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The idea that we might be living in just one of an infinite number of universes has been fodder for scientific debate and sci-fi movie plots for a long time, but coming up with evidence to support the theory has been hard to come by. Now, researchers have discovered something in space that they can’t quite account for, and one of the possible explanations is that — are you sitting down? — our universe actually bumped into a neighboring, parallel one.

 

When gazing into the heavens, scientists spotted what they refer to as a “cold” area of space. It was observed some time ago, and explaining it proved difficult, but a 2015 study suggested it was merely an area of the universe in which the number of galaxies is dramatically lower than the rest. Unfortunately, subsequent investigations couldn’t support that finding, and a new study by Durham University suggests the slim possibility that it’s actually evidence of parallel universes is still on the table.

The multiverse theory hinges on the idea that all possible outcomes of any given scenario are all playing out at the same time in a layered reality of which we are only experiencing one layer. It’s a wild idea that has a foundation in quantum mechanics, but it’s also entirely unproven.

 

As the study states, the researchers believe the mysterious cold spot, while still totally unexplained, could actually be “the remnant of a collision between our universe and another ‘bubble’ universe during an early inflationary phase.” In short, if the idea is correct, our early universe collided with another young universe early on, causing something of a “bruise” which we are able to observe today.

Source: This article was published BGR News By Mike Wehner

Categorized in Science & Tech

Scientists believe they have moved a step closer to proving the existence of a parallel universe with the discovery of a mysterious ‘cold spot’.

This cool patch of space, that was first spotted by the NASA WMAP satellite in 2004, is part of the radiation that was thought to have been produced during the formation of the universe some 13 billion years ago.

 

However, research conducted by Professor Tom Shanks from Durham University has uncovered a new theory – that the Cold Spot was formed when universes COLLIDED.

The cold spot could be evidence of a larger multiverse (Flickr)
The cold spot could be evidence of a larger multiverse (Flickr)

 

Professor Shanks theorises that this is ‘the first evidence for the multiverse – and billions of other universes may exist like our own”.

He explained: “We can’t entirely rule out that the spot is caused by an unlikely fluctuation explained by the standard [theory of the Big Bang].

“But if that isn’t the answer, then there are more exotic explanations.

“Perhaps the most exciting of these is that the Cold Spot was caused by a collision between our universe and another bubble universe.”

He added: “If further, more detailed, analysis… proves this to be the case then the Cold Spot might be taken as the first evidence for the multiverse.”

Source: This article was published Yahoo News UK By Andy wells

Categorized in Science & Tech

As far as we know the universe is not infinite, there's actually a place where it ends. While astronomers have never actually seen the edge of the universe, they know it's out there. Theoretical physicist and director of the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, Robbert Dijkgraaf explains how scientists know there's an edge of the universe.

Following is a transcript of the video: 

It’s a fascinating question, “How far can you see in the universe?”

And the point is that if you look at very distant objects, it takes a lot of time for the light to travel all the way to us. And since the universe was kind of created 13.8 billion years ago, there's a finite distance that we can see.

 

We can almost see the edge of the visible universe. In fact, the earliest thing that we can see is the first light that was created just after the Big Bang.

Well, just 380,000 years after the Big Bang. At that point the universe was kind of transparent enough for light to escape.

So using our satellites we can pick up a signal that was emitted at this very brief moment after the Big Bang.

While in the meantime the universe has expanded and so that first light has kind of cooled down and it's now a microwave signal.

 

In fact what you can do, if you take an old-fashioned television set and you just unplug the cable, there will be static noise on your screen. Roughly 1% of that static noise is actually coming from the very edge of the universe.

Source: This article was published on businessinsider.com by Darren WeaverJessica Orwig and Alana Kakoyiannis

Categorized in Science & Tech

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