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Keeping Facebook safe and keeping Facebook secure are two different tasks, Facebook’s Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos said at recent conference. Security, he explained to the crowd, is building walls of defense to keep threats out. But “safety is bigger than that.”

Stamos explained that the “bigger” form of safety was making use of stolen password dumps on the darknet. Instead of simply comparing the password hashes of Facebook users with those made publicly available, Facebook buys the account dumps hidden on the DNMs.

Database breaches containing electronic healthcare records have routinely popped up on marketplaces like the TheRealDeal. Social media has been regularly exploited too. Earlier this year, 65 million Tumblr accounts surfaced for a surprisingly low price.

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After the Adobe breach, we learned Facebook that the social media giant mined the Adobe data to find anyone who shared passwords between Facebook and Adobe. The accounts that used the same username (email) and password were “concealed” and received a message with instructions to update their password.

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“Recently, there was a security incident on another website unrelated to Facebook. Facebook was not directly affected by the incident, but your Facebook account is at risk because you were using the same password in both places,” the Facebook message said.

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Stamos explained that the social media giant hunted the darknet for account and/or server dumps to buy. The team then used a “computationally heavy” method to cross-reference the passwords found in the dumps with Facebook users’ password hashes.

Facebook sandboxed the users after matches were found, keeping the possibly-compromised accounts from the public eye—until the account owner changed the password.

“The reuse of passwords is the No. 1 cause of harm on the internet,” Cnet quoted Stamos on stage. He continued “Even though we provide these options, it is our responsibility to think about those people that choose not to use them.”

The ability that Facebook had regarding cross-referencing passwords found in data breaches and those of Facebook users raised several questions. People wanted to know how Facebook could possibly check their credentials against those found online without storing their login data in plain text. The suspicion that Facebook stored account information in plain text or similar encrypted fashion was not held by a lone conspirator.

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Chris Long, a security incident response manager at Facebook, explained the process after the 2013 Adobe breach. This was his reply to a commenter on krebsonsecurity.

We used the plaintext passwords that had already been worked out by researchers. We took those recovered plaintext passwords and ran them through the same code that we use to check your password at login time. Like Brian’s story indicates, we’re proactive about finding sources of compromised passwords on the internet. Through practice, we’ve become more efficient and effective at protecting accounts with credentials that have been leaked, and we use an automated process for securing those accounts.

“It can do that because passwords can be used to create hashes, but the reverse isn’t true: hashes can’t be used to recreate the passwords that made them,” Naked Security wrote.

Stamos explained “When somebody logs into Facebook, the password they hand over is passed through a one-way hashing function. If the result matches what Facebook has on record, that user is allowed in.”

Facebook looks for stolen password that are able to pass through Facebook’s hashing algorithm. If it passes and matches the hash file on record for a particular user, “Facebook knows it has hit on a reuser,” Stamos said.

He ended by adding: “Usernames and passwords are an idea that came out of the 1970s mainframe architectures. They were not built for 2016.”

Source : https://www.deepdotweb.com

Author : C. ALIENS

Categorized in Social

FEI-FEI LI IS a big deal in the world of AI. As the director of the Artificial Intelligence and Vision labs at Stanford University, she oversaw the creation of ImageNet, a vast database of images designed to accelerate the development of AI that can “see.” And, well, it worked, helping to drive the creation of deep learning systems that can recognize objects, animals, people, and even entire scenes in photos—technology that has become commonplace on the world’s biggest photo-sharing sites. Now, Fei-Fei will help run a brand new AI group inside Google, a move that reflects just how aggressively the world’s biggest tech companies are remaking themselves around this breed of artificial intelligence.

Alongside a former Stanford researcher—Jia Li, who more recently ran research for the social networking service Snapchat—the China-born Fei-Fei will lead a team inside Google’s cloud computing operation, building online services that any coder or company can use to build their own AI. This new Cloud Machine Learning Group is the latest example of AI not only re-shaping the technology that Google uses, but also changing how the company organizes and operates its business.

