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Learn to unblock them, too

Since WhatsApp is so popular, chances are good that someone you don’t want to connect with might contact you through the instant messaging app. You can simply choose to ignore the unwanted messages or you can take it a step further and block the undesirable contact. 

You can easily block existing or unknown contacts and unblock them just as quickly, if you change your mind. Learning how to block a contact on WhatsApp  (or unblock them) depends on the type of phone you are using.

Blocking Known Contacts

When you block someone on WhatsApp, you will stop receiving messages, calls or status updates from them. The blocked users will no longer be able to view your status updates, last seen or online information. Here's how to block a contact on WhatsApp. 

iPhones

  1. Open WhatsApp.
  2. Tap Settings and select Account.
  3. Tap Privacy
  4. Tap Blocked and then tap Add New.
  5. Select the name of the contact you wish to block from your contact list.

Android Phones

  1. Start WhatsApp.
  2. Tap the Menu button. 
  3. Tap Settings and choose Account.
  4. Tap Privacy
  5. Tap Blocked Contacts and then tap Add.
  6. Select the name of the contact you want to block from your list of contacts.

Windows Phones 

  1. Start WhatsApp.
  2. Tap More and then choose Settings
  3. Tap Contacts and then tap Blocked Contacts.
  4. Tap the plus icon (+) on the bottom of the screen to select the name of the person you want to block.

Nokia S40

You can block a contact that is saved in your phone.

  1. Open WhatsApp and go to Options.
  2. Select Settings.
  3. Choose Account and then select Privacy.
  4. Select Blocked Contacts and choose Add Contact
  5. Move to the name of the person you want to block. Select the contact to add them to your Blocked Contacts list. 

Blocking Unknown Numbers

You have the option of blocking people using unknown numbers or reporting the user for spam on WhatsApp, which also blocks the person from contacting you in the future.

iPhones

  1. Start WhatsApp and open the message you received from the unknown person.
  2. Tap Block.
  3. Tap Report and Block if you want to report the user for spam.

Android Devices

  1. Open WhatsApp and tap the chat with the unknown person to open it.
  2. Tap Block.
  3. Tap Report Spam if you want to block the user and report the person for spam, as well.

Windows Phones 

  1. Open WhatsApp.
  2. Open the message you received from an unknown contact.
  3. Tap More.
  4. Tap Block and then tap Block once more to confirm.

Nokia S40

  1. Open WhatsApp and open the chat window from the unknown person.
  2. Go to the Options menu and select Block.

Unblocking Contacts

When you unblock a contact on WhatsApp, you will be able to receive new messages and calls from that person. However, you will not receive calls or messages sent from that contact while they were blocked. Here's how to unblock someone on WhatsApp.

iOS Phones

  1. Open WhatsApp.
  2. Tap Settings and select Account.
  3. Tap Privacy and then select Blocked.
  4. Swipe left on the name of the contact you wish to unblock.
  5. Tap Unblock

Android Phones

  1. Start WhatsApp.
  2. Tap the Menu button and choose Settings.
  3. Tap Account and then tap Privacy.
  4. Select Blocked Contacts.
  5. Tap and hold the contact's name until a menu pops up.
  6. Tap Unblock from the menu.

    Windows Phones

    1. Open WhatsApp.
    2. Tap More and choose Settings
    3. Tap Contacts and select Blocked Contacts.
    4. Tap and hold the contact you wish to unblock.
    5. Choose Unblock from the popup menu.

    Alternatively, you can send a message to the blocked contact and choose Yes on the prompt that appears asking if you wish to unblock the contact. 

    A blocked contact will remain in your contact list. You must delete the contact from your phone’s address book to remove that person from your WhatsApp contact list.

     Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Tricia Goss

    Categorized in How to

    WHATSAPP users are being targeted by cybercriminals, who have unearthed a new way to pilfer your online bank account details. This is everything you need to know about the new hack, and how to avoid the scam.

    WhatsApp users should be careful to avoid a new scam that attempts to steal your bank account login details.

    Hackers are targeting unsuspecting users with a mobile virus that is distributed via legitimate-looking Word documents sent inside WhatsApp .

    Once opened, these documents are capable of siphoning sensitive information from users, including online banking credentials and other personal data.

    The virus has also been disguised as a Microsoft Excel or PDF file, according to users.

    So far, the technique has only been demonstrated in India, with the malicious files bearing the names of the NDA (National Defence Academy) and NIA (National Investigation Agency) to try and lure WhatsApp users into downloading and opening the virus-laced files.

