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Google Chrome is known to be one of the mobile browsers that are most easily used. There are, however, a variety of elements that cannot be found or used quickly. Google’s web Chrome browser is testing a new feature. Shortly, the search engine giant is creating a Chrome Video Tutorials to help new users familiarise themselves with the app, how-to browser.

 

Google Tests Chrome Browser Video Tutorials for Android Mobile Users

According to a report from PhoneArena, Google Chrome users will watch a video tutorial to understand the browser’s functions. This functionality is designed into the app and is now being tested or stable on the mobile browser that can right now be enabled from the Google Play Store on the Android smartphone. It contains the Chrome Canary application and the Chrome Dev app that allows users to access features the company checks and later arrive on live builds. These guides are for new users who don’t know the app and its features. Chrome Android users will watch a video tutorial explaining the browser features on the app’s home page.

The video tutorial was first noticed through Chrome Story, a platform that tracks the development of Google Chrome. A new flag is found inside the Dev and Canary channels of the Google Chrome Android app in the Chrome Story report. The flag is known as #video tutorials. When the flag is set to ‘Enabled,’ a new card will be shown on a new Chrome tab page for videos below the site shortcuts. The card shows many videos, and tapping any will play the video for users. The option also asks you to use your chosen language before playing a video, as seen in a clip-on Chrome Story. On top of each video, there is also a sharing button that allows users to share videos with just one tap.

The report says that the videos used for Chrome Dev and Canary channels are videos from placeholders from Google, with tutorials on the main screen already accessible. However, titles in the complete list of videos found in Chrome Dev and Canary editions indicate that these videos’ completion includes topics such as “How to use Chrome.”

 [Source: This article was published in phoneworld.com.pk By Sehrish Kayani - Uploaded by the Association Member: Rene Meyer]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google, the company that’s making money from ads tailored to your preferences, will finally be more transparent about how ads work. Google, the company that has been involved in various privacy scandals that revealed the novel ways it was tracking your online activity or your location to improve its ads, will tell you exactly how ad tech works. And it’s all happening in Google Chrome, the world’s most popular web browser. It’s not exactly coming from the goodness of its heart. Google still wants to make money off of your anonymized data, and I often explained that the data-for-free-apps trade-off does make plenty of sense for several of Google’s class-leading apps. But competing browsers that offer the user analytics about online ads and trackers, as well as ad blockers that threaten Google’s bottom line, forced Google to rethink its ad-related policies. In recent years, Google announced and implemented several measures meant to allow it to police the bad ads that ruin the internet-browsing experience, and the latest move further complements those efforts.

However, the Ads Transparency Spotlight (ATS) comes as a Chrome add-on that you’d have to install from the Chrome Web Store rather than becoming a built-in feature of the browser.

The new ATS add-on was built around an API called the “Ad Disclosure Schema” that allows advertisers to disclose how their ads work. However, ATS will pull information from Google’s ads initially, per ZDNet. Google hopes that other advertisers will expose a similar API/schema for their own system.

The ATS add-on will show you the following information:

  • Detailed information about the ads on the web page, including how many ads are on the page.
  • A list of ad providers responsible for serving the ads on the page. These companies serve ads or provide the ad technology to help ads appear on this page.
  • The reasons why ads are shown on a page. A combination of several factors that decide which ad will be shown on a page:

– Your demographics: May include age, gender, and other information (provided by you or inferred).
– Marketing Campaign: A visit to the advertiser’s website added you to a marketing campaign.
– Your location: General: Broad location, such as country or city.
– Your interests: Topics related to websites you have visited or interests you provided.
– Context: Topics shown to anyone who visits this page.
– Other information: All other reasons.
– Your location: Specific: Your specific location.

Google will also list companies in the ad tech business that deal with social media buttons, web analytics, or tracking scripts. Google will offer links to the privacy policy of each of these countries, where you’ll be able to see what data they collect about you.

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Screenshot shows Google’s new Ads Transparency Spotlight for Chrome. Image source: Google

The ATS add-on will not let you take any action against any of the companies, ads, or trackers found on the page. It just presents the information in a neatly arranged format. Should you not like something that you see, you’ll either have to change browsers and/or install programs that can block trackers and ads.

