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Google yesterday announced it will introduce a fact check tag on Google News in order to display articles that contain factual information next to trending news items. Now it’s time for Facebook to take fact-checking more seriously, too.

Facebook has stepped into the role of being today’s newspaper: that is, it’s a single destination where a large selection of news articles are displayed to those who visit its site. Yes, they appear amidst personal photos, videos, status updates, and ads, but Facebook is still the place where nearly half of American adults get their news.

Facebook has a responsibility to do better, then, when it comes to informing this audience what is actually news: what is fact-checked, reported, vetted, legitimate news, as opposed to a rumor, hoax or conspiracy theory.

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It’s not okay that Facebook fired its news editors in an effort to appear impartial, deferring only to its algorithms to inform readers what’s trending on the site. Since then, the site has repeatedly trended fake news stories, according to a Washington Post report released earlier this week.

The news organization tracked every news story that trended across four accounts during the workday from August 31 to September 22, and found that Facebook trended five stories that were either “indisputably fake” or “profoundly inaccurate.” It also regularly featured press releases, blog posts, and links to online stores, like iTunes – in other words, trends that didn’t point to news sites.

Facebook claimed in September that it would roll out technology that would combat fake stories in its Trending topics, but clearly that has not yet come to pass – or the technology isn’t up to the task at hand.

In any event, Facebook needs to do better.

 

It’s not enough for the company to merely reduce the visibility of obvious hoaxes from its News Feed – not when so much of the content that circulates on the site is posted by people – your friends and family –  right on their profiles, which you visit directly.

Plus, the more the items are shared, the more they have the potential to go viral. And viral news becomes Trending news, which is then presented all Facebook’s users in that region.

This matters. Facebook has trended a story from a tabloid news source that claimed 9/11 was an inside job involving planted bombs. It ran a fake story about Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly which falsely claimed she was fired. These aren’t mistakes: they are disinformation.

Facebook has apologized for the above, but declined to comment to The Washington Post regarding its new findings that fake news continues to be featured on the platform.

 

In addition, not only does Facebook fail at vetting its Trending news links, it also has no way of flagging the links that fill its site.

Outside of Trending, Facebook continues to be filled with inaccurate, poorly-sourced, or outright fake news stories, rumors and hoaxes. Maybe you’re seeing less of them in the News Feed, but there’s nothing to prevent a crazy friend from commenting on your post with a link to a well-known hoax site, as if it’s news. There’s no tag or label. They get to pretend they’re sharing facts.

Meanwhile, there’s no way for your to turn off commenting on your own posts, even when the discussion devolves into something akin to “sexual assault victims are liars” (to reference a recent story.)

 

Because perish the thought that Facebook would turn of the one mechanism that triggers repeat visits to its site, even if that means it would rather trigger traumatic recollections on the parts of its users instead.

There is a difference between a post that’s based on fact-checked articles, and a post from a website funded by an advocacy group. There’s a difference between Politifact and some guy’s personal blog. Facebook displays them both equally, though: here’s a headline, a photo, some summary text.

Of course, it would be a difficult job for a company that only wants to focus on social networking and selling ads to get into the media business – that’s why Facebook loudly proclaims it’s “not a media company.” 

Except that it is one. It’s serving that role, whether it wants to or not.

Google at least has stepped up to the plate and is trying to find a solution. Now it’s Facebook’s turn.

Facebook may have only unintentionally become a media organization, but it is one. And it’s doing a terrible job.

Source : https://techcrunch.com

Categorized in Search Engine

Facebook is the principal digital public square of today. Well, it's the principal digital public square for those of a certain age (i.e. post-college, the young'nsaren't into it). But Zuck & Co's site is still an extremely integral virtual venue and will continue to be for some time.

While Facebook's business model has evolved away from just Facebook.com to include its mobile incarnation and other associated apps, the old familiar website is still the preferred venue for many. And why not? Facebook.com one of the most advanced public-facing websites out there. 

Facebook is a magnet for some of the top engineering talent in the world, so it stands to reason that the company would boast one of the world's most complex and multi-faceted websites. It rivals many standalone software apps with the sheer amount of personalization, tweaks, and tinkering available to visitors.

In fact, there are so many things you can do on Facebook.com that you probably don't know about them all.

And we're not even talking about the third-party Facebook apps or browser add-ons, we're talking about all the official, baked-in, easily accessible functions that are just a few clicks away. As you'll see in our slideshow, there are even some functions that appear to be leftovers from bygone eras that we're not even sure Facebook still knows are there. Take a look and awaken your inner power user social super star.

1-The Facebook Inbox You Didn't Even Know You Had
If you've been a Facebook user for a while, then you probably have a folder full of unread messages that you didn't even know you had: the "Message Requests" folder (formerly, the "Other" folder.) This is where Facebook sends all the messages from people you're not currently friends with. It could be filled with old high school flings reaching out or a bunch of Nigerian spammers, who knows?! Only one way to find out!

To review these messages, click the "messages" icon at the top of your homescreen (or the "Messages" link in the left field). By default, you'll find yourself in the "Recent" tab of your inbox. Directly to the right, you'll find the "Message Request" tab. After you click this, you may see a link that says "See filtered requests." Click that and then you'll see all sorts of messages from strangers on the Internet. Have fun with that!

In 2012, Facebook experimented with allowing members to pay to reach the inboxes of non-friends. Fees started at $1 and went all the way up to $100 for Zuck himself, but the option to do this appears to be limited.

2-See Who's Snooping In Your Account
Want to know if someone is logged into your Facebook account without your permission? First, go to your settings page. Under the Security folder, you'll see the link "Where You're Logged In." Here you will find all your active Facebook log-ins from desktop or mobile. It will (usually) provide data on the location, browser, and device. If something seems fishy, you also have the ability to "end activity" from individual or all devices.