    According to a report by the Economic Times, central security services in India have issued a notification to the NDA and NIA, since it is believed the WhatsApp attacks are attempts to target people in uniform.

    Officials told the publication, "As these two organisations are very popular and known within the country and abroad and there is a curiosity about them, it is possible that it may affect the mobile phones of people interested in these subjects.

    "However, it has been analysed that the men and women in defence, paramilitary and police forces could be the target groups."

    The virus is purportedly able to access personal data stored on the smartphone, including banking credentials and PIN codes.

    This is not the first time cybercriminals have used .

    Last year, WhatsApp users in the UK were warned about  that claimed to offer users a .

    Worse still, the scam message appeared as if it was forwarded by someone within your contacts – such as a friend or family member.

    However the recipient name was actually a fake designed to trick WhatsApp users into trusting the web address for the alleged £100 Sainsbury's voucher.

    The scam message asks users to follow a link to the web for the Sainsbury's voucherThe WhatsApp scam message asks users to follow a link to the web for the Sainsbury's voucher

    The messages reads: "Hey have you heard about this?

    "Sainsbury's is giving away £100 gift cards. They are expanding their store network and they launched this promotion.

    "Grab a gift card while its lasts. I got mine already." (sic)

    The -owned app was recently praised by Amnesty International, which dubbed the Facebook-owned instant messenger as the "most secure" platform available to consumers.

    But  was convinced by the praise.

    WhatsApp is aware that cybercriminals use its app to try and steal users' information
    WhatsApp is aware that cybercriminals use its app to try and steal users' information

    According to Amnesty International, the chat app, which uses end-to-end encryption by default, was closely followed by Apple's iMessage and FaceTime, and Telegram.

    However it is still possible to become the victim of a scam – like the above – within these secure apps.

    WhatsApp is aware that spam messages manage to make their way onto its secure platform.

    According to the hugely-successful firm, "We work diligently to reduce any spam messages that come through our system.

    "Creating a safe space for users to communicate with one another is a priority. 

     "However, just like regular SMS or phone calls, it is possible for other WhatsApp users who have your phone number to contact you.

    "Thus, we want to help you identify and handle these messages.

    "Unwanted messages from unauthorised third parties come in many forms, such as spam, hoax and phishing messages. 

    "All these types of messages are broadly defined as unsolicited messages from unauthorised third parties that try to deceive you and prompt you to act in a certain way."

    If you think you have been tricked into clicking on any of these links –

    Source: This article was published express.co.uk By AARON BROWN

    Categorized in Internet Privacy

    Opera’s latest update for its desktop browser makes its easier to stay on top of conversations from various messaging apps, by baking their services right into the app.

    Fire up Opera and you’ll now be able to access Facebook’s Messenger, WhatsApp and Telegram right from the browser’s sidebar. You can switch between them whenever you like, pin the messaging tab for easier access and use shortcuts to jump from one service to the other.

    Additionally, you can quickly share images to these services by dragging and dropping photos on the messenger’s icon.

    I was grateful for desktop versions of these apps when they launched, because they freed me from having to pick up my phone to reply to messages ever so often. But with so many of them to juggle, the number of extra browser tabs adds up quickly. Franz, which is a free app that lets you run multiple messengers in a single window, helped a bit – but it’s nice to have all my browser tabs and chats in a single app.Opera previously added features like a built-in adblocker and a free VPN service. You can grab the latest version of Opera for Mac, Windows and Linux here.

    Source: This article was published on thenextweb.com

    Categorized in Science & Tech

    WhatsApp is testing two major new features that could soon make their way to all users.

    The messaging app has long been rumoured to be working on an “unsend” option for messages, which would allow users to delete messages they’ve already sent.

    The company is testing the feature in a new beta release of WhatsApp Web, reports @WABetaInfo, which says it offers users a five-minute window to revoke sent messages.

    Once those five minutes are up, the message is there to stay.

    A new beta version of WhatsApp for Android, meanwhile, introduces new shortcuts for formatting text.

    Currently, users have to remember a range of commands to format their messages.

    To make text bold, they have to place it between two asterisks, like *this*. To italicise it, users need to sandwich it between two underscores, like _this_, and to strikethrough a message, they need to use tildes, like ~this~.

    Instead of making users learn and type those commands, the test version of the app displays the full range of formatting options when a user selects an excerpt of text with a tap and hold.

    If feedback from the tests proves positive, WhatsApp will roll the features out to all users in future updates.