Google did build its own ad blocker in Chrome, a program meant to police the ads that misbehave, and announced that ads would no longer be able to consume resources and drain battery life. Google also announced a new Privacy Sandbox last year that’s meant to add a further layer of anonymity to the data that advertisers collect. Finally, Google last week announced a new Trust Token API tech intended to replace third-party cookies in the future, so the functionality of some websites doesn’t break once the cookies are gone.

Check out the Ads Transparency Spotlight at this linkAnd here is the manual for it.

[Source: This article was published in bgr.com By Chris Smith- Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff]

Categorized in Internet Privacy

These days, you can’t get hardly anything done without a good, working web browser, but what do you do when Google Chrome starts acting up? Here’s a guide for how to clean up some of Google Chrome’s most common issues including slow loading, excess notifications, using the wrong search engine, and more.

Note: This guide is only intended for Google Chrome for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS. The instructions here do not apply to Chrome on smartphones, but do let us know in the comments or on Twitter if you’d like to see a similar guide for Android or iOS.

Google vs. Google Chrome

Before we dive in, I want to make sure we all understand that there’s a difference between “Google” and “Google Chrome.” “Google Chrome” is a web browser, the tool you use to view sites on the internet, including the one you’re on right now! Google Chrome is used for the same things as Safari, Microsoft Edge, and Firefox.

Meanwhile, “Google” is the company that makes the Chrome browser. Commonly, though, when folks think of “Google,” they’re thinking of the “Google.com” search enginegoogle_search_desktop_1.jpg

More importantly, you can use Google as your search engine in other browsers like Edge and Safari. You do not need Google Chrome to use Google Search.

Similarly, just because you’re using Google Chrome does not mean your searches will always go through Google Search.

How to switch Chrome search engines

Are you looking to remove Yahoo from Google Chrome? What should you do if your searches in Chrome are going to Yahoo or Bing instead of Google? Sometimes people will change this on purpose, simply because they prefer another search engine over Google, but other times a program will ask to switch Google Chrome’s search engine to something like Yahoo without your notice.

No matter how your search engine got changed, there’s a few different things you can try to remove Yahoo or any other search engine and switch back to using Google Search in Chrome.

Method 1: Switch to Google

First, click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then click Settings. On this page, scroll down to “Search engine.” Make sure that the setting labeled “Search engine used in the address bar” is set to “Google.”

google-chrome-switch-search-engine.png

If all goes well, your searches in the address bar should now default to Google Search.

Method 2: Reset to default settings

If switching the search engine manually doesn’t change things, the next step we recommend is to reset Google Chrome’s settings to default. Open the Settings page again, and on the left-hand side of the page, click “Advanced” then “Reset settings.”

Next, click on “Restore settings to their original defaults” and you’ll be offered to confirm that you really do want to reset your customized settings. Click the “Reset settings” button to confirm.

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Once done, your Google Chrome should be most of the way back to the way it was on day one. All of your Google Chrome extensions will still be installed, but will be “disabled” after reset. For help on how to re-enable them, look through our guide to removing/disabling Chrome extensions down below.

Method 3: Check for malware

If your searches in Chrome are still going to Yahoo or another search engine instead of Google, even after resetting to default, you’ll want to check for malware using a program like MalwareBytes or seek professional tech support.

How to update Google Chrome

There are many, many reasons why Google Chrome can act up or feel slow, but before we dive in to more advanced methods, it’s important that we cover the easiest thing to check first and that’s whether or not you’re on the newest update. By default, Google Chrome should keep itself updated automatically, but sometimes this doesn’t happen. Here’s how to manually check whether Google Chrome is up to date.

Windows/macOS

First, click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then hover over “Help” and click on “About Google Chrome.” When the next page opens, Google Chrome will immediately begin checking if you need a new update. Simply follow along with what it asks. Or, if you’re already up to date, you’ll see “Google Chrome is up to date.”

