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There are millions of websites on the internet. Here, you'll find everything from CNN.com to YouTube cooking channels. But you might not realize what you're seeing online is only a fraction of what's really out there. Vast networks called the Deep and Dark Web are what's hiding beneath the surface.

You've probably heard about the Dark Web before, but there's a good chance the term "Deep Web" is less familiar to you. It's not as widely discussed as the Dark Web, even though it's much larger. And, the Dark Web sometimes gives the Deep Web a bad name because the two are often mistaken for one another. Click here to see five common myths about the Dark Web.

The Deep Web, however, is everything on the internet that isn't easily accessible to the average internet user. In many cases, you need a special web browser to access its content. In others, the content is hidden behind the firewall and security protection of private networks - typically, small businesses and corporations.

What regular search engines are missing

Nine times out of 10, a regular Google search will suffice and bring back the results you're looking for. However, search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing only have access to information that has been indexed. This means any site that's marked as private can pretty much go undetected.

Just think of all the information that's being shared right under our noses. If you'd like to do a deeper search, these web browsers are what you need.

Deeperweb.com

Easing away from Google is no easy task. We've all become so familiar with how the search engine works, and how it will display our results. So, one of the best places to start is a site called Deeperweb.com. This search engine is powered by Google, so it organizes your results similarly to what you're used to.

Dogpile

This powerful search engine pulls its results from Google, Yahoo, and Yandex, digging specifically through the metasearch engine for the information you need. The benefit to you is that every search engine has its own method and algorithms for searching, and Dogpile uses all of them to pull the most extensive results.

DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo is a solid Google replacement, and it doesn’t track or target your IP address or search history. So, you don’t have to worry about targeted ads or being trapped in a search filter bubble, which actually means you get more results. You can also make DuckDuckGo an extension of your browser and activate more privacy settings to keep your search history as protected as possible. 

Yippy

This Google-type site called Yippy goes beyond producing search results and blocks adult content, including pornography, gambling sites, and other inappropriate websites.

Plus, the site protects your privacy. It will not collect personally identifiable information about you, like your name, telephone number, address or email address. That is, as long as you're in the United States. "Yippy will not track a U.S. citizen for any reason" unless required by court order, subpoena or required by law. If you're not in the U.S., Yippy said you're subject to tracking so that it can comply with government required protocols.

Tor

If you're considering Tor as an option for web browsing, be sure to do your homework. This free software has a dark side. Not the software itself, but the places to where it grants access on the internet. Tor gives you access to the Dark Web, a portion of the internet that is often used for illegal activities. However, there could also be information shared on the Dark Web that isn't shared anywhere else. Reporters often use Tor to uncover new leads or communicate privately with their sources. 

Specialty search engines

When you're hunting for information, sometimes you know exactly what you're looking for, and sometimes you don't. The sites above will help you search through a broad scope of information out there. However, when you need to narrow it down, these are amazing specialty databases you should check out.

  • Archive.org: Non-profit library of millions of free books, movies, software, music and more.
  • Library of Congress: Sift through historical archives from the Civil War, Great Depression, World War I, World War II and other monumental events that shaped our country.
  • Osti.gov: Wondering what the government has been up to with all of its research? This helpful search engine puts that information right at your fingertips.
  • Smithsonian Libraries: Collections covering everything from anthropology to zoology.
  • Encyclopedia Britannica: Remember all of the information held in the Encyclopedia Britannica? It's still available. Here's where you'll find it.
  • Pipl.com: Want to know what's out there on the internet associated with your name, or a loved one? This site will search the Deep Web for that information.

A word of warning

One of the biggest advantages to common search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing, is that they provide a certain level of protection. In the same way, it's less likely for a robbery to take place in broad daylight, it's also less likely for someone to post illegal things out in the open.

For this reason, the Dark Web has become the home to some pretty horrific online activity.

Source : komando.com

Categorized in Deep Web

Shrouded online websites, black markets and hidden content are often referred to as the “deep web” or the “dark net.” There’s naturally a lot of mystery and curiosity surrounding these portions of the Internet, hidden as they are from the average user.

Because hidden web content is so mysterious, a lot of people want to know exactly how to access the deep web. But first, we’re going to need to define what the deep web and dark net actually are, as well as what they are not.

Though many people may think it’s cool to access secretive and clandestine content that average users don’t even know exists, you may want to rethink your intentions because some of the content on the dark net is pretty awful stuff.

Think things like drugs and weapon dealing, but also child pornography and other services catering to some very deviant tastes; the dark net is not for the faint of heart and even visiting it may land you on a government watchlist or two.

On the other hand, a lot of content hosted on the deep web is incredibly mundane, as we’ll discuss in a bit. However, before we define the difference between the dark net and the deep web, let’s first discuss what you’ll need to access it.

What You Will Need to Access the Deep Web

You don’t need a secret password, an invitation from an inside member or hacking tools to access the dark net; all you need is a computer and an Internet connection. That may sound a little anticlimactic, but, as long as the proper tools are downloaded, the deep web is only seconds away to anyone who can access the regular web.

Besides this, you may want to have a few Bitcoins handy if you plan to buy anything, but be warned: even just being on the dark net may raise a few governmental eyebrows, buying something there is very likely very illegal.

Differences Between the Deep Web, the Dark Net and the Rest of the Internet

First off, let’s set one thing straight: the deep web and the dark net are not the same thing. While the two terms are often used synonymously, the dark net is where illegal things happen, while the deep web is simply all the hidden content that isn’t picked up by Google.

The best way to picture it, is by thinking of the entire Internet as an iceberg. As average users, we can only see the top of the iceberg, which represents the public Internet. Under the surface, there’s a massive amount of data that we can’t see.

The majority of Internet users seem to have the idea that Google is the entire Internet, while in fact it only indexes a very small part of it. To understand how this works, we first need to see how exactly Google does what it does.

How Google Indexes Websites

Before search engine technologies became what they are now, it was nearly impossible to discover a cool new website without a link (perhaps via email) or a friend who was in the know.

Today, however, we simply type a few keywords into Google and within seconds millions of links to websites pop up. Google finds all these websites by using code called bots, spiders or crawlers.

Essentially, crawlers start combing through an individual webpage. It takes notes and assigns various ranking metrics to the page to determine which keywords it should rank for.

When the crawlers are finished with the first page, they then follow every link on that page, and begin crawling the new pages as well. This process is recursive and because websites are linked with one another, Google can crawl through most of the web pages that were intended for public viewing.

Crawlers are not perfect, and there is a lot of content that they simply don’t have access to. If a crawler can’t access pages or data, it can’t index the page in Google.

Then there’s a massive amount of data that crawlers can’t access. For instance, any website with gated content that first requires a user to enter login credentials isn’t going to be easily indexed by crawlers. This means that most content on social media is behind lock and key, as it should be. In addition, a lot of website data is created dynamically by using back-end databases.

The crawlers don’t have access to this content, either. Furthermore, crawlers lack access to certain pages, content, and services because of security factors. For instance, corporate networks frequently host web pages on their intranet, but they wouldn’t want the public to see those web pages.

To draw an analogy, pretend that the Google search algorithm is like an old telephone book, however, instead of serving as a directory of names, addresses and telephone numbers, Google serves as a directory for URL addresses.

Plenty of websites want to be listed in this phone book, but a fair few do not — some folks just want to keep themselves to themselves. In this analogy, those people make up the deep web.

Generally speaking, the deep web is any website, content, or service that cannot be crawled by Google, and as such, cannot be accessed via a search engine.

So if you’re school, university or place of business hosts an internal website that can’t be crawled through by Google’s spiders, that technically qualifies as one sliver of the deep web. The dark net, however, is much less pedestrian.

The Dark Net Explained

Websites and services on the dark net are a little more secretive, and often intentionally clandestine. They typically use secure browsers like Tor (the Onion Router) and entire networks of VPN tunnels to hide their presence.

Doing so helps them stay anonymous, secret and safe from the prying eyes of the general public. Services like Tor don’t only allow users to surf the web anonymously; they also allow people to host content anonymously.

One example of such a website is Silk Road: this infamous site is really nothing more than a black market in the form of an ecommerce site. People buy, sell and trade all kinds of illicit and illegal items like drugs, weapons and other unsavory services.

This type of website is probably what you were thinking of when thinking of the deep web, as it’s fairly easy on a site like Silk Road to buy and sell whatever you want, far away from the government’s eye.

Interestingly enough, Tor, was originally created as a project by the U.S. Navy. Later, the FBI infiltrated the network to crack down on illegal black market trading, child pornography and other illegal activities.

Morality and Ethics

Many times in life, it’s not whether a question whether something can be done, but whether it should be done. Such is the case with visiting the deep web and dark net.

The ugly truth is that these back alleys of the Internet are filled with some pretty disgusting content.: black markets, child pornography, sex trafficking and plenty of more run-of-the-mill seedy or sordid sites make their home there.

The first thing we need to ask ourselves is whether or not it’s appropriate to view such content. Also consider that if you don’t use the correct tools when visiting these sites, your computer might raise some red flags to the government, and consequently end up on a government’s watch list.

How to Access the Deep Web and the Dark Net

So, if all of these hidden websites are so secretive it’s impossible to find them with a search engine, how do you find them?

One of the best ways to find them is by word of mouth. Some of them are mentioned on forums and directories like Reddit and Tor threads.

Despite past infiltration by the FBI, the Tor anonymity network and the Tor browser are still fantastic tools — especially if they’re combined with a VPN tunnel for increased security.

If you don’t want to use the Tor browser, there are Tor plugins for just about every major web browser, too. The Tor network hosts a ton of hidden services that can’t be accessed using other browsers.

Final Thoughts

Before you go snooping around through the back alleys of the Internet, we’d like to repeat that you do so with caution as not only is the content itself of a dubious nature, some of it is illegal enough that you may be on the receiving end of a police visit if you’re found out.

It’s best not to venture into the dark net out of idle curiosity. That said, there are some interesting news sites and other topical content that you won’t find anywhere else. Just make sure you don’t accidentally visit a site that may make you uncomfortable.

Source : cloudwards.net

Categorized in Deep Web

It turns out the Internet is full of unusual and creepy information which usually well-hidden from prying eyes. However the desire to find out what secrets are hidden in the web has led to the emergence of a community of so-called NetStalkers, and here is what they are searching for.

The majority of the Internet users are satisfied with what they can find in what the NetStalkers call the Surface Web.

The Surface Web is anything that can be indexed by a typical search engine like Google, Bing, Yahoo or Yandex. Here users simply click suggested links, while the search engines’ crawling technology finds and identifies the websites.

Search engines rely on pages that contain links to find and identify content. Generally people are looking for blogs, news, products, recipes and other types of open information.

But this technique of navigating links also misses a lot of content. NetStalkers try to go a little deeper to find out exactly what type of content they have missed.

A Little Deeper

According to BrightPlanet, which describes itself as “a software-as-a-service company that specializes in harvesting large amounts of unstructured web data and preparing it for analysis, “the Surface Web is anything that a search engine can find while the Deep Web is anything that a search engine can’t find.”

The company cites as an example a search engine on the travel site Hotwire.

A regular visitor, its explains, can only interact with the site like a standard search engine would – meaning, he or she can only click links to get there.

Deep web
© Photo: Pixabay
Deep web

However, it says, “there’s a nice search box that Hotwire allows users to fill out, but you can’t use it. Search engines don’t use search boxes, they just use links. You’ll quickly find that you can’t find the search results you are looking for without a search box.”

The results of a Hotwire search are perfect examples of Deep Web content, it states.

Other examples of Deep Web content can be found almost any time a user navigates away from Google and does a search directly in a website – government databases and libraries contain huge amounts of Deep Web data, it says.

Google search can’t find the pages behind these website search boxes. Most of the content located in the Deep Web exists in these websites that require a search and is not illicit and scary like the media portrays, the company says.

However, if you go a little deeper in the Internet you’ll find the Dark Web.

‘Getting a Little Darker’

The Dark Web then is classified as a small portion of the Deep Web that has been intentionally hidden and is inaccessible through standard web browsers.

The Dark Web is a term that refers specifically to a collection of websites that are publicly visible, but hide the IP addresses of the servers that run them. Thus they can be visited by any web user, but it is very difficult to work out who is behind the sites. And you cannot find these sites using search engines.

Almost all sites on the so-called Dark Web hide their identity using the Tor encryption tool.

The TOR network is an anonymous network that can only be accessed with a special web browser, called the TOR browser.

In other words, to visit a site on the Dark Web that is using Tor encryption, the web user needs to be using Tor. Just as the end user's IP is bounced through several layers of encryption to appear to be at another IP address on the Tor network, so is that of the website.

Not all Dark Web sites use Tor. Some use similar services such as I2P. The principle remains the same. The visitor has to use the same encryption tool as the site and — crucially — know where to find the site, in order to type in the URL and visit.

This is the portion of the Internet most widely known for illicit activities, such as drug markets and child pornography, because of the anonymity associated with the above networks.

However the most difficult thing here is knowing where to look.

What a user can actually find in the deeper segments of the Internet are the examples of the net art, such as a photo project by Jon Rafman The Nine Eyes of Google Street View.


Monkeys

The Canadian artist collects the bizarre and beautiful sights captured by the nine lenses on Google Street View camera cars as they photograph scenes around the world.

Or such projects as jodi.org or NeoCities.

Or some unusual video footage which has captured strange, mysterious or otherwise events which have no explanation.

Or other forums where people share their unusual hobbies, addictions or other deviations.

Source : sputniknews.com

Categorized in Deep Web

When you go online to search for something you either go to search engines such as Google or Bing. You probably think that if it doesn’t show up on these search engines, then it doesn’t exist, wrong! Believe it or not, there are things on the web that will never show up on your tradition search engine, no matter how hard you may try.

Why? Well, because a password is needed or the site belongs to a private network of organizations. I’m sorry to disappoint you if you thought that Google and Bing were the powerful search engines that have it all. If those tech giants had everything, neither the deep web search engines nor the hidden web would have existed.

Google and Bing follow one hyperlink after another and as a result doesn’t get everything you would want in the results. To be able to find the hidden things of the web, you have to dig a little deeper than usual, but I will show you how to do that and where to look. Hopefully, you can find what you need in the following deep web search engines.

What is the Hidden Web?

When you hear or read about the hidden or deep web, it’s anything behind a paywall, something with a password, or dynamically generated content on the fly and didn’t have a permanent URL. These are the things you are not going to find with a traditional Google search. So, where can you look? Thankfully, there are deep web search engines available on the web.

Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

In this post, let’s find out top 10 best deep web search engines to explore hidden web.

1. TechXtra

The Best Hidden Web Search Engines - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

TechXtra is one of the best deep web search engines where you can search for content that has to do with Math, Engineering, and Computing. You can search for things such as technical data, industry news, classifieds, learning resources, full-text Eprints, and relevant website information. The design may not be as pretty as you might want it to be, but if you are a student who is looking for this kind of information, now you know where to look.

2. Infomine

Infomine is another great deep web search engine option for your hidden web needs. It is another site created by many online libraries of the United States. Here you can find things such as articles, books, notes, question papers, solutions, etc. The information that you find on this search engine is from universities such as Wake Forest University, University of California, University of Detroit and California State University.

How to search the Hidden web with Infomine - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

This hidden deep web search engine gets its information from places such as electronic books, databases, online library card catalogs, electronic journals, directories of researchers, bulletin boards, mailing lists, articles, and many other resources.

3. DeepWebTech

With DeepWebTech you can choose between five search engines. If one doesn’t work for you, you can always count on the other to help you find what you need. Just like Chrome, DeepWebTech also counts with browser plugins for you to use if you are searching for something in particular.

Deep Web Technolgies Hidden web search engine - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

With this deep web search engine, you can find information on a subject such as medicine, science, and business. If Google is not giving you what you are looking for, you can count on these deep web search engines getting the job done.

4. WWW The Virtual Library

WWW The Virtual Library also has a lot to offer. This hidden web search engine was created by Tim Berners-Lee and is the oldest deep web search engines out there. This dark search engine is not the most popular one out there but can say it was the first one of its kind.

The first Hidden Web search engine for Dark Web - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

So, isn’t it strange that it finds a place in the list of Invisible Web resources? WWW Virtual Library has quite a few useful resources on different subjects. It arranges all the categories in alphabetical order, so they are easier to find. You can choose from categories such as education, engineering, society, law, recreation, international affairs and more!

5. InfoPlease

If you are looking for an educational portal, then you should visit InfoPlease. It features all sorts of additional features for you to use. The search bar is located on the upper right-hand corner for your searching needs. You can enjoy things such as almanacs, encyclopedias, an atlas, and biographies.

InfoPlease Hidden web search engine - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

Infoplease is not just a one of the best deep web search engines, but it also has additional tools such as a Calculator, Spell Checker, Place, Finder, Periodic Table, Conversion Tool, Distance Calculator, Fact Monster, and a Perpetual Calendar.

6. Clutsy

Clutsy is in a class all it’s own because of all the channels it offers for your searches. Besides the traditional things such as news, images, purchases, etc. it looks for its results from a large number of places. For example, it searches in directories such as Daypop, Blogdigger, IceRocket and more.

Yippy Clutsy hidden Deep web search engine - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

Since things change over time, when you go to Clutsy, you will notice a name change to Yippy. I kept the original name, just in case someone remembered it by that name.

7. The Internet Archive

When you are looking for something on the Internet, one of those things are probably movies, audio or music, right? The hidden web is also full of this stuff; you just have to know where to look.

The Internet Archive for the Hidden Web - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

On The Internet Archive, you are going to have access to things such as movie, music, etc. that I mentioned earlier, but you can also enjoy printed materials. Do you want to see what a particular website looked like back in the day? The Internet Archive also lets you see older and saved versions of sites, I hope you have time since there are over 55 billion sites to look at.

8. Science.gov

If you are looking for something that you would only find on a site from the government, then you might want to check out Science.gov. It is a site that explores over 60 databases and more than 2200 websites from 15 federal agencies.

Science Gov Hidden Deeb Web search engine - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

If you need certain information for that science project, this is the place to go. The site offers 200 million pages of authoritative U.S government science information and development and research results are among that information.

9. Wolfram Alpha

With Wolfram Alpha you get a computational web search engine, in other words, you can enjoy a deep web search engine that has a significant amount of data for you to take advantage of. The site has categories such as:

  • Mathematics
  • Step-by-step solutions
  • Words % Linguistics
  • Units and Measure
  • Chemistry
  • Date & Times
  • Art & Design
  • Music
  • Astronomy
  • Engineering
  • Food & Nutrition
  • Shopping
  • Earth Sciences and more!

Worlfram Alpha Deep Web Search engine for Hidden web - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

Once you choose a topic, the site gives you so many options that you won´t know where to start. For example, let us say you choose Chemistry. In that category, you can either have the site give you chemical formulas, Chemical quantities, chemical solutions, functional groups, and the list keeps going.

10. FindLaw

Hopefully, you will never have to search for something that happened to you, but if you ever get into any legal trouble, this is the place to go. FindLaw is a site where you can have access to a vast repository of legal information you can use for free.

FindLaw Deep Web search engine for Hidden Web - Top 10 Best Deep Web Search Engines to Explore Hidden Web

FindLaw has one of the biggest online lawyer directories you can find on the Internet. You can either use the site to know more about U.S law, get yourself a lawyer, learn more about particular legal topics and use the Law forums. I’m sure the forums will be of big help since it’s almost certain you will come across some legal information you don’t understand.

Author: Rahul Dubey
Source: https://techreviewpro.com/deep-web-search-engines-hidden-web-13884

Categorized in Deep Web

Now it's a darknet marketplace that hopes a bug bounty scheme can improve security for its clientele.

To keep its customers out of trouble, Hansa, a popular darknet marketplace for selling illicit goods, is following legitimate businesses by paying researchers for reporting security flaws.

It is one of many darknet marketplaces seeking to meet demand for anonymous trading once offered by fallen drugs bazaar Silk Road. With its buyers and sellers likely to be of interest to law-enforcement agencies as well as hackers, Hansa announced on Reddit last week that it had launched a bitcoin bug bounty to keep clients safe.

How does internet technology change the reality of what humans do? In this book, Jamie Bartlett explores some of the internet's wilder shores in search of an answer.

Bug bounties are gaining in popularity in the world of legitimate business as a means of improving product security.

Google has operated its bug bounties for six years, and more conventional organizations, including some automakers, airlines, and the US Department of Defense, are now using them to attract bug reports, often through bounty programs run by Bugcrowd and HackerOne.

For Hansa, being an arena where anonymity is prized and exposure can lead to jail time, the highest value rewards are for bugs that could result in users being identified.

Hansa's operators say they will offer 10BTC for any bugs that could "severely disrupt" Hansa's integrity in a way that would expose the IP address, or personal information of a user or seller. After last month's spike in the value of bitcoin, this sum is greater than $10,000.

Less critical bugs are valued at 1BTC each, while simple "display bugs or unintended behavior" will earn researchers 0.05BTC.

CyberScoop, which first reported the new bug bounty, notes that Hansa is responsible for about $3m in trade. The hidden website launched the bounty following reports of a bug on AlphaBay, another post-Silk Road marketplace, that exposed private messages containing user names and delivery addresses. According to CyberScoop, Hansa has already received reports of non-critical bugs.

 

Despite Hansa's intention to improve its own measures, security and privacy researcher Sarah Jamie Lewis told CyberScoop that the bounty is unlikely to achieve much for darknet markets.

"The problems pervading onions [the nickname for websites accessed on the Tor network] are caused by bad assumptions at the software design level, the reliance on web technologies designed for an internet without consideration for privacy," Lewis said.

"Bug bounties are only a patch. What we really need are new privacy-oriented software stacks, servers, blog platforms."

Author : Liam Tung

Source : zdnet.com

Categorized in Deep Web

Nothing feels more 90s than the dark web.

If you remember when Ask Jeeves was more of a household name than Google, you might be pleased to discover that an aesthetically primitive, nostalgically crude form of the Internet exists today.

The dark web, a.k.a. Tor Browser, holds one main draw, which is also its greatest fault: It allows you to search the Internet anonymously. This means you can also purchase things anonymously, and that's why people like it. It has become the premiere cyber black market.

It offers a flurry of drugs, underage pornography, guns, and even hirable assassins that have gotten both patrons and salesmen into legal quicksand.

Indeed, being a cyber Amsterdam isn't all that it's cracked up to be. In 2015, a local man admitted to supplying a drug ring with heroin and fentanyl, essentially heroin on heroin, through purchases made through the dark web.

The dark web itself is actually not of great concern to local police. Portland Police admit that they are not actively paying attention to people who simply visit the dark web, even if they click on links that could end in an illegal purchase. It's more likely that the dark web will lead to an arrest if it is explicitly relevant to an uninvolved case.

"In terms of dark web-related cases we intersect with, we're not seeing an increase, but we're starting to see cases," says Captain Mark Kruger from the Police Bureau's Drugs and Vice Division. "But we don't proactively instigate dark web investigations. Mostly what we're doing is looking at crimes that occur and if there's an intersection with the dark web, we might follow up on that investigation."

Perhaps the largest misconception of the dark web is that it's some anomaly like a virtual drug dealer, and one can only access it through knowing cool people or going to the right parties. Yet, it doesn't take being a mole person to gain access. All one has to do is download a program called Tor Browser. You can Google it and the process takes about as long as it does to get Spotify.

And that's what I did. I entered the dark web, and I can assure you that I've thought about putting black tape over my laptop camera ever since.

Immediately after downloading Tor Browser, you are reminded of simpler times. You bare witness to a crude, primitive pale green search engine. After typing anything, the search engine that takes over is called Duck Duck Go.

From here, you witness the Internet as you know it reflected in a funhouse mirror. Essentially, all of the sites you frequent have a Tor equivalent. For instance, there's a "Hidden Wiki" as opposed to Wikipedia, which is a great place to find categorical links for common black market searches, such as: Marketplace drugs, Marketplace commercial services, "erotic jailbait" and blogs.

Drugs

I click on a link to the People's Drug Store. It offers a quarter gram of #4 heroin for $55 (mind you, quarter is spelled wrong), $37 for a quarter gram of crack cocaine and two MDMA capsules for $25. The drugs are displayed like specials you might see on a happy hour menu.

Meanwhile on Brainmagic, a site specializing in psychedelics, ten tabs of acid are marketed at $100.

Unfortunately, the growing popularity of online drug retailers correlates with the increasing fragility of dark web privacy. Too often, people think they're smarter than the system.

They're not.

According to Motherboard, undercover FBI agents stalked online forums looking for commenters who might have suggested possessing ties to the founders of the Silk Road, the Dark Web's former largest black market.

Eventually, the Silk Road founder was caught promoting his business in a Silk Road chat room and subsequently had his location traced. Silkroad 2.0 has emerged in its stead.

Commercial Services

The dark underbelly of the already-dark web offers underage pornography, hitmen, and hackers who will tinker with your ex's Facebook account for a reasonable sum of Bitcoin.

Bitcoin is the official dark web currency, distinguishing it as its own sovereign nation. If the word "Bitcoin" rings a bell, you've probably seen it on a Yelp checklist. And no—no restaurant in Portland will accept Bitcoin.

"Erotic jailbait"

Sprint back to the Hidden Wiki and surprisingly, you'll find that underage pornography and sex chatrooms don't also fit under the "commercial services" category. These links are simply called "erotic jailbait."

In early 2016, the FBI cracked down and caught 1,500 people looking at child pornography on the dark web.

The dark web also specializes in offering services to help people cheat on their spouses.

Blogs

Having a Facebook account on the dark web seems like an oxymoron considering social media often equals self-marketing. However, Facebook is into it. The social media giant has opted to work with Tor software in creating a Tor version of their website, so that some users can bask in increased privacy. But even Facebook admits that when you login, the service can still identify you, which hints at a somewhat aimless effort on their part.

Twitter also has a lost twin, and its bird icon is perched within the trenches of the dark web. But all you're going to find on the Tor version of Twitter is neo-Nazis. The hashtag #daywithoutjews is visibly utilized by AdolfHitler1. This is especially disturbing as it suggests "AdolfHitler" was already taken as a username.

Overall, I wouldn't wish the dark web on my worst enemies. I mainly say this in reaction to a pop-up ad that occurred as I clicked on a drug website that warned me that my privacy may be breached. Just a week later, my Mac browser was 10x slower, and similar to when grandma falls or grandpa has a stroke, I knew my five-and-a-half-year-old computer's days were numbered.

But if you're looking for an excuse to splurge on a new Macbook Pro, the dark web may be just the thing. It feels like Adobe Flash if it had an empire.

Source : wweek.com

Categorized in Deep Web

A dark web vendor is reportedly selling millions of decrypted Gmail and Yahoo accounts in an unspecified underground marketplace. Over 20 million Gmail accounts and five million Yahoo accounts from previous massive data breaches are now reportedly up for sale.

A dark web vendor going by the name "SunTzu583", who has previously also allegedly listed over one million decrypted Gmail and Yahoo accounts on the dark web, now appears to have ramped up his efforts.

According to a HackRead report, in separate listings, the cybercriminal is allegedly offering 4,928,888 and 21,800,969 Gmail accounts, of which the latter has been listed for $450 (0.4673 Bitcoins). While the first listing includes email addresses and clear text passwords, 75% of the second listing allegedly contains decrypted passwords and 25% hashed passwords.

The Gmail data reportedly corresponds to those stolen in previous breaches, including the Nulled.cr hack and the Dropbox data breach.

The cybercriminal is also allegedly selling 5,741,802 Yahoo accounts for $250 (0.2532 Bitcoins). Most of the accounts listed were allegedly disabled and appear to have been stolen from MySpace, Adobe and LinkedIn data breaches.

For both the Gmail and Yahoo accounts, the dark web vendor claims that not all the email and password combinations work directly, warning potential buyers to not expect them to match in all cases.

The data has reportedly been matched against those on popular data breach notification platforms such as Have I Been Pwned and Hacked-DB. However, the data has not been independently verified by IBTimes UK.

How to keep your data safe

Cybercrime ramped up to alarming levels last year, which also saw a slew of massive cyberattacks. Those concerned about keeping their accounts and data safe should incorporate safe security practices. In the event of a breach, or even a potential one, it is recommended that passwords be changed immediately. It's also essential that you not reuse passwords, instead use unique passwords for each of your accounts.

Author : Ashok
Source : https://www.yahoo.com/news/over-20-million-gmail-5-091238421.html

Categorized in Deep Web

The internet is amazingly robust, but like any complex network is still prone to the occasional failure. A new analysis using network theory explains why the dark net – the hidden underbelly of the regular internet, invisible to search engines – is less vulnerable to attacks. The lessons learned could help inform the design of more robust communications networks in the future.

The regular internet’s design is deliberately decentralised, which makes it very stable under normal circumstances. Think of each site or server as a node, connected to numerous nodes around it, which in turn connect to even more nodes, and so on. Take out a node or two here or there and the network continues to function just fine. But this structure also makes it more vulnerable to a coordinated attack: take out many nodes at once, as happens during a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, and the result can be catastrophic failure that cascades through the entire network.

The dark net is much less vulnerable to such directed attacks, thanks to its unique structure. Manlio De Domenico and Alex Arenas at Rovira i Virgili University in Tarragona, Spain, used data from the Internet Research Lab at the University of California, Los Angeles, to build their own model of the dark net. They ran simulations to see how it would react to three failure scenarios: random node failures, targeted attacks on specific nodes, and cascading failures throughout the network.

They found that an attack on the dark net would need to hit four times as many nodes to cause a cascading failure as on the regular internet. This stems from its use of “onion routing”, a technique for relaying information that hides data in many layers of encryption. Rather than connecting a user’s computer directly to a host server, onion routing bounces the information through various intermediary nodes before delivering it to the desired location. This stops an attack from spreading so widely.

Powerful connections

Another reason for the dark net’s resilience is its lack of something called the “rich-club effect”. In the regular internet, powerful nodes connect more readily with other powerful nodes, creating what Simon DeDeo at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, terms a “smoky back room” of “network elites”. An attack on one such node can trigger the failure of others, which can in turn lead to cascading failure across the network. The dark net doesn’t have this high level of connectivity between powerful nodes.

“This is [another] one of the things that make it more robust to attack,” says DeDeo. “The network elites are more spread out. In fact, the elites appear to be avoiding each other.”

This model of the dark net somewhat resembles a so-called “small-world network”, in which several heavily connected nodes link clusters of smaller local nodes – similar to how major air traffic hubs connect smaller local airports. Both systems exhibit similar resilience to catastrophic failure, although in-depth comparisons have yet to be completed.

Reconfiguring the entire internet to make it as robust as the dark net would be prohibitively expensive, but De Domenico thinks the pair’s work could still offer practical insights. “It is possible to rethink next-generation upgrades and the design of more localised communication networks, like the intranets of large companies,” he says.

Author : Jennifer Ouellette

Source : https://www.newscientist.com/article/2123354-why-the-dark-net-is-more-resilient-to-attack-than-the-internet/

 

Categorized in Deep Web

Shrouded online websites, black markets and hidden content are often referred to as the “deep web” or the “dark net.” There’s naturally a lot of mystery and curiosity surrounding these portions of the Internet, hidden as they are from the average user.

Because hidden web content is so mysterious, a lot of people want to know exactly how to access the deep web. But first, we’re going to need to define what the deep web and dark net actually are, as well as what they are not.

Though many people may think it’s cool to access secretive and clandestine content that average users don’t even know exists, you may want to rethink your intentions because some of the content on the dark net is pretty awful stuff.

Think things like drugs and weapon dealing, but also child pornography and other services catering to some very deviant tastes; the dark net is not for the faint of heart and even visiting it may land you on a government watchlist or two.

On the other hand, a lot of content hosted on the deep web is incredibly mundane, as we’ll discuss in a bit. However, before we define the difference between the dark net and the deep web, let’s first discuss what you’ll need to access it.

What You Will Need to Access the Deep Web

You don’t need a secret password, an invitation from an inside member or hacking tools to access the dark net; all you need is a computer and an Internet connection. That may sound a little anticlimactic, but, as long as the proper tools are downloaded, the deep web is only seconds away to anyone who can access the regular web.

Besides this, you may want to have a few Bitcoins handy if you plan to buy anything, but be warned: even just being on the dark net may raise a few governmental eyebrows, buying something there is very likely very illegal.

Differences Between the Deep Web, the Dark Net and the Rest of the Internet

First off, let’s set one thing straight: the deep web and the dark net are not the same thing. While the two terms are often used synonymously, the dark net is where illegal things happen, while the deep web is simply all the hidden content that isn’t picked up by Google.

© abc.com

The best way to picture it, is by thinking of the entire Internet as an iceberg. As average users, we can only see the top of the iceberg, which represents the public Internet. Under the surface, there’s a massive amount of data that we can’t see.

The majority of Internet users seem to have the idea that Google is the entire Internet, while in fact it only indexes a very small part of it. To understand how this works, we first need to see how exactly Google does what it does.

How Google Indexes Websites

Before search engine technologies became what they are now, it was nearly impossible to discover a cool new website without a link (perhaps via email) or a friend who was in the know.

Today, however, we simply type a few keywords into Google and within seconds millions of links to websites pop up. Google finds all these websites by using code called bots, spiders or crawlers.

Essentially, crawlers start combing through an individual webpage. It takes notes and assigns various ranking metrics to the page to determine which keywords it should rank for.

When the crawlers are finished with the first page, they then follow every link on that page, and begin crawling the new pages as well. This process is recursive and because websites are linked with one another, Google can crawl through most of the web pages that were intended for public viewing.

© shoutmeloud.com

Crawlers are not perfect, and there is a lot of content that they simply don’t have access to. If a crawler can’t access pages or data, it can’t index the page in Google.

Then there’s a massive amount of data that crawlers can’t access. For instance, any website with gated content that first requires a user to enter login credentials isn’t going to be easily indexed by crawlers. This means that most content on social media is behind lock and key, as it should be. In addition, a lot of website data is created dynamically by using back-end databases.

The crawlers don’t have access to this content, either. Furthermore, crawlers lack access to certain pages, content, and services because of security factors. For instance, corporate networks frequently host web pages on their intranet, but they wouldn’t want the public to see those web pages.

To draw an analogy, pretend that the Google search algorithm is like an old telephone book, however, instead of serving as a directory of names, addresses and telephone numbers, Google serves as a directory for URL addresses.

Plenty of websites want to be listed in this phone book, but a fair few do not — some folks just want to keep themselves to themselves. In this analogy, those people make up the deep web.

Generally speaking, the deep web is any website, content, or service that cannot be crawled by Google, and as such, cannot be accessed via a search engine.

So if you’re school, university or place of business hosts an internal website that can’t be crawled through by Google’s spiders, that technically qualifies as one sliver of the deep web. The dark net, however, is much less pedestrian.

The Dark Net Explained

Websites and services on the dark net are a little more secretive, and often intentionally clandestine. They typically use secure browsers like Tor (the Onion Router) and entire networks of VPN tunnels to hide their presence.

Doing so helps them stay anonymous, secret and safe from the prying eyes of the general public. Services like Tor don’t only allow users to surf the web anonymously; they also allow people to host content anonymously.

One example of such a website is Silk Road: this infamous site is really nothing more than a black market in the form of an ecommerce site. People buy, sell and trade all kinds of illicit and illegal items like drugs, weapons and other unsavory services.

This type of website is probably what you were thinking of when thinking of the deep web, as it’s fairly easy on a site like Silk Road to buy and sell whatever you want, far away from the government’s eye.

Interestingly enough, Tor, was originally created as a project by the U.S. Navy. Later, the FBI infiltrated the network to crack down on illegal black market trading, child pornography and other illegal activities.

Morality and Ethics

Many times in life, it’s not whether a question whether something can be done, but whether it should be done. Such is the case with visiting the deep web and dark net.

The ugly truth is that these back alleys of the Internet are filled with some pretty disgusting content.: black markets, child pornography, sex trafficking and plenty of more run-of-the-mill seedy or sordid sites make their home there.

The first thing we need to ask ourselves is whether or not it’s appropriate to view such content. Also consider that if you don’t use the correct tools when visiting these sites, your computer might raise some red flags to the government, and consequently end up on a government’s watch list.

How to Access the Deep Web and the Dark Net

So, if all of these hidden websites are so secretive it’s impossible to find them with a search engine, how do you find them?

One of the best ways to find them is by word of mouth. Some of them are mentioned on forums and directories like Reddit and Tor threads.

Despite past infiltration by the FBI, the Tor anonymity network and the Tor browser are still fantastic tools — especially if they’re combined with a VPN tunnel for increased security.

If you don’t want to use the Tor browser, there are Tor plugins for just about every major web browser, too. The Tor network hosts a ton of hidden services that can’t be accessed using other browsers.

Final Thoughts

Before you go snooping around through the back alleys of the Internet, we’d like to repeat that you do so with caution as not only is the content itself of a dubious nature, some of it is illegal enough that you may be on the receiving end of a police visit if you’re found out.

Sign up for our newsletter to get the latest on new releases and more.

It’s best not to venture into the dark net out of idle curiosity. That said, there are some interesting news sites and other topical content that you won’t find anywhere else. Just make sure you don’t accidentally visit a site that may make you uncomfortable.

If you exercise some common sense and stay well away from anything that looks overly suspicious, you should be fine. If you have any personal experience with visiting the dark net, let us know in the comments below, thank you for reading.

Author : Joel Tope

Source : https://www.cloudwards.net/how-to-access-the-deep-web-and-the-dark-net/

Categorized in Deep Web

Shrouded online websites, black markets and hidden content are often referred to as the “deep web” or the “dark net.” There’s naturally a lot of mystery and curiosity surrounding these portions of the Internet, hidden as they are from the average user.

Because hidden web content is so mysterious, a lot of people want to know exactly how to access the deep web. But first, we’re going to need to define what the deep web and dark net actually are, as well as what they are not.

Though many people may think it’s cool to access secretive and clandestine content that average users don’t even know exists, you may want to rethink your intentions because some of the content on the dark net is pretty awful stuff.

Think things like drugs and weapon dealing, but also child pornography and other services catering to some very deviant tastes; the dark net is not for the faint of heart and even visiting it may land you on a government watchlist or two.

On the other hand, a lot of content hosted on the deep web is incredibly mundane, as we’ll discuss in a bit. However, before we define the difference between the dark net and the deep web, let’s first discuss what you’ll need to access it.

What You Will Need to Access the Deep Web

You don’t need a secret password, an invitation from an inside member or hacking tools to access the dark net; all you need is a computer and an Internet connection. That may sound a little anticlimactic, but, as long as the proper tools are downloaded, the deep web is only seconds away to anyone who can access the regular web.

Besides this, you may want to have a few Bitcoins handy if you plan to buy anything, but be warned: even just being on the dark net may raise a few governmental eyebrows, buying something there is very likely very illegal.

Differences Between the Deep Web, the Dark Net and the Rest of the Internet

First off, let’s set one thing straight: the deep web and the dark net are not the same thing. While the two terms are often used synonymously, the dark net is where illegal things happen, while the deep web is simply all the hidden content that isn’t picked up by Google.

© abc.com

The best way to picture it, is by thinking of the entire Internet as an iceberg. As average users, we can only see the top of the iceberg, which represents the public Internet. Under the surface, there’s a massive amount of data that we can’t see.

The majority of Internet users seem to have the idea that Google is the entire Internet, while in fact it only indexes a very small part of it. To understand how this works, we first need to see how exactly Google does what it does.

How Google Indexes Websites

Before search engine technologies became what they are now, it was nearly impossible to discover a cool new website without a link (perhaps via email) or a friend who was in the know.

Today, however, we simply type a few keywords into Google and within seconds millions of links to websites pop up. Google finds all these websites by using code called bots, spiders or crawlers.

Essentially, crawlers start combing through an individual webpage. It takes notes and assigns various ranking metrics to the page to determine which keywords it should rank for.

When the crawlers are finished with the first page, they then follow every link on that page, and begin crawling the new pages as well. This process is recursive and because websites are linked with one another, Google can crawl through most of the web pages that were intended for public viewing.

© shoutmeloud.com

Crawlers are not perfect, and there is a lot of content that they simply don’t have access to. If a crawler can’t access pages or data, it can’t index the page in Google.

Then there’s a massive amount of data that crawlers can’t access. For instance, any website with gated content that first requires a user to enter login credentials isn’t going to be easily indexed by crawlers. This means that most content on social media is behind lock and key, as it should be. In addition, a lot of website data is created dynamically by using back-end databases.

The crawlers don’t have access to this content, either. Furthermore, crawlers lack access to certain pages, content, and services because of security factors. For instance, corporate networks frequently host web pages on their intranet, but they wouldn’t want the public to see those web pages.

To draw an analogy, pretend that the Google search algorithm is like an old telephone book, however, instead of serving as a directory of names, addresses and telephone numbers, Google serves as a directory for URL addresses.

Plenty of websites want to be listed in this phone book, but a fair few do not — some folks just want to keep themselves to themselves. In this analogy, those people make up the deep web.

Generally speaking, the deep web is any website, content, or service that cannot be crawled by Google, and as such, cannot be accessed via a search engine.

So if you’re school, university or place of business hosts an internal website that can’t be crawled through by Google’s spiders, that technically qualifies as one sliver of the deep web. The dark net, however, is much less pedestrian.

The Dark Net Explained

Websites and services on the dark net are a little more secretive, and often intentionally clandestine. They typically use secure browsers like Tor (the Onion Router) and entire networks of VPN tunnels to hide their presence.

Doing so helps them stay anonymous, secret and safe from the prying eyes of the general public. Services like Tor don’t only allow users to surf the web anonymously; they also allow people to host content anonymously.

One example of such a website is Silk Road: this infamous site is really nothing more than a black market in the form of an ecommerce site. People buy, sell and trade all kinds of illicit and illegal items like drugs, weapons and other unsavory services.

This type of website is probably what you were thinking of when thinking of the deep web, as it’s fairly easy on a site like Silk Road to buy and sell whatever you want, far away from the government’s eye.

Interestingly enough, Tor, was originally created as a project by the U.S. Navy. Later, the FBI infiltrated the network to crack down on illegal black market trading, child pornography and other illegal activities.

Morality and Ethics

Many times in life, it’s not whether a question whether something can be done, but whether it should be done. Such is the case with visiting the deep web and dark net.

The ugly truth is that these back alleys of the Internet are filled with some pretty disgusting content.: black markets, child pornography, sex trafficking and plenty of more run-of-the-mill seedy or sordid sites make their home there.

The first thing we need to ask ourselves is whether or not it’s appropriate to view such content. Also consider that if you don’t use the correct tools when visiting these sites, your computer might raise some red flags to the government, and consequently end up on a government’s watch list.

How to Access the Deep Web and the Dark Net

So, if all of these hidden websites are so secretive it’s impossible to find them with a search engine, how do you find them?

One of the best ways to find them is by word of mouth. Some of them are mentioned on forums and directories like Reddit and Tor threads.

Despite past infiltration by the FBI, the Tor anonymity network and the Tor browser are still fantastic tools — especially if they’re combined with a VPN tunnel for increased security.

If you don’t want to use the Tor browser, there are Tor plugins for just about every major web browser, too. The Tor network hosts a ton of hidden services that can’t be accessed using other browsers.

Final Thoughts

Before you go snooping around through the back alleys of the Internet, we’d like to repeat that you do so with caution as not only is the content itself of a dubious nature, some of it is illegal enough that you may be on the receiving end of a police visit if you’re found out.

It’s best not to venture into the dark net out of idle curiosity. That said, there are some interesting news sites and other topical content that you won’t find anywhere else. Just make sure you don’t accidentally visit a site that may make you uncomfortable.

If you exercise some common sense and stay well away from anything that looks overly suspicious, you should be fine. If you have any personal experience with visiting the dark net, let us know in the comments below, thank you for reading.

Author : Joel Tope

Source : https://www.cloudwards.net/how-to-access-the-deep-web-and-the-dark-net/

Categorized in Deep Web

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