As always, when Google releases a new update to its search algorithm, it’s an exciting (and potentially scary) time for SEO. Google’s latest update, BERT, represents the biggest alteration to its search algorithm in the last five years.

So, what does BERT do?

Google says the BERT update means its search algorithm will have an easier time comprehending conversational nuances in a user’s query.

The best example of this is statements where prepositional words such as ‘to’ and ‘for’ inform the intent of the query.

BERT stands for Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers, which is a language processing technique based on neural networking principles.

Google estimates the update will impact about 10% of United States-based queries and has revealed BERT can already be seen in action on featured snippets around the world.

How does Google BERT affect on-page SEO?

SEO practitioners can breathe a collective sigh of relief, because the Google BERT update is not designed to penalise websites, rather, only improve the way the search engine understands and interprets search queries.

However, because the search algorithm is better at understanding nuances in language, it means websites with higher-quality written content are going to be more discoverable.

Websites that have a lot of detailed ‘how-to’ guides and other in-depth content designed to benefit users are going to get the most from Google BERT. This means businesses who aren’t implementing a thorough content strategy are likely to fall behind the curve.

Basically, the BERT update follows Google’s long-running trend of trying to improve the ability of its search algorithm to accurately serve conversational search queries.

The ultimate result of this trend is users being able to perform detailed search queries with the Google voice assistant as if they were speaking to a real person.

Previous algorithm updates

While BERT may be the first major change to Google search in five years, it’s not the biggest shakeup in their history.

The prior Google PANDA and Google PENGUIN updates were both significant and caused a large number of websites to become penalised due to the use of SEO strategies that were considered ‘spammy’ or unfriendly to users.

PANDA

Google PANDA was developed in response to user complaints about ‘content farms’.

Basically, Google’s algorithm was rewarding quantity over quality, meaning there was a business incentive for websites to pump out lots of cheaply acquired content for the purposes of serving ads next to or even within them.

The PANDA update most noticeably affected link building or ‘article marketing’ strategies where low-quality content was published to content farms with a link to a business’ website attached to a keyword repeated throughout the article.

It meant that there was a significant push towards more ethical content marketing strategies, such as guest posting.

PENGUIN

Google PENGUIN is commonly seen as a follow up to the work started by PANDA, targeting spammy link-building practices and ‘black-hat’ SEO techniques.

This update was focused primarily on the way the algorithm evaluates the authority of links as well as the sincerity of their implementation in website content. Spammy or manipulative links now carried less weight. 

However, this meant that if another website posted a link to yours in a spammy or manipulative way, it would negatively affect your search rankings.

This meant that webmasters and SEO-focused businesses needed to make use of the disavow tool to inform Google what inbound links they approve of and which they don’t.

[Source: This article was published in smartcompany.com.au By LUCAS BIKOWSKI - Uploaded by the Association Member: Bridget Miller]

Categorized in Search Engine

Search-engine giant says one in 10 queries (and some advertisements) will see improved results from algorithm change

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.—Google rarely talks about its secretive search algorithm. This week, the tech giant took a stab at transparency, unveiling changes that it says will surface more accurate and intelligent responses to hundreds of millions of queries each day.

Top Google executives, in a media briefing Thursday, said they had harnessed advanced machine learning and mathematical modeling to produce better answers for complex search entries that often confound its current algorithm. They characterized the changes—under a...

Read More...

[Source: This article was published in wsj.com By Rob Copeland - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jasper Solander] 

 
Categorized in Search Engine

Don't try to optimize for BERT, try to optimize your content for humans.

Google introduced the BERT update to its Search ranking system last week. The addition of this new algorithm, designed to better understand what’s important in natural language queries, is a significant change. Google said it impacts 1 in 10 queries. Yet, many SEOs and many of the tracking tools did not notice massive changes in the Google search results while this algorithm rolled out in Search over the last week.

The question is, Why?

The short answer. This BERT update really was around understanding “longer, more conversational queries,” Google wrote in its blog post. The tracking tools, such as Mozcast and others, primarily track shorter queries. That means BERT’s impact is less likely to be visible to these tools.

And for site owners, when you look at your rankings, you likely not tracking a lot of long-tail queries. You track queries that send higher volumes of traffic to your web site, and those tend to be short-tail queries.