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Chrome OS

Click the clock in the bottom-right corner of your screen, this will open the notification list and Chrome OS’s quick settings panel. In this panel, click on the gear icon to open the Settings app. On the left-hand side of the page, click on “About Chrome OS.”

update-google-chrome-os-1.png

At the center of the new page that opens, click the button labeled “Check for updates.” If an update is available, your Chromebook will begin downloading and installing it immediately, then prompt you to restart. If there’s no update available you’ll see “Your Chromebook is up to date.”

update-google-chrome-os-3.png

That said, not every update to Chrome OS arrives for every device right away. Sometimes Google’s Pixelbook and Pixel Slate devices will get Chrome OS updates a few days earlier than others. It’s also important to check whether your Chromebook is still eligible for updates.

How to remove/disable Chrome extensions

When used wisely, extensions can be a fantastic way to add new features to your Google Chrome browser. However, some extensions have been shown to drastically slow down Google Chrome or even hijack your searches.

 

If your Google Chrome is acting weirdly or is being very slow, it’s probably time to look at your installed extensions and remove anything you don’t truly need. First, click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then hover over “More tools,” and click “Extensions.”
chrome-open-extensions-menu.png

In the page that opens, you’ll see a list of every extension you’ve installed for Google Chrome. Next to each extension, you’ll see a handy “Remove” button. After you click the button, a pop-up will appear asking if you’re sure you want to remove. Click the “Remove” button on the popup to confirm.

remove-chrome-extension.gif

We strongly recommend that you remove every extension that you don’t recognize, as any one of them could be the culprit for Google Chrome being slow or any other issues.

If Google Chrome is still slow or acting strangely, you can try disabling your other extensions one-by-one. Open the Extensions page, as described above, and at the bottom right of each extension, you’ll see a little switch. Click the switch to turn that extension either on or off.

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If you’ve removed or disabled all of your extensions and Google Chrome is still loading slowly or behaving strangely, you’ll likely want to check for malware using a program like MalwareBytes or seek professional tech support.

How to stop Chrome pop-ups and notifications

Notifications are without a doubt one of the most controversial additions to web browsers like Google Chrome in the last few years. On the one hand, notifications are necessary for the web to have the app-like experiences that developers have long dreamed of.

Conversely, some websites have abused notifications, making them one of the worst features of Google Chrome today. Luckily, it’s not too hard to turn off notifications for websites in Google Chrome.

First, remember that Google Chrome’s notifications are accepted on a per-site basis, which means you can turn off notifications from a bad website while still keeping notifications from Gmail or Twitter, if you so choose.

Click the three dots menu button in the top-right corner of Google Chrome, then click Settings. On the left-hand side of the page, click “Privacy and security,” then in the center of the page click “Site settings.”

On the page that opens, scroll down to “Permissions” and click on “Notifications.” At the top of this page, you’ll see a switch labeled “Sites can ask to send notifications.” If you turn this switch off, Google Chrome will never again ask if you want to receive notifications from any website.

1) Privacy and security

google-chrome-notification-settings-1.png

2) Site settings

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3) Notifications

google-chrome-notification-settings-3.png

4) Notifications permission toggle

google-chrome-notification-settings-4.png

However, this switch does nothing about the sites you’ve already agreed to receive notifications from. To turn those sites’ notifications off, scroll down to the section labeled “Allow.”

In the Allow section, you’ll find the list of websites that you’ve agreed to receive notifications from. Next to each of these, you’ll see a three dots menu button. To disable Google Chrome’s notifications for a particular site, click that menu button, followed by “Block.”

google-chrome-notification-settings-5.png

If you’re still receiving unwanted notifications from Google Chrome after cleaning out this list, your next step would be to try removing any extensions that may be misbehaving.

 [Source: This article was published in 9to5google.com By Kyle Bradshaw - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dana W. Jimenez]

Categorized in Search Engine

To make its own browser more efficient, Google wants to significantly reduce Chrome’s energy consumption. For this, the search engine group is working on a new function that reduces the number of background processes and thus the required performance.

Battery life is increased by slowing down the JavaScript timer for background processes. As TheWindowsClub reports, the scripts are only woken up once a minute. This measure extended the battery life of the laptop on which the Chrome browser was started by two hours or 28 percent.

