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Google published a YouTube content strategy guide for politicians that's useful for web and podcasting content too.

Google published a YouTube strategy guide for politicians. It contains great tips for content planning that’s applicable for non-politicians, including advice that can be applied web and podcasting content as well.

YouTube Content Planning Guide

The guide is organized into three sections

  1. First Steps
  2. Content Planning
  3. Content Creations

First Steps for Content Planning

This part contains three sections:

  1. Find Your Why
  2. Think About Branding
  3. Learn the Formats

Find Your Why

This is about writing down reasons for creating the content. Low quality content that fails to help a site rank is, in my opinion, content that lacks a relevant purpose.

A relevant purpose could be found in identifying goals that the audience may have, problems that need solving.

The kinds of questions one might find in a (competitor’s) Frequently Asked Questions section can give an indication of the kinds of problems and concerns that your readers might need to have addressed in your content.

Goal oriented content can perform well with users because some search queries can have underlying goals and purposes that need addressing.

 

For example when someone searches for Pancakes they’re probably really asking, “How do I make a pancake?”

So instead of writing an article about Pancake and adding associated phrases like breakfast and pancake batter and synonyms like flapjacks, a content writer can instead focus on writing a web page that directly and unambiguously answers the question,  “How do I make a pancake?”

That’s the difference between writing for keywords and SEO and writing for users. The SEO who misses the point focuses on synonyms and associated phrases. The person who understands the question that is inside the search query will focus on answering the question.

That’s why content that is written in a way that answers a question that underlies a search query is more helpful and useful than content that is written because it needs to contain specific keywords in it.

Learn more about the Latent Question Concept: Search Queries: Search Results Analysis: The Latent Question

This is how Google addressed it in the context of political content:

“To help find your “why,” consider:
– Who is your “ideal viewer”? (e.g. age, demographic, political identity)
– What do you want your audience to get from your content? (e.g. general knowledge, entertainment, understanding of current events)
– What value can you or your organization uniquely offer?
– For inspiration, check out this channel trailer that breaks down the “why?” in compelling fashion””

Answering the above questions can help solve the “What Should I Talk About” dilemma that every content creator faces, regardless if it’s text for a web page, YouTube video or a podcast.

Branding

The next section was about branding the YouTube channel so that it has an attractive appearance.

Areas of focus for a YouTube channel:

  • “Channel Banner
  • Channel Avatar
  • Channel Trailer
  • Playlist”

That’s pretty relevant for anyone contemplating a YouTube channel!

Content Formats

The next section is called “Learn the Format(s). This is a reference to different kinds of content. There are different kinds of content that can be cycled through. Having these written down and put on a schedule can be helpful.

These are the content formats that Google suggested:

  • Weekly Coverage
  • Behind the Scenes
  • Interviews
  • Explainers
  • Q&A
  • Listicles
  • Collaborations
  • Live Streams

2. Content Planning

Here Google offers great advice for creating a content schedule. Google advises that it is less important to publish lots of content than it is to publish content on a fixed schedule.

“Consistency doesn’t equal volume. It’s far less important that you post frequently than it is that you post on a reliable schedule.”

Google also advises to not overextend yourself.

“Keep your content manageable. High production videos are great, but can be very difficult to sustain. Find a balance between content quantity and quality that you can maintain over the long term.”

Three Kinds of Content

Google identifies three kinds of content:

  • HERO
  • HUB
  • HELP

That’s a way of conceptualizing different kinds of content, identifying what the purpose of the content so as to fit it into a schedule.

Hero Content

Hero content, outside of YouTube, could be thought of as content that tries to rank for a major keyword phrase or address an important pain point. It’s not limited to evergreen content, it can also be focused on a current event, like a conference or an important announcement.

Here’s how Google explains it in the context of a politician YouTube channel:

“Frequency: Rare. Usually built around a major event, moment, or idea.

Content: Mass appeal topics that lean into increased interest in the general public at a particular time (Ex. Election day, State of the Union address, major legislative vote, etc.).

Audience: Hero Content attempts to cast as wide a net as possible and be accessible to viewers who may be unfamiliar with your organization or content.

Goal: Provide a moment of significant visibility for your content,converting a large amount of casual viewers into long-term subscribers.”

Help Content

Generally, I think all content should be helpful or useful in some way, even an eCommerce product page (with reviews, how-to data, unique product info, etc.).

What Google’s referring to as Help Content is evergreen content. Evergreen content is content that addresses a topic that remains the same every year. Topics like how to boil an egg or how to make a California Roll don’t really change much.

Evergreen content is great for any website because it’s useful and can become a source of steady traffic and links, with only a minor infrequent content touch-up to keep it relevant.

Google’s YouTube guide offers this explanation:

“Frequency: More often than Hero, but less than Hub

Content: Evergreen topics targeted towards specific questions or areas (Ex: What is the NHS, How would “The Green New Deal” work, etc. )

Audience: Broad and targeted appeal, typically this type of content can appeal to more casual viewers who do not normally engage with your channel

Goal: Provide evergreen videos that continuously gain viewership and convert subscribers at a steady rate”

Hub Content

This is the main content that’s produced on a regular basis. This means relying on the content “formats” that Google suggested.