Moz on BERT. Pete Meyers of Moz said the MozCast tool tracks shorter head terms and not the types of phrases that are likely to require the natural language processing (NLP) of BERT.

dr.pete

RankRanger on BERT. The folks at RankRanger, another toolset provider told me something similar. “Overall, we have not seen a real ‘impact’ — just a few days of slightly increased rank fluctuations,” the company said. Again, this is likely due to the dataset these companies track — short-tail keywords over long -tail keywords.

Overall tracking tools on BERT. If you look at the tracking tools, virtually all of them showed a smaller level of fluctuation on the days BERT was rolling out compared to what they have shown for past Google algorithm updates such as core search algorithm updates, or the Panda and Penguin updates.

Here are screenshots of the tools over the past week. Again, you would see significant spikes in changes, but these tools do not show that:

mozcast 800x348

serpmetrics 800x308

algoroo 800x269

advancedwebranking 800x186

accuranker 800x245

rankranger 800x265

semrush 800x358

SEO community on BERT. When it comes to individuals picking up on changes to their rankings in Google search, that also was not as large as a Google core update. We did notice chatter throughout the week, but that chatter within the SEO community was not as loud as is typical with other Google updates.

Why we care. We are seeing a lot of folks asking about how they can improve their sites now that BERT is out in the wild. That’s not the way to think about BERT. Google has already stated there is no real way to optimize for it. Its function is to help Google better understand searchers’ intent when they search in natural language. The upside for SEOs and content creators is they can be less concerned about “writing for the machines.” Focus on writing great content — for real people.

Danny Sullivan from Google said again, you cannot really optimize for BERT:

johan

Continue with your strategy to write the best content for your users. Don’t do anything special for BERT, but rather, be special for your users. If you are writing for people, you are already “optimizing” for Google’s BERT algorithm.

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Joshua Simon]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google said it is making the biggest change to its search algorithm in the past five years that, if successful, users might not be able to detect.

The search giant on Friday announced a tweak to the software underlying its vaunted search engine that is meant to better interpret queries when written in sentence form. Whereas prior versions of the search engine may have overlooked words such as “can” and “to,” the new software is able to help evaluate whether those change the intent of a search, Google has said. Put a bit more simply, it is a way of understanding search terms in relation to each other and it looks at them as an entire phrase, rather than as just a bucket of words, the company said. Google is calling the new software BERT, after a research paper published last year by Google executives describing a form of language processing known as Bidirectional Encoder Representations from Transformers.

While Google is constantly tweaking its algorithm, BERT could affect as many as 10 percent of English language searches, said Pandu Nayak, vice president of search, at a media event. Understanding queries correctly so Google returns the best result on the first try is essential to Google’s transformation from a list of links to determining the right answer without having to even click through to another site. The challenge will increase as queries increasingly move from text to voice-controlled technology.

But even big changes aren’t likely to register with the masses, he conceded.

“Most ranking changes the average person does not notice, other than the sucking feeling that their searches were better,” said Nayak.

“You don’t have the comparison of what didn’t work yesterday and what does work today,” said Ben Gomes, senior vice president of search.

BERT, said Nayak, may be able to determine that a phrase such as “math practice books for adults” likely means the user wants to find math books that adults can use, because of the importance of the word “for.” A prior version of the search engine displayed a book result targeted for “young adults,” according to a demonstration he gave.

Google is rolling out the new algorithm to U.S. users in the coming weeks, the company said. It will later offer it to other countries, though it didn’t offer specifics on timing.

The changes suggest that even after 20 years of data collection and Google’s dominance of search — with about 90 percent market share — Web searches may best be thought of as equal parts art and science. Nayak pointed to examples like searches for how to park a car on a hill with no curb or whether a Brazilian needs a visa to travel to the United States as yielding less than satisfactory results without the aide of the BERT software.

To test BERT, Google turned to its thousands of contract workers known as “raters,” Nayak said, who compared results from search queries with and without the software. Over time, the software learns when it needs to read entire phrases versus just keywords. About 15 percent of the billions of searches conducted each day are new, Google said.

Google said it also considers other input, such as whether a user tries rephrasing a search term rather than initially clicking on one of the first couple of links.