Scripts are updated more slowly

The test was run with 36 random browser tabs in the background and one tab in the foreground. On the first attempt, only a blank page was visible in the foreground. Here, the battery life could be increased by the aforementioned 28 percent, because the background scripts were updated at significantly longer intervals and therefore more slowly. In the second attempt, a YouTube video was played in the foreground. Here the consumption could be reduced by 13 percent and the battery life increased by 36 minutes.

The new feature is expected to update to Chrome 86 which has to be delivered. The function can currently only be tried out by activating an experimental flag option. Administrators should later be able to use a policy to deactivate the new function. This means that web-based background applications, which must always run in real-time, can continue to run without any problems.

[Source: This article was published in researchsnipers.com By Yasir Zeb - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jason bourne]

Categorized in Search Engine

Live captions are an important part of the tech industry, and a big part of the reason why that is the case has to do with the fact that a lot of the people that are trying to use tech solutions are living with disabilities with hearing impairments being among the most common disabilities that people end up facing on a regular basis. Hence, a lot of tech companies have been working on live captions but the fact of the matter is that we haven’t seen anything quite like what Chrome has just done.

You see, the latest version of Chrome is going to feature support for live captions, marking the first time that a web browser has ever had anything of this nature all in all. Enabling the feature would make it so that you would start seeing a dedicated captions box, and any media that you play would start showing captions inside that box. This is useful because of the fact that not all companies emphasize live captions and making their technology accessible quite as much as they should be doing, and this is causing a lot of problems along the way.



If you want to toggle captions on then you need to start by having the latest version of Chrome Canary. Once you have the latest version, the next thing that you are going to have to do is type chrome://flags into the address bar, and when you see the option to search for flags put in “live captions”. A drop down menu will come up and if you select “enabled” all you would have to do is restart your browser and then you can start using the live captions. Once you have restarted the browser, go into accessibility section in your settings to switch them on or off and play any media to see if they are working properly.

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[Source: This article was published in digitalinformationworld.com By Zia Muhammad - Uploaded by the Association Member: Corey Parker]

Categorized in Search Engine

GOOGLE CHROME users have been put on alert after thousands of people were tricked into download a dangerous download posing as a browser update.

Google Chrome fans are being warned about a fake download which has already tricked thousands users of the market leading browser. Google Chrome is the most popular browser in the world by a country mile, and it's not in danger of losing that illustrious crown anytime soon. Latest stats from NetMarketShare put Google Chrome as holding onto a 68.50 per cent share of the internet browser marketplace.

That's over two thirds of the market, and is far ahead of its nearest challengers Microsoft Edge and Mozzila Firefox.

These rival internet browsers hold 7.59 per cent and 7.19 per cent of the marketplace respectively.

And the huge Google Chrome user base have been put on alert about a fake download that has already tricked thousands of people.

Doctor Web in a post online revealed the existence of the dangerous Google Chrome download which poses as an update to the browser.

In total more than 2,000 people have downloaded the fake Google Chrome update.

Doctor Web said hackers had specifically been targeting Chrome users in the UK, US, Canada, Australia, Israel and Turkey.

The security experts said: "According to the Doctor Web virus laboratory, the hacker group behind this attack was previously involved in spreading a fake installer of the popular VSDC video editor through its official website and the CNET software platform.

"This time the cybercrooks managed to gain administrative access to several websites that began to be used in the infection chain.

"They embedded a malicious JavaScript code inside the compromised pages that redirects users to a phishing site, which is presented as legitimate Google service.

"Target selection is based on geolocation and browser detection. The target audience are users from the USA, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Israel and Turkey, using the Google Chrome browser.

"It is worth noting that the downloaded file has a valid digital signature identical to the signature of the fake NordVPN installer distributed by the same criminal group."

As always a good anti-virus programme can help you detect any such threats and remove malicious software that does end up on your machines.

While you should always be wary if you randomly get redirected to a website asking you to download anything or input sensitive information.