Content Formats

  • Weekly Coverage
  • Behind the Scenes
  • Interviews
  • Explainers
  • Q&A
  • Listicles
  • Collaborations
  • Live Streams

The goal of Hub content is to give regular site visitors and new visitors something to dig into once they discover your YouTube channel, podcast, or website.

An important aspect of Hub content is being timely with current events. Fresh news and content that’s breaking is highly popular and keeps people coming back. I suspect there’s a little fear of missing out (FOMO) involved that keeps visitors returning for more.

Here’s Google’s advice:

“Frequency: Your regular chosen cadence. Think of Hub Content as your channel’s “bread and butter.”

Content: Sustainable, targeted content that appeals directly to your subscribers’ tastes and expectations. (Lean into your formats!)

Audience: Your existing subscriber base, plus those viewers who’ve been watching but haven’t subscribed.

Goal: Keep your audience coming back with steady, consistent content that appeals to their expectations and desires. Secondarily, provide a bank of content for new viewers to explore after subscribing.”

3. Content Creation

This section addresses issues that are directly related to video production.

“Stay accessible…audiences want to see the real, unfiltered you. Personal content is best. Distance and mystique are not your friends here.

Imperfections are your friend. While it may seem counterintuitive, don’t be afraid to keep your videos rough around the edges.

Capture great audio. Good sound can significantly impact how viewers experience your video.”

Creating Great Content Takes Planning

It takes an organized plan to get a content program rolling. Google’s tips for YouTube content are useful for creating a successful content strategy.

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Roger Montti - Uploaded by the Association Member: Patrick Moore]

Categorized in Search Engine

[This article is originally published in bbntimes.com written by Issac Thomas - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Rebecca Jenkins] 

A content strategy is a segment of your marketing plan that deals with the management of any media that you create and own – written or visual. Along with content curation, one needs to form a deliberate strategy and execute this plan in an efficient manner to attain the desired results.  

If you’re looking to drive more traffic to your website, spread awareness, and build a profitable online business, you need to start paying attention to your content marketing strategy. When you have an effective strategy in place, content marketing challenges won’t be as overwhelming – in fact, it will actually help you gain confidence in your work and take a critical step towards success.

Having a content strategy in hand opens a business up to a plethora of benefits, including higher domain authority, search engine rankings, and increased conversion potential. This form of marketing is undoubtedly a long process, and you need to be persistent enough to get the best results. Here are the five things that should be kept in mind before you draft a content marketing strategy.

1. Why do you want to do content marketing?

Before you decide to adapt content marketing for your business, the first thing you need to determine is why you even want to do content marketing in the first place. Your goals should be defined, as knowing what you want to achieve gives you a better direction and focus. Your goals can be anything – from better traffic to your website to more email subscriptions for your blog, there is no barrier to setting up your business goals.

2. Who is your audience?

Your customer should be the focal point of your content marketing strategy. It is critical to developing a broad and substantial understanding of who your customers are to gain access to their buyer’s journey. By producing content that is of value to your readers, you are more likely to gain their trust and initiate conversions. Even if you are an experienced marketer, make sure to revisit your audience parameters by conducting market research from time to time.

3. What type of content do you want to promote?

After figuring out the objectives, the next thing up for debate is the kind of material you need to create. You need to figure out the type of relevant and personalized content that can be consumed by the audience. Now, in the digital era, there are several social media platforms with a wealth of content, designed specifically to entertain and inform the audience. You can present content in the form of articles, blogs, memes, infographics, case studies, and e-books. However, before you start creating content, you should know the buyer persona for which content is being created. Knowing your customer will help you understand the way they think and the type of content they will like to read. You will sync your marketing message better with the content you create.

Try mixing and experimenting with different forms of content to see which style is producing the best results. If you have been crafting only blog posts till now, it might be a good idea to switch. For example, you can create an e-book that lists out all your previous work into one ultimate guidebook. This is a great way to offer the same information in a creative format – something that your readers will find efficient as well.

4. How will you promote the content?

Creating content is not enough – you need to make sure that your content reaches the maximum number of people as well. Promotion is as important as creating content. There are three primary mediums through which you can promote your content on various digital channels. Depending on the kind of strategy you follow, you need to choose one of these channels and make sure that your content reaches the maximum number of people. After all, without sufficient outreach, great content cannot explore its real potential.

There are three ways in which you can promote your content:

  • Influencer Marketing: To put into simple words, influencer marketing is taking the endorsements of socially influential people and utilizing it in a modern-day content-driven marketing strategy. When one collaborates with influencers, it leads to a 3-10 times increase in the conversion rate since they have a large and diverse follower list. You can approach these influencers easily, but keep in mind to perform thorough research and then provide them with a tailor-made strategy, along with your budget details.

  • Social Media Snippets: Ideally, your content should include numerous snippets such as quotes, statistics, and images, among others. These snippets can be shared multiple times over a period across various social media platforms.

  • Guest posting: Sharing your content as a guest post that has a massive number of readers will help increase the authority of your brand. Once can use channels like RedditBiz Sugar, and Business 2 Community to fulfill this purpose.

