which our desktops can do these days. But all too often, we don’t protect our smartphones nearly as well as we protect our computers.

Hackers are just as capable of breaking into your smartphone and they can do all sorts of damage to you once they are in. As 60 Minutes shows, a hacker could break into your phone and find out who you are calling, where you are, and even listen in on your conversations and read your texts. There is the recent incident where several Democratic staffers recently had their phones attacked by foreign hackers looking to uncover private information.

But while there is no such thing as the perfect protection, implementing protection protocols can help keep your phone safe. Upon seeing even simple protections, most hackers will just move on and search for another less-protected phone. Here are a few things which you can do to keep your phone safe.

1. Keep your Phone safe

You may think of hackers as nerds sitting in some basements inputting some complicated program. But that is not the biggest threat to your phone. Your biggest threat is an ordinary thief who snatches your phone, escapes, and then cracks your password to find what is inside.

So the first step to protecting your phone is to do the same things which you should be doing to protect against thieves. Be aware of your environment when you are using your smartphone. Keep an eye out for suspicious individuals, and grip your phone with both hands so it is harder for the thief to rip it away. Also, back up your mobile data to your computer so that you can easily access it if your phone gets stolen.

2. Don’t use your Phone for everything

One of the biggest reasons why hackers try to go after your phone is so that they can uncover sensitive information such as banking information and passwords. But if you don’t have that sort of data on your phone, then there is nothing for the hacker to uncover.

Obviously, you need certain private information on your phone. But what about something like banking information or work-related affairs? Do you really need to check that information now, or can it wait until you get home and check it on your computer?

Avoid accessing confidential information whenever possible, especially if you are using public Wi-Fi. Also regularly clear your browsing history and caches so that hackers have less information to find.

3. Update your phone

Hacking is a war between hackers and software companies. The hackers find loopholes, software companies fix the holes, the hackers find more holes, and so on. But in order to fix those holes, you have to keep your phone updated so that the earlier holes are filled in.

This is particularly important because less competent hackers have to rely on those holes which other hackers have uncovered to get your information. The longer you choose to not update your phone, the more the opportunity to break in and uncover your information.

4. Look into encryption

There are a lot of people out there who think that encryption and password protection are the same thing. This is incorrect. Encryption scrambles your phone’s data so that even if the hacker just hacks your phone while bypassing the password request (and they can do that), the data will be completely illegible. Just look at the recent controversy between Apple and the FBI on breaking into a terrorist’s Apple phone, and that should give an idea of how hard it can be to break into an encrypted phone.

Encryption can do a lot to protect your phone’s data and the good news is that all iPhones and newer Android versions come with their phone automatically encrypted once you set a password (tip: set a password for your phone). But if you have an older version, you will have to encrypt it yourself by going into the security section of your phone’s settings.

5. Be careful using public Wi-Fi and Bluetooth

Public Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are easy to use, but they are an easy gateway for hackers to get into your mobile phones. As CNN notes, hackers can trick your phones into connecting to spoof Wi-Fi or Bluetooth accounts which just end up sending all your cell phone’s data right to the hacker. Hackers can also take advantage of vulnerabilities in Bluetooth software as another way into your cellphone.

So try to rely on your phone’s 4G network instead of Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, and never let your phone automatically connect to public Wi-Fi hotspots. If you do, then it is possible for hackers to realize your phone is connected and hack in even while you have no idea that your phone is connecting to the Wi-Fi network in the first place.

Author: Michael Prywes
Source: http://www.lifehack.org/466933/5-expert-security-tips-for-your-smartphone

Categorized in Internet Privacy

If you're job hunting potential employers will Google you, and inappropriate dirt on social media will hurt your chances of getting the gig. Jimmy Rhoades has three tips for finding what's out there and how to clean up the mess.

1.  Google Yourself

92 percent of Google users don't look past the first page, so the idea is to push the bad stuff down to Page 2 or later. That can be tough -- companies pay big bucks to get on Page 1 results, but to even have a shot, create positive, new content -- a website, a blog, whatever -- and do whatever free or cheap search engine optimization you can to move it above the bad stuff.

2.  BrandYourself

This company offers paid services, but also a free DIY tool. You start by entering your name, then categorizing the search results as positive, negative or not you at all. This generates a reputation score which you can improve using their optimization tools.