This is not how companies alert users to important software updates, with Chrome in particular offering an auto-download feature for patches.

The news comes as in the past few days Google has released the latest version of Chrome, update 81.

However the search engine giant has opted to skip the planned-for version 82 of Chrome due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The Chrome development team revealed the news on Twitter saying: "Due to adjusted work schedules, we’re pausing upcoming Chrome & Chrome OS releases.

"Our goal is to ensure they continue to be stable, secure, and reliable for anyone who depends on them.

"We’ll prioritise updates related to security, which will be included in Chrome 80. Stay tuned."

 

[Source: This article was published in express.co.uk By DION DASSANAYAKE - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore]

Categorized in Search Engine

Google has seemingly put the final nail in the coffin for Adobe Flash, the once-popular video and animation player that's become less relevant as newer web standards like HTML5 have taken over.

The company announced on Monday that its search engine will stop supporting Flash later this year, and that it will ignore Flash content in websites that contain it. The search engine will also stop indexing SWF files, the file format for media played through the Flash Player. Google noted that most users and websites won't see any impact from this change. 

The move has been a long time coming for Flash. Adobe announced in 2017 that it was planning to end-of-life Flash by ceasing to update and distribute it at the end of 2020, and Flash is already disabled in Chrome by default. When it made the announcement, Adobe said it was working with partners like Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, and Mozilla to smoothly phase out Flash.

Flash was once a critical technology that enabled content creators to easily implement media, animations, and games  in their websites during the earlier days of the web. If you frequently played online games in your web browser in the early 2000s, you'll probably remember that Flash plugin was a necessity. 

But as new web standards like HTML5 and WebGL have risen in popularity, there became less of a need for Flash. Plus, as time went on, Flash became more prone to security concerns — including one vulnerability highlighted by security blog Naked Security which surfaced last year that would have made it possible for hackers to execute malicious code via a Flash file.

[Source: This article was published in businessinsider.com By Lisa Eadicicco - Uploaded by the Association Member: David J. Redcliff] 

Categorized in Search Engine

[Source: This article was Published in venturebeat.com By EMIL PROTALINSKI - Uploaded by the Association Member: James Gill]

Google today released the Suspicious Site Reporter Extension. As its name implies, the extension lets users report suspicious sites to Google’s Safe Browsing service. Google also highlighted that Chrome recently started warning users about sites with deceptive URLs.

Google’s Safe Browsing service provides lists of URLs that contain malware or phishing content to Chrome, Firefox, and Safari browsers, as well as to internet service providers (ISPs). Google said in September 2017 that Safe Browsing protects over 3 billion devices and that the number last month increased to over 4 billion devices. The service shows warnings before users visit dangerous sites or download dangerous files.

Now Google is opening Safe Browsing for submissions. In fact, the Suspicious Site Reporter extension is a two-way street. The extension’s icon shows when you’re on a potentially suspicious site. Clicking the icon will show more information about why it might be suspicious. You can also report it for further evaluation. If the site is added to Safe Browsing’s suspicious lists, those aforementioned 4 billion devices will be protected from it.

 

In addition, Google released Chrome 75 earlier this month. The latest version comes with a new warning to direct users away from sites that have confusing URLs. The feature compares the URL of the page you’re currently on to URLs of pages you’ve recently visited. If the URL looks similar but isn’t identical (say, go0gle.com vs. google.com), Chrome will show a warning that helps you get back to the right domain.

“We believe that you shouldn’t have to be a security expert to feel safe on the web and that many Chrome power-users share our mission to make the web more secure for everyone,” said Chrome product manager Emily Schechter. Given today’s news, that’s fair. But if you look at the competition, Chrome could be doing more.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

[This article is originally published in fastcompany.com written by JR RAPHAEL - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Grace Irwin]

Give your internet experience a jolt of fresh energy with these easily overlooked features, options, and shortcuts for Google’s browser.

These days, a browser is more than just a basic navigator for the web. It’s effectively a second desktop—a gateway to countless apps, sites, and services. And optimizing that environment can go a long way in increasing your efficiency.

