WikiLeaks reveals that both British and American intelligence agencies used an implant on Samsung TVs to secretly listen-in on user conversations.

Using MI5’s EXTENDING Tool, American counterparts at the CIA developed the listening implant tool code-named “Weeping Angel” to record audio on Samsung F Series Smart Televisions, according to the latest Vault 7 dump by WikiLeaks.

“Based on the ‘Extending’ tool from MI5/BTSS, the [Weeping Angel] implant is designed to record audio from the built-in microphone and egress or store the data,” the intro reads.

According the EXTENDING Tool user’s guide, the implant is installed using a USB stick inserted into the TV, and it could be configured to setup a WiFi hotspot through which the intelligence agencies could spy directly on live conversations.

“The implant is configured on a Linux PC, and then deployed onto the TV using a USB stick. Audio files can then be extracted using a USB stick or setting up a Wi-Fi hotspot with-in range of the TV. It is also possible to listen to audio exfiltration live, using the Live Listen Tool, designed for use on a Windows OS.”

Regarding the WiFi hotspot, which is required for Remote Access Audio Retrieval and Live Audio Exfiltrating, the user’s guide explains, “To exfiltrate files over a Wi-Fi hotspot, the hotspot must be setup within range of the TV with a preconfigured SSID, set in the config file. Files are then exfiltrated over this Wi-Fi network to a server as configured in the configuration file.”

Even when the TV is off, the CIA and MI5 still can record audio using the aptly-named “Fake-off” recording feature.

“EXTENDING will continue to record audio, even whilst the TV appears to be off. This is achieved by intercepting the command for the TV to switch-off and turning off the TV screen, leaving the processor running.”

In what appears to be a perverted form of British charm, the guide is ever-so polite in saying, “Please ensure the unencrypted settings file, encryptSettings tool and rsakeygen tool are always stored securely.”

The walkthrough of the implant’s installation in the user’s guide even gives a friendly reminder to hackers to clear the TV’s history after installing the ultra-secretive, privacy-stealing, attack apparatus on individuals’ rights.

Source : This article was published sociable.co By TIM HINCHLIFFE

Categorized in News & Politics

Leak suggests CIA malware systems have targeted iPhones, Android systems, Microsoft software and Samsung smart TVs.

The CIA can turn your TV into a listening device, bypass popular encryption apps, and possibly control your car, according to thousands of documents published by WikiLeaks, an anti-surveillance group.

The group posted nearly 9,000 documents on Tuesday it said were leaked from the Central Intelligence Agency, in what it described as the largest-ever publication of secret intelligence materials.

It said the trove of documents "appears to have been circulated among former US government hackers and contractors in an unauthorised manner, one of whom has provided WikiLeaks with portions of the archive".

Jonathan Liu, a spokesman for the CIA, said: "We do not comment on the authenticity or content of purported intelligence documents."

Experts who have started to sift through the material said that it appeared legitimate.

The leak, named "Vault 7" by WikiLeaks, claims the CIA developed a malware to infect mobile phones to allow easier surveillance - but lost control of the technology. If the CIA really lost control of the technology, hackers worldwide could use the tools to steal data.

Edward McAndrew, a lawyer with a speciality in cyber security, said the security breach is a major concern for the CIA because its technology could already be in the wrong hands

"What we're hearing from WikiLeaks and others is that pieces of the toolkit are now outside of Langley [the CIA's Virginia headquarters]," he told Al Jazeera.

"If that's true, once these tools are introduced into the wild of the internet, they cannot be reclaimed. We'll then see a race between those who would use these tools to exploit others and those trying to close all these vulnerabilities that have now come to light." 

The actual hacking tools were not part of the WikiLeaks trove.

WikiLeaks said it planned to avoid distributing tools "until a consensus emerges" on the political nature of the CIA's programme and how such software could be analysed, disarmed and published.

Malware systems

WikiLeaks said the documents show the CIA has produced more than 1,000 malware systems - viruses, trojans, and other software that can infiltrate and take control of target electronics.

These hacking tools have targeted iPhones, Android systems such as the kind of personal phone reportedly still used by President Donald Trump, popular Microsoft software and Samsung smart TVs, which can be transformed into covert microphones, according to WikiLeaks.

The agency has also examined hacking into the electronic control systems on cars and trucks, potentially enabling it to control them.