5. How Can You Stand Out?

The digital space is overflowing with content that’s almost begging for views and engagement. So, when you enter this digital space with your content, how will you stand out? Simple – you need to be innovative and smart enough to outsmart this wealth of content on the internet. The best thing to do in this regard is, to be honest with your audience. Create content that is useful to them and they will definitely engage with it.

6. What Content Ideas Can You Utilize?

If you wish to make your website more SEO-friendly and discover new content ideas, you can use HubSpot’s Website Grader to help you optimize and enhance each area. This tool effectively grades your marketing areas and provides its users with a detailed report on how they can improve and streamline their marketing efforts.

If you're having trouble sparking content ideas, ‘What To write’ is a tool that asks you questions to jumpstart your brain with diversified ideas. BuzzSumo is a similar tool that uses social media to determine if a particular form of content is popular and well-liked.

7. How Will You Build an Email List?

“Content marketing is useless if you’re not getting it in front of the right people.” There’s a lot of truth in this seemingly simple quote. The most important part of the content distribution is emailing since it lets you directly communicate with your subscribers and find a place in their inbox.

An email service provider (ESP) is a helpful tool since it lets you build and maintain your subscribers' list. It also allows you to check reports on how your campaigns are performing. An ESP also ensures that your emails aren’t automatically rerouted to the spam folder. MailChimp and ConvertKit are a few options you can start with, especially if you have lower startup costs.

8. How Will You Measure the ROI?

Knowing the progress of your content marketing efforts is very necessary to track the direction of your lead. In the online space, following the results of the investment you made is important to understand how useful it is. A content piece is considered successful when it has generated a good number of views, clicks, and engagement. Now, with modern online tools available at the disposal of every marketer, measuring the success of a content piece is not that difficult. You can easily track how your marketing efforts are faring and constantly make improvements in your content marketing strategy.

Keep these things in mind before you go through any content marketing strategy to adopt it for your business or brand. These points, if executed well, will lay the foundation for a robust content marketing strategy and help in the attainment of better marketing results.

Source: This article was published itweb.co.za - Contributed by Member: Anthony Frank

The kids of today are comfortable in the digital space. They use digital diaries and textbooks at school, communicate via instant messaging, and play games on mobile devices.

However, as much as the Internet is an incredible resource, access to it can be dangerous for children, and parents who want their child to spend time online safely and productively, need to understand the basic concepts of digital security and the associated threats and be able to explain them to their children.

With this in mind, Kaspersky Lab compiles an annual report, based on statistics received from its solutions and modules with child protection features, which examines the online activities of children around the world.

Video content

According to the report, globally, video content made up 17% of Internet searches. Although many videos watched as a result of these searches may be harmless, it is still possible for children to accidentally end up watching videos that contain harmful or inappropriate content.

The report presents search results on the ten most-popular languages for the last six months. The data shows that the 'video and audio' category, which covers requests related to any video content, streaming services, video bloggers, series, and movies, are the most regularly 'Googled', and make up 17% of the total requests.

Second and third places go to translation (14%) and communication (10%) Web sites respectively. Gaming Websites sit in fourth place, generating only 9% of the total search requests.

Harnessing smart wearables to spy on owners

Kaspersky Lab has also noted a clear language difference for search requests. "For example, video and music Web sites are typically searched for in English, which can be explained by the fact that the majority of movies, TV series and musical groups have English names. Spanish-speaking kids carry out more requests for translation sites, while communication services are mostly searched for in Russian."

Chinese-speaking children look for education services, while French kids are more interested in sport and games Web sites. German children dominate in the "shopping" category, Japanese kids search for Anime, and the highest number of search requests for pornography are in Arabic.

Anna Larkina, the Web-content analysis expert at Kaspersky Lab, says children around the world have varying interests and online behaviors, but what links them all is their need to be protected online from potentially harmful content.

"Children looking for animated content could accidentally open a porn video. Or they could start searching for innocent videos and unintentionally end up on Web sites containing violent content, both of which could have a long-term impact on their impressionable and vulnerable minds," she says.

A local view

In addition to analyzing searches, the report also delves into the types of Web sites children visit, or attempt to visit, which contain potentially harmful content that falls under one of the 14 pre-set categories, which cover Internet communication sites, adult content, narcotics, computer games, gambling and many others.

The data revealed that in South Africa, communication sites (such as social media, messengers, or e-mails) were the most popular (69%) of pages visited.

However, the percentage for this category is dropping each year, as mobile devices play an increasingly bigger role in children's online activities.

The second most popular category of Web sites visited in SA is 'software, audio, and video', accounting for 17%. Websites with this content have become significantly more popular since last year when it was only the fifth most popular category globally at 6%.

Others in the top four are electronic commerce (4.2%) and alcohol, tobacco, and Web sites about narcotics (3.9%), which is a new addition compared to this time last year.

Education

Irrespective of what children are doing online, it is important for parents not to leave their children's digital activities unattended, says Larkina.