Google’s Chrome, in particular, is full of hidden shortcuts, features, and power-user possibilities. Take the time to learn these tips, and watch your productivity soar.

(Note that most of the tips here are specific to the desktop versions of Chrome for Windows PCs and Macs and may not apply to the browser’s mobile variants.)

LEARN SOME HANDY HIDDEN SHORTCUTS

1. Want to open a link into a new tab in the background, so it won’t interrupt what you’re doing? Hold down Ctrl- or Cmd- and click it. To open a link in a whole new window, meanwhile, use Shift instead. (This’ll work within most areas of Chrome, by the way—including the History page and the dropdown history list within the Back button, which we’ll get to in a bit.)

2. You probably know you can press the space bar to scroll down a full page-length, but there’s another side to that shortcut: If you press Shift and the space bar together, Chrome will do the opposite and scroll up by a full page-length at a time.

3. If you ever close a tab by mistake, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-Shift-T. Chrome will reopen your most recently closed tab as if nothing had ever happened. (And you can do it multiple times, too, if there’s more than one tab you’d like to recover.)

4. When you have a bunch of tabs open and want to hang onto the entire session for later, hit Ctrl-Shift-D. That’ll let you save all your open tabs into a folder for easy future access. To restore them, right-click the folder within your bookmarks and select “Open all” or “Open all in a new window.”

save all your open tabs into a folder for easy future access

5. Skip a step and get info about any word or phrase in a page by highlighting it and then right-clicking and selecting the “Search Google” option. You can also highlight a word or phrase and drag it into Chrome’s address bar to achieve the same result—or drag it into the area directly to the right of your final tab to launch the search in a new tab instead of your current one. (Bonus tip: Those same dragging behaviors can also be used to open links.)

6. Save a link with a single click: Just click, hold down your mouse button, and drag the link up into Chrome’s bookmarks bar. Drop it wherever you want, and it’ll be there the next time you need it.

7. If you download a file and then want to move it somewhere specific, click on its tile in the download bar that appears at the bottom of the browser. You can then drag and drop whatever you downloaded directly onto your desktop or into any folder.

8. You can also drag and drop files from Chrome’s download bar directly into an online service—like Google Drive, for instant uploading, or Gmail, for inserting the file as an attachment in a new message.

9. Should you ever find Chrome mysteriously misbehaving, remember this command: chrome://restart. Type it into Chrome’s address bar, and your browser will restart itself and restore all your tabs and windowsin a jiffy. You never know when it might come in handy.

TEACH YOUR BROWSER SOME NEW TRICKS

10. With 60 seconds of setup, you can give Chrome its own quick-access scratchpad that’ll let you jot down thoughts right within the browser—no extensions required. All you have to do is paste a snippet of code into Chrome’s address bar. Click here or on the image below to view and copy the necessary code.

jot down thoughts right within the browser

…and then save the page to your bookmarks bar for easy access. The scratchpad supports text formatting (Ctrl- or Cmd-B for bold, Ctrl- or Cmd-I for italics, and Ctrl- or Cmd-U for underlining) and even has a built-in spell check feature. Just open it and start typing—and if you want to save your thoughts for later retrieval, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-S.

The scratchpad supports text formatting

11. Chrome’s custom search engine feature has tons of untapped productivity potential. First, you can use it to create simple shortcuts to pages you visit often—anything from favorite websites to internal Chrome pages or even the scratchpad described in the previous tip. Just open up Chrome’s settings, click the line labeled “Manage search engines,” then click the “Add” command next to the “Other search engines” heading. Type the name of the page in the “Search engine” field, the shortcut you want for it in the “Keyword” field, and the page’s full URL in the “URL” field.

For instance, if you want to be able to pull up Chrome’s settings simply by typing “cs” into your address bar, you could use “Chrome Settings” as the search engine name, “cs” as the keyword, and chrome://settings as the URL. To get to your new scratchpad quickly, you could use “Scratchpad” as the search engine name, “s” as the keyword, and the full string of code from above as the URL.