3.  Scrubber

What kind of embarrassing things might be lurking way back in your social history? Enter Scrubber! Use this tool to find profanity, mentions of drugs or alcohol, even cheek-ins at strip clubs. They focus solely on the social media aspect of your digital history.

Author: Jimmy Rhoades
Source: http://www.ktnv.com/entertainment/television/the-list/3-tips-to-clean-up-your-image-on-google-searches

Categorized in Internet Privacy

In the last five years, social networks have acquired about 1 billion new users. Over one third of the world’s population is now accessible via social media, and companies have gone from being skeptical about social media marketing to seriously investing in it.

In this social media dominated world, marketing is heavily reliant on technology, but that technology remains focused on people. This year’s trends will help marketers reach and engage their audience on a more personal level, over social media noise. Companies will be able to fine-target their niche communities, with increased support from software solutions.

Social Media Marketing Trends and Tips

The following is a list of trends and tips for social media marketers to leverage now.

1. Investment in Visual Marketing Will Increase

Most social networks have already launched their versions of live-streaming. Twitter has Periscope, Facebook’s Live, and other networks like Blab and DubSmash support live video sharing. Live-feeds are becoming the “in-thing”. Even the US Presidential election updates were broadcast live by BuzzFeed on Twitter.

You can use live video platforms to engage you audience will near-tangible experiences. If you don’t have a Facebook Live strategy, now is the best time to get one.

With social feeds growing crowded and viewer attention spans growing shorter by year,  you’ll need powerful graphics to captivate your audience. In the last five years, the graphic design software market has expanded, giving marketers extensive options to choose from. You can put together graphics on a drag-and-drop editor to simplify your content creation process.

2. Personalization Will Become Priority

Today’s social media users are faced with ads and commercial content on multiple fronts. The receive information from multiple sources, and breaking through that barrier is becoming a tough task for brands and marketers. Personalization will help marketers slice through the chaos and reach only the people who matter.

Tracking consumers’ behaviors on social platforms and targeting them based on interests will become an essential part of marketing. Some social media marketing tools and apps are already incorporating features to support personalization and targeting. More technology solutions will appear in the time to come. You can target your high-potential market by posting content that only they can relate to, or by targeting them using data pulled from tools.

3. Brand Advocacy Will Grow Popular Among Marketers

Ad saturation is driving brands to look for alternative means to reach their target markets. Investment in advocate marketing has seen a steep increase (by about 191 percent) in the recent times. Micro-influencers could be the key to increasing your brand’s reach on social media, because they are more influential and credible than your brand can be.

Employees, customers and social fans are among the micro-influencers that brands are activating. There a quite a few great employee advocacy guides and case-studies that you can look at for inspiration in building your brand advocate outreach programs. You can use an advocacy platform to build and run your brand advocacy program.

4. Native Content Promotion Will Expand

In Joe Pulizzi’s words, native advertising is content marketing’s “gateway drug”. The modern audience is wise to commercial ploys, and traditional advertising alone may not be a great option for branding your company. Native ads help you create awareness without disrupting users’ activities. Content delivered in this manner can help you connect with your audience without being too pushy. According to a study, native ads are set to to grow to $21 billion by 2018.

Content discovery tools, content distribution platforms and content amplification tools are interesting means to having your content shared organically on social media. You could use one of these solutions to have your content positioned where it can earn you some traction.

5. Marketing Automation Will Go Mainstream

Companies with constrained marketing budgets may have not used marketing automation until now, but according to a study, 92 percent of these companies are losing revenue because of that decision. 2017 may see business of all types and sizes adopt marketing automation. 91 percent marketers are convinced that automation is an indispensable part of marketing.

Each social network is unique in terms of demographic and use-cases. This may force businesses to be present on more than one of them to keep consumers and prospects engaged. Managing social pages can be a time intensive task, without the assistance of a supporting social management tool. The idea is to use the tool to automate tasks that don’t require personal attention – like posting created content to multiple accounts and catching mentions of your brand. You can also curate content with a tool and take the final call on what to share. It all comes down to the extra-time that you can save to better invest elsewhere. Managing content on a central platform can also help you maintain consistency across different pages.

Wrap

Social media marketing is set to evolve into a highly tech-focused and detail-oriented effort. To succeed  at reaching and engaging your target market, you need to explore and stay abreast of the latest developments and technologies offered for social. The areas mentioned on this post are good places to keep tabs on.

Author: Jessica Davis
Source: https://smallbiztrends.com/2017/01/social-media-marketing-trends.html

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