Nayak and Gomes said they didn’t know whether BERT would be used to improve advertising sales that are related to search terms. Advertising accounts for the vast majority of Google’s revenue.

[Source: This article was published inunionleader.com By Greg Bensinger - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jeremy Frink]

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was published in enca.com - Uploaded by the Association Member: Rene Meyer]

In this file illustration picture taken on July 10, 2019, the Google logo is seen on a computer in Washington, DC. 

SAN FRANCISCO - Original reporting will be highlighted in Google’s search results, the company said as it announced changes to its algorithm.

The world’s largest search engine has come under increasing criticism from media outlets, mainly because of its algorithms - a set of instructions followed by computers - that newspapers have often blamed for plumenting online traffic and the industry’s decline.

Explaining some of the changes in a blog post, Google's vice president of news Richard Gingras said stories that were critically important and labor intensive -- requiring experienced investigative skills, for example -- would be promoted.

Articles that demonstrated “original, in-depth and investigative reporting,” would be given the highest possible rating by reviewers, he wrote on Thursday.

These reviewers - roughly 10,000 people whose feedback contributes to Google’s algorithm - will also determine the publisher’s overall reputation for original reporting, promoting outlets that have been awarded Pulitzer Prizes, for example.

It remains to be seen how such changes will affect news outlets, especially smaller online sites and local newspapers, who have borne the brunt of the changing media landscape.

And as noted by the technology website TechCrunch, it is hard to define exactly what original reporting is: many online outlets build on ‘scoops’ or exclusives with their own original information, a complexity an algorithm may have a hard time picking through.

The Verge - another technology publication - wrote the emphasis on originality could exacerbate an already frenetic online news cycle by making it lucrative to get breaking news online even faster and without proper verification.

The change comes as Google continues to face criticism for its impact on the news media.

Many publishers say the tech giant’s algorithms - which remain a source of mysterious frustration for anyone outside Google -- reward clickbait and allow investigative and original stories to disappear online.

Categorized in Search Engine

 [Source: This article was Published in searchenginejournal.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Martin Grossner]

Google says the June 3 update is not a major one, but keep an eye out for how your results will be impacted.

Google has just announced that tomorrow it will be releasing a new broad core search algorithm update. These core updates impact how search results are ranked and listed in the Google search results.

Here is Google’s tweet:

searchliaison

Previous updates. Google has done previous core updates. In fact, it does one every couple months or so. The last core update was released in March 2019. You can see our coverage of the previous updates over here.

Why pre-announce this one? Google said the community has been asking Google to be more proactive when it comes to these changes. Danny Sullivan, Google search liason, said there is nothing specifically “big” about this update compared to previous updates. Google is being proactive about notifying site owners and SEOs, Sullivan said, so people aren’t left “scratching their heads after-the-fact.”

casey markee

When is it going live? Monday, June 3, Google will make this new core update live. The exact timing is not known yet, but Google will also tweet tomorrow when it does go live.

eric mitz

Google’s previous advice. Google has previously shared this advice around broad core algorithm updates:

“Each day, Google usually releases one or more changes designed to improve our results. Some are focused around specific improvements. Some are broad changes. Last week, we released a broad core algorithm update. We do these routinely several times per year.

As with any update, some sites may note drops or gains. There’s nothing wrong with pages that may now perform less well. Instead, it’s that changes to our systems are benefiting pages that were previously under-rewarded.

There’s no ‘fix’ for pages that may perform less well other than to remain focused on building great content. Over time, it may be that your content may rise relative to other pages.”

 

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in makeuseof.com  written by Dan Price  - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Carol R. Venuti]

Of course, most social networks have their own search engines built in, but they’re fundamentally limited by the fact they can only search their own database. And how you are supposed to know whether Aunt Mary is on Facebook, Google Plus, or one of the other myriad options?

The solution? Use a network-agnostic social search engine. They can search all the most common networks, as well as lots of the niche, smaller ones.

If you need a social search engine, you’ve come to the right place. Here are six options for you to consider.

1. Pipl

Pipl offers a vast database of online accounts – almost three billion are accessible through its search algorithms.