Google is not alone in this rapid re-orientation. Amazon is building a similar group cloud computing group for AI. Facebook and Twitter have created internal groups akin to Google Brain, the team responsible for infusing the search giant’s own tech with AI. And in recent weeks, Microsoft reorganized much of its operation around its existing machine learning work, creating a new AI and research group under executive vice president Harry Shum, who began his career as a computer vision researcher.

Oren Etzioni, CEO of the not-for-profit Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence, says that these changes are partly about marketing—efforts to ride the AI hype wave. Google, for example, is focusing public attention on Fei-Fei’s new group because that’s good for the company’s cloud computing business. But Etzioni says this is also part of very real shift inside these companies, with AI poised to play an increasingly large role in our future. “This isn’t just window dressing,” he says.

 

The New Cloud

Fei-Fei’s group is an effort to solidify Google’s position on a new front in the AI wars. The company is challenging rivals like Amazon, Microsoft, and IBM in building cloud computing services specifically designed for artificial intelligence work. This includes services not just for image recognition, but speech recognition, machine-driven translation, natural language understanding, and more.

Cloud computing doesn’t always get the same attention as consumer apps and phones, but it could come to dominate the balance sheet at these giant companies. Even Amazon and Google, known for their consumer-oriented services, believe that cloud computing could eventually become their primary source of revenue. And in the years to come, AI services will play right into the trend, providing tools that allow of a world of businesses to build machine learning services they couldn’t build on their own. Iddo Gino, CEO of RapidAPI, a company that helps businesses use such services, says they have already reached thousands of developers, with image recognition services leading the way.

When it announced Fei-Fei’s appointment last week, Google unveiled new versions of cloud services that offer image and speech recognition as well as machine-driven translation. And the company said it will soon offer a service that allows others to access to vast farms of GPU processors, the chips that are essential to running deep neural networks. This came just weeks after Amazon hired a notable Carnegie Mellon researcher to run its own cloud computing group for AI—and just a day after Microsoft formally unveiled new services for building “chatbots” and announced a deal to provide GPU services to OpenAI, the AI lab established by Tesla founder Elon Musk and Y Combinator president Sam Altman.

The New Microsoft

Even as they move to provide AI to others, these big internet players are looking to significantly accelerate the progress of artificial intelligence across their own organizations. In late September, Microsoft announced the formation of a new group under Shum called the Microsoft AI and Research Group. Shum will oversee more than 5,000 computer scientists and engineers focused on efforts to push AI into the company’s products, including the Bing search engine, the Cortana digital assistant, and Microsoft’s forays into robotics.

 

The company had already reorganized its research group to move quickly into new technologies into products. With AI, Shum says, the company aims to move even quicker. In recent months, Microsoft pushed its chatbot work out of research and into live products—though not quite successfully. Still, it’s the path from research to product the company hopes to accelerate in the years to come.

“With AI, we don’t really know what the customer expectation is,” Shum says. By moving research closer to the team that actually builds the products, the company believes it can develop a better understanding of how AI can do things customers truly want.

The New Brains

In similar fashion, Google, Facebook, and Twitter have already formed central AI teams designed to spread artificial intelligence throughout their companies. The Google Brain team began as a project inside the Google X lab under another former Stanford computer science professor, Andrew Ng, now chief scientist at Baidu. The team provides well-known services such as image recognition for Google Photos and speech recognition for Android. But it also works with potentially any group at Google, such as the company’s security teams, which are looking for ways to identify security bugs and malware through machine learning.

Facebook, meanwhile, runs its own AI research lab as well as a Brain-like team known as the Applied Machine Learning Group. Its mission is to push AI across the entire family of Facebook products, and according chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer, it’s already working: one in five Facebook engineers now make use of machine learning. Schroepfer calls the tools built by Facebook’s Applied ML group “a big flywheel that has changed everything” inside the company. “When they build a new model or build a new technique, it immediately gets used by thousands of people working on products that serve billions of people,” he says. Twitter has built a similar team, called Cortex, after acquiring several AI startups.