12. You can also use Chrome’s custom search engines feature to create shortcuts for searching any sites you want. The trick is to first find the full URL of the site’s own search system—so if you wanted to do it for Fast Company, you’d go to fastcompany.com, click the search icon in the upper-right corner of the screen, then search for a word like “test.” The site will take you 

With that knowledge in tow, head back to Chrome’s “Manage search engines” section and click the “Add” command. This time, type “Fast Company” in as the search engine name, “fastcompany.com” as the keyword, and ”—with “%s” taking the place of the actual query—as the URL.

create shortcuts for searching any sites you want

The next time you start typing “fastcompany.com” into Chrome’s address bar, you’ll see instructions telling you to press Tab to search the site. Set up similar systems for shopping sites, Wikipedia, dictionaries and thesauruses, travel sites, or anything else you search semi-regularly, and you’ll save valuable time by skipping steps and jumping straight to the info you need.

13. Want to be able to search your email directly from Chrome’s address bar? Create a new custom search engine with the name Gmail, whatever keyword you want (either “gmail.com” or some shortened command), and “https://mail.google.com/mail/ca/u/0/#search/%s” as the URL.

14. Search Google Drive from the address bar by creating a custom search engine with “https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/search?q=%s” as the URL.

15. Speaking of Google Drive, if you move between multiple devices during the day (and at this point, who doesn’t?), make your life a little easier by telling Chrome to save anything you download to a cloud-based folder. That way, you’ll be able to find important files from your desktop, laptop, smartphone, or any other device—regardless of where the download was actually performed.

First, you’ll have to install the desktop syncing program for your cloud storage service of choice. Most services, including Google DriveDropbox, and OneDrive, offer such utilities for all the common operating systems. Once you set up the program, you’ll have a folder on your local hard drive that’s always synced to a folder in your cloud storage.

Now, head into Chrome’s settings, click “Advanced,” and scroll down to the section labeled “Downloads.” Click the “Change” command and find or create an appropriate subfolder within your cloud-synced folder. Once you’ve followed those steps on any desktop computers you want connected, anything you download will be available everywhere you work—and always accessible via the cloud service’s mobile apps as well.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF HIDDEN POWER TOOLS

16. Quiet annoying sites once and for all by right-clicking their tabs (where the title is displayed) and selecting “Mute site.” This recently added option will prevent the site from playing any audio on your computer anytime you visit it.

17. Prefer to avoid leaving a trail as you navigate the web? Open Chrome’s settings, click “Advanced,” and then turn on the toggle next to “Send a ‘Do Not Track’ request with your browsing traffic,” located within the “Privacy and security” section.

18. For additional privacy, take advantage of Chrome’s out-of-the-way option to create multiple user profiles and allow guest access to your browser. That’ll let someone else use Chrome on your computer without gaining access to all of your personal data (and without gunking up your history with whatever sites they visit). Look for the line labeled “Manage other people” in Chrome’s settings to get started.

19. Chrome’s History page—accessible by hitting Ctrl- or Cmd-H or by typing chrome://history into your address bar—has a powerful yet easily overlooked feature: an always-synced list of tabs you have open in Chrome on other devices. Surf over there anytime you want to find what you were last viewing on your phone, your tablet, or another computer.

20. The Back button in Chrome’s upper-left corner does more than you might think. Click it and hold your mouse’s button down, and you’ll get a pop-up history of recent pages viewed within your current tab

a pop up history of recent pages viewed within your current tab

21. Chrome can strip all formatting from copied text as you paste it—eliminating links, fonts, colors, and anything else you might not want to carry over. Once you’ve copied some text, hit Ctrl- or Cmd-Shift-V to give it a whirl.

22. Trying to look at a website that’s down—or need to step back in time and see how a particular page looked a while ago? Type cache:website.com into Chrome’s address bar, replacing website.com with whatever URL you want.

23. Let Chrome act as your file explorer: Drag and drop any image, video, or audio file into the browser to open it right then and there—and on Windows, try typing C:\ into Chrome’s address bar to browse your hard drive’s contents.