The search engine doesn’t only scan social media networks. It also scans a list of both personal and work emails, deep web archives such as court records, news reports, and publicly available government lists.

6 Most Powerful Search Engines for Social Networks pipl 670x449

To use the tool, enter the person’s name, email address, or social media username into the search box. If you wish, you can also enter a location. Click on the magnifying glass icon to start the search.

How to Check for Open Usernames on Dozens of Social Media Sites at Once How to Check for Open Usernames on Dozens of Social Media Sites at OnceIf you want to create a new presence across social media sites, this tool will help you find a username that you can use on all of them!READ MORE

The results page will show you hits from across the site’s various databases. You can use the filters on the left-hand side of the screen to narrow the results by location and age.

Twitter itself also allows you to search for tweets by location.

2. Social Mention

Social Mention is both a social search engine and a way to aggregate user-generated content across a number of networks into a single feed. It helps you search for phrases, events, and mentions, but it won’t let you find individual people.

The site supports more than 80 social networks, including Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Digg, Google Plus, and Instagram. It can also scan blogs, bookmarks, and even comments.

6 Most Powerful Search Engines for Social Networks socialmention 670x476

In the left-hand panel of the results page, you’ll see an abundance of data about the phrases you entered. You can find out how frequently the page is mentioned, a list of associated keywords and hashtags, top users, and more.

On the right-hand side of the screen you’ll find links for exporting data into a CSV file, and along the top of the screen are various filter options.

3. snitch.name

The snitch.name site is one of the easiest on this list to use.

The site has several advantages over a regular search query on Google. For example, many social networks are either not indexed by Google, or only have very limited indexing. It also prioritizes “people pages,” whereas a regular Google search will also return results for results for posts mentioning the person, associated hashtags, and other content.

6 Most Powerful Search Engines for Social Networks snitch name 670x480

Obviously, even after running a search, some profiles theoretically remain restricted depending on the said user’s privacy settings. However, as long as you can access the account through your own social media account, you will be able to access the listing on snitch.name.

To use the site, fire up the homepage, enter your search terms, and mark the checkboxes next to the networks you want to scan. When you’re ready, click Search.

4. Social-Searcher

Social-Searcher is another web app that works across a broad array of social networks and other platforms.

You can use the site without making an account. Non-registered users can search Twitter, Google Plus, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, Reddit, Flickr, Dailymotion, and Vimeo. You can also save your searches and set up email alerts.

6 Most Powerful Search Engines for Social Networks social searcher 670x316

If you need a more powerful solution, you should consider signing up for one of the paid plans. For $3.50 per month, you get 200 searches per day, three email alerts, three keyword monitors, and space for up to 3,000 saved posts. The top-level plan, which costs $20 per month, increases the limits even further.

5. Social-Searcher: Google Social Search

The same team who is responsible for the previously-mentioned Social-Searcher has also developed a Google Social Search tool.

It works with six networks. They are Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. You can mark the checkboxes next to the networks’ logos to limit your search to particular sites.

6 Most Powerful Search Engines for Social Networks google social search 670x353

The usual Google search tricks apply. For example, putting quotation marks around a set of words will force Google to only return results with an exact match, adding a minus sign will exclude specific words from the results, and typing OR between words will let you roll several terms into one search result.

Results are sorted by networks, and you can click on Web or Images to toggle between the different media.

6. Buzzsumo

Buzzsumo takes a slightly different approach to the tools we have mentioned so far. It specializes in searching for trends and keyword performance.

That makes it an ideal tool for businesses; they can find out what content is going to have the biggest impact when they share it, as well as gaining an insight into the words and phrases their competitors are using.

On the results page, you can use the panel on the left-hand side of the screen to create filters. Date, content type, language, country, and even word counts are searchable parameters.

6 Most Powerful Search Engines for Social Networks buzzsumo 670x300

On the right-hand side of the page, you can see how successful each post was. Analytics for Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Pinterest are shown, as are the total number of shares.

Free users can only see the top 10 results; you will need a Pro account for $79 per month to unlock more. It’s probably too much money for individual users, but for businesses the cost is negligible.

Which Social Media Search Engines Do You Use?