"While it is important to trust your children and educate them about how to behave safely online, even your good advice cannot protect them from something unexpectedly showing up on the screen. That's why advanced security solutions are key to ensuring children have positive online experiences, rather than harmful ones," she concludes.

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Doing research for your next content marketing campaign? Using Google search operators helps speed up your research, and makes your job a lot easier. In this cheat sheet, we’ll share 13 useful search operators for content marketers.

Before we dive into the Google search operators, let’s briefly go over what is a search operator.

What is a Search Operator?

A search operator is a character, or set of characters, used to narrow down the focus of a search engine query.

Savvy content marketers use search operators when researching keywords, competitors, blog post headlines, or when checking SEO health.

Now that you know what a search operator is, let’s take a look at the 13 useful search operators for content marketers.

Exclusive Bonus: Download the Google Search Operators Cheat Sheet to make content marketing research a breeze.

Google Search Operators Cheat Sheet

Here is the Google search operators full list at a glance. We will go into each operator in depth below this cheat sheet.

Feel free to click on each of the search operators below to skip to that section:

Search Operator What it Does Example Query
Quotes (“”) Return only results with a specific phrase “conversion optimization tips”
Minus (-) Exclude a specific keyword from the search results conversion optimization -tips
site: Return results from a particular site site:optinmonster.com
Asterisk (*) Replace this with anything “* content upgrade ideas”
inurl: Return results within URL inurl:conversion
intitle: Return results within title intitle:conversion
inurl:.extension Return results for particular country inurl:.ca
OR Return results for one query or the other query conversion OR optimization
allinpostauthor: Return results from a particular author allinpostauthor:Syed Balkhi
define: Return definitions define:lead magnet
Date/time range Return results from a particular date or time range. any query (must enter your date/time range into Google’s search tools filter)
filetype: Return specific filetypes filetype:PDF
info: Return information about a specific domain info:optinmonster.com

That’s the bird’s eye view. Now let’s take a deep dive into each of these Google search operators…

1. Quotes (“”)

Want to narrow down your search to return only results including a specific phrase? Put that phrase in quotes.

searchoperators-1

This search operator is useful for removing any irrelevant results, particularly with longer search queries.

Use Case: Check for scraped content

Let’s say I want to check and see if anyone has been stealing my content. Maybe I want to make sure that our content isn’t getting filtered out of the search results as duplicate content because someone scraped our post.

To do that, I would want to copy a long string of text from my post.

searchoperators-20

Next, I’ll paste it into Google and put quotes around it.

searchoperators-20

As we can see, Google is only showing our content, so we don’t have anything to be concerned about here.

However, if we really wanted to, we could click on the link to “repeat the search with the omitted results included”. Then, we would see this:

searchoperators-19

The second result is an earlier version of our blog post, so that’s fine. But sure enough, as the third result shows, someone has scraped our post.

Again, I’m not concerned because we have done our on-page SEO properly, and Google is only showing our latest post in the search results, which is exactly what we want.

However, if you think that duplicate content may be negatively affecting your search rankings (or you simply want to rule it out as a possibility), then you may want to perform this check.

2. Minus (-)

Want to exclude a specific keyword from the search results? Put a minus sign in front of it.

searchoperators-2

This is useful when your query has more than one meaning.

Use Case: Research jaguars (the animal, not the car)

Let’s say I need to research jaguars. When I do an initial query, I get the following results.

searchoperators-21

Most of these results are about the car, which is not what I want to see. But let’s see what happens if I add “-car” to the query.

searchoperators-22

Well, the top three results are still about cars (can’t do anything about that). However, the first organic result is “Jaguar | Basic Facts About Jaguars | Defenders of Wildlife”. Now that is the kind of jaguar I want to research!

Scrolling down, the rest of the results also do not appear to be in regard to the automobile. So the minus search operator just saved me a ton of time sifting through results that I don’t want.

3. Site:

Want to search one particular site? Use “site:” in front of the URL for the domain you want to search.

searchoperators-4

This is useful for researching your competitors or checking your own website for indexed pages.

Use Case: Check your site for indexing issues

Let’s say I want to check and make sure that our site doesn’t have any problems being indexed by Google.

To see the indexed pages, I would simply type in “site:optinmonster.com” and look at the number of results.

searchoperators-23

It is showing about 665 results, which seems pretty reasonable to me for the current size of our site. I’m also seeing our homepage coming up first (right after the “Google promotion”), which is good. And if I browse through the pages and look deeper into the search results, I’m seeing that the indexed pages look high quality.

However, if it returned a much lower amount than what I was expecting, then we may have an indexing problem which needs to be addressed.

And on the flip side, if it returned a much higher amount of indexed pages than what I was expecting, then that is also a potential problem because someone may have hacked our site and injected a bunch of spammy pages.

4. Asterisk (*)

Not sure what word(s) you need in your search query? In place of unknown keywords, add an asterisk (*) and Google will replace the asterisk with anything.

searchoperators-12

This is useful for finding list posts by a specific title, but you don’t know the exact number of the list. For example, if I wanted to find all posts entitled, “Top X Free WordPress Themes”, I could do a search for “Top * Free WordPress Themes”.