    The app came under heavy fire from Home Secretary Amber Rudd in the wake of the Westminster attacks last month, but unfairly so in most people’s eyes.

    She attacked its use of end-to-end encryption, which protects the privacy of its millions of users, keeping them safe from cybercriminals. Encryption is also used by banks and government websites.

    However, WhatsApp could soon start sharing users’ data with parent company Facebook again, with an agreement expected to be reached this summer.

    Source : independent.ie

    Categorized in Social

    It seems that the number of scams spreading through the messaging app WhatsApp keeps on increasing, with deceptive campaigns coming up with with novel ways of luring in victims. Today we will show you a new example of this.

    This particular WhatsApp scam promises users a free internet service, without needing to use Wi-Fi. Despite being complete nonsense from a technical point of view, the offer may nevertheless appear tempting to those unaware of the realities. And it’s also selling something pretty amazing …

    Imagine being able to navigate with your smartphone wherever you are, without mobile data from your carrier or a Wi-Fi network. Who wouldn’t like that while on holiday abroad? It’s like magic … because it’s not real. Clicking on this scam won’t change that.

    The decoy

    As usual, the message spreads via WhatsApp groups or comes from a friend who “recommends” the service – often unaware of it. In this case, you receive a special invitation with a link:

    1-whatsapp-free-internet

    Once you click on the link, the page will detect the device’s language and show the following images, with the intention of making the scheme credible and leading the victim to share the content with at least 13 people. Thus, the scam keeps spreading:

    2-whatsapp-scam-spreading

    On the bottom of the screenshot you can see some comments from people who supposedly tried the service, stating that it works. This is a ruse. Clearly these messages and the profiles associated with them are fake – they aren’t on Facebook at all, so this is all part of the fraud.

    As you can see in the image below, the scam can also be seen in Spanish (you will be automatically redirected to their default language depending on their browser settings). All of this goes on without you even noticing:

    3-whatsapp-scam-spanish

    This behavior is widely used nowadays, mostly because it allows cybercriminals to create different scams using the same pattern, in order to make them credible for users in multiple countries. This way, they don’t depend on a single country or language and they can target different nationalities all at once.

    What happens after you share?

    Having overcome the barrier of sharing, unwary users looking for free internet end up on sites where different actions may occur, ranging from subscription to premium and costly SMS services, to installation of third party apps, always with the goal of granting an economic return to the scammer.

    Unfortunately, victims will only see offers, but no trace of free internet.

    Tips to avoid falling in these campaigns

    We have to keep in mind that education and security solutions are still the main tools users need to be safe online. Awareness about these scams should become viral faster than the scams themselves; however, we keep seeing an alarming rate of propagation.

    If you know a victim, you can help by alerting their contacts to avoid hitting sour note. In case you want to report the fraud, you can flag it in your browser as is usually done in phishing campaigns.

    Source : welivesecurity.com

    Categorized in Science & Tech

    Users of the popular  Web service are being warned to restart their web browsers after a terrifying vulnerability was discovered.

    The serious security flaw can allow cyber criminals to access personal data including photos, contacts and videos in a matter of seconds.

    Worryingly, it appears the simple hack can be performed without the user ever knowing.

    According to security firm Check Point, the flaw can be exposed by the hacker sending a single fake image to WhatsApp users.

    Although the shared snap might look innocent enough, hackers can use it to mask a piece of malicious code buried within.

    Once the image has been downloaded, the code gets to work infiltrating the computer - granting hackers full access to the WhatsApp account.

    WhatsApp Web users are being warned to restart their browsers

    WhatsApp: Hidden Tips, Tricks and Features You Never Knew

    WhatsApp is the world's most popular messaging app but you probably don't know all of the tricks and features hidden up its sleeve. Here's everything you need to know to master WhatsApp.

    WhatsApp - Hidden tricks and features you probably don't know, but definitely should be using
    WHATSAPP • EXPRESS NEWSPAPERS
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    WhatsApp - Hidden tricks and features you probably don't know, but definitely should be using

    To matters worse, once the criminals have accessed your account, they can use your log-in to forward further fake images to all of your contacts, spreading the malicious code wide and gaining access to hundreds of further accounts.

    The vulnerability, which was discovered by Check Point, was found to trouble those who use the desktop WhatsApp service.

    It also affect those signed up to the rival messaging platform, Telegram.

    Fortunately, having discovered the problem, the security firm alerted WhatsApp of the problem on March 8 and the messaging behemoth has already patched the problem.

