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A massive social media protest is exploding on Facebook, not Twitter for a change, yet Facebook’s dehumanized Trending system wasn’t picking it up. People around the country are checking in on Facebook at the Standing Rock Native American Reservation in an effort to supposedly hinder local Morton County police from targeting protesters attending in person to fight an oil pipeline through historic tribal lands.

[Update 3:15pm PT: About two hours after we published this post, Facebook is finally showing a Trend for #NoDAPL, which stands for “No Dakota Access Pipeline.” The fact that it says 790,000 people are talking about the Trend, between 2X and 100X the chatter of other Facebook Trends, shows just how late Facebook was to surfacing the latest in the Standing Rock protest saga.

Facebook tells us it did previously have a ‘Dakota Access Pipeline’ trend on Saturday. But the renewed swell of interest and people trying to learn about the check-in protest may have warranted a swifter renewal of the trend. This article has been edited to discuss the trend’s absence in the past tense.]

The Morton County’s sheriff has denied using Facebook for surveillance. Still, the social media protest has proceeded to bring concerns about the environmental and cultural impact of the pipeline to national attention. While some users have taken to masking their posts, explaining their absentee check-ins by using incorrect spellings like “Randing Rock,” there’s still more chatter about the exact term than many other Facebook Trends.

 

Even if Facebook showed related Trends in past weeks, or was trying to suppress the spread of the check-in story since police may not be doing surveillance on protesters with geotargeting, it’s still a huge topic of conversation. Including a Trend highlighting a story that discusses the surveillance denial by the sheriff or why people are checking in could have provided important context for users.

facebook_standing_rock

The New York Times went as far as to publish a story headlined “Why Your Facebook Friends Are Checking In To Standing Rock.” Yet “Standing Rock,” “Native Americans,” “pipeline,” “Missouri River,” and related terms didn’t show up as Facebook Trends to any users until long after the check-in protest began over the weekend. Until around when we first published this story, related terms weren’t even in the “Emerging Trends” pool from which Facebook internally surfaces trends, which can be seen through Facebook’s data tool for journalists called Signal.

Standing Rock wasn’t a Trend despite Facebook’s own search tool showing “Standing Rock Indian Reservation” was a popular search, with more than 86,000 people talking about it. But you’d only know that if you searched for it. Standing Rock and related terms have much more chatter than other topics Facebook was showing as Trending, such as actor Bryan Cranston saying he’ll move to Canada if Trump is elected.

Since Facebook removed its human curators, it switched the Trends design to remove the immediately visible descriptions of the trends and now only shows the trending term itself, in this case #NoDAPL. Since there’s no way to guess what that terms mean, only users who click on the Trend or hover over it to see the related news link would learn about the pipeline protest.

facebook-video-filtersFacebook’s Chris Cox and Sheryl Sandberg speak about Facebook being a tech company with responsibilities to news readers at the WSJDLive conference

The failure to identify a huge, viral protest that’s built off of Facebook’s own location check-in feature shows how badly Facebook needs to overhaul Trends. Facebook also failed to surface any trends related to the police shooting of Terence Crutcher until more than a day after the news became a topic of national discussion.

 

Facebook continues to deny it’s a media company, repeatedly labeling itself a technology platform. While that argument may have been bolstered by its decision to fire all its human Trend curators, that move has given way to multiple instances of glaring errors in Facebook’s Trends. It has highlighted fake news several times that a human curator could have easily debunked, while omitting or being slow to pick up on critically important news stories surrounding human rights issues like the Standing Rock protest.

Facebook’s COO Sheryl Sandberg and CPO Chris Cox again reiterated this month that Facebook is a tech company, not a media company, but admitted it has responsibilitiesto its readers since it has become such a prolific distribution channel for news. Ensuring the day’s most important protests aren’t hidden behind frivolous celebrity dreck should be one of those responsibilities.

Source : techcrunch

Lifestage, Facebook’s newer “teens-only” app designed to counteract the Snapchat threat by giving younger users a place to connect outside of Facebook’s larger social network, has now arrived on Android. Previously an iPhone-only application, this experimental app represents Facebook’s attempt to woo the high schooler crowd, while also testing other features like video profiles, gamification elements, and more.