ENHANCE YOUR ENVIRONMENT AND ELIMINATE ANNOYANCES

24. Sick of getting those pop-ups asking if some site can send notifications through your browser? Turn off site notifications entirely by opening Chrome’s settings, clicking “Advanced,” then clicking the line labeled “Content settings.” Next, find and click the line for “Notifications” and turn the toggle at the top of the page off.

25. The next time you come across a text form on a website, give yourself a little space to think: Look for the two diagonal lines in the box’s lower-right corner. Click that area and drag downward, and ta-da: You can resize the text box to make it as large as you’d like.

resize the text box to make it as large as youd likeJPG

26. Chrome extensions can be incredibly useful, but they can also create a lot of clutter in your browser’s upper-right corner. Hide the extension icons you don’t need to see by right-clicking them and selecting “Hide in Chrome menu” from the options that appear. You can also just hover your mouse over the far right side of the address bar until you see a double-sided arrow appear and then drag the address bar toward the right to extend it and hide multiple extension icons at once.

And if you ever need to get to an out-of-sight extension icon, just open the main Chrome menu (the three-dot icon to the right of the extensions). You’ll see all of the icons there.

27. While we’re talking about extensions, did you know you can create custom keyboard shortcuts for opening extensions on demand?Some extensions even allow you to create shortcuts for specific commands. Type chrome://extensions/shortcuts into your browser’s address bar to set up your own.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was Published qz.com By Dave Gershgorn - Contributed by Member: Dennis Smith

Ten years into its life, Chrome is the most widely-used internet browser in the world. But the stock features aren’t what make it so popular. There’s also a thriving community of developers adding onto the browser with extensions, little pieces of software that add features Google hasn’t dreamt up yet.

The Quartz staff like their extensions. After all, we all spend a borderline unhealthy amount of time on the internet, whether it be researching, writing, or fact-checking stories. Here are the ways our favorites have helped us out:

Clutter/tab maintenance

If you’re like us, you have way too many tabs open. The holy trinity of tab maintenance can help: The Great Suspender pauses tabs after a certain amount of time so they don’t use processing power in the background, OneTab is great for condensing all the tabs you’re keeping open “to read later” into one summary tab, and Clutter Freemakes sure you don’t have duplicate tabs open.

Productivity

Sometimes you want to jot down a quick note but don’t want to open a word processor. Papier turns each new tab’s homepage into a notebook for recording quick thoughts or distraction-free writing. And everything is backed up to Chrome, so you won’t lose it later.

Search

The Personal Blocklist extension, made by Google, filters out certain domains from your searches, so if you don’t like a certain site you don’t need to see it. (Keep qz.com, please.) A Quartz developer says that it’s useful to block out certain unhelpful sites when Googling through a web development problem.

Writing

Sometimes a hand you need with grammar. Grammarly.

News

Use Pocket to save good stories and NewsGuard to fend against bad ones. Quartz science editor Elijah Wolfson also sends longer stories he really wants to read to his Kindle using Push to Kindle. It’s distraction-free reading at its best, with no notifications or ads or messages.

Password management

A password manager is just basic internet hygiene—use one to maintain strong passwords for every one of your internet accounts. The most popular ones are 1Password, LastPass, and Dashlane— there are pros and cons to each, and the Quartz staff uses them all. Just remember the master password—your digital life depends on it.

Archive search

Once it’s on the internet, it lives forever. That’s pretty much due to Archive.org, which stores decades of revisions to websites, as well as preserved copies of sites that don’t exist anymore. The Wayback Machine extension allows you to see saved versions of web pages that have been either taken down or are otherwise unavailable, a boon to any internet historian.

Money Saver

Get around academic paywalls with extensions like Kopernio and Unpaywall, which search for accessible PDFs of the paper online. Or, find out if you’re actually getting a good deal with a price tracker like CamelCamelCamel.

GIFs

My trustiest Chrome extension is called MakeGIF, and it’s very simple. It makes GIFs. It’s particularly good at capturing and converting YouTube videos.

Fun

Inject a little bit of simple internet nostalgia into your life with Tabogotchi, which makes a game out of how many tabs you have open, or Tabby Cat, which generates an internet cat you can virtually pet for every tab you open.

Categorized in Search Engine
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