    “This new vulnerability put hundred of millions of WhatsApp Web and Telegram Web users at risk of complete account takeover,” said Oded Vanunu, Check Point’s head of product vulnerability research.

    “By simply sending an innocent looking photo, an attacked could gain control over the account, access message history, all photos that were ever shared, and send messages on behalf of the user.”

    WhatsAppWABetaInfo

    WhatsApp users could soon get a landscape mode

    How to enable or disable WhatsApp's new security feature

    WhatsApp now telling users that they must restart their browsers immediatley to avoid being targeted by the scam.

    Speaking to technology website, The Verge, a WhatsApp spokesperson said: "“We build WhatsApp to keep people and their information secure,

    “When Check Point reported the issue, we addressed it within a day and released an update of WhatsApp for web. To ensure that you are using the latest version, please restart your browser.”

    This latest update comes as  to its hugely popular smartphone app.

    One of the features currently being trialled in beta is the addition of a landscape mode.

    Code for a landscape has been hidden in the latest beta software release on iOS.

    Screenshots of the landscape layout have been tweeted by the reliable WABetaInfo account, although beta testers will not find the new feature enabled in the latest update.

    As the feature is included in the latest beta, it's not difficult to imagine the new layout rolling out to users in the coming weeks and months.

    Author : DAVID SNELLING

    Source : express.co.uk

    Categorized in Internet Privacy

    Internet service providers have warned that using WhatsApp offline can expose subscribers to hacking and malicious viruses.

    This was contained in a message by Airtel Nigeria, which advised Nigerians, especially subscribers on its network, to be vigilant in accepting certain messages.

    It said on Tuesday in Lagos that there had been messages in circulation which tend to show that a subscriber could make use of WhatsApp without access to the internet.

    “Dear customer, our attention has been drawn to messages notifying customers of the use of WhatsApp without internet.

    “Kindly ignore and do not click on those links, as it redirects to cloned applications.

    “The links may be used to harvest sensitive information from your device. Be cautious,” Airtel said in a text message to its customers.

    The News Agency of Nigeria reports that since the beginning of 2017, the message has been circulating, while many may have fallen victims.

    The hackers’ message usually reads, “First, you need to update your WhatsApp iOS to the latest WhatsApp version 2.17.1.

    “Now, this allows sending the message to any contact in your list without having internet connection.

    “This feature was available on Android for more than a year, but iOS users are only getting it now.

    “Also, you will be getting an option to send 30 photos or videos at a time if you update your WhatsApp.”

    The message has been certified to be a hoax, and should be disregarded. (NAN)

    Source : punchng.com

    Categorized in Internet Privacy

    WHATSAPP Web users are being warned after a vulnerability is discovered that allows hackers to access personal data - luckily there is a very simple fix that everyone should follow.

    Users of the popular  Web service are being warned to restart their web browsers after a terrifying vulnerability was discovered.

    The serious security flaw can allow cyber criminals to access personal data including photos, contacts and videos in a matter of seconds.

    Worryingly, it appears the simple hack can be performed without the user ever knowing.

    According to security firm Check Point, the flaw can be exposed by the hacker sending a single fake image to WhatsApp users.

    Although the shared snap might look innocent enough, hackers can use it to mask a piece of malicious code buried within.

    Once the image has been downloaded, the code gets to work infiltrating the computer - granting hackers full access to the WhatsApp account.

    To matters worse, once the criminals have accessed your account, they can use your log-in to forward further fake images to all of your contacts, spreading the malicious code wide and gaining access to hundreds of further accounts.

    The vulnerability, which was discovered by Check Point, was found to trouble those who use the desktop WhatsApp service.

    It also affect those signed up to the rival messaging platform, Telegram.

    Fortunately, having discovered the problem, the security firm alerted WhatsApp of the problem on March 8 and the messaging behemoth has already patched the problem.

    “This new vulnerability put hundred of millions of WhatsApp Web and Telegram Web users at risk of complete account takeover,” said Oded Vanunu, Check Point’s head of product vulnerability research.

    “By simply sending an innocent looking photo, an attacked could gain control over the account, access message history, all photos that were ever shared, and send messages on behalf of the user.”

    WhatsAppWABetaInfo

    WhatsApp users could soon get a landscape mode

    How to enable or disable WhatsApp's new security feature

    WhatsApp now telling users that they must restart their browsers immediatley to avoid being targeted by the scam.

    Speaking to technology website, The Verge, a WhatsApp spokesperson said: "“We build WhatsApp to keep people and their information secure,

    “When Check Point reported the issue, we addressed it within a day and released an update of WhatsApp for web. To ensure that you are using the latest version, please restart your browser.”