The New Education

The trouble for all of these companies is that finding that talent needed to drive all this AI work can be difficult. Given the deep neural networking has only recently entered the mainstream, only so many Fei-Fei Lis exist to go around. Everyday coders won’t do. Deep neural networking is a very different way of building computer services. Rather than coding software to behave a certain way, engineers coax results from vast amounts of data—more like a coach than a player.

As a result, these big companies are also working to retrain their employees in this new way of doing things. As it revealed last spring, Google is now running internal classes in the art of deep learning, and Facebook offers machine learning instruction to all engineers inside the company alongside a formal program that allows employees to become full-time AI researchers.

Yes, artificial intelligence is all the buzz in the tech industry right now, which can make it feel like a passing fad. But inside Google and Microsoft and Amazon, it’s certainly not. And these companies are intent on pushing it across the rest of the tech world too.

Update: This story has been updated to clarify Fei-Fei Li’s move to Google. She will remain on the faculty at Stanford after joining Google.

Author:  Cade Metz

Source:  https://www.wired.com

Categorized in News & Politics

Facebook’s fake news frenzy continued as the company came under scrutiny for its debated influence on the U.S. election, LinkedIn was blocked in Russia and a person was treated with CRISPR technology for the first time. Also, the human species has about 1,000 years left according to Stephen Hawking. But do we deserve survival? The existence of Coca-Cola’s selfie bottle points toward no.

1. Mark Zuckerberg published a response to accusations that fake news on Facebook influenced the outcome of the U.S. election. The Facebook CEO claims that at least 99 percent of news content on Facebook was “authentic.” However, many still argue that Facebook has locked users inside of an echo chamber. 

2. Apple and U.S. auto sales could suffer a setback if President-elect Donald Trump takes action on his pre-election comments about global trade. Back in September, Trump said he would impose a 45 percent tariff on imports from China. And now the country is threatening to squeeze iPhone sales if a trade war comes to be. 

MacBook Pro

3. A full four years after the last major upgrade, the new MacBook Pro is finally here. It’s slimmer and lighter than its predecessor, has a new Touch Bar feature and a larger TrackPad.

4. Chinese scientists injected a human being with cells genetically edited using CRISPR-Cas9technology. This is the first time CRISPR has been used on a fully formed adult human, and scientists are hoping that this will help their patient fend off a deadly type of lung cancer.

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5. Snap Inc. appears to be moving forward in its plans to go public early next year. The company reportedly filed confidentially for its massive IPO. Snap is already targeting as much as $1 billion in revenue for 2017. It has 150 million daily active users and has rapidly become one of the most enticing new advertising platforms for marketers. Snapchat also continued selling its Spectacles glasses to the public in the most millennial way possible — through pop-up vending machines across California and in Oklahoma. But they didn’t give them away to techies. 

6. Microsoft and the Linux community often felt like they were at war with each other in the past. But this week, Microsoft, one of the biggest open-source contributors, joined the Linux Foundation as a high-paying Platinum member.

7. Shareholders approved Tesla’s acquisition of SolarCity in an important hurdle for the deal. Tesla expects the transaction to close in the coming days. Overall, the acquisition is pushed forward by Elon Musk’s vision of a unified sustainable energy track.

Jason Robins of DraftKings

8. It was confirmed that fantasy sports sites DraftKings and FanDuel are merging into one company in what will be a

dual-operating

 

structure. DraftKings CEO Jason Robins will become CEO of the newly combined company and FanDuel CEO Nigel Eccles will become Chairman of the Board.

9. WhatsApp is on its way to becoming the global multi-platform FaceTime. The Facebook-owned communication app launched video calling for everyone.

10. A red-hot new startup called Hustle announced it’s raised $3 million led by Social Capital. The text-distribution tool’s goal is to let organizers quickly start individual, personalized conversations with huge groups of supporters. It has already been used by Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.

11. Samsung is gunning to increase its focus on connected cars as it announced plans to buy auto and audio product maker Harman in an $8 billion all-cash deal.

12. LinkedIn was officially blocked in Russia after the social network failed to transfer Russian user data to servers located in the country. This violates a law instituted in Russia requiring all online sites to store personal data on national servers.