5. Inurl:

Want to see results that include your keyword in the URL? Add “inurl:” before your keyword in your query.

searchoperators-5

This is useful when you are looking for specific pages on a site.

Use Case: Find guest posting guidelines

Let’s say I want to submit a guest post for Lifehacker, but their guidelines for guest authors is really hard to find. (Many popular publishers will actually hide their guidelines page because they are already swamped with submissions.)

What I would do is search the Lifehacker site (using the “site:” search operator) and add the “inurl” operator to search for keywords that I am guessing might be in the URL, like “guidelines”, “contribute”, “submit”, etc.

searchoperators-25

Bingo! Now I’ve found the page that explains how I can become a Lifehacker contributor.

6. Intitle:

Want to see only pages that have your keyword in their title? Use the “intitle:” search operator just before the keyword.

searchoperators-6

This is useful for competitor research, or researching a blog where you want to get published.

Use Case: Research a target blog

Continuing with the previous use case, let’s say I want to research Lifehacker because I want to write for them. I know I want to write something about email, but I want to make sure that I pitch them with a unique angle that they haven’t covered before.

 

What I would do is search Lifehacker (using the “site:” operator) and use the “intitle:” operator with the keyword “email”. Then I’d take a look at what headlines come up.

searchoperators-26

The first couple of results aren’t blog posts, but then I can see a whole list of headlines that Lifehacker has used in the past about email.

This is really helpful, because now I can send them a pitch along the lines of, “I see you’ve published a post about the Three-Email Rule, but you haven’t yet covered…”

7. Inurl:.extension

Looking for results from a specific country? Add that country’s domain extension to the “inurl:” search operator.

searchoperators-15

This is useful for checking brand mentions outside your own country.

8. OR

Want to see results for one keyword or another keyword? Place “OR” in between each keyword.

searchoperators-8

This is useful when you aren’t exactly sure which keyword will give you the desired result.

Use Case #1: Make multiple guesses at once

Remember when I wanted to find the guest posting guidelines for Lifehacker using the “inurl:” operator? I wasn’t sure exactly which keyword would reveal the guidelines page, but I had a few educated guesses.

So far, I’ve only been able to make one guess at a time. So unless I make a lucky guess right off the bat, this can be time consuming.

To streamline the process, I could use the “OR” operator and make multiple guesses all in one search query. For example, “site:lifehacker.com inurl:guidelines OR inurl:contribute OR inurl:submit”.

This will return the results for any of these guesses, and hopefully one of these keywords will hit the mark!

Use Case #2: Discover brand mentions

Want to find people who have mentioned your brand? It’s a good idea to know who is mentioning and/or linking to your site, so that you can build relationships with those people and get even more mentions and links in the future.

First, you’ll want to add any different names for your brand into your query (with all possible spellings or misspellings), using the “OR” operator in between each. For example, “OptinMonster OR “Optin Monster””.

Then, you’ll need to use the minus sign to exclude your own properties from the search results. For example, “-site:optinmonster.com -site:wpbeginner.com”. You may also want to exclude social sites, such as, “-site:twitter.com -site:facebook.com -site:youtube.com”

All put together, here’s what that query looks like: “OptinMonster OR “Optin Monster” -site:OptinMonster.com -site:wpbeginner.com -site:twitter.com -site:facebook.com -site:youtube.com”.

And here are our results.

searchoperators-27

We still had a couple of results at the top that were irrelevant (that’s because we didn’t eliminate WordPress.org), however the rest of the results are actual brand mentions for OptinMonster.

Now we can create an alert with this search result, so we can receive emails about new brand mentions!

To create an alert, first go to google.com/alerts. Then, type in your search query.

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Next, click on “Show Options”, and under Sources select “Web”.

Enter your email and click on the blue button to create your alert.

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That’s it! Now you’ll be notified of any new brand mentions by email, so you can build valuable relationships and backlinks.

9. Allinpostauthor:

Need to find articles by one particular author? Use the “allinpostauthor:” operator just before the author’s full name.

searchoperators-10

This is useful if you want to study someone else’s content, or if you want to see a particular writer’s work before hiring them.

10. Define:

Want to find the definition of something? Simply use the “define:” search operator.

searchoperators-14

This is useful for doing research on a specific topic for a blog post. Or, you may use it for competitor research to see who comes up in the results for a specific definition that you want to rank for.

11. Date/Time Range

Need to narrow down your search results by a specific date or time range? There used to be a search operator for that (“daterange:”). However, it was a bit difficult to use because it required using the Julian calendar. Now, Google has a filter you can use instead.

searchoperators-11

This filter is useful if your initial query is only showing recent results and you want to see older results, or if you want to see recent results and your initial query is only showing older results.

To access this filter, click on the “Search tools” link directly below the search box. Then, select “Any time” to open up a dropdown menu with a few options.

searchoperators-30

If you don’t like any of the suggestions, click on “Custom range…”. From there, you’ll be able to choose any range of dates that you like.

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12. Filetype:

Want to find a specific filetype with your keyword? Use the “filetype:” operator, followed by the type of file you are looking for (e.g. “PDF”).

searchoperators-16

This is useful if you want to discover ideas for lead magnets.

13. Info:

There is a lot of general information that you can get from Google on your own domain, or your competitor’s domain, with the “info:” search operator.

searchoperators-17

This is useful for many things, such as finding competitors, finding sites that link to you, or finding sites that link to your competitors.

Use Case: Find sites that link to your domain

To find sites that link to our domain, I’ll first enter the “info:optinmonster.com” query into Google. Then, I’ll see a number of choices. Let’s select “Find web pages that link to optinmonster.com”.

searchoperators-17

This will return the websites that most frequently link to OptinMonster.

searchoperators-33

That’s it. Now it’s your turn.

Go ahead and pick one of the Google search operators above to start with. Play around with it as you conduct your research. Then, as you become familiar with each of these operators, try combining them to get even more focused results.

 Source: This article was published optinmonster.com By Mary Fernandez

Categorized in Search Engine

Machine learning-driven results entirely bypass the traditional search box.

Several weeks ago, without much fanfare, Google added new shortcut icons to its mobile app and website. They appear immediately under the search box to provide quick access to current weather, sports, entertainment and restaurant information.

These are essentially prepackaged queries, using a range of data behind the scenes, to replace typing with tapping. These shortcuts have quietly turned Google’s local search and discovery experience into a powerful competitor to Yelp.

Below is a screen grab of the conventional local-mobile search experience for “lunch near me.” Users see a local pack, a map, organic links and images down the first page (not pictured). Here’s what it looks like — pretty familiar:

But when you tap the “eat & drink” shortcut, you get a different experience that brings a much richer set of results. Also on display is the full range of Google’s mobile and location data capabilities.

 

Google is providing personalized recommendations and offering a plethora of other choices and options. These are grouped by interest, cuisines, atmosphere and various attributes. All of this is driven and accompanied by rich data. This is also an argument for adding more enhanced data as part of your local SEO strategy.

Google presents “places for you,” based on your location history — your actual visits to other restaurants that establish patterns and preferences. Google also uses machine learning to group venues into useful categories by interest and attributes: “popular with foodies,” “best lunch,” “recently opened,” “great beers” and so on.

It’s not clear how much usage this is getting; Google hasn’t done much to build awareness other than place the shortcuts under the search bar. But it offers a dramatically improved experience that eliminates the need to do multiple queries and click around. It’s like a super carousel on AI. (Note: I didn’t say “steroids.”)

The experience represents a template for other kinds of mobile search results beyond the four categories currently present. Shopping and Travel come immediately to mind. Android features more shortcuts than iOS.

Currently, you can buy movie tickets via the entertainment shortcut. We can expect more transactional capabilities like this to roll out to other categories.

Right now there are no ads, but assume there will be if it gains widespread usage. If it indeed does gain momentum, we could see large numbers of people entirely bypass the search box in certain key categories.

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Greg Sterling

Categorized in Search Engine

Most people don't care if content is sponsored as long as it's useful and high quality

Internet users are fed up with poor-quality ads. Make no mistake, most users see branded content as a fact of digital life, but they are tired of intrusive, poorly targeted experiences, so they’re opting out by installing ad blockers. However, according to a survey from Collective Bias, an influencer-based content marketing agency, sponsored content may be an unobtrusive way to reach audiences.

Collective Bias surveyed 2,111 U.S. online consumers and weighed the survey data against data from the U.S. Census Bureau in order to ensure that it had a representative sample of the U.S. population. Unsurprisingly, nearly 40 percent of use social media daily, and 25.1 percent use it even more frequently; only 11.7 percent of those surveyed who knew what sponsored content is said they “never” use social media.

The majority of the survey respondents (51 percent) said they read blogs weekly or more frequently, which means that they’re reading longer-form content. Perhaps most encouraging is not the polarized rabid love or cold disdain for sponsored content, but the fact that most people are not bothered by seeing sponsored content alongside other content.

In fact, according to the survey, internet users don’t care if content is sponsored—all they care about the quality and usefulness of the content. They want content that helps them make informed decisions, which is precisely why they search for product information, and follow influencers.

Marketers need to meet these expectations, according to Bill Sussman, president of Collective Bias, who noted:

Just because marketers have paid for content does not mean they’re off the hook from having it be informative and high-quality for audiences. The findings of this study imply that by focusing on providing genuinely useful content rather than overtly promotional or generic material, marketers can implement sponsored content programs that not only inform and delight readers, but also positively impact the bottom line, as well.

And sponsored content delivers in the most meaningful way possible: sales. More than one-third of the survey respondents have been persuaded to make a purchase because of sponsored content. Indeed, sponsored content can provide exactly what users are looking for during their purchase journey. All marketers have to do is deliver useful, high-quality content if they want to break through the digital noise and reach their target audiences.

 

For more details about what moves people to purchase based on sponsored content and how much they spend, check out the infographic below.

Image courtesy of grinvalds/iStock.

Source: This article was published adweek.com By Kimberlee Morrison

Categorized in Online Research

It’s amazing what you can learn by analyzing the strategies that are working for your competitors. Best of all, you can incorporate what you learn and put your own spin on it when creating your own campaigns. What are some ways you can find and leverage this valuable information? Read on!

Knowledge is power and you can find it in unexpected places. It’s nearly impossible to develop an effective digital marketing strategy without having adequate information about your competitors. It’s amazing what you can learn by analyzing the strategies that are working for your competitors. Best of all, you can incorporate what you learn and put your own spin on it when creating your own campaigns. What are some ways you can find and leverage this valuable information? Read on!

Keywords your competitors are using

Researching your competitor’s keywords is one of the best ways to enhance your search engine optimization strategy. When you have details of your competitor’s keywords, it guides you in shaping your own SEO strategy, giving you a competitive advantage when it comes to those sought after search engine rankings.

Competitors' keywords in this context include those keywords which your competitors are using to rank higher on search engines and also those they targeted, but didn’t rank well. Knowing these two categories of keywords will enable you to make informed decisions about your SEO strategy.

So, how do you hack your competitor’s keywords?

Competitor keyword research involves more than just generating any keywords associated with your competitors. It requires doing a bit of manual research to get an authentic list of your competitor’s keywords. Though there is no one tool that will generate your competitor’s keywords in one click, there are several tools which can help speed up the process.

SEMRush

This is a unique keyword research tool that requires you to enter a URL, then lists the top 10 keywords that the website ranks well for organically. It will also provide information about the website, including each keyword’s position in search, traffic percentage and more.

Google Keyword Planner Tool

The Google keyword planner is a free tool from Google, provided to advertisers in order to research keywords for Adwords campaigns.  The tool can also be used by those who do not intend to use Adwords but are looking for other information. All you need is a free Google account, then set up your Adwords account and you can use the tool.

 

The tool provides an estimate of your competitor’s keywords and how each one is performing. Simply log in to your Adwords account and select keyword planner, then click on "find new keywords." Then input your competitor’s URL into the “your landing page” field and click on “get ideas."

Google scans your competitor’s website and generates a list of all the keywords related to it. Then just click on “keyword ideas” to see the analysis.

Alexa

Alexa is generally known for giving traffic scores to websites. However, it also enables you to analyze the specific keywords bringing a high percentage of a website’s traffic. To do this, navigate to the site “info” tab and input your competitor’s URL, then go to the “analytics” tab to see the top keywords driving traffic to the website.

Top trends your competitors are following

In order to leverage customer’s behavior to your advantage, you need to understand the market and continuously monitor the entire niche. If you aren’t doing this, you need to be! You can easily do this by reading industry blogs and other publications, but you should also pay close attention to what your competitors are doing and saying when it comes to these trends.

You can take advantage of some great tools available to help properly analyze the top trends that your competitor are following. Here are just a few:

Google Trends

This tool sends reports whenever your competitor is mentioned online, which helps you monitor their activities.

Simply Measured

This tool gives you a bit of everything. It monitors your competitions’ trends, traffic sources, conversion rates, social media activities and more.

Google Alerts

Google Alerts sends you relevant updates of the latest Google results from specified queries. You can set up alerts for your competitors, allowing you to monitor any developments from them. It’s also helpful to set this up for yourself to monitor your own mentions!

Effective content formats

Developing content is a daunting task, whether it’s coming up with topics or adding new types of content. However, you can easily get ideas on how to craft your content by taking a peek at your competition. A look at how they create their content can give you valuable insight on how to create yours.

Look at the type of content that’s popular with their customers. Look at the word count and writing style. Is it casual? Formal? Quirky? Look at other structures like the length of paragraphs, headings and bullets. You’ll want to analyze the topics they write about and the format of the content. Is it predominantly written content or video? How many images do they use? Are they repurposing through Slideshare or infographics? What are they NOT doing?

 

Observe how many of each of these formats are published, how and whether they publish a single topic in different formats. All of these insights will enhance your own content game.

Backlinking possibilities

Despite the claims that Google’s algorithm focuses on content, backlinks are still part of the criteria that contributes to Google ranking. High-quality backlinks do wonders for SEO!

It’s important to have relevant backlinks for your website and one way of finding these opportunities is to analyze the backlinks of your competitors. There are several tools available to help you do this.

Monitor Backlinks

This website analyzes backlinks and then sends them directly to your inbox. It provides a detailed description of each link, specifying the highest and lowest rank, as well as indicating whether they are do follow or no follow. You can then compare the results to know which links might be good fit for your website.

Open Site Explorer

This tool reveals your competitor’s link building efforts and discloses those linking back to them. It also allows you compare data from various sites.

Ahrefs

This is a popular backlink tool that helps you research competitor backlinks. It will disclose the top pages and the IP address of those websites linked to your competitors.

You can learn a lot from your competitors and generate ideas for your own campaigns using these hacks. Have you used any of these tools or strategies? Which ones worked best for your business?

Source: This article was published business.com By Michael Georgiou

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Twitter has introduced some new features that will let you filter out more notifications and content you don’t want to see. Here’s what’s new.

1. New Filtering Options

Twitter advanced notification filters

Twitter has introduced three new advanced filters that give you the option to mute notifications from accounts that:

  • Use the default Twitter avatar (an egg).
  • Haven’t verified their email address.
  • Haven’t confirmed their phone number.

2. Timeline Muting Options

Twitter Muted words

In November, Twitter announced an update to its notification mute feature that let you mute keywords, phrases, hashtags, usernames, emojis, and conversations you didn’t want to see.

Now you can decide how long you want to mute content from your timeline. Twitter gives you four options:

  • 24 hours.
  • 7 days.
  • 30 days.
  • Forever.

3. Twitter Gets Proactive About Abusive Content

A couple other changes are on Twitter’s end.

First, Twitter said it’s working to algorithmically identify abusive content itself – even if users don’t report it.

When Twitter identifies an account that is engaging in abusive behavior, the platform will limit them so that only their followers can see their tweets.

“For example, this change could come into effect if an account is repeatedly Tweeting without solicitation at non-followers or engaging in patterns of abusive behavior that is in violation of the Twitter Rules,” according to Twitter. “Our platform supports the freedom to share any viewpoint, but if an account continues to repeatedly violate the Twitter Rules, we will consider taking further action.”

In addition, Twitter said it will notify you (via your Notifications tab) when they receive your report of an abusive account, and update you if they take “further action.”

Author : Danny Goodwin

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/twitter-content-filtering-muting/188033/

Categorized in Social
Washington, Feb 6 (Prensa Latina) The Dark Web, the darkest part of so-called Deep Web, was hacked to expose pages with enormous amounts of children''s pornography to the authorities, Motherboard platform reported Monday.
 
It is known as Deep Web the pages that carry every content that is not found on superficial Internet or in public nets. It constitutes 90 percent of everything published in the Internet but it cannot be searched by using traditional search engines like GOOGLE, YAHOO or BING.

The hacker responsible for the attack made public the content of more than 10,000 websites hidden in the Internet, which up to now, were only available through a program called THOR.


The action was against a website called Freedom Hosting II, a service to place websites in the Dark Web, which has been involved in polemic issues, linked to child pornography.

According to the hacker, the attack was due to the fact that at least, 50 percent of the files in those servers working for Freedom Hosting II corresponded to child pornography and frauds, through messages that have been shown.

The Deep Web is inaccessible for most of the Internet users, due to the limitations of the public network for access to all the websites; also, the majority of the content in the Deep Web is generated dynamically, so it is difficult to search them through traditional search engines.

That is why many international organizations have qualified the Deep Web as a refuge for criminals and a place to publish illegal content.

 


According to experts, what is more rampant in this sector of the network are scams, since the only thing that protects users in the Deep Web is common sense.
 
Categorized in Deep Web

Our cast falls short on members but stays big on insight this week when Matt and Min join together to break down powerful information in the worlds of design and marketing. Together, they look at some more future trends, changes to Google search, and more!

  1. 2017’s Design Trends [1:45]
  2. YouTube in Google Search [10:20]
  3. Sourcing Your Content [12:05]

2017’s Design Trends

This week, Min revisits the 2017 trends to lay out some insight into the world of design, from an actual designer! Together, her and Matt look at popular trends from colors and layouts of websites, to navigation and user experience in just about everything!

  • “I’ve been seeing a lot of hype around conversational interfaces lately in the design world. People just want to feel like they’re really talking to someone.” -Min
  • “There’s also a big trend for websites to be smarter in predicting what their users want, think Amazon but in a lot of other websites.” -Min
  • “2017 is going to be a year of trying to make things easier for mobile users. Think UI and UX, little things like pulling the screen down to refresh it or simplified navigation” -Min
  • “Personally, I think virtual reality is going to have the biggest effect on design as a whole, it’s throwing so many designers for a loop.” -Min

 

YouTube in Google Search

Recently, someone discovered some changes to the mobile search results from Google that could have a huge impact on SEO in the future. To get a deeper look, Matt breaks down the changes and talks about what it could mean to the industry and businesses that want to utilize this powerful tool!

  • “As we all know, Google is the largest search engine but the second largest is actually YouTube.” -Matt
  • “A user found that when he searched certain things that videos from YouTube would be listed first and they would auto play like they do on Facebook.” -Matt
  • “By making videos auto-play without sound, it forces designers to edit text onto the videos that have dialogue or information share verbally.” -Matt

Sourcing Your Content

The number one question our host Matt gets asked when he’s talking with people about digital marketing is, where should you get your content from and how much of it should you curate? Matt takes some time to dive into just that, to answer all those questions so you don’t even need to ask!

  • “Personally, I like to adhere to a an 80/20 rule if you’re just starting out on social media. Post 80% of curated content and 20% of original content.” -Matt
  • “For small business who don’t have time to create lots of content, starting small is great until you’ve got a good que of built up material.” -Min
  • “It’s okay to update older content, just put in your sub header that you’ve updated it. Google likes it, your viewers like it, everyone likes it!” -Matt

 

 

Author: Matt Curtis
Source: http://www.business2community.com/podcasts/2017s-design-trends-youtube-google-search-sourcing-content-podcast-01758797#AwMw6U4Bjw36YX2F.97

 

 

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