By infecting smartphones, WikiLeaks said, the CIA can get around the encryption technologies of popular apps such as WhatsApp, Signal, Telegram, Weibo, and Confide by collecting communications before they are encrypted.

Matthew Green, professor of computer science, told Al Jazeera that "ordinary people" should not have to worry about the revelations.

"What I would perhaps worry about is that some of this might get into the hands of very sophisticated criminal organisations or foreign governments and be used in a very targeted way against activists or human rights workers," he said.

Source : aljazeera.com

 

Categorized in News & Politics

WikiLeaks has promised 2017 will be an even bigger year for leaks than 2016, which saw the whistleblowing site publish thousands of documents exposing US political secrets, covert trade deals and private communications from global leaders.

“If you thought 2016 was a big WikiLeaks year, 2017 will blow you away,” WikiLeaks tweeted on Monday, giving no hints as to what may be in store.

The tweet also included a link to its website’s donation page so people can help the site “prepare for the showdown.”

It proved a very busy 2016 for the whistleblowing site, as it delivered a massive trove of documents over the 12-month period.

This included more than 50,000 emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair JohnPodesta and more than 27,000 emails from the Democratic National Committee, which confirmed the DNC worked against Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, favoring Clinton.

More US State Department cables were released, as well as documents which gave an insight into the US arming of Yemen. Text from the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) was also revealed.

The emails relating to the US election rocked the Democratic establishment and delivered a blow to the Clinton campaign in the lead-up to the November election.

WikiLeaks also confirmed that founder Julian Assange will take part in a Reddit Ask Me Anything (AMA) on Thursday at 14:00 GMT (9am EST). The tweet announcing the AMA contained the hashtag ‘proofoflife’, presumably referencing concerns raised by some for the WikiLeaks editor’s wellbeing.

Author: Julian Assange
Source: https://www.rt.com/news/372550-wikileaks-2017-showdown-leaks

Categorized in News & Politics

NOT SO LONG ago, the internet represented a force for subversion, and WIRED’s list of the most dangerous people on the internet mostly consisted of rebellious individuals using the online world’s disruptive potential to take on the world’s power structures. But as the internet has entered every facet of our lives, and governments and political figures have learned to exploit it, the most dangerous people on the internet today often are the most powerful people.

A Russian dictator has evolved his tactics from suppressing internet dissent to using online media for strategic leaks and disinformation. A media mogul who rose to prominence on a wave of hateful bile now sits at the right hand of the president. And a man who a year ago was a reality television star and Twitter troll is now the leader of the free world.

Vladimir Putin

Since experts pinned the Democratic National Committee breach in July on two teams of hackers with Russian-state ties, the cybersecurity and US intelligence community’s consensus has only grown: Russia is using the internet to screw with America’s electoral politics. The Russian hack of the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, followed by the leak of those groups’ private communications, injected chaos and distraction into the Democratic party at a crucial moment in the electoral season, and may have even helped tip the scales for Trump.

Even before those Russian hackers’ handiwork came to light, Putin’s government was already hard at work poisoning political discourse online. Its armies of paid trolls have been busy injecting false stories into online discussion forums, attacking the Kremlin’s critics on Twitter and in the comments of news sites. Taken together, that hacking and trolling makes Putin’s government one of the world’s most malevolent forces for disinformation and disruption online. And if anything, recent events have only emboldened them.

Donald Trump

When WIRED compiled its list of the internet’s most dangerous people in 2015, we called Trump a “demagogue, more interested in inciting backward fears and playing to Americans’ worst prejudices than addressing global problems.” None of that has changed. Trump still hasn’t officially renounced his promises of a ban on Muslim immigration or apologized for calling Mexican immigrants rapists. Now, he’s weeks away from becoming President of the United States.

As President-elect, Trump has continued to act as the world’s most powerful internet troll, telling his 17.6 million Twitter followers that anyone who burns the American flag should be unconstitutionally imprisoned and have their citizenship revoked, and arguing, with no evidence, that millions of fraudulent votes were cast in an election that he won. Trump’s Twitter account telegraphs his apparent disregard for the Constitution, spreads disinformation on a massive scale, and has baselessly called America’s electoral process into question.