Author : Anna Escher

Source : techcrunch.com

Categorized in News & Politics

Mike wants to save a video from Facebook. Luckily if you’re using a desktop or laptop PC it’s quite easy.

 

I can almost hear you saying, “Hold on Josh—when I watch a Facebook video on my PC there aren’t any links to save it!” Correct, but all you have to do is trick your browser into thinking you’re browsing Facebook on your phone. Here are the steps:

 

Right-click any non-Youtube video and select Show video URL

 

Revealing the URL

Right-click the video and select Show video URL.

Copy this URL to your clipboard, then paste it into the browser’s address bar.

 

Hit Enter to open this page

 

Delete the 'www' in front of the URL and replace it with the letter 'm' so the links look like this:

Original URL

 

 

We just need to remove these w’s.
 

Mobile version

Replace the w’s with an m to view the mobile version. 

 

Hit Enter to open the mobile version of the video and click Play on the video. It has to start playing for you to proceed to the final step.

 

Right-click the video and select Save Video As...

 

Saving the video

And voila - you can now save the video.

 

Save the video to your PC, and now you can watch it using your video player of choice for MP4 files.

 

 

 

Source : pcworld.com

Categorized in Social

While it would have been nice to tackle this issue before the election, Google and Facebook are finally taking a tiny step in order to fight back against fake news. According to multiple statements, both companies have updated their policies to ban fake news sites from using Facebook’s and Google’s advertising networks.

With the U.S. election, fake news became incredibly popular on social networks, such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, as well as news aggregating services, such as Google News and news articles in Google search results. We’re not talking about opinion articles — we’re talking about reports spreading blatantly inaccurate information.

Google first updated its policy saying that the company will try to ban sites that “misrepresent, misstate, or conceal information.” Websites who don’t comply with this rule will get banned from using Google AdSense.

 

When it comes to Facebook, the company has also updated its policy to rule out fake news sites from using Facebook Audience Network.

Google AdSense and Facebook Audience Network let content publishers display ads on their websites. Google and Facebook manage the ad inventories, content publishers get a cut for clicks or impressions.

Both companies already have strict policies for their ad networks. For instance, you can’t use Google AdSense on a porn website. Google uses a combination of algorithms and human moderation to decide whether a site is eligible to use its advertising service.

By removing a potential revenue stream, it makes the business of fake news a bit less lucrative. For instance, Buzzfeed discovered that more than 100 fake news sites were created in a tiny city in Macedonia. So it’s clear that it’s not just about influencing the election — people are taking advantage of social networks to make money using fake news.

But there will always be alternative revenue streams, so this move is not enough. Reducing the reach of these websites is the best way to prevent fake news sites from popping out. If Facebook, Twitter, Google News and other websites flagged fake news appropriately, then there would be no reason to create fake news sites in the first place.

Source:  techcrunch.com

Categorized in Social

Mark Zuckerberg’s drive to “put video first” is also putting money in Facebook’s pockets. The more organic videos Facebook users watch, the more high-priced video ads Facebook can slip into the feed. Now Facebook’s strategy around auto-play video, paying Live content producers and offering more creative tools is helping to propel its massive revenue growth.

Facebook revealed yesterday during its strong quarterly earnings call that in the last year, Facebook’s average revenue per user grew 49.1 percent in the U.S. and Canada — Facebook’s home market where advertiser concentration, buying power and fast mobile networks make video and video ads popular. That’s compared to 35 percent growth worldwide. The U.S. and Canada’s ARPU grew 9.1 percent this quarter, faster than any other market.

In terms of viewership, Facebook has declined to share a stat since it announced 8 billion daily 3-second-plus views a year ago. But viewership has likely been growing dramatically, because as Mark Zuckerberg said on the earnings call:

“What is enabling video to become huge right now is that fundamentally the mobile networks are getting to a point where a large enough number of people around the world can have a good experience watching a video. If you go back a few years and you tried to load a video in News Feed it might have to buffer for 30 seconds before you watched it, which wasn’t a good enough experience for that to be the primary way that people shared. But now you can — it loads instantly. You can take a video and upload it without having to take five minutes to do that.”

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The rise in video viewership also comes thanks to sharper cameras, bigger screens to watch on, better video creation tools and professional and amateur creators getting the hang of the mobile format.

Facebook’s begun adding Live video filters and effects, augmented reality selfie masks, overlaid graphics and more, built off of its acquisition of AR lens startup MSQRD. These are closing the feature gap between Facebook and its competitor, Snapchat.

While many believed Snapchat would steal Facebook’s users, the percentage of Facebook’s monthly visitors who come back daily has actually increased slightly since the rise of Snapchat in 2014. Holding steady at two-thirds of its user base, this stickiness stat is impressive for a 12.5-year-old utility.

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Continued user count growth, engagement and the ability to earn more per user via video ads has contributed to Facebook’s $7.01 billion in revenues this quarter, up 59 percent year-over-year, and its $2.35 billion in profit. Essentially, Facebook’s soft pivot to video worked.

Normalizing the video feed

Back in 2013, seeing video in the News Feed was rare. Uploading to Facebook was clumsy, and whether the clips were native or from YouTube, they took a click and some load time to start watching.

 

That’s why people were downright angry about the whole idea of Facebook planning auto-play video ads. The Wall Street Journal trumpeted “Facebook Moves Cautiously on Video Ads,” delaying their roll-out. And rightfully so. Without much organic video content, video ads would have stuck out like sore thumbs.


Woman holding domestic product emerging from television, portrait

Yet suddenly over the course of 2014, with the roll-out of auto-play and the rise of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge video meme, organic videos became more and more prevalent in the feed. Meanwhile, advertisers started to get the hang of the format. They cut the intros and went straight to the action, adopting eye-catching visuals and subtitles to make up for the fact that they played silently unless tapped.

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said yesterday that “P&G is creating mobile video ads designed to grab attention in the first few seconds. He shared the example of Tide. In a typical TV ad, they start with a clean dress or shirt, then show it getting stained, and then cleaned with Tide. On mobile, they need to communicate the product value quickly, so they start by showing Tide cleaning a stained garment.”

Masked by the surrounding organic content and designed for Facebook instead of TV, video ads became a normal part of the News Feed. That gave Facebook the freedom to show more of them, both in the feed and as suggested videos after you watched another, without people getting too pissed off.

FaceTV

Now Facebook is putting its connections with 4 million advertisers behind video. That includes big brands. As Sandberg said yesterday, “GM’s subsidiary Holden used Carousel Ads with video to maximize its sponsorship of Australia’s premier rugby tournament. Holden created a video series about their support of youth rugby. The ads generated an 8-point lift in brand favorability for the overall audience — and a 15-point lift amongst their target audience of women over 35.”

 

Facebook is also bringing small businesses to the video format. Sandberg explained that “For many small businesses, the shift to mobile means leveraging video for the very first time. Rather than needing a camera crew and production budget, anyone with a smartphone can shoot a video and share it on Facebook. In the past month alone over 3 million small businesses have posted a video on Facebook, including organic posts and ads.”

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Compared to less vivid text and photo posts, Facebook can charge more for video ads without using up more space. CFO David Wehner said yesterday that “The average price per ad increased 6 percent in Q3.” Adtech firm AdRoll’s CMO Adam Berke agrees that video is pushing that increase. He tells TechCrunch, “Video ads garner a higher CPM than other ad formats, so that will certainly help drive revenue growth…We’re seeing interest in these types of video ad formats from our install base of over 25,000 businesses that never would’ve bought TV ads.”

 

Snapchat, Twitter and other services are also trying to cash in on video, where YouTube and Facebook have become dominant.

snapchat-video
 

Snapchat’s vertical layout allows for full-screen ads that can feel more impactful and convenient than Facebook’s typically landscape videos. People also typically watch Snapchat with the sound turned on so videos automatically play with audio, unlike on Facebook. People purposefully visit YouTube to watch a specific video, so they’re willing to sit through pre-roll ads. And Twitter is becoming a home for premium video streams like the NFL and presidential debates, which draw advertisers.

But Facebook has several advantages of its own. Its 1.79 billion user reach is appealing to TV advertisers seeking scale. Meanwhile, its success the last five years has financed a leading artificial intelligence research team that Facebook is applying to make sure videos and video ads reach the right people.

Zuckerberg noted yesterday that “There’s a whole thread of work that we’re doing on visual understanding. Right, so understanding photos, what’s in photos, what’s in videos, what people are doing. There’s some deeper AI research that we’re doing…that can apply to things like ranking for News Feed and Search and ads and all of our systems more broadly.”

Facebook gets paid when its video ads work, and AI will help them target the people they’re most likely to work on.

facebook-video-ads

When Facebook popularized the feed-based social network people browse to discover content, it became a home to colorful brand ads. As users first shifted to mobile, it attracted app install ads from developers desperate to rise out of the crowded app stores. Now as mobile data networks strengthen to support high-bandwidth content, Facebook has built a powerful distribution network that video advertisers want to join.

 

As Sandberg concluded yesterday, “When we think about video ads and what platform they run on, we really believe that over time the dollars will shift with eyeballs and our goal is to be the best dollar and the best minute people spend measured across channels.” The numbers say those dollars have arrived.

Source: techcrunch.com

Categorized in Market Research

Facebook has responded to widespread criticism of how its Newsfeed algorithm disseminates and amplifies misinformation in the wake of the Trump victory in the US presidential election yesterday.

Multiple commentators were quick to point a finger of blame at Facebook’s role in the election campaign, arguing the tech giant has been hugely irresponsible given the role its platform now plays as a major media source, and specifically by enabling bogus stories to proliferate — many examples of which were seen to circulated in the Facebook Newsfeed during the campaign.

Last week Buzzfeed reported on an entire cottage industry of web users in Macedonia generating fake news stories related to Trump vs Clinton in order to inject them into Facebook’s Newsfeed as a way to drive viral views and generate ad revenue from lucrative US eyeballs.

This enterprise has apparently been wildly successful for the teens involved, with some apparently managing to pull in up to $3,000 and $5,000 per month thanks to the power of Facebook’s amplification algorithm.

 

That’s a pretty hefty economic incentive to game an algorithm.

As TC’s Sarah Perez wrote yesterday, the social network has become “an outsize player in crafting our understanding of the events that take place around us”.

In a statement sent to TechCrunch responding to a series of questions we put to the company (see below for what we asked), Adam Mosseri, VP of product management at Facebook, conceded the company does need to do more to tackle this problem — although he did not give any indication of how it plans to address the issue.

Here’s his statement in full:

We take misinformation on Facebook very seriously. We value authentic communication, and hear consistently from those who use Facebook that they prefer not to see misinformation. In Newsfeed we use various signals based on community feedback to determine which posts are likely to contain inaccurate information, and reduce their distribution. In Trending we look at a variety of signals to help make sure the topics being shown are reflective of real-world events, and take additional steps to prevent false or misleading content from appearing. Despite these efforts we understand there’s so much more we need to do, and that is why it’s important that we keep improving our ability to detect misinformation. We’re committed to continuing to work on this issue and improve the experiences on our platform.

 

Facebook has previously been criticized for firing the human editors it used to employ to curate its trending news section. The replacement algorithm it switched to was quickly shown to be trivially easy to fool.

Yet the company continues to self-define as a technology platform, deliberately eschewing wider editorial responsibility for the content its algorithms distribute, in favor of applying a narrow and universal set of community standards and/or trying to find engineering solutions to filter the Newsfeed. An increasingly irresponsible position, given Facebook’s increasingly powerful position as a source of and amplifier of ‘news’ (or, as it sometimes turns out to be, propaganda clickbait).

Pew research earlier this year found that a majority of U.S. adults (62 per cent) now get news via social media. And while Facebook is not the only social media outfit in town, nor the only where fake news can spread (see also: Twitter), it is by far the dominant such platform player in the US and in many other markets.

Beyond literal fake news spread via Facebook’s click-hungry platform, the wider issue is the filter bubble its preference-fed Newsfeed algorithms use to encircle individuals as they work to spoonfeed them more clicks — and thus keep users spinning inside concentric circles of opinion, unexposed to alternative points of view.

That’s clearly very bad for empathy, diversity and for a cohesive society.

The filter bubble has been a much discussed concern — for multiple years — but the consequences of algorithmically denuding the spectrum of available opinion, whilst simultaneously cranking open the Overton window along the axis of an individual’s own particular viewpoint, are perhaps becoming increasingly apparent this year, as social divisions seem to loom larger, noisier and uglier than in recent memory — at very least as played out on social media.

 

We know the medium is the message. And on social media we know the message is inherently personal. So letting algorithms manage and control what is often highly emotive messaging makes it look rather like there’s a very large tech giant asleep at the wheel.

Questions we put to Facebook:

  • How does Facebook respond to criticism of its Newsfeed algorithm amplifying fake news during the US election, thereby contributing negatively to misinformation campaigns and ultimately helping drive support for Donald Trump’s election?
  • Does Facebook have a specific response to Buzzfeed’s investigation of websites in Macedonia being used to generate large numbers of fake news stories that were placed into the Newsfeed?
  • What steps will Facebook be taking to prevent fake news being amplified and propagated on its platform in future?
  • Does the company accept any responsibility for the propagation of fake news via its platform?
  • Will Facebook be reversing its position and hiring human editors and journalists to prevent the trivial gaming of its news algorithms?
  • Does Facebook accept that as increasing numbers of people use its platform as a main news source it has a civic duty to accept editorial responsibility for the content it is broadcasting?
  • Any general comment from Facebook on Trump’s election?

Source:  techcrunch.com

Categorized in Social

A responsibility that Facebook has with its users is that it needs to ensure that your account is not easily hackable. This means creating security systems, but there is always a problem: the most vulnerable point of any online system is the user who does not care right to their own information.

This usually comes in the form of insecure and repeated passwords. Then, no matter if the company built the Fort Knox; if someone has your email address and the password is "123456", your only chance of not being hacked is to have two-step authentication enabled. Face it: if your password really is "123456", you probably also have not activated the second verification step.

However, Facebook has taken a very unorthodox place to deal with this problem. Alex Stamos, chief security officer in the company, told CNET today the company negotiates directly with cybercrime in the deep web to buy databases with passwords stolen by hackers.

The fact is that these databases stolen end up revealing enough of human behavior on the Internet. By analyzing a huge amount of passwords, you can see patterns of which are those most recurrent, and therefore more fragile. On a bench 1 million keywords, imagine how many "123456" will not arise. Suddenly, you can see that many people are using the password "kittens", and it became dangerous.

 

By purchasing these stolen banks, Facebook can do this analysis and compare it with your own database (encrypted, it is true) passwords. Stamos reveals that to make this work, which is quite heavy for company computers, the social network was able to alert tens of millions of users that their passwords were not safe.

The executive explains that Facebook has the tools to offer more security to users, such as the aforementioned two-step authentication. It is the person's prerogative to use these tools or not, but the company says it is his responsibility to take care of those who choose not to activate the features.

Source:  olhardigital.uol.com.br

Categorized in Internet Technology

Can you feel the tension among your family and friends and the country at large? With the touchline in sight and fingernails chewed raw, there could be more twists and turns before the end of polling day. So if you want to keep up to date with the very latest US election news, here’s how Google, Twitter, Facebook can help you do that.

US Election News

How to track US election news

Whoever wins, whether that be Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton, modern technology will make sure you never miss a word. So if you’re an avid social media user and have an iPhone or another kind of smartphone, you can keep updated. Here’s what each information provider is doing to keep you with them.

facebook us election news

Facebook being patriotic

According to Facebook during this divisive campaign, it has encouraged more than 2 million people to vote. This was accomplished via the social network’s Get Ready for Election Day page, which Mark Zuckerberg is apparently very proud of. In fact, not only does the page help people register to vote and keep them updated with US election news, it also provides a vote planner made specifically for each user, meaning that person can print it off and take it to the polling station when they vote.

twitter us election news

Twitter #Election2016

Twitter’s open nature allows you to see tweets from all over the USA, which is great, and the same goes for keeping up to date with US election news. If you don’t already know, the official #hashtags are #Ele4ctionDay and #Election2016; both have their own polling emoji.

 

 

However, Twitter has done its own thing this time around and encouraged people to vote. A lot of the work done by Twitter can be seen at the account @gov. While this on its own does not keep you directly updated with what’s going on in the US elections, you can send a tweet to the account asking about US election news.

google us election news

Google results

Google has taken the unprecedented step of embedding US election news into its search results. This means that whether you want the information or not, it will be there, in more than 30 languages. According to Google, it has seen a rise of more than 233% in use of the phrase “how to vote” typed into the search engine. This is what prompted it to take a more direct informative approach. The numbers seen for the 2016 election have been far higher than it recorded in the 2012 victory by Barack Obama.

 

Additional help given for those looking for US election news can be found at Google’s voter registration page and the Google Trends Election Hub.

And there you have three ways you can keep up with US election news now and on the day of. We advise you to go and take a look at each service and decide which one best suits your needs. As with everything in life, each has their pros and cons, but ultimately they are there to be helpful and non-partisan.

Source: valuewalk.com

Categorized in News & Politics

Staff and Wire Reports

Need to know how to find your polling place?

Simple: Just Google “How to vote” and the results will be localized for you according to where you are

And if you want to see the important issues on the ballot in each state including yours beyond the presidential election visit here.

And, for hours of the polls state-by-state including yours visit here.

It’s the age of digital information on election day.

TVs are so last century. News outlets are using Facebook Live, Snapchat, YouTube and other tools to offer live coverage of Election Day in ways not possible four years ago.

It’s a fitting close to an election season that has played out on Twitter and Facebook as much as it has on the nightly news, with debates live-streamed online and candidates barbing on social media.

Here’s your online guide for Tuesday. All times are Eastern.

 

FIND YOUR POLLING PLACE AND MORE

Unless you’re one of the millions of Americans who have already voted, it’s a good idea to find out where to cast your ballot, preferably before Tuesday. Googling “how to vote” will take you to localized results that include the times the polls are open and any requirements such as an ID. You can also type into google “where do I vote” and then enter your address to locate your polling place.

Facebook’s elections tool will show you what’s on your ballot and where various candidates stand on key issues. The information comes from the nonpartisan group Center for Technology and Civic Life, which also generates some of the data for Google searches such as “what’s on my ballot.” To get started, go to https://www.facebook.com/elections/yourplan (you’ll need a Facebook account).

SNAP AWAY

Snapchat users will be able to see “live stories” on the app — showing people at the polls, election results, acceptance and concession speeches and election night celebrations. In the U.S., users will see overlays they can add to their snaps.

 

FACE-OFF ON FACEBOOK

NowThis, a news outlet aimed at millennials, will have video coverage on its Facebook channel. Comedian Jordan Carlos will host the stream, called “No Sleep til POTUS.”

CNN will have live coverage with reporters in battleground states, as well as drone shots of voting locations and international reaction throughout the day. Each hour from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. will be streamed from a different location. After 6 p.m., the network will continue Facebook Live streams from various locations, including watch parties and, again, battleground states.

The Washington Post is planning live programming on its Facebook page beginning at 7 p.m. The show will include commentary and updates from Post reporters, including those at campaign headquarters for both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

The New York Times will also stream election coverage on its Facebook page, beginning at 4:30 p.m., from locations such as polling stations, college campuses and election viewing parties.

Other news outlets with live streaming plans include Univision, PBS NewsHour, the Daily Caller, ABC News and Vox.

 

TWITCH ALONG WITH TWITTER

Twitter is partnering with BuzzFeed News for a live stream from BuzzFeed’s New York headquarters. The stream will begin at 6 p.m. Twitter says segments will include critiques of traditional news outlets and how they are covering the election, as well as live reports from BuzzFeed journalists at various locations throughout the U.S. and elsewhere.

Source:  oxfordeagle.com

Categorized in Search Engine

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