In this article, we have introduced you to six of the best social media search engines. Each of them focuses on a different type of user and presents its results in a different way. If you use them all, you should be able to quickly find the topic, person, trend, or keyword you’re looking for.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: Clara Johnson

Some SEOs are seeing more fluctuations with the Google rankings now, but Google has confirmed the August 1 update has been fully rolled out.

Google has just confirmed that the core search algorithm update that began rolling out a week ago has now finished fully rolling out. Google search liaison Danny Sullivan said on Twitter, “It’s done” when I asked him if the rollout was complete.

Danny did add that if we are seeing other changes, “We always have changes that happen, both broad and more specific.” This is because some of the tracking tools are seeing more fluctuations today, and if they are unrelated to this update, the question is what they can be attributed to.

Here is Danny’s tweet:

@dannysullivan is the rollout of the core update complete? Seeing fluctuations today.

It's done. That said, we always have changes that happen, both broad and more specific.

Based on our research, the August 1 update was one of the more significant updates we have seen from Google on the organic search side in some time. It continued to roll out over the weekend and has now completed.

Google’s current advice on this update is that webmasters do not need to make any technical changes to their websites. In fact, the company said, “no fix” is required and that it is aimed at promoting sites that were once undervalued. Google has said that you should continue to look at ways of making your overall website better and provide even better-quality content and experiences to your website visitors.

Now that the rollout is complete, you can check to see if your site was impacted. But as Danny Sullivan said above, there are always changes happening in search.

 

Categorized in Search Engine

 Source: This article was published forbes.com By Jayson DeMers - Contributed by Member: William A. Woods

Some search optimizers like to complain that “Google is always changing things.” In reality, that’s only a half-truth; Google is always coming out with new updates to improve its search results, but the fundamentals of SEO have remained the same for more than 15 years. Only some of those updates have truly “changed the game,” and for the most part, those updates are positive (even though they cause some major short-term headaches for optimizers).

Today, I’ll turn my attention to semantic search, a search engine improvement that came along in 2013 in the form of the Hummingbird update. At the time, it sent the SERPs into a somewhat chaotic frenzy of changes but introduced semantic search, which transformed SEO for the better—both for users and for marketers.

What Is Semantic Search?

I’ll start with a briefer on what semantic search actually is, in case you aren’t familiar. The so-called Hummingbird update came out back in 2013 and introduced a new way for Google to consider user-submitted queries. Up until that point, the search engine was built heavily on keyword interpretation; Google would look at specific sequences of words in a user’s query, then find matches for those keyword sequences in pages on the internet.

Search optimizers built their strategies around this tendency by targeting specific keyword sequences, and using them, verbatim, on as many pages as possible (while trying to seem relevant in accordance with Panda’s content requirements).

Hummingbird changed this. Now, instead of finding exact matches for keywords, Google looks at the language used by a searcher and analyzes the searcher’s intent. It then uses that intent to find the most relevant search results for that user’s intent. It’s a subtle distinction, but one that demanded a new approach to SEO; rather than focusing on specific, exact-match keywords, you had to start creating content that addressed a user’s needs, using more semantic phrases and synonyms for your primary targets.

Voice Search and Ongoing Improvements

Of course, since then, there’s been an explosion in voice search—driven by Google’s improved ability to recognize spoken words, its improved search results, and the increased need for voice searches with mobile devices. That, in turn, has fueled even more advances in semantic search sophistication.

One of the biggest advancements, an update called RankBrain, utilizes an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm to better understand the complex queries that everyday searchers use, and provide more helpful search results.

Why It's Better for Searchers

So why is this approach better for searchers?

  • Intuitiveness. Most of us have already taken for granted how intuitive searching is these days; if you ask a question, Google will have an answer for you—and probably an accurate one, even if your question doesn’t use the right terminology, isn’t spelled correctly, or dances around the main thing you’re trying to ask. A decade ago, effective search required you to carefully calculate which search terms to use, and even then, you might not find what you were looking for.
  • High-quality results. SERPs are now loaded with high-quality content related to your original query—and oftentimes, a direct answer to your question. Rich answers are growing in frequency, in part to meet the rising utility of semantic search, and it’s giving users faster, more relevant answers (which encourages even more search use on a daily basis).
  • Content encouragement. The nature of semantic search forces searches optimizers and webmasters to spend more time researching topics to write about and developing high-quality content that’s going to serve search users’ needs. That means there’s a bigger pool of content developers than ever before, and they’re working harder to churn out readable, practical, and in-demand content for public consumption.