Steve Bannon

Before Steve Bannon joined Donald Trump’s campaign as CEO, he was already in Trump’s corner as the publisher of the righter-than-right wing news site Breitbart.com. During his tenure running that site, Breitbart published the racist, anti-semitic and overtly misogynist content that made it the paper of record for the bigoted new political fringe known as the alt-right. Now, as the chief strategist for Trump’s transition team coming presidency, he stands to bring that fascist agitprop perspective into the White House itself.

James Comey

In the weeks before November’s election, FBI Director James Comey cemented his already controversial reputation by revealing that his agents would continue the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s private email server, after previously setting it aside in July. He did not explain anything about what a newly found trove of emails entailed, or why they might be significant (they weren’t). That half-clue was all the Trump campaign and its surrogates needed to start a wildfire of speculation, and even to claim that Clinton would be imminently indicted (she wasn’t).

But even before Comey’s unwarranted insertion of the FBI into the most sensitive political moment of a tense election, the FBI head had led the federal government’s war on encryption to a dangerous standoff: demanding that Apple write code to help the bureau crack its own device, the locked iPhone 5c of San Bernadino killer Rizwan Farook. That six-week battle, which finally ended in the FBI finding its own method of breaking into the phone, showed Comey’s willingness to compromise Americans’ cybersecurity and privacy in the interests of surveillance, and put a lasting strain on Silicon Valley’s relationship with the FBI.

ISIS

The pseudo-religious apocalyptic cult known as the Islamic State may be losing money, resources, and ground on its home turf in Iraq and Syria. But its tendrils still extend throughout the web and social media. The group showed in 2016 that it can still reach lone, disaffected, and even mentally ill people to inspire tragic acts of violence. Even as its direct power crumbles, ISIS’s propaganda this year contributed to horrific massacres from the Bastille Day truck attack in Nice to the Pulse night club shootings in Orlando. And unlike the rest of the individuals on this list, ISIS’ danger comes from what social media extremism expert Humera Khan calls “the ISIS Borg collective.” The deaths of dozens of top ISIS commanders in 2016, in other words, hasn’t dulled the group’s message.

Milo Yiannopoulos

The Breitbart columnist Milo Yiannpoulos in 2016 illustrated everything that’s wrong with Twitter. Not simply his role as an “alt-right troll”—a polite term for a race-baiting, misogynistic, immoral fame-monger. Yiannopoulos graduated from awful ideas to actual targeted abuse, gleefully turning his hordes of followers on targets like actress and comedian Leslie Jones, who thanks to Yiannopolous was drowned in so much nakedly racist, sexist abuse that she temporarily quit the site. Twitter eventually banned him, a decision Yiannopolous lauded as only increasing his fame. And there are plenty more people who still espouse his ideas on the platform. But it will at least keep his vile statements confined to the darker corners of the internet, where they belong.

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan

For a brief moment this summer, the world feared that a military coup would topple Turkey’s elected president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. Then it watched in horror as Erdoğan used that failed coup to justify a internet and media crackdown rarely, if ever, seen in modern democracies. More than a hundred Turkish journalists have since been jailed, and access has been intermittently throttled or cut to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and WhatsApp. In response to protests that have since embroiled the country, Erdoğan’s regime has at times cut off internet access entirely to millions of Turks, denying them both the means to assemble and spread dissident information, as well as basic services.

Julian Assange

Julian Assange proved in 2016 that even from the two-room de facto prison of London’s Ecuadorean embassy, it’s possible to upend the powers-that-be. In WikiLeaks’ most influential and controversial moves since it first rose to national attention in 2010, Assange masterminded the leaks of emails from the Democratic National Committee and the email account of Hillary Clinton campaign staffer John Podesta. Never mind that those leaks appeared to come not from internal whistleblowers but from external hackers, believed by US intelligence agencies to be on Russia’s payroll. Assange has denied that his source is Russian. But it’s a curious claim: WikiLeaks is designed to guarantee sources’ anonymity, so that even he can’t identify them. He also promises those sources he’ll “maximize the impact” of their leaks. And in this election, he kept his promise.

Peter Thiel

After supporting Donald Trump’s campaign financially and vocally, Peter Thiel ended this year as arguably the most influential person in Silicon Valley, literally sitting at the left hand of the president-elect in the tech industry’s meeting with him earlier this month. The intelligence contractor Palantir, which he co-founded, will no doubt rise with him, and its powers for privacy-piercing analysis could become more broadly applied within America’s intelligence and law enforcement agencies than ever before.