    This latest update comes as  to its hugely popular smartphone app.

    One of the features currently being trialled in beta is the addition of a landscape mode.

    Code for a landscape has been hidden in the latest beta software release on iOS.

    Screenshots of the landscape layout have been tweeted by the reliable WABetaInfo account, although beta testers will not find the new feature enabled in the latest update.

    As the feature is included in the latest beta, it's not difficult to imagine the new layout rolling out to users in the coming weeks and months.

    Author : DAVID SNELLING

    Source : http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/science-technology/780802/WhatsApp-Web-hack-warning-Google-Chrome-Safari-Edge-restart

    Categorized in Internet Privacy

    WhatsApp has a security bug that could allow encrypted messages to be intercepted from the popular messaging app that owner Facebook has said promises end-to-end encryption.

     

    WhatsApp, acquired by Facebook in 2014, said last year that all communications such as text messages, videos and other files flowing the service would be encrypted. The app has become hugely popular, with more than 1 billion users.

    About the time that WhatsApp announced its end-to-end encryption, cryptography and security researcher Tobias Boelter at the University of California-Berkeley contacted WhatsApp about a flaw he had found in the app. He found that undelivered messages — perhaps because the receiver of the message was offline or had changed their phone number — could be intercepted either by an attacker or WhatsApp itself, he says.

    That's because WhatsApp makes new encryption keys for undelivered messages and those could be intercepted by a third party that is not WhatsApp. WhatsApp itself, since it is generating another version of the message, has it on its servers, too.

    In an interview with The Guardian, Boelter said, "If WhatsApp is asked by a government agency to disclose its messaging records, it can effectively grant access due to the change in keys."

    Boelter also did a presentation on the WhatsApp vulnerability earlier this year — a video is posted on Twitter— and wrote about the situation on his blog in May saying that "next time the FBI will not ask Apple but WhatsApp to ship a version of their code that will send all decrypted messages directly to the FBI."

    He contacted Facebook and WhatsApp about the vulnerability in April 2016 and, in May, Facebook told him the company is not "actively working on changing" it.

    A WhatsApp spokesperson told The Guardian that users can change their security settings so that they know when a contact's key or code is changed. "We know the most common reasons this happens are because someone has switched phones or reinstalled WhatsApp. This is because in many parts of the world, people frequently change devices and Sim cards. In these situations, we want to make sure people's messages are delivered, not lost in transit," the company told The Guardian.

    Privacy advocates had been concerned with WhatsApp on another issue, too. In August 2016, WhatsApp said it would begin sharing data with Facebook, as a way to better serve users and fight spam. But the requirement that users opt-out of the feature led privacy groups including Electronic Privacy Information Center to file complaints with the Federal Trade Commission.

    EPIC called the move an "unfair and deceptive trade practice." And European Union Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said Facebook "gave us incorrect or misleading information during the investigation into its acquisition of WhatsApp."

    Author : Mike Snider

    Source : http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/13/whatsapp-has-bug-that-could-be-exploited.html

    Categorized in Social

    WhatsApp might stop working for many users as the company made it public that it would end support for the popular chat app on older handsets by the end of 2016.

    The company said dropping support on older devices would give it the opportunity to focus more on mobile platforms used by the vast majority of the people.

    The mobile platforms that would no longer enjoy WhatsApp are Android 2.1 and Android 2.2, Windows Phone 7, iPhone 3GS and iOS 6. The reason is lack of functionality to support the upcoming features.

    "While these mobile devices have been an important part of our story, they don't offer the kind of capabilities we need to expand our app's features in the future," the company wrote in an official blog post last February.

    For the owners of the affected devices, the only way to start using WhatsApp again is by upgrading to a newer version of Android, iPhone or Windows Phone.

    The Facebook-owned company earlier said it would end support to BlackBerry OS and BlackBerry 10, Nokia S40 and Nokia Symbian S60, but later it said it was extending the support for the devices until 30 June, 2017.

    These changes are believed to allow WhatsApp to deeply integrate encryption and other privacy features, reports the Independent.

    WhatsApp might introduce more new features. The changes rumoured to be part of updates scheduled for 2017 include a feature that would allow users to edit or delete messages after they are sent.

    Author: Sarmistha Acharya
    Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/whatsapp-might-stop-working-for-older-android-iphones-and-windows-devices/ar-BBxOZbp

    Categorized in Others
    Page 1 of 2

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