These things could make their way into Facebook’s main application, even if Lifestage itself later fails.

Lifestage is now one of many ways Facebook has been targeting Snapchat’s user base. In particular, the company understands that Snapchat’s camera-first design mechanism is one the social app’s key draws.

To engage Facebook users in similar ways, the company acquired photo and video filtering app MSQRD, then tried out selfie filters on Facebook using that technology,alongside opening your camera right on top of the News Feed.

It also reached out to the developer community with an offer of tools that would allow for third-party creation of profile filters, and it even internally tested a Snapchat clone called “Facebook Stories.”

More recently, Facebook has been testing another Snapchat clone as a standalone app called Messenger Day, and it rolled out a Snapchat-like feature in Instagram, “Stories,” which has become fairly popular.

Lifestage, therefore, is just one weapon in Facebook’s arsenal when it comes to competing with Snapchat. And, from the look of the early numbers, at least, it may not be one that lasts.

The app by its nature is limited to the high school crowd primarily. Technically, it’s for 21 and unders, but Facebook is hoping for viral spread through high schools in particular

In Lifestage, users answer bio questions with videos, which then unlocks more questions. And when you update your profile, you get a little sunglasses-smile emoji next to your name. If you don’t update, the smile turns to a frown, or even the poop emoji. This is meant to encourage regular engagement with the app.

 

In addition, users can show off what they like and dislike by adding it to their profile – a feature that caters to the ever-changing interests of younger users, who often latch on and then drop new trends more quickly than their older counterparts.

Launched this summer, Lifestage has so far failed to find significant traction, however – it’s not a viral hit. According to App Annie’s metrics, the app has dropped to #1289 in the Social Networking category on iTunes, which hits at slow adoption. (Of course, without the Android app, its potential reach has been limited until now.)

unnamed-4

It’s also, of course, targeting a narrower audience than most social apps. Lifestage blocks users over a certain age, which means it would never really climb to the top of the charts, even if it became a hit. (There is also some concern that Lifestage isn’t effectively blocking adults from signing up, which will become a larger problem as the app scales. It’s not likely the go-to destination for predators right now, though, given its small footprint.)

 

Still, even if Lifestage doesn’t ever find its footing as the next best teen thing, Facebook can take what it learned here, then incorporate those elements into its other products.

For example, though Facebook’s news-reading app Paper failed, it taught the company how to do Instant Articles. And via Lifestage, Facebook may discover how to better improve user profiles with video – something that is not yet working on Facebook itself, where video profiles are an option, but haven’t been widely adopted.

In the meantime, users of a certain age can download the Lifestage app for free from here on Google Play.

Source : techcrunch

Categorized in Market Research

Copying Snapchat and capitalizing on the acquisition of MSQRD, today Facebook finally integrated augmented reality selfie lenses it calls “Masks” into its main app. Starting with Halloween-themed skeleton, witch and pumpkin masks, some Facebook users can now start to use the special effects when they go Live.

Masks simultaneously make Facebook feel more modern, lure users to Live in order to try them and decrease self-consciousness while broadcasting.

The feature will start rolling out today to iOS users in the U.S., U.K. and New Zealand, and public figures on Facebook Mentions for iOS. Facebook says masks will come to Android and more countries “in the coming months.”

halloween_reactions-mock1

Facebook is also offering limited-time Halloween variants of its beyond-the-Like-button emoji Reactions, like a laughing witch instead of the Haha reaction, a Wowed ghost, sad Frankenstein and a mad jack’o’lantern. Users can just tap and hold on the Like button during the days around Halloween.

Facebook acquired MSQRD back in March, and briefly tested using a similar technology to offer Canadians and Brazilians some Olympic-themed masks for traditional photos and videos. In July, Facebook started letting users go Live from inside of MSQRD‘s own app.

But today represents the earnest start of a rollout of masks to Facebook proper. The feature could revitalize Facebook, which looks a little stale and stodgy compared to Snapchat, with its focus on creative tools. Masks could also make users less shy about going Live on camera, which can be a bit awkward. For the same reason, Facebook added Live color filters and is prototyping Prisma-esqe AI style transfer Live video filters that make your footage look like fine art. Though with masks, now you can actually obscure your face so you don’t worry about how you look.

livemasks_video-demo

To try on the Masks, users can launch a Live video broadcast with the button on their Timeline, News Feed or Page, then tap the magic wand in the upper left corner to reveal Facebook’s special effects. After selecting the masks icon, users can scroll through the options and tap on any to see them on their own face. There’s no need to tap and hold on your face to activate the augmented reality feature like Snapchat used to require.