But we’ll leave all that for next year’s “most dangerous” list. Thiel’s real demonstration of his power in 2016 came in the form of Hulk Hogan’s lawsuit against Gawker, which the tech billionaire was revealed to have funded. The suit effectively wiped one of his personal enemies off the internet—which, as Thiel has calmly explained, was his goal. Given that win for censorship, his role on the Trump transition team, and Trump’s promise to “open up” libel laws, Gawker may just be the canary in the First Amendment coal mine.1

Source : https://www.wired.com/2016/12/dangerous-people-internet-2016/

Categorized in News & Politics

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange promised 'significant' disclosures on subjects including the U.S. election and Google in the coming weeks as the secret-spilling group marked its 10th anniversary on Tuesday.

  • Assange said WikiLeaks plans to start publishing new material starting this week, but wouldn't specify the timing and subject and warned that the so called 'October Surprise' may expose Google.

  •  
  • The war between Assange and the tech giant started in 2014 when he wrote about the company in his book titled, 'When Google Met Wikileaks', according to Recode.

  • 'Nobody wants to acknowledge that Google has grown big and bad,' Assange wrote in the book. 

  • WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (pictured in 2016) promised 'significant' disclosures on subjects including the U.S. election and Google in the coming weeks as the secret-spilling group marked its 10th anniversary on Tuesda

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange (pictured in 2016) promised 'significant' disclosures on subjects including the U.S. election and Google in the coming weeks as the secret-spilling group marked its 10th anniversary on Tuesda

     

    Assange (pictured above on Tuesday) said WikiLeaks plans to start publishing new material starting this week

     

    Assange (pictured above on Tuesday) said WikiLeaks plans to start publishing new material starting this week

    'But it has. Schmidt's tenure as CEO saw Google integrate with the shadiest of U.S. power structures as it expanded into a geographically invasive megacorporation.' 

    Assange became concerned about former Google CEO Eric Schmidt's ties with the State Department in 2009 when Hillary Clinton was serving as secretary of state.

    He has claimed that Schmidt, who is a chairman at the company, has worked with the Clintons for years, as Donald Trump accused Google of political bias saying that it suppresses negative news about Clinton.  

    Speaking by video link to an anniversary news conference in Berlin earlier this week, he said the leaks include 'significant material' on war, arms, oil, internet giant Google, the U.S. election and mass surveillance.

    WikiLeaks hopes 'to be publishing every week for the next 10 weeks,' Assange said.

    Assange wrote in his 2014 book that 'Schmidt's (file above) tenure as CEO saw Google integrate with the shadiest of U.S. power structures as it expanded into a geographically invasive megacorporation'

     

    Assange wrote in his 2014 book that 'Schmidt's (file above) tenure as CEO saw Google integrate with the shadiest of U.S. power structures as it expanded into a geographically invasive megacorporation'

    The group, which released Democratic National Committee emails days before the party's national convention earlier this year, wouldn't say who or what campaign would be affected by the upcoming U.S. election leaks. 

    Assange said speculation that he or WikiLeaks intend to harm Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton is 'false.'

    Asked whether he feels any personal affinity with Clinton's Republican rival, Donald Trump, Assange replied: 'I feel personal affinity really, I think, with all human beings.'

    'I certainly feel sorry for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump,' he added. 'These are two people that are tormented by their ambitions in different ways.'

    Assange claimed that Schmidt has worked with the Clintons for years, as Donald Trump accused Google (file) of political bias saying that it suppresses negative news about Clinton 

    Assange claimed that Schmidt has worked with the Clintons for years, as Donald Trump accused Google (file) of political bias saying that it suppresses negative news about Clinton

    Wikileaks came to prominence a decade ago by publishing classified documents that related to prisoners in the United States' Guantanamo Bay, NSA surveillance of world leaders and military operations in Afghanistan.

    In addition, millions of diplomatic and military files were made public by Wikileaks from US soldier Chelsea Manning who is currently serving a 35-year prison term for leaking the information.

    Sweden is seeking Assange's extradition in a rape investigation.

    He hasn't left the Ecuadorean Embassy in London since 2012.

    Assange denies the rape allegation and says he fears being extradited to the U.S. to face espionage charges if he leaves.

    Source : dailymail.co.uk

    Categorized in Others

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