Why It's Better for Optimizers

The benefits aren’t just for searchers, though—I’d argue there are just as many benefits for those of us in the SEO community (even if it was an annoying update to adjust to at first):

  • Less pressure on keywords. Keyword research has been one of the most important parts of the SEO process since search first became popular, and it’s still important to gauge the popularity of various search queries—but it isn’t as make-or-break as it used to be. You no longer have to ensure you have exact-match keywords at exactly the right ratio in exactly the right number of pages (an outdated concept known as keyword density); in many cases, merely writing about the general topic is incidentally enough to make your page relevant for your target.
  • Value Optimization. Search optimizers now get to spend more time optimizing their content for user value, rather than keyword targeting. Semantic search makes it harder to accurately predict and track how keywords are specifically searched for (and ranked for), so we can, instead, spend that effort on making things better for our core users.
  • Wiggle room. Semantic search considers synonyms and alternative wordings just as much as it considers exact match text, which means we have far more flexibility in our content. We might even end up optimizing for long-tail phrases we hadn’t considered before.

The SEO community is better off focusing on semantic search optimization, rather than keyword-specific optimization. It’s forcing content producers to produce better, more user-serving content, and relieving some of the pressure of keyword research (which at times is downright annoying).

Take this time to revisit your keyword selection and content strategies, and see if you can’t capitalize on these contextual queries even further within your content marketing strategy.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was published bizjournals.com By Sheila Kloefkorn - Contributed by Member:Anthony Frank

You may have heard about Google’s mobile-first indexing. Since nearly 60 percent of all searches are mobile, it makes sense that Google would give preference to mobile-optimized content in its search results pages.

Are your website and online content ready? If not, you stand to lose search-engine rankings and your website may not rank in the future.

Here is how to determine if you need help with Google’s mobile-first algorithm update:

What is mobile-first indexing?

Google creates an index of website pages and content to facilitate each search query. Mobile-first indexing means the mobile version of your website will weigh heavier in importance for Google’s indexing algorithm. Mobile responsive, fast-loading content is given preference in first-page SERP website rankings.

Mobile first doesn’t mean Google only indexes mobile sites. If your company does not have a mobile-friendly version, you will still get indexed, but your content will be ranked below mobile-friendly content. Websites with a great mobile experience will receive better search-engine rankings than a desktop-only version. Think about how many times you scroll to the second page of search results. Likely, not very often. That is why having mobile optimized content is so important.

How to determine if you need help

If you want to make sure you position your company to take advantage of mobile indexing as it rolls out, consider whether you can manage the following tasks on your own or if you need help:

  • Check your site: Take advantage of Google’s test site to see if your site needs help.
  • Mobile page speed: Make sure you enhance mobile page speed and load times. Mobile optimized content should load in 2 seconds or less. You want images and other elements optimized to render well on mobile devices.
  • Content: You want high-quality, relevant and informative mobile-optimized content on your site. Include text, videos, images and more that are crawlable and indexable.
  • Structured data: Use the same structured data on both desktop and mobile pages. Use mobile version of URLs in your structured data on mobile pages.
  • Metadata: Make sure your metadata such as titles and meta descriptions for all pages is updated.
  • XML and media sitemaps: Make sure your mobile version can access any links to sitemaps. Include robots.txt and meta-robots tags and include trust signals like links to your company’s privacy policy.
  • App index: Verify the mobile version of your desktop site relates to your app association files and others if you use app indexation for your website.
  • Server capacity: Make sure your hosting servers have the needed capacity to handle crawl mobile and desktop crawls.
  • Google Search Console: If you use Google Search Console, make sure you add and verify your mobile site as well.

What if you do not have a mobile site or mobile-optimized content?
If you have in-house resources to upgrade your website for mobile, the sooner you can implement the updates, the better.

If not, reach out to a full-service digital marketing agency like ours, which can help you update your website so that it can continue to compete. Without a mobile-optimized website, your content will not rank as well as websites with mobile-friendly content.

Categorized in Search Engine
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