After 12 years and everyone’s parents joining, Facebook is struggling to hold on to any sense of cool it still has from its wild college-growth days. The simple fact that it’s used by 1.71 billion people negates any sense of exclusivity or ahead-of-the-curve hipness that users might get from newer social apps like Snapchat, Musical.ly and Houseparty.

facebook-live-masks

But Facebook is trying desperately to stem the shift of engagement elsewhere by showing it can offer zany creative tools, not just text status updates, baby photos and engagement announcements. A report from The Information earlier this year said Facebook had seen significant drops in original content sharing as the News Feed became dominated by Instant Articles.

 

The problem is people can read news in lots of places, but Facebook thrives by being the home for what you do with friends. Halloween has historically been one of the most active seasons for Facebook as everyone goes to share photos of their costumes, so it’s the perfect time for Facebook to roll out its vision for the future of visual communication.

Snapchat may have started consumer augmented reality, but Facebook wants to scale it.

Source : techcrunch

Categorized in Internet Technology

Facebook has been named the most secure company in a study of instant messaging apps.
Amnesty International ranked well-known services, with Apple coming second on the list with its iMessage and FaceTime apps.

"We are already in an age where incredible amounts of people's personal data is online and that is rapidly increasing," says Joe Westby, a technology researcher for the human rights group.
Snapchat and Skype were much lower down the list and Westby warns that "there won't be any privacy in the future"

Part of the research looked at how open companies are to requests for data from governments."To date, Snapchat has not received any formal government demands for a 'backdoor' but if the day was to come then we would oppose it, just like any other measure that would compromise [user] security," the firm told Newsbeat.

 

Researchers also looked at whether "end-to-end" security comes as standard on the most used platforms.

End-to-end refers to a type of secure communication that prevents anyone else from accessing your data while it's transferred from one system or device to another.

"Only 10 years ago nobody had smartphones and in 10 years time everything will be online - from your kettle to your house," Joe Westby says.

"So we need to put in place these privacy protections now otherwise there won't be any privacy in the future."

A Syrian woman speaks on her mobile phone

A Syrian woman speaks on her mobile phone

Your data and your human rights

"Online threats are growing, from cyber criminals who may be seeking to steal people's identity to massive government snooping that we have seen exposed recently.

 

Most 'secure' app providers, according to Amnesty International

  • Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp
  • Apple
  • Telegram
  • Google
  • Line
  • Viber
  • Kakao Inc
  • Skype
  • Snapchat
  • Blackberry
  • Tencent

"That is where government agencies hoover up loads of data about people and we argue that's a breach of everybody's human rights."

End-to-end encryption helps ensure that nobody can read your content or see your pictures except for the people in the conversation.

Amnesty is putting pressure on companies to "protect everybody using these apps".

But it's not all about encryption

The study also looked at how well each company recognises online threats to users' privacy and freedom of expression.

The campaign group thinks tech firms should disclose details of government requests for user data.
No app is being named 'completely secure' but...

 

The Signal app is "often seen as the gold standard in security" and "it is a service which a lot of cyber security experts, like Edward Snowden, have endorsed as a particularly secure tool" according to the research.

But they didn't include it in the rankings as it's not considered a mainstream platform.

Find us on Instagram at BBCNewsbeat and follow us on Snapchat, search forbbc_newsbeat

Source : bbc

Amnesty International ranked well-known services, with Apple coming second on the list with its iMessage and FaceTime apps.

"We are already in an age where incredible amounts of people's personal data is online and that is rapidly increasing," says Joe Westby, a technology researcher for the human rights group.

Snapchat and Skype were much lower down the list and Westby warns that "there won't be any privacy in the future".

Part of the research looked at how open companies are to requests for data from governments.

"To date, Snapchat has not received any formal government demands for a 'backdoor' but if the day was to come then we would oppose it, just like any other measure that would compromise [user] security," the firm told Newsbeat.