This also comes in handy if you logged in to your friend's computer or on some public laptop, but forgot to log out.

3-There Are Lots of Secret Emoji on FB
Emoji. They take away some of the horrible pain of writing in plain language. Facebook will render all the usual face emoticons into pictorial representations: :) :D ^_^ . You know the ones. But there's also a whole bunch that you may not even be using.

(y) = thumbs-up 'like' symbol
(^^^) = a great white shark
:|] = a robot
:poop: = well, you know
<(") = a penguin

You can use these in wall posts, chats, and comments, but they don't always seem to render in mobile. You can find a full run-down of Facebook emoticons here.

 



4-Transfer Files Over Facebook Messenger
If you open a Facebook Messenger window, there's a little gear icon in the top right corner of the window. One of the options is "Add Files...", which will allow you to upload files directly from your computer to transfer over. The receiver can just click on the included link and download them from there.

5-Make Facebook Upside Down or in Pirate Speak
Remember 10 years ago, when pirates were all the rage for a minute? Well, at one point the Facebook engineers got swept up in this ironic buccaneer frenzy and programmed a peculiar Easter egg that allows you to translate your Facebook interface into Pirate or Upsidedown speak.

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Does this sound appealing to you for some reason? Go to General Account Settings > Language, and you can change your settings to either "English (Pirate)" or "English (Upside Down)." Think that's a whimsical little feature that you will never ever get sick of?! You're wrong. It's actually quite annoying.

6-Create a Customizable Supersized Post
Sometimes you want to share something that is worth more than a few sentences or a single image. If you don't have your own blog you can take advantage of a Facebook "Note." This is a personal blog post that lives inside the Facebook ecosystem. Here you can share paragraphs of text and multiple images (no HTML coding knowledge required).

Just head on over to facebook.com/notes where you'll find notes from people you follow. If you want to add your own, just click the "+ Write a Note" link in the top-right corner. Spill your thoughts out using the easy post editor, add a cover image if you want, and share just like you would a regular Facebook post. If you can't finish your note in one sitting you can just save it and publish later.

7-Detail Your Facebook Romance
If you want to see the detailed Internet history of you and your significant other, go to www.facebook.com/us, and you will see the complete Facebook history with whomever you are listed as in a relationship with ("us," get it?). If you're not listed as being in a relationship, it will just go to your regular page because Facebook thinks that you are just in love with yourself.

 



8-Save Posts for Later
Did you ever want to read a link that a friend shared on Facebook, but didn't have the time at that particular moment? Then, when you finally do have a moment, you either forgot about it, or it has been buried under so much other junk that it's not even worth searching for? We've all been there. That's why you should get acquainted with Facebook's "Save for Later" function.

If there's anything you want to save for later, click the little arrow in the top-right of any post. Then click the Save link button from the pull-down. This will send the link to your Saved folder. "Where's your Saved folder," you ask? Good question! You actually won't see it until you save something for the first time. Then you will see a little "saved" ribbon in your left-hand favorites bar. Click that and you will find all your favorite stories. It also works with any video your friends posted.

At F8 2016, Facebook announced it is extending "Save for Later" to the Web, so you can save things to Facebook even when you're not on Facebook.com, a shot at services like Pocket and Instapaper. Facebook's first two partners are Overstock and Product Hunt, but any site can add the functionality, so look for it to expand over time.

9-Download a Copy of All Your Facebooking
Want your own personal copy of everything you've ever shared on Facebook? I'm talking, ev-er-y-thing: Every post, every image, every video, every message, and chat conversation (not to mention all the settings you probably don't even think about)? You can do that!

Just go to Settings > General and click on the link "Download a copy of your Facebook data" at the bottom and follow the directions from there.

This feature lets you take a trip down memory lane, or just save your info should you ever decide to delete your FB account. However it is probably most useful to those in the legal profession as it can capture your Facebooking at a particular moment (social media posts can trigger lawsuits, after all).

10-Choose Who Controls Your Account After You Croak
Everyone on Facebook will die. One day. This may be true for other social networks as well, but you can definitely be assured that everyone you are friends with on Facebook will perish from this Earth. (Or, you know, unless the Singluarity comes to pass.) In anticipation of this unavoidable truth, Facebook has created a way to name a legacy contact who will manage your account after you are gone.

Your legacy contact will have the ability to write a pinned post for your profile, respond to new friend requests (e.g. friends or family who weren't on Facebook at the time of your demise), or update your profile and cover photo (do you really want your final image to be you in your ironic SpongeBob Halloween costume?) They won't have access to all your messages unless you proactively decide to give them access.

To assign a legacy contact, go to Settings > Security > Legacy Contact tab and choose one of your Facebook friends to handle your digital affairs. You will also have the opportunity to choose that your account is deleted after you die.

11-Add Some Extra Security
It's a good idea to throw in some additional layers of security on your Facebook account. No, you shouldn't be worried that someone will break into your account and start "liking" BuzzFeed articles like crazy. But you should be concerned that someone could get in and use the information they find to steal your identity.

Here are two smart things you can do to protect yourself:

1) Create a log-in approval. This setting will only allow your Facebook account to be opened on a new browser after you enter a special code sent to your phone. To enable it, go to Settings > Security > Login Approvals. You'll be sent a test code to verify your device's authenticity.

2) Create some Trusted Contacts. Trusted Contacts are Facebook friends (you'll need to choose between three and five) who can securely help you regain access to your account—for example if you forget your password or lose your mobile device—OR a nefarious person breaks in and decides to lock YOU out. To enable this function, just go to Settings > Security > Trusted Contacts. And remember, you can always change your contacts later.



