Source: This article was published nytimes.com By GABRIEL J.X. DANCE, NICHOLAS CONFESSORE, and MICHAEL LaFORGIA - Contributed by Member: Linda Manly

As Facebook sought to become the world’s dominant social media service, it struck agreements allowing phone and other device makers access to vast amounts of its users’ personal information.

Facebook has reached data-sharing partnerships with at least 60 device makers — including Apple, Amazon, BlackBerry, Microsoft and Samsung — over the last decade, starting before Facebook apps were widely available on smartphones, company officials said. The deals allowed Facebook to expand its reach and let device makers offer customers popular features of the social network, such as messaging, “like” buttons and address books.

But the partnerships, whose scope has not previously been reported, raise concerns about the company’s privacy protections and compliance with a 2011 consent decree with the Federal Trade Commission. Facebook allowed the device companies access to the data of users’ friends without their explicit consent, even after declaring that it would no longer share such information with outsiders. Some device makers could retrieve personal information even from users’ friends who believed they had barred any sharing, The New York Times found.

[Here’s what we know about Facebook’s partnerships with device makers.]

Most of the partnerships remain in effect, though Facebook began winding them down in April. The company came under intensifying scrutiny by lawmakers and regulators after news reports in March that a political consulting firm, Cambridge Analytica, misused the private information of tens of millions of Facebook users.

In the furor that followed, Facebook’s leaders said that the kind of access exploited by Cambridge in 2014 was cut off by the next year, when Facebook prohibited developers from collecting information from users’ friends. But the company officials did not disclose that Facebook had exempted the makers of cellphones, tablets and other hardware from such restrictions.

“You might think that Facebook or the device manufacturer is trustworthy,” said Serge Egelman, a privacy researcher at the University of California, Berkeley, who studies the security of mobile apps. “But the problem is that as more and more data is collected on the device — and if it can be accessed by apps on the device — it creates serious privacy and security risks.”

In interviews, Facebook officials defended the data sharing as consistent with its privacy policies, the F.T.C. agreement and pledges to users. They said its partnerships were governed by contracts that strictly limited use of the data, including any stored on partners’ servers. The officials added that they knew of no cases where the information had been misused.

The company views its device partners as extensions of Facebook, serving its more than two billion users, the officials said.

“These partnerships work very differently from the way in which app developers use our platform,” said Ime Archibong, a Facebook vice president. Unlike developers that provide games and services to Facebook users, the device partners can use Facebook data only to provide versions of “the Facebook experience,” the officials said.

Some device partners can retrieve Facebook users’ relationship status, religion, political leaning and upcoming events, among other data. Tests by The Times showed that the partners requested and received data in the same way other third parties did.

Facebook’s view that the device makers are not outsiders lets the partners go even further, The Times found: They can obtain data about a user’s Facebook friends, even those who have denied Facebook permission to share information with any third parties.

In interviews, several former Facebook software engineers and security experts said they were surprised at the ability to override sharing restrictions.

“It’s like having door locks installed, only to find out that the locksmith also gave keys to all of his friends so they can come in and rifle through your stuff without having to ask you for permission,” said Ashkan Soltani, a research and privacy consultant who formerly served as the F.T.C.’s chief technologist.

How One Phone Gains Access to Hundreds of Thousands of Facebook Accounts

After connecting to Facebook, the BlackBerry Hub app was able to retrieve detailed data on 556 of Mr. LaForgia's friends, including relationship status, religious and political leanings and events they planned to attend. Facebook has said that it cut off third parties' access to this type of information in 2015, but that it does not consider BlackBerry a third party in this case.

The Hub app was also able to access information — including unique identifiers — on 294,258 friends of Mr. LaForgia's friends.

By Rich Harris and Gabriel J.X. Dance

Details of Facebook’s partnerships have emerged amid a reckoning in Silicon Valley over the volume of personal information collected on the internet and monetized by the tech industry. The pervasive collection of data, while largely unregulated in the United States, has come under growing criticism from elected officials at home and overseas and provoked concern among consumers about how freely their information is shared.

In a tense appearance before Congress in March, Facebook’s chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, emphasized what he said was a company priority for Facebook users.“Every piece of content that you share on Facebook you own,” he testified. ”You have complete control over who sees it and how you share it.”

But the device partnerships provoked discussion even within Facebook as early as 2012, according to Sandy Parakilas, who at the time led third-party advertising and privacy compliance for Facebook’s platform.

“This was flagged internally as a privacy issue,” said Mr. Parakilas, who left Facebook that year and has recently emerged as a harsh critic of the company. “It is shocking that this practice may still continue six years later, and it appears to contradict Facebook’s testimony to Congress that all friend permissions were disabled.”

The partnerships were briefly mentioned in documents submitted to German lawmakers investigating the social media giant’s privacy practices and released by Facebook in mid-May. But Facebook provided the lawmakers with the name of only one partner — BlackBerry, maker of the once-ubiquitous mobile device — and little information about how the agreements worked.

The submission followed testimony by Joel Kaplan, Facebook’s vice president for global public policy, during a closed-door German parliamentary hearing in April. Elisabeth Winkelmeier-Becker, one of the lawmakers who questioned Mr. Kaplan, said in an interview that she believed the data partnerships disclosed by Facebook violated users’ privacy rights.

“What we have been trying to determine is whether Facebook has knowingly handed over user data elsewhere without explicit consent,” Ms. Winkelmeier-Becker said. “I would never have imagined that this might even be happening secretly via deals with device makers. BlackBerry users seem to have been turned into data dealers, unknowingly and unwillingly.”

In interviews with The Times, Facebook identified other partners: Apple and Samsung, the world’s two biggest smartphone makers, and Amazon, which sells tablets.

An Apple spokesman said the company relied on private access to Facebook data for features that enabled users to post photos to the social network without opening the Facebook app, among other things. Apple said its phones no longer had such access to Facebook as of last September.

Samsung declined to respond to questions about whether it had any data-sharing partnerships with Facebook. Amazon also declined to respond to questions.

Usher Lieberman, a BlackBerry spokesman, said in a statement that the company used Facebook data only to give its own customers access to their Facebook networks and messages. Mr. Lieberman said that the company “did not collect or mine the Facebook data of our customers,” adding that “BlackBerry has always been in the business of protecting, not monetizing, customer data.”

Microsoft entered a partnership with Facebook in 2008 that allowed Microsoft-powered devices to do things like add contacts and friends and receive notifications, according to a spokesman. He added that the data was stored locally on the phone and was not synced to Microsoft’s servers.

Facebook acknowledged that some partners did store users’ data — including friends’ data — on their own servers. A Facebook official said that regardless of where the data was kept, it was governed by strict agreements between the companies.

“I am dumbfounded by the attitude that anybody in Facebook’s corporate office would think allowing third parties access to data would be a good idea,” said Henning Schulzrinne, a computer science professor at Columbia University who specializes in network security and mobile systems.

The Cambridge Analytica scandal revealed how loosely Facebook had policed the bustling ecosystem of developers building apps on its platform. They ranged from well-known players like Zynga, the maker of the FarmVille game, to smaller ones, like a Cambridge contractor who used a quiz taken by about 300,000 Facebook users to gain access to the profiles of as many as 87 million of their friends.

Those developers relied on Facebook’s public data channels, known as application programming interfaces, or APIs. But starting in 2007, the company also established private data channels for device manufacturers.

At the time, mobile phones were less powerful, and relatively few of them could run stand-alone Facebook apps like those now common on smartphones. The company continued to build new private APIs for device makers through 2014, spreading user data through tens of millions of mobile devices, game consoles, televisions and other systems outside Facebook’s direct control.

Facebook began moving to wind down the partnerships in April, after assessing its privacy and data practices in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Mr. Archibong said the company had concluded that the partnerships were no longer needed to serve Facebook users. About 22 of them have been shut down.

The broad access Facebook provided to device makers raises questions about its compliance with a 2011 consent decree with the F.T.C.

The decree barred Facebook from overriding users’ privacy settings without first getting explicit consent. That agreement stemmed from an investigation that found Facebook had allowed app developers and other third parties to collect personal details about users’ friends, even when those friends had asked that their information remain private.

After the Cambridge Analytica revelations, the F.T.C. began an investigation into whether Facebook’s continued sharing of data after 2011 violated the decree, potentially exposing the company to fines.

Facebook officials said the private data channels did not violate the decree because the company viewed its hardware partners as “service providers,” akin to a cloud computing service paid to store Facebook data or a company contracted to process credit card transactions. According to the consent decree, Facebook does not need to seek additional permission to share friend data with service providers.

“These contracts and partnerships are entirely consistent with Facebook’s F.T.C. consent decree,” Mr. Archibong, the Facebook official, said.

But Jessica Rich, a former F.T.C. official who helped lead the commission’s earlier Facebook investigation, disagreed with that assessment.

“Under Facebook’s interpretation, the exception swallows the rule,” said Ms. Rich, now with the Consumers Union. “They could argue that any sharing of data with third parties is part of the Facebook experience. And this is not at all how the public interpreted their 2014 announcement that they would limit third-party app access to friend data.”

To test one partner’s access to Facebook’s private data channels, The Times used a reporter’s Facebook account — with about 550 friends — and a 2013 BlackBerry device, monitoring what data the device requested and received. (More recent BlackBerry devices, which run Google’s Android operating system, do not use the same private channels, BlackBerry officials said.)

Immediately after the reporter connected the device to his Facebook account, it requested some of his profile data, including user ID, name, picture, “about” information, location, email, and cell phone number. The device then retrieved the reporter’s private messages and the responses to them, along with the name and user ID of each person with whom he was communicating.

The data flowed to a BlackBerry app known as the Hub, which was designed to let BlackBerry users view all of their messages and social media accounts in one place.

The Hub also requested — and received — data that Facebook’s policy appears to prohibit. Since 2015, Facebook has said that apps can request only the names of friends using the same app. But the BlackBerry app had access to all of the reporter’s Facebook friends and, for most of them, returned information such as user ID, birthday, work and education history and whether they were currently online.

The BlackBerry device was also able to retrieve identifying information for nearly 295,000 Facebook users. Most of them were second-degree Facebook friends of the reporter, or friends of friends.

In all, Facebook empowers BlackBerry devices to access more than 50 types of information about users and their friends, The Times found.

Categorized in Social

As a follow up to our recent article on how to spot and stop phishing attempts, we’re now going to focus on the difficulty of recognising phishing and email spoofing attempts on mobile devices and how to overcome this.

img src="https://www.beaming.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/SamPhone1-370x312.png" alt="Email spoofing: Mobile spoof email can be hard to detect" width="432" height="364" srcset="https://www.beaming.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/SamPhone1-370x312.png 370w, /

Beware the email address

Sometimes a spoof email seems to be from someone famous or well known, to attract the attention of the recipient.  Otherwise, it may be a trusted brand name. More sophisticated scams will appear to be from someone the user knows, usually through work. Email spoofing addresses tend to be a mixture of letters, numbers and meaningless words. Depending on the type of device and app you are using, this may be more difficult to spot on a mobile device as they often just display the sender’s “Friendly name” and the email address itself is more difficult to find.

To display the sender’s email address you’ll need to open the email. At the top, underneath the “From” and “To” lines, you should find a link entitled “Details” or “View detail.

img src="https://www.beaming.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/Samphone2.png" alt="Email spoofing: How to view a sender's email address on mobile" width="236" height="430" srcset="https://www.beaming.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/Samphone2.png 236w, /
Once clicked, this will expand the “From” and “To” details so that you may view the email address of the sender and details as to when the message was received.

Watch what they ask for and how they ask for it

Spoof emails will be asking for something from you, this may include money, passwords or sensitive information. Legitimate banks or companies will never ask for personal credentials over email so don’t give them up.  High-end brands are extremely cautious with their spelling, punctuation, and grammar so if an email has many spelling mistakes, it’s likely that the email is trying to spoof you.

 Treat all links as suspicious

 Malware and ransomware can be spread when victims unwittingly click on an untoward download link. Phishers will also send links that take the user to a convincing looking corporate website where they are encouraged to enter personal information such as credit card details.

If you’re on a PC, you can use your mouse to hover over any link in an email to view the destination web address. As with the email address, if the destination web address is a random mixture of numbers and letters, be wary of it. Likewise, if the website address is mis-spelled this is a red-flag that can be easily missed eg http://www.micorsoft.com. On a mobile device, you won’t have a mouse, but you can still check the link by holding your finger down on it. Unlike a short tap, which would open the link, holding your finger on it will cause a new dialogue window to pop up, showing you what the destination web address is but without actually following the link.

As is always our advice, if you are in any doubt, check! Don’t put your personal details or business in jeopardy. By making sure that everyone is aware of tactics used in email spoofing and know how to verify the original source of an email, you can save wasted time, effort and resources in the future.

Source: This article was published beaming.co.uk By Beaming Support

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Every day, millions of people all over the world use their smartphones, but many people don’t realize that these phones are not completely secure. If you own an Android smartphone, you need to take steps to protect yourself from fraud and identity theft. You can lose a whole lot more than just contact information and other day-to-day information! Someone could end up getting your financial information, and then you would really be in a mess. Also, you can lose the things that mean a lot to you, including photos, social media accounts, documents, emails, and more, or even worse, your information could be shared online for the rest of the world to see. With these things in mind, here are some things you can do to tighten the security on your Android device.

Encrypt Your Data

Encrypting data is like securing your data with a secret code that only you know. Using encryption helps to increase your security, and you can open encrypt while using any type of smartphone setting. You will need to have a password to access any of your data.

Lock all Apps

You need to lock all of your apps. This is particularly important for apps that contain personal information that you don’t want anyone else to see. Investigate the range of app locking apps, or search within individual apps and disable any options that allow simple and easy access – unless you’re certain that you don’t mind anyone else having access!

Use Built-In Security

There are all kinds of screen locks available, from passwords to pins to patterns to face unlock. Make sure that you are using at least of the screen locks that can be found in your Android settings. Be sure to make it so your passwords are not easy to guess, even with this security.

Choose the Best VPN Service

It is important to use the right VPN for your Android device, but there are so many out there that it can be difficult to know which one is the best for your particular needs. Do your research before you buy, and be sure to consider all the options carefully.

Don’t Save All Passwords

A lot of people save all of their passwords to sites and online services they use. But, if you do this, and someone were to get your device, they will have access to all of your passwords. Do not save them in your Android device, in particular, banking and payment apps.

Create Multiple User Accounts

If you share your device with others (spouse, children, etc.), it is important that each user has their own accounts in order to protect your privacy. If you’ve a reasonably new tablet you can create guest accountsfor other users – just like on your desktop computer.

Install Antivirus Software

There is antivirus software available for Android devices, and we strongly suggest that you install one. Smartphones are basically hand-held computers, and they are as subject to viruses as any other computer.

Watch for Safe Apps Download

Loads of software and applications are available for Android devices, and you could end up unwittingly downloading harmful applications. For this reason, you need to pay attention to the smart phone agency terms and application before downloading anything. Also, you can set your antivirus to check every app that installs.

Avoid Financial Transactions

Never do any type of financial transactions on your smartphone or tablet. If you must do online financial transactions, be sure to use a private home computer that is password protected. If you can get a dedicated Internet line to your home, that is even better, because there is no chance that others in the neighborhood can use your service and possibly access your information.

Author:  Jane Hurst

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/

Categorized in Science & Tech

Almost all smartphones are powered by the Android Operating System, perhaps over 80% of them. Yet Android smartphones just can’t do it all, since most of them do not come with more complex management software like the Android PC suite. Also, Google doesn’t have devoted software on the Mac or the PC for your Android device. But, we all need to manage our devices somehow!

Well, smartphones are here to stay. Thus it is necessary to discover the right tools that will save us the time and effort when it comes to managing our Android smartphone.

Here are four tools that can help you do this.

1. Mobikin Assistant for Android

There are other Android PC Suite software choices out there, but the Mobikin Assistant stands out because you do not need to search the internet to download or install device drivers on your PC for it to work with your Android device. The Mobikin Assistant for Android is installed on your computer, and your smartphone can be connected to PC via USB cable. You can then export contacts, files, and text messages from your Android mobile phone or tablet into your computer. This way, you can free up more space on your smartphone.

You can backup and manage your contacts with this tool. You don’t need to spend so much time finding the right contact to call. Rather than having both your Gmail accounts and your phone memory card configured to store contacts because you are worried about losing them, Mobikin Assistant for Android PC has a duplicate contacts finder option to help you weed out similar contacts from your Android Smartphone Phonebook.

Another reason Mobikin would be a great manager for your Android Smartphone is that you can manage your text messages with it. Deleting junk text messages just got easier and faster.

2. SnapPea

What makes SnapPea unique is that it is one tool that you can use to manage, control and backup Andriod from Windows. Managing your devices from Windows can be tedious. However, SnapPea offers a desktop tool that can be used to organize and backup your Android tablet or phone from Windows, and yes, they also have a Mac version too.

SnapPea offers you the option of backing up apps. Before making any major app upgrades, you can copy your relevant files from your device to your computer. You also can edit, create and delete address book entries, and send your SMS with the program too.

3. AirDroid

AirDroid is another tool that can help you manage all files on your Android device. You can send and receive text messages; play, import, and export music or videos; send and receive text messages; even manage ringtones and notification sounds. The premium version allows you to find a lost phone, and remotely wipe or lock the phone. You can also manage contacts, connect, and switch between up to six devices.

Through a PC, you can manage most of your common phone tasks with this tool, and it is pretty easy to set up. It can also work without a wireless network if you are working outside your home.

4. Moborobo

Moborobo is an Android sync software and app developer. It supports all devices, and you can manage just about anything on your phone from your PC. When connected to the internet, it works very well, and it is pretty safe because of its verification code. It doesn’t require an internet connection to work, though, and it can be set to automatically backup whenever you connect your device. One inadequacy, though, is that it does require a USB or shared network connection to connect to your Android device. However, it does have a FindMyPhone function in case your device goes missing. With Moborobo, you can make an easy switch/upgrade to a new phone.

Author:  CASEY IMAFIDON

Source:  http://www.lifehack.org/

Categorized in Science & Tech

Firefox announced the launch of its Firefox Focus browser for iOS users. Firefox claims that it is a private browser designed to not leave behind traces of internet browsing on the device. Firefox Focus aims to protect online privacy by blocking web trackers and analytics, the company said.

Firefox reports that users can browse content with the knowledge that ‘browsing history, passwords, cookies’ can be deleted with a tap of the “Erase” button, which is located next to the search bar. The company claims that browsing on Firefox Focus is faster compared to other browsers thanks to default blocking of trackers and advertisements that slow down page loading times.

“For the times when you don’t want to leave a record on your phone. You may be looking for information that in certain situations is sensitive – searches for engagement rings, flights to Las Vegas or expensive cigars, for example. And sometimes you just want a super simple, super fast Web experience – no tabs, no menus, no pop-ups,” Firefox said in a blog post.

The browser is bare-boned with a single input box for entering the URL and search functionality using Google(UK) or Yahoo (US). Firefox Focus however, lacks features such as ‘Tabs’, ‘Menus’, and other features, reports The Guardian. There is also no option to change the default search engine from Yahoo, as of yet.

Customising tracking information is found under ‘Settings’. The following trackers can be blocked- ‘advertisements’, ‘analytics’, ‘social’ and others.

Apple’s decision to allow developers write Safari integrations resulted in Firefox initially launching the ‘Focus by Firefox’ in December 2015 as a content blocker for Safari. The new app can still integrate with Safari for blocking tracking information, Firefox added.

Mozilla told Engadget that depending on how the iOS app is received, it’ll consider building an Android version of Firefox Focus. The app is currently available for free on Apple’s App Store.

Author:  Tech Desk

Source:  http://indianexpress.com/

Categorized in News & Politics

In a recent poll by Tech Pro Research, 45 percent of respondents chose mobile devices as their company's weakest link, in terms of security

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According to an online poll conducted by Tech Pro Research in June, everyday threats like security breaches involving mobile devices are more worrisome than acts of cybercrime. More results from this research are presented in the infographic below: 

To learn more, download the full report: Cybersecurity Research: Weak Links, Digital Forensics, and International Concerns. (Tech Pro Research membership required.)

You can also download our full special report on "Cyberwar and the Future of Cybersecurity" as a PDF in magazine format, available for free at registered ZDNet and TechRepublic members.

Source : zdnet

Categorized in Online Research

According to official Google statements, more than 50 percent of search queries globally now come from mobile devices. But we don’t know whether the number is 51 percent or 60 percent, or if it varies significantly by country.

A recent report from Hitwise (registration required) argues that in the US mobile search is roughly 58 percent of overall search query volume. That’s based on an average of 11 key categories and associated queries analyzed by Hitwise in its “Mobile Search: Topics and Themes” report. The company “examined hundreds of millions of online search queries” across PCs, smartphones and tablets between April 10 and May 7, 2016.

Share of online searches initiated on a mobile device, by industry

Hitwise mobile search %

Hitwise mobile search %

 

Source: Hitwise

The category with the highest percentage of mobile search volume was “Food & Beverage,” with 72 percent. The category with the lowest volume was banking, with 39 percent (or 61 percent on the desktop).

Another interesting finding in the report is that mobile queries are slightly longer than PC search queries. For example, in Food & Beverage, average PC query strings were 13.8 characters, mobile queries were at 15.5 characters (just over two words). Unfortunately, the report doesn’t provide additional insight or detail by category on query length.

Hitwise mobile query length

Source : http://searchengineland.com/report-nearly-60-percent-searches-now-mobile-devices-255025

Categorized in Search Engine

The Internet is a necessity in the workplace, whether you work in a supermarket or in an office, there is a part of your job that will require an Internet connection. With companies becoming increasingly obsessed with ways to increase productivity, the most obvious way is to improve your connection speed.

If you count up the times you have waited for a page to load or a tutorial video to stop buffering, you’ll probably have spent hours if not days each year sat at your screen simply waiting.

In the following paragraphs we’ll cover what contributes to Internet speed and share some top tips on how you can speed yours up.

Internet speed is determined by a number of factors; some are completely out of your control, like where you live whilst others you do have control over.

Network structure

Perhaps the most important thing is the structure of your network. Whether you use a wired or wireless connection, if your system isn’t installed with bandwidth in mind you could be losing mountains of all-important speed. As a result, it is imperative that your business hires a structured cabling and wireless network professional to ensure that your network is in the best position possible to help you reach maximum Internet speed.

Clean your device

Have you ever wondered why the Internet on your laptop seems to move much quicker than on your PC, despite you being connected to the same network? Well a lot of this can be to do with your device rather than the network.

If you are trying to use multiple applications at once or your device is reaching its memory capacity, it will run much slower. As a knock on effect this means it will take longer for web pages to load.

Spend a few hours going through your computer and remove any unwanted applications. Don’t forget to perform regular virus scans as well because if your computer is infected it could make your Internet run at a snail-like pace. Here are a few more tips on how to clean your computer.

Check your browser

This is something that many people forget, but different browsers will have more of a strain on your computer and connection. For example, Internet Explorer is a popular browser but it does use a lot of resources, on the other hand you could find that using a more compact browser like Chrome will speed up your connection.

Download browser plug-ins

Most browsers now come with the ability to download plug-ins like dictionaries that allow you to hover over a word and instantly be presented with a definition.

There are many fantastic plug-ins that can help to improve your Internet speed. Popular ones include those which virtually disable ads from your surfing experience and with less flashing banners and pop-ups on your screen, you will have less elements to load and ultimately the content that matters should load much more quickly.

Most browsers now come with this ability built-in, like Safari will automatically disable all Flash elements unless you physically click on it and enable Flash.

Remove unwanted plug-ins

There are countless plug-ins that you can download so you’ll be forgiven for amassing a few over time. However, if you have plug-ins that you haven’t used in months, delete them. They’ll be running in the background and consuming bandwidth unnecessarily.

Close all unneeded tabs

Many webpages will now refresh automatically every few minutes, mainly news sites. So even if you aren’t looking at pages but have them open in tabs, they will be consuming bandwidth. If you are one of these people that likes to have unlimited tabs and browser windows open, think again if you are experiencing slow Internet speeds – closing them could have a huge difference.

Source : http://www.toptensocialmedia.com/social-media-technology-2/internet-reliance-improving-your-speed-at-work/

Categorized in Science & Tech

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