Researchers also looked at whether "end-to-end" security comes as standard on the most used platforms.

End-to-end refers to a type of secure communication that prevents anyone else from accessing your data while it's transferred from one system or device to another.

 

"Only 10 years ago nobody had smartphones and in 10 years time everything will be online - from your kettle to your house," Joe Westby says.

"So we need to put in place these privacy protections now otherwise there won't be any privacy in the future."

A Syrian woman speaks on her mobile phone
Image caption A Syrian woman speaks on her mobile phone before the civil war

Your data and your human rights

"Online threats are growing, from cyber criminals who may be seeking to steal people's identity to massive government snooping that we have seen exposed recently.

Most 'secure' app providers, according to Amnesty International

    • Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp
    • Apple
    • Telegram
    • Google
    • Line
    • Viber
    • Kakao Inc
    • Skype
    • Snapchat
    • Blackberry
    • Tencent
 

"That is where government agencies hoover up loads of data about people and we argue that's a breach of everybody's human rights."

End-to-end encryption helps ensure that nobody can read your content or see your pictures except for the people in the conversation.

Amnesty is putting pressure on companies to "protect everybody using these apps".

But it's not all about encryption

The study also looked at how well each company recognises online threats to users' privacy and freedom of expression.

The campaign group thinks tech firms should disclose details of government requests for user data.

No app is being named 'completely secure' but...

The Signal app is "often seen as the gold standard in security" and "it is a service which a lot of cyber security experts, like Edward Snowden, have endorsed as a particularly secure tool" according to the research.

But they didn't include it in the rankings as it's not considered a mainstream platform.

Source : bbc.co.uk

 

Categorized in Market Research

Facebook: the platform that has been reconnecting us with friends and family for more than 10 years. Yes, you got that right, Facebook has been around for more than ten years and every year the company finds a way to take advantage of its huge database and help businesses succeed.

One of my main points is there has been a recent difficulty when reaching out to a wide audience at an affordable cost. There are several ways to increase your reach on Facebook and this article will explain the most effective ways to achieve this goal.

Engaging Audience With Images

When adding advertising images on Facebook, the platform goes by a 20% text rule, but Facebook clearly states that they prefer images with little-to-no text on them. If an image has too much text, it will look spammy to users and the delivery rate will go down.

 

If you are uploading an image on the Facebook Power Editor, the tool will warn you if your image has too much text. There are many advantages of having a clean image—focusing the attention on the product rather than the text will focus the user on the product, enhancing a call to action.

Never Lose Traffic With Automatic Bidding

Facebook optimizes your bids automatically for conversions and this will increase the reach. On Facebook, every day there may be a higher or lower need for Cost-Per-Acquisition or CPA bidding. Facebook basically determines that the more conversions you get, the more the platform will learn about your company. They will be able to allocate your budget depending on time of day or the week to get the best results possible.

 

At the same time, when the market becomes competitive, Facebook might automatically increase the bid so you won’t lose traffic, keeping you competitive in the market. Meaning, more sales in a lower margin, rather getting a sale that day with a very high margin but overall not enough volume at the end of the week.

7 Ways to Easily Increase Your Reach on Facebook | SEJ

Instant Success With Automatic Target Placement

Facebook has launched a new way to target placement. This new function is called automatic placement and it’s something that Facebook reps are pushing for the users to use. Some people might say that this new function is controversial because they are seeing a lot of success in running placement automatically versus manual placement. Some tips on automatic placement:

  1. You might want to have different bid and budget strategy for automatic placement.
  2. Have different ad placements to fit the ad format.
  3. The audience network that you will target will not be the best to be on. There seems to be something with automatic placement that optimizes the reach the of a campaign.

7 Ways to Easily Increase Your Reach on Facebook | SEJ

Keep Your Ads From Overlapping With Each Other

Try to avoid ad sets and/or audience overlaps. Overlap is when two ads are competing for the same thing. This might drive the price up and confuse system. Doing will decrease the overall reach for an overall target method. With ads that are conflicting with each other, we might see a hike on price for bid.

 

Negative Results With Multiple Changes

When making changes on Facebook, it’s recommended that you don’t make many frequent changes. It takes a few days or even weeks for the algorithm to change. Making a lot of changes on Facebook would be like resetting the system and never allowing the Facebook algorithm reach its full potential.

Get to Your Goals With Reach Campaigns

Facebook reach campaigns help give Facebook an even timeline of what the goal in terms of reach is. If you want to buy an “x” amount of impressions, you will pay a fixed price. By doing that you’re telling the algorithm the goal. It makes sense to create a reach and frequency campaign if you have delivery issues. This type of campaign works best when you get a good CPA and drives good results.

7 Ways to Easily Increase Your Reach on Facebook | SEJ

Increase Your Reach With a Lifetime Budget

Lifetime budget is a great way to increase reach as well. Basically, you’re telling Facebook the amount of money you want to spend in a given time frame. The system will work to get you the best results within that time frame. The way the lifetime budget works is that traffic gets higher in the beginning, slows down in the middle and goes up again towards the end of the campaign. That is the trend you will see.

7 Ways to Easily Increase Your Reach on Facebook | SEJ

Conclusion

Running a business is a full-time job. Every person who owns a business knows that. Hopefully these tips will make running your business much easier. In terms of running advertising campaigns on social media, Facebook is a very accessible tool that every business owner should be using. You can use Facebook to reach that untargeted audience you didn’t know you were neglecting, and now it will be easier to reach.

Source : searchenginejournal

First large-scale empirical analysis of online news-seeking behavior compares diversity of news found on search, social

The first large-scale empirical analysis of online news-seeking behavior, has found that people who seek out news and information from social media are at higher risk of becoming trapped in a 'collective social bubble' compared to using search engines.

Indiana University researchers have found that people who seek out news and information from social media are at higher risk of becoming trapped in a "collective social bubble" compared to using search engines.

The study, "Measuring online social bubbles," was recently published in the open-access online journal PeerJ Computer Science. The results are based on an analysis of over 100 million Web clicks and 1.3 billion public posts on social media.

"These findings provide the first large-scale empirical comparison between the diversity of information sources reached through different types of online activity," said Dimitar Nikolov, a doctoral student in the School of Informatics and Computing at IU Bloomington, who is lead author on the study. "Our analysis shows that people collectively access information from a significantly narrower range of sources on social media compared to search engines."

To measure the diversity of information accessed over each medium, IU researchers developed a method that assigned a score for how user clicks from social versus search engines were distributed across millions of sites.

 

A lower score indicated users' Web traffic concentrated on fewer sites; a higher score indicated traffic scattered across more sites. A single click on CNN and nine clicks on MSNBC, for example, would generate a lower score than five clicks on each site.

Overall, the analysis found that people who accessed news on social media scored significantly lower in terms of the diversity of their information sources than users who accessed current information using search engines.

The results show the rise of a "collective social bubble" where news is shared within communities of like-minded individuals, said Nikolov, noting a trend in modern media consumption where "the discovery of information is being transformed from an individual to a social endeavor."

He added that people who adopt this behavior as a coping mechanism for "information overload" may not even be aware they're filtering their access to information by using social media platforms, such as Facebook, where the majority of news stories originate from friends' postings.

"The rapid adoption of the Web as both a source of knowledge and social space has made it ever more difficult for people to manage the constant stream of news and information arriving on their screens," added study co-author Filippo Menczer, professor of informatics and computing, director of the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, or CNetS, and a member of the IU Network Science Institute. "These results suggest the conflation of these previously distinct activities may be contributing to a growing 'bubble effect' in information consumption."

To conduct the study, IU scientists applied their analysis to three massive sources of information on browsing habits. These were an anonymous database compiled by CNetS containing the Web searches of 100,000 users at IU between October 2006 and May 2010; a dataset containing 18 million clicks by over half a million users of the AOL search engine in 2006; and 1.3 billion public posts containing links shared by over 89 million people on Twitter between April 2013 and April 2014. The IU dataset comprised the primary source for the study.

 

The other datasets, which contained identifiers, enabled the scientists to confirm that information access behavior at the community level reflected the behavior of individual users.

Moreover, to measure the range of news sources accessed by users, the IU scientists used an open directory of news sites, filtering out blogs and wikis, resulting in 3,500 news outlets.

"Compared to a baseline of information seeking activities, this evidence shows, empirically, that social media does in fact expose communities and individuals to a significantly narrower range of news sources, despite the many information channels on the medium," Nikolov said.

Source : sciencedaily

Several years ago, Sarah Schoppe-Sullivan noticed something curious as she scrolled throughFacebook: Many of her female friends used an image of their child as a personal profile photo. Even Schoppe-Sullivan made the switch without fully realizing the implications.  

 

"It just kind of dawned on me at one point, 'Hey that's your identity, that’s a really profound statement,'" she told Mashable. "It's saying, 'This is who I am right now.'" 

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Of course, plenty of new moms see Facebook as simply a way of sharing joyous baby-related updates with family and friends. 

Schoppe-Sullivan, however, thought something more complicated might be going on, particularly as moms tried to navigate the tricky terrain of balancing their new identity with their old one. 

As a professor of human sciences and psychology at The Ohio State University, she set out to understand if and when women seek validation on Facebook for their roles as mothers, and whether they're at greater risk of depressive symptoms when they do so. She was already evaluating new parenthood in a long-term study and decided to explore those new questions in her ongoing research. 

"A lot of moms may feel pressured to portray this very positive image of motherhood." 

The results, published last week in Sex Roles, may make new moms reconsider why they use Facebook to post about their children. While the social media platform can offer guidance and support from a large community, frequent posting for some users can also amplify their anxiety about motherhood. 

 

Schoppe-Sullivan and her co-authors analyzed data from 127 participants and found that when women felt more societal pressure to be perfect mothers and viewed motherhood as central to their identity, they were more likely to share child-related updates and photos. The majority of moms in the study did use their baby's image as a profile photo at some point. 

The mothers who strove for perfection as parents and sought external validation for their maternal role also expressed stronger emotional responses — both positive and negative — to the frequency and nature of their friends' likes and comments.

That relationship with Facebook may have come at a cost. Nine months after giving birth, those same mothers reported more depressive symptoms like having a poor appetite, not being able to shake off the blues and experiencing restless sleep. 

The study couldn't pinpoint a cause-and-effect dynamic between a new mom's desire for validation, her increased Facebook use and a greater risk for symptoms of depression, but Schoppe-Sullivan believes there could be a direct link. 

"A lot of moms may feel pressured to portray this very positive image of motherhood, and if on the inside you're not feeling that good, I think that could be detrimental," she said.  

The study does have some important limitations. Schoppe-Sullivan surveyed well-educated, employed women who were mostly white, which means the results aren't nationally representative. The participants also self-reported their social media use, which can be a reliable way to account for their habits but isn't necessarily the most accurate method.

"This is an evolving way of representing your identity and your family and what’s important to you." 

Schoppe-Sullivan and her co-authors did control for several factors, including maternal age, education and personality traits that might make participants more prone to experiencing depression. Only one of five key traits — neuroticism — was associated with a mother's more intense emotional reaction to if and how people responded to her Facebook posts. The researchers also controlled for depressive symptoms at three months postpartum. 

While some may be quick to use the study's findings as a justification for judging new moms who constantly post photos of their newborn, that's not the point Schoppe-Sullivan is trying to make.

 

Like with any personal social media post, users are trying to carefully craft their identity. New mothers, in particular, encounter unyielding expectations about how they should behave, which can feel magnified on a platform like Facebook. 

They may feel pressure to adhere to impossibly high parenting standards, said Schoppe-Sullivan, and turn to Facebook for both support in meeting those expectations and validation that they're fulfilling a stereotypical maternal role. 

"This is an evolving way of representing your identity and your family and what’s important to you," she said.

The working women in the study, she added, may have wanted to defy stereotypes about mothers who have careers and prove to friends and family that devotion to their child came first. 

Some moms who post frequent updates and photos of their child may feel none of these pressures and care little about validation. But for those who notice that frequent Facebook posts involve stress and angst, Schoppe-Sullivan had some simple advice: take a break. 

 

That can mean turning off notifications, posting less frequently and finding other ways to distribute photos to family members and friends eager to see them. 

"There are ways to manage this," said Schoppe-Sullivan, "so you’re not necessarily getting sucked into it." 

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

Source : Mashable

Categorized in Others

According to a new study published today from the American Civil Liberties Union, major social networks including Twitter, Facebook and Instagram have recently provided user data access to Geofeedia, the location-based, social media surveillance system used by government offices, private security firms, marketers and others.

As TechCrunch previously reported, Geofeedia is one of a bevy of technologies used, secretly, by police to monitor activists and the contents of their discussions online.

The ACLU said in a blog post that both Twitter and Facebook (which owns Instagram) made some immediate changes in response to their study’s findings.

“Instagram cut off Geofeedia’s access to public user posts, and Facebook cut its access to a topic-based feed of public user posts,” the ACLU said.

The ACLU also noted in their post:

“Neither Facebook nor Instagram has a public policy specifically prohibiting developers from exploiting user data for surveillance purposes. Twitter does have a ‘longstanding rule’ prohibiting the sale of user data for surveillance as well as a Developer Policy that bans the use of Twitter data ‘to investigate, track or surveil Twitter users.’”

On Tuesday, following the publication of the ACLU findings, Twitter announced that it would “immediately suspend Geofeedia’s commercial access to Twitter data"

A Facebook spokesperson tells TechCrunch:

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“[Geofeedia] only had access to data that people chose to make public. Its access was subject to the limitations in our Platform Policy, which outlines what we expect from developers that receive data using the Facebook Platform. If a developer uses our APIs in a way that has not been authorized, we will take swift action to stop them and we will end our relationship altogether if necessary.”

It’s worth noting that Facebook’s platform policy generically limits developers.

 

For example, it says developers are not permitted to “sell, license, or purchase any data obtained” from Facebook or its services. And they can’t transfer data they get from Facebook, including “anonymous, aggregate, or derived data,” to any data brokers. Finally, developers are not permitted to put Facebook data into any search engines or directories without the social network’s explicit permission.

We have reached out to Geofeedia for comment but executives were not immediately available for an interview.

A public relations consultant for Geofeedia sent a lengthy statement, attributed to Geofeedia CEO Phil Harris, defending the company’s practices in general. An excerpt follows:

“Geofeedia is committed to the principles of personal privacy, transparency and both the letter and the spirit of the law when it comes to individual rights. Our platform provides some clients, including law enforcement officials across the country, with a critical tool in helping to ensure public safety…

Geofeedia has in place clear policies and guidelines to prevent the inappropriate use of our software; these include protections related to free speech and ensuring that end-users do not seek to inappropriately identify individuals based on race, ethnicity, religious, sexual orientation or political beliefs, among other factors.

That said, we understand, given the ever-changing nature of digital technology, that we must continue to work to build on these critical protections of civil rights.”

 

Update: A company statement from Geofeedia was added to this post after it was originally published. 

Source : https://techcrunch.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Facebook wants you to lean back and watch its News Feed videos on your television with a new feature that lets you stream clips via Apple TV, AirPlay devices, Google Chromecast, and Google Cast devices. The move could help Facebook generate more video ad revenue, and increase usage time by giving people the richest possible viewing experience while at home.

The feature is now available on iOS and will come to Android soon. To use it, just find a video in the feed on your phone or desktop, tap the TV button in the top right, and then select the device you want to stream through.

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You can keep scrolling through the feed and using Facebook while the video continues to stream. That allows Facebook to become both the first and second screen, a strategy Periscope is pursuing differently by allowing professional content broadcasts to be piped into Periscope and Twitter via its new Producer feature.

 

Facebook started testing streaming to televisions from Android back in May and iOS in August. The company actually added a way to cast via AirPlay from its iPad app back in 2011, so it’s strange that it’s taken this long to come to web and mobile.

 

Competitors like YouTube and Periscope already have ways to stream onto televisions, and today’s launch could make sure Facebook doesn’t fall behind. YouTube lets you create a queue of videos on the fly to watch sequentially, which seems like a sensible next feature for Facebook to add.

The goal for Facebook is always ubiquity, so it’s embracing as many viewing platforms as possible. While its most popular surface and core money maker might remain mobile for a long time, VR and TVs could give Facebook an even bigger presence in our lives.

Source : techcrunch.com

Categorized in Search Engine

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