12-Mute Facebook Live Notifications
You may have seen a bunch of "live videos" popping up in your Facebook feed recently (we here at PCMag have certainly embraced them). Unfortunately, for now you are only able to broadcast live video through a mobile device (if you want to try it on your device, click the little person icon surrounded by a couple of halos at the bottom of a post).

You may have also noticed that you will sometimes receive a notification that a person or brand you follow is broadcasting live (it appears that Facebook will sometimes set this notification on by default). To turn these possibly unwanted notifications off, click the little inverted arrow next to the notification in the notification pull-down and choose "Turn off notifications about live videos from... ". OR, click through to the actual video and you will have the ability to toggle live video notifications on/off in the top-right corner of the video.

13-Don't Let Facebook Track Your Mobile Browsing
Here's one feature you unfortunately won't find anywhere in Facebook, and that's the problem. When Facebook announced it was going to give users more control over ads in order to make them more targeted, it didn't exactly publicize the fact that it would also start using your app- and Web-browsing history to show targeted ads from advertisers.

Unlike most Facebook privacy settings, you can't opt out of this kind of tracking. However, as our SecurityWatch blog points out, you can take steps to Web surf in private. You can opt out via a special third-party site courtesy of the Digital Advertising Alliance. (Remember to disable AdBlocker Plus or other similar software you may be running). Follow a simple set of directions, and make sure to click the box next to Facebook and you can go about your Internet business without third-party advertisers getting all up in your bizness.

14-Create an Interest List
There's a little-known Facebook function boringly called "interest lists." It's basically Facebook's version of Twitter lists (and should not to be confused with Facebook's "Friends lists"). Interest Lists are a curated collection of posts from websites, companies, or individuals that you follow in one streamlined feed (e.g. "indie hip-hop" or "local restaurants"). Interest lists may be kept private just for you or some friends, or can be made public for the world to follow.

To access interest lists, scroll down to the "Interests" link in the left column, hover over the header and click on "more." On the next page, click the "+Add Interests" button and you will have the option to search and follow other publicly available interest lists or create your own.

15-Curate Your News Feed
Your News Feed is your home on Facebook. And as your home, you should try your best to keep it clean, orderly, and free of distractions. You don't want to be inundated with posts from that one brand or friend you follow who just posts all. the. time.

One of the most direct ways to do this is by giving more voice to the things you want to see, while removing the stuff you don't want. The quickest way to access this feature is by clicking the three dots next to "News Feed" at the top of the left rail. Choose "Edit Preferences" from the pop-up screen, click "Prioritize who to see first," and choose the people, Pages, and brands you want to see more or less of in your News Feed.

You can also click "Unfollow people to hide their posts" to mute annoying posters (they won't know they've been muted). This feature is also accessible by clicking the little arrow in the top-right corner of a post and selecting "Unfollow [Friend]."

16-Mute Your Ex on Facebook
Breaking up is hard to do. But Facebook has made it slightly easier to deal with. Currently this feature is only available on mobile, but when you change your relationship status to "single," Facebook will automatically ask you if you want to see less of your significant other. If you want to see less of anyone, you can still do that by unfriending or muting them as detailed in the previous slide.

 



17-Want to See What Your Friends Are Up to Without You?
When you see a post that a friend posted on another friend's wall, you will have the ability to see a detailed history of their friendship. Just click the little arrow in the top right hand of that post and then click "More Options." There, you will see the "see friendship" option.

There is one other way to access this. If you type in the URL your Facebook page, which is probably something like www.facebook.com/[first name].[last name] and then directly followed by ?and= and followed by the name of the second person. So, if you wanted to see the detailed Facebook relationship of Texas Senator Ted Cruz and TV personality David Letterman, the link would be: www.facebook.com/DavidLetterman?and=TedCruz .

(As you see above, those two apparently haven't had much interaction.)

When playing with this URL trick, be sure to check the official URL of each person—Facebook can assign strange characters into their official URL (for example, it will add a number if there is someone else with the same name).

18-You Can Embed Public Content
Like other social media sites, Facebook allows you to embed publicly available content on your webpage. Just click the pull-down menu in the top right of the file and click "embed" to place the code wherever you'd like.

19-Edit Your Ad Preferences
Do you hate-follow any celebrities or personalities on Facebook? A while back, I gave former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin a follow. I was just curious more than anything. But then I noticed that the ads on Facebook feed began to ... change. Let's just say, I started getting ads for things I really wasn't all that interested in.

Facebook's business is built around providing marketers with detailed information on its users' interests, which Facebook's algorithms insinuate based on—among other things—celebrities and personalities they've actively followed. However, if you "like" something on Facebook that's a little out of your usual media diet, you also have the ability to keep your ad experience in check.

To curate your ads, go to Settings > Ads > click "edit" next to "Ads based on my preferences." Here, you will find all the topics that Facebook has determined is a "preference" of yours, conveniently separated into categories. You can delete an interest simply by hitting delete on the right of each interest. Or, if you're a weirdo who's really into their Facebook ads, you can even add new preferences.

20-Send Money Through Facebook
Do you have any old people near you right now? Ask them to tell you about "Western Union"—that's how people used to send money before the Internet.

In the digital age, there are lots of services that will allow you to transfer money from your computer or mobile device, including right through your Facebook account (as long as both the sender and recipient have a valid debit card). In addition (and probably of greater interest to Facebook), these payments will allow users to purchase products and make in-game purchases through Facebook.

While this feature is largely tied to Messenger, you can use it on regular Facebook as well. To set it up, go to Settings > Payments to enter a debit card. Once accepted, you can send (or request) funds to/from another user via Messenger.

To use this feature on Facebook.com, just open a pop-over conversation with one of your contacts (accessible via either the "Chat" window in the bottom-right-hand of your screen or through the Messenger icon in the right side of the top rail). Next, just click the dollar sign at the bottom of the chat window to send/request funds. Cha-ching!

 



21-Birthday Cam (iOS Only)
One of my favorite Facebook features is the Birthday reminders—it's a nice way to keep in touch with people who you don't interact with on a daily basis. Recently, Facebook created a new feature (so far, it's only for the iOS app), in which users will be prompted to post a 15-second video on a friend's wall (as opposed to some generic birthday wishes).

When you visit a friend's profile on their birthday, you'll find a banner near the top giving you the option to create this video B-day wish. How sweet!

22-How to Upload '360' Pics and Vids
You've probably seen some immersive "360" photos (and some videos) popping up in your Facebook feed recently. On the desktop Web version, viewers can explore a field of vision in all directions using their mouse or keyboard. On mobile, users can pivot their device to look all around. But you also have the opportunity to upload your own 360 images and video.

While you can utilize the new breed of (often expensive) 360 cameras, you can also just use your smartphone to capture a panorama or "photosphere" and upload it to Facebook.

Immsersive videos are a bit more complicated and need some of that aforementioned high-end hardware, but if you happen to have some, here's how you would get started.
Let's Sum it Up
And to recap what you just learned, check out the video above.

Source : pcmag

Categorized in Internet Technology

Ten years ago Facebook was just cresting as the cool new social media site that helped you keep in touch with the people you didn’t actually like in high school. We fed it our thoughts and feelings, shared our meals and locations and our top ten movie lists, kept it up-to-date on our relationship status, political views, favorite links, and personal information — all in the name of staying connected, and all without a thought to our security. But with a decade of questions regarding how Facebook makes money now answered, and a general understanding of how sharing information online can be dangerous (while the platform constantly updates its security protocol), we continue to use it anyway, even though many of us are just checking in as ritual and have threatened our exit from Facebook for years. 

Of course, screen time in moderation is, for the most part, perfectly acceptable, and social media can offer a few genuinely beneficial uses. But before you log in or tap that app on your smartphone again, here are a few reasons to quit Facebook in 2015.

It Wastes Your Time

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It's estimated that the average casual user (17 minutes per day on Facebook) who has been active on the site for 10 years has wasted upwards of 40 entire days of their lives scrolling and liking and commenting on pictures and posts. And more engaged users, who spend at least an hour a day on the site, have clocked 150 days feeding the Facebook beast during the same time. Think about how long you spend on the site each day, and what else could be a more productive use of your time.

Facebook Uses You to Sell Stuff...

In 2012, the site manipulated posts from 689,000 accounts without consent in an experiment that examined whether or not it could affect your emotions by making a few edits on your page. The study was done, according to Facebook, to "improve our services and to make the content people see on Facebook as relevant and engaging as possible." Skeptics think it was really used to discover the monetary benefit of a Like. COO Sheryl Sandberg later apologized, adding that they "never meant to upset you."

 

 

And Targets You with Advertisements

One time you wanted to buy a thing, and then you searched for that thing, and six months later Facebook is still reminding you that you should think about buying that thing, even if you already bought the thing. Yes, most sites do this thanks to embedded cookies, but only Facebook seamlessly posts these ads in your timeline with enough regularity that you can only assume your friend has an odd obsession with the latest Norelco razor.

It's Bad for Your Health

Facebook isn't just a harmless website dedicated to cataloging your vacations, poor wardrobe choices, and myopic thoughts on sporting events (which can both define or destroy relationships), it can actually do you harm. Studies hint that it can impact your immune system and inhibit the release of growth hormones, impair digestion and vision, limit thinking and kill creativity, and affect sleep patterns and happiness.

"Who Are These People, Anyway?"

The average adult has 338 friends on Facebook and probably doesn't know more than 10 percent of them anymore, or at all. Many of them likely have new lives, some have new last names, new passions, new facial hair, and new humans they're now responsible for keeping alive (read: babies). These are not the friends you knew, and semi-casually keeping up with them is a waste of time that could be better spent with new, real friends. Or on Twitter.

 

 

"But I Don't Care About Privacy"

Fair. That's your right. But the problem is that we're setting precedent for the future without yet understanding how it will affect the free and open Web, and simultaneously creating an internet that relies on you having a Facebook account to access sites that are not Facebook. As one of nearly 1.2 billion users to date, odds are decent that your account won't be hacked by someone with ill-will toward your family. That doesn't mean that permitting easy access to your information goes without consequence, both immediately and decades from now.

Nothing You Post Actually Matters

Very few people care what you're doing, whom you're with, where you're eating, or what you just bought, and the people who do were probably right next to you when you did it. We all saw that funny Ice Bucket Challenge video, and if we didn’t see it, it's fine. We're all fine. You'll sleep well without knowing which childhood toys you owned are now worth a fortune, and you will absolutely "believe what happened next" on Upworthy, because someone took time to write about it. These articles only exist because you share them on Facebook, and you only share them because they exist. So, instead, just invite a friend over to talk about how much you both loved Save By the Bell. The internet can only take so much nostalgia. 

If you're serious about quitting Facebook today, you can do it right now by clicking here.

Source : mensjournal

The number is simply astounding: In the second quarter of 2016, Facebook had more than 1.7 billion active monthly users. And it’s a safe bet that many of them don’t know these five secrets.

1. Erase your search history

Maybe you were just mildly curious, but the evidence is still there. If you’ve ever looked up an ex, this will show up in your Facebook search history. So will any groups, photos, posts and anything else you've tried to find.

Fortunately, you can erase your Facebook search history. To do this, log in your Facebook account, click on the upside-down triangle in the top-right corner, and click Activity Log. That’s where Facebook tracks your actions on the site.

Note: The Activity Log stores a lot of data about what you’ve done on Facebook. Use these tips to clean it up and prevent things from coming back to haunt you.

In the left column of the Activity Log, under "Photos, Likes and Comments," click More. Then scroll down and click the "Search" link.

You’ll see a list of your Facebook searches, organized by date. You can clear searches individually by clicking the crossed-circle icon on the right and selecting Delete. You'll be asked to verify that you'd like to take this action. Once you click Remove Post, the search will be deleted from your history.

To clear every search without sifting through years of individual entries, click the "Clear Searches" link located at the top-right of the list.

Unfortunately, Facebook doesn't let you completely turn off its search history feature. You'll have to remember to do this every now and then.

 

2. Play chess

You've seen those Facebook game requests for Candy Crush and Farmville, but did you know there's a way to challenge your friends to a game of chess? It's fun! You have to try it.

The game is played in Facebook Messenger. Start by choosing the friend you'd like to challenge. Open a new message, or insert the game into a conversation you already have going. Type “@fbchess play” to get started.

When you type “@fbchess play”, a chessboard will be inserted into your conversation feed. Typically, whoever initiates the game will be assigned the color white and will have the first move.

Although the gameplay isn't as simple as some online chess games, it’s still easy to move your pieces around the board. At the bottom and top of the board, you'll see the letters A through H assigned to the grid. On the right and left sides of the board, you'll see the numbers 1 through 8.

To move, just combine the letters and numbers with a piece command. Typing “@fbchess Pe4”, for example, will move your pawn to square E4. A list of more advanced commands, such as moving your bishops and knights, can be found by typing “@fbchess help”. And, if you ever happen to make a mistake, you can correct it by typing “@fbchess undo”.

3. Check other messages folder

Facebook is designed to help you keep in touch, but that doesn't mean all your messages get through. In fact, some messages are actually tucked into a special folder you probably didn’t know existed.

 

Messages are stashed in this folder when they're sent from someone who's not on your Friends list. Facebook flags these messages as spam, even though it's possible that you know the sender. Old friends, for example, could be reaching out to you. I recently mentioned this folder on my national radio show, and a few weeks later a listener told me that she checked the folder and found an email from her birth mother!

You'll find this folder in the Messenger app on your smartphone. Tap the Me icon in the bottom right-hand corner, then tap People. Once there, look for the option for Message Requests, and then a link that says, "See filtered requests."

You can also access these messages when you're logged into the Facebook site. Click here to see step-by-step instructions on my website.

4. See who's ignoring your friend requests

At one point or another, maybe you wonder who has ignored your Friend requests. To see which Friend requests are still pending, log in to your Facebook account and click the Friends icon at the top of the page. From there, select See All Friends, then Friend Requests, then View Sent Requests.

If you wish to cancel the friend request, hover over "Friend Request Sent" and select Cancel Request. Click here to see helpful screenshots.

5. Download your whole Facebook history

When you consider how much of your life is shared on Facebook, it makes you wonder what else you can do with all of that information. The good news is there's actually a way to archive everything you've ever shared on Facebook, including the things you've deleted.

To do this, open your Facebook Settings and click "Download a copy of your Facebook data." There, you'll see a button that says "Start My Archive."

 

Once you begin your archive, you'll be asked to confirm your password. Another email will be sent once your download is complete. It will contain a link that will allow you to download a Zip file that contains the data from your Facebook history.

With these tips, you'll be using Facebook like a pro in no time at all. But, there are still some annoying features you'll want to fix. Learn which settings to tweak by visiting my website, Komando.com.

Finally, be sure to Like my page at Facebook.com/KimKomando.

Copyright 2016, WestStar Multimedia Entertainment. All rights reserved.

Kim Komando hosts the nation’s largest weekend radio talk show as she takes calls and dispenses advice on today’s digital lifestyle. Visit Komando.com for free podcasts, videos, product reviews, shows, tips and advice.

Soruce : foxnews.com

Categorized in Market Research

While Donald Trump busies himself battling beauty queens on Twitter and occasionally touting his slapdash, unworkable "concepts" on trade, taxes, and immigration, Hillary Clinton is busy being a normal American presidential candidate. For instance, she's releasing reasonably detailed papers on all manner of public policy issues. (I know, so very boring.) If this were a normal American presidential election, these proposals would be vigorously discussed and examined, particularly at the presidential debates. Instead we get extended back-and-forths on her network server management issues.

But these policy proposals really do deserve our attention. For instance, consider Clinton's speech in Toledo on Monday, in which she attacked the anti-competitive, anti-consumer business practices of "too many" in corporate America. The Democratic presidential nominee didn't go full Elizabeth Warren. But it was pretty close:

Look at Wells Fargo. Really shocking, isn't it? One of the nation's biggest banks bullying thousands of employees into committing fraud against unsuspecting customers. … It is outrageous that eight years after a cowboy culture on Wall Street wrecked our economy, we are still seeing powerful bankers playing fast and loose with the law. … Part of the problem is large corporations are amassing so much power in our economy. Sometimes it's called market concentration or even old-fashioned monopolies. … As president, I will appoint tough, independent authorities to strengthen anti-trust enforcement and really scrutinize mergers and acquisitions, so the big don't keep getting bigger and bigger. [Hillary Clinton]

All hail Hillary of the House Clinton, First of Her Name, Slayer of Monopolies and Megabanks.

Now, a competent Republican presidential campaign would take note of its opponent's tough, populist speech. It would place that speech in the context of what many left-of-center thinkers are saying these days about corporate power and inequality. For instance, the Obama economic team has put forward a thorough analysis of how American industry is getting more and more concentrated, potentially harming consumers and small business.

 

Moreover, a competent, policy-oriented Republican presidential campaign would note that many Democrats are using the reality of greater market concentration as a springboard for attacking Silicon Valley and the broader technology sector — one part of the American economy that seems to be working pretty well. (At least, that's the impression I get when I pull that small pane of glass from my pocket allowing me to instantly access the sum of human knowledge.)

This summer, Warren singled out Amazon, Apple, and Google as examples of concentrated corporate power. She even compared them to Wall Street's "too big to fail" megabanks. And in a New York Times op-ed last month, former Clinton labor secretary Robert Reich bemoaned the economic and political power of "Big Tech." Like Warren, Reich looks favorably on the European Union's efforts to break up Google's supposed monopoly powers and practices. Indeed, some on the left would actually dismantle some of these tech industry giants here in the U.S.

Interestingly, Clinton never mentioned tech in her Toledo speech, instead singling out banking and healthcare. Then again, she never gave the tech industry any sort of special dispensation due to the special economics of the digital economy where, for instance, the more users you attract to a platform, the more valuable it may get.

Would President Hillary Clinton aggressively pursue anti-trust actions against America's most successful and innovative companies as many in her party would like? We don't know. But how could Big Tech not be at least a bit worried about a regulatory war against them during another Clinton administration, especially given the Democratic Party's continued leftward shift?

Maybe they are worried. The day after Clinton's speech, Google's top economist Hal Varian had an op-ed in the Financial Times in which he made the case that tech giants are nothing like the robber baron monopolists of old. Rather, they are constantly subject to "disruption" while continuing to innovate and bring cool new products and services to consumers and small businesses alike.

 

A competent GOP nominee might be coming to the defense of Big Tech, and questioning Hillary's commitment to this vibrant sector of the American economy. And in doing so, he might broadly acknowledge that many sectors of the economy have grown more concentrated, perhaps making the economy less competitive and dynamic. But he also might explain, as Varian did, how the tech sector can be different. It wasn't so long ago that MySpace was the largest and most dominant social networking site. Fortune magazine once declared Yahoo the winner of the "search engine wars." The founders and executives at top tech firms hardly think their positions are forever secure. Will smart bots threaten Google's core search business? Will the fast-growing Chinese market undermine the iPhone in Asia? Look out Facebook, here comes Snapchat!

A competent GOP nominee might also point out all the ways — in addition, perhaps, to an anti-trust rethink on the right — to make the economy more competitive, including reforming occupational licensing laws, less stringent patent and copyright protection, and reviewing tax and regulatory rules that benefit incumbents over startups. He might also point out how the Obama administration's healthcare and banking overhauls might be driving increased business concentration in those sectors.

A competent GOP nominee might say some or all of these things as part of an intellectually honest agenda to promote a more open and dynamic economy. But instead, the GOP nominee is Donald Trump.

Source: theweek.com

Categorized in Social

Shake your fist and your VR avatar’s face will turn “angry.” Put your hands on your face Home Alone-style to express “shock.” Triumphantly thrust your hands in the air and your virtual self’s face will show “joy.”

These are what Facebook calls “VR emoji,” and they’re the company’s vision for how we’ll convey emotion in virtual reality. We’re not talking about yellow illustrated emoticons popping up over your head. Instead, your avatar’s eyes, eye brows, mouth and other facial features will change to mimic how we exhibit body language in the real world.

Face-to-virtual-face

Michael Booth, Facebook’s head of social VR, describes that “when you send a message and you want to make an emotional point, you stick an emoji on there.” We lose tone and physical cues when we text, so emojis emerged to clarify what you really mean. Otherwise, the recipient won’t know whether you’re excited or worried when you say “oh my.”

Booth wanted to alleviate similar sentiment ambiguity that exists in social VR as you don’t usually see someone’s real face. The solution goes far, far beyond the “Reactions” you can leave on 360 News Feed content to express more nuanced feedback than just a “Like.”

 

“We’re coming up with a language that triggers your avatar to make certain emotions,” aka “VR emoji” Booth tells me. “We can’t just be a blank presence. [In VR] we have eyes, we have mouths. We need some kind of emotions or it seems like totally flat affect.” If you say something shocking to a friend in VR, but their face stays completely static, it breaks your sense of presence. We’re accustomed to facial cues.

oculus-cards-joy-emoji

For example, in the real world if you’re in the middle of a long explanation and someone doesn’t understand you, you can recognize the confused expression on their face. That tells you to dumb it down a bit, provide more background context or say it again in a different way.

Without VR emoji, your conversation partner would either have to interrupt you, flail their arms in a non-obvious way or wait until you’re finished. With Facebook’s VR emoji, you can shrug with your palms up, and your face will show an easily recognized expression of confusion — eyes scrunched and mouth crooked. Though Booth warns the gestures behind its VR emoji vocabulary are sure to change over time.

zuck-brain-chemistryMark Zuckerberg dives into how our brain processes social VR

None of this depends on eye or facial tracking, which would require additional hardware to be built into VR headsets. Startups like FOVE are building these headsets, and apps like VR chat room Altspace make your eye movements visible on your avatar. But eye tracking isn’t built into the Oculus Rift, Gear VR, Google Daydream and Cardboard, HTC Vive or PlayStation VR headsets. The hand-tracking that VR emojis require is proliferating much faster toward the scale Facebook craves for its product.

Booth details four of the main goals Facebook has for using avatars to create the sense of believable human presence in social VR:

  1. “You’re comfortable with the way you look”
  2. “Friends can recognize you at a glance”
  3. “It’s not creepy and disturbing”
  4. “Facebook can create avatars that represent each of its 1.7 billion users”

Facebook is still experimenting with different ways to personalize avatars so they look like you. One option is an internal drawing tool where you illustrate a version of your face to plaster onto your avatar. Another is to use an Occipital Structure sensor or other image-capture device to model your head. Facebook could potentially even try to recreate your VR face from the photos tagged of you on its social network.

vr-surprised-emoji

Whatever it offers will have to work reliably, otherwise you could end up with a grotesquely disfigured avatar version of yourself that would break rules No. 1 and No. 4 above.

Live VRing

Luckily, Booth knows plenty about avatars. He spent 10 years making video games at Valve and another two at Blizzard. He was planning to start his own VR game studio, but then Facebook showed him the “Toybox” social VR demo, which he says “really blew my mind.” He joined Facebook, and since December has been working on the successor to Toybox, Facebook’s unnamed social VR prototype demoed today. 

Presence isn’t enough. VR needs utility — things to do in there. Along with the VR emojis, Booth and Mark Zuckerberg demonstrated the ability to visit VR destinations with your friends’ avatars overlaid on the scene. They showed how you’ll be able to play cards, watch TV and sword fight together. If you see something cool, you’ll be able to take a VR selfie, turn to your wrist and see a button to instantly share the photo to Facebook. You’ll even get a change to take a Facebook Messenger video call and show someone in the real world what your avatar is up to in the virtual realm.

That’s just the start, though. Facebook is plotting to turn you into a VR videographer. Booth tells me it’s developing a way for you to “basically have a virtual camera you can pick up and move around.” This way, friends without headsets can see what all the hype is about by watching your VR antics straight from the Facebook News Feed. “You become a 2D camera man for your friends in VR,” Booth says. “With video streaming, you become a superstar.”

image_facebook-avatar-design-experimentsThe evolution of Facebook’s social VR avatars, from generic figures to blocky heads to polished faces to emotional creatures

That concept of expanding Facebook Live streaming from the physical world to your adventures in the digital one ties social VR back to the company’s core product that’s increasingly focused on video. While Oculus and Facebook started quite distinct, the dividing lines are blurring.

 

If Facebook can build a compelling social VR experience at scale, Booth says “we’ll figure out some way to monetize it. I’m sure advertising will be very interesting in VR.”

For now, though, this is all just the next way Facebook wants to accomplish its mission of connecting the world, making friends feel closer together no matter where they are. From basic profiles to photos to auto-play videos in the News Feed, from text chat to multi-media Messenger apps, from web to mobile and now to VR, Facebook continues to evolve. But no matter the technology, Booth says Facebook’s staying true to its principle of “People First.’

Source : techcrunch

The Menlo Park, Calif.-based company on Monday announced the launch of “Facebook Marketplace,” a new, prominent feature that allows individual users to easily buy and sell a range of items, such as clothing electronics, household goods, furniture, jewelry, art and cars. To start, Marketplace is rolling out to users over the age of 18 in the U.S., U.K., Australia and New Zealand on iOS and Android over the next few days. Facebook plans to extend the service to its desktop site and additional countries over the coming months.

For now, Marketplace can be accessed by tapping a highly-visible shopping bag icon at the bottom of the app, alongside icons such as ”Messenger” and “Notifications.” Facebook’s massive 1.7-billion person user base and the new feature’s ease of use give it a good shot of competing with more established, peer-to-peer online marketplaces such as eBay and Craigslist. Facebook said the inspiration for Marketplace came from observing that a significant number of people were using Facebook to buy and sell products, especially within “Groups.” More than 450 million Facebook users visit Groups categorized as “buy-and-sell” each month to view items for sales from neighbors or collectors globally, the company said. For now, Marketplace is free for both buyers and sellers. 

“Marketplace is a single destination where people can discover, buy and sell things in their neighborhood and community,” said Facebook product manager Bowen Pan in an interview. “The feature will also surface the most relevant items when we don’t know what we’re looking for. It’s designed for people, not big businesses.”

A preview of an item for sale on Marketplace. (Courtesy of Facebook)

The feature has been in testing since late last year and was built to be mobile-first, Pan said. Marketplace items can also appear in the news feed or be posted within groups and pages. For now, Marketplace is only built for individual users, not a store front for companies — businesses can currently use pages for that purpose. In early tests of Marketplace, Facebook found that most users started browsing without having a specific item in mind. As a result, the company wanted to make browsing highly visual, Pan said. Testing also indicated that users who were most interested in buying items on Marketplace also wanted to sell items, which encouraged the company to make both buying and selling simple.

Marketplace currently prioritizes local purchases. When users open the app, they will first see for-sale items posted by people nearby. To look for specific items, users can use a search bar at the top of the app to filter by category, item or price. Users can adjust location to view items in a different region or city. Tapping on an item image will show users more information such as a product description, location and the profile of the seller. A “Your Items” tab can be used to keep track of a user’s saved items, items for sale and any buy-and-sell messages. Buyers can also view an estimate of how quickly a seller tends to respond.

To purchase an item, users can send an offer price with or without a more detailed message. Facebook said it currently does not facilitate the delivery or payment of items in Marketplace. The company said illegal goods will be monitored through a combination of user flagging and Facebook’s own automated systems.

A preview of a message screen from the point of view of the seller. (Courtesy of Facebook)
 

Facebook said it expects Marketplace to complement buy-and-sell activity that already happens in groups. For example, users posting an item for sale can choose to post the item in Marketplace as well as in a group at the same time.

Original Source of this article is forbes

Facebook is stealing the Stories format and invading countries where Snapchat isn’t popular yet. Today in Poland it launched “Messenger Day”, which lets people share illustrated filter-enhanced photos and videos that disappear in 24 hours, just like on Snapchat.

By using the international popularity of Messenger to spread the Stories format, Facebook could boost retention and return visits to its chat app while becoming the primary place where people post off-the-cuff lifecasting content before they get hooked on Snapchat.

facebook-messenger-day

Sources in Poland spotted Messenger Day and sent TechCrunch’s John Biggs these screenshots. We reached out to Facebook for comment, and it told us “We know that people come to Messenger to share everyday moments with friends and family. In Poland we are running a small test of new ways for people to share those updates visually. We have nothing more to announce at this time.”

Additionally, Facebook says it frequently runs small tests before rolling products out to other regions, but there’s no guarantee it will expand this feature beyond Poland. It’s unclear, but Facebook might not bring it to the US unless it really blows up abroad. 60 million people in the US and Canada already use Snapchat daily, and aggressively pushing Messenger Day there could annoy them. But in countries where people aren’t that familiar with Snapchat, it has nothing to lose by experimenting.

Share Suggestion Filters

Much of the feature works exactly like Snapchat Stories, with the ability to draw or add text to images. Facebook’s one big innovation with Messenger Day is the use of graphic filters as suggestions for what to share, instead of just to celebrate holidays and events or to show off your location like with Snapchat’s geofilters.

messenger_day_filters

 
At the top of the Messenger thread list, users see a row of tiles representing “My Day” and friends’ Days they can watch, but there are also prompts like “I’m Feeling”, “Who’s  Up For?” and “I’m Doing”. Tapping on these tiles provides a range of filters “I’m feeling…so blue” with raindrops and a bubbly blue font, “I’m feeling…blessed” with a glorious gold sparkly font, “Who’s up for…road trip” with a cute car zooming past, or “Who’s up for…Let’s grab drinks” with illustrated beer mugs and bottles that cover the screen.

messenger_day_shareThis feature allows people to share visually appealing images even if they aren’t great artists or especially creative. These prompts could also spur usage when people are bored, sparking their imagination.

Messsenger is already an app people use all day with close friends, so it could end up a better home for the Stories format than cramming it into Facebook’s core app, which the company tested as “Quick Updates” andscrapped.

The Stories slideshow format has proven to be a powerful way to share more than the perfectly polished pics people post to Instagram. That’s why Instagram launched its own clone of Snapchat Stories, but its CEO Kevin Systrom admitted “They deserve all the credit”. But Facebook suffers from the same problem of people only sharing their biggest life highlights, which don’t happen that often. Facebook is already so stuffed with features and probably isn’t opened as frequently as Messenger.

Now Messenger Day wants to make this casual sharing option ubiquitous before Snapchat can. That’s a similar strategy to Instagram Stories, which I hear is flourishing in places like Russia where Snapchat adoption is low. This is the benefit of Facebook being a giant company earning $2 billion in profit a quarter. It can clone fast thanks to its enormous team, translate and localize features for testing in certain markets, and cross-promote what works with its inescapable feed and chat apps.

 

Messenger Day might not lure many people away from Snapchat, but Facebook could stunt its competitor’s growth by racing to to bring its own Stories to the unclaimed corners of the earth.

Source: https://techcrunch.com

When a journalist gets their first job, or switches role to a new area or specialism, they need to quickly work out where to find useful leads. This often involves the use of feeds, email alerts, and social networks. In this post I’m going to explain a range of search techniques for finding useful sources across a range of platforms.

Search techniques for finding news and blog sources

Let’s get the obvious things out of the way first, starting with Google.

Aside from the main search engine, remember that there’s a specific News search option. Within that, you can also specify you want to search within blogs.

google-blog-search

But what about all those local websites and blogs that aren’t listed on Google News? Try using a normal Google search with site:blogspot.com or site:wix.com and your particular keywords to limit results to those hosted on Blogger or Wix.

If you are looking for a place which also exists elsewhere (such as Cambridge, Massachusetts or Birmigham, Alabama), use Search tools to specify you only want results from your country. This isn’t perfect: it will still include wrong results and exclude right ones, but it’s worth trying.

Search tools: specify country

You can also exclude irrelevant results by using the minus operator immediately before keywords in results you want to exclude, e.g. Birmingham -Alabama or Cambridge -Massachusetts

Finding email newsletters in your field

You can search for email newsletters by using your keyword with intitle:subscribe andintitle:email or intitle:newsletter.

Search box: birmingham intitle:subscribe intitle:email

Use an RSS reader instead of email alerts

RSS readers are much easier to read than email alerts: these pull in a range of feeds into one place. Widely used RSS readers include FeedlyNetvibes (where you can share or publish dashboards) and Flipboard (which gives you a magazine-like interface).If you think social media has taken over the role of RSS readers, you aren’t using RSS as much as you could. Here are some examples which you won’t find on social media…

You can get updated on new results by using Google Alerts. Use this on Chrome and you should be able to choose to receive results by email or by RSS.

WordPress has its own search engine, and results can be subscribed to using RSS so you get updated whenever a new post is published mentioning your keyword. Look for the ‘related topics’  box on the right, too: this links to tag pages on WordPress which are also useful.

wordpress search results

Look out for other places where you can find RSS feeds or email alerts for new search results For example TheyWorkForYou’s search page and WhatDoTheyKnow provide both for what MPs are saying and FOI requests respectively.

Consultation websites also typically offer RSS feeds: Transport for London’s has separate feeds for forthcoming, open, and closed consultations, but it will also give you a feed for searches.Here’s their guide to using RSS. Most government departments and local councils use the same system: here’s Leicester’s and here’s DEFRA’s.

The Gov.uk website’s Publications section also offers both RSS feeds and email alerts for new results matching any search you conduct.

Finding events in your area

Meetup, Eventbrite and Lanyrd are all useful for finding events in a particular area.

Meetup is good for regular and more informal events. You can search by location and radius, and get a calendar of upcoming events that meet your criteria.

meetup calendar view

Use the calendar view on Meetup to see upcoming events in your area

Joining a meetup group doesn’t mean you have to attend any – it’s more like joining a group on Facebook. The more you join, the more Meetup will suggest to you.

You can get an RSS feed of meetups you’ve signed up to, and you can add any individual meetup URL to an RSS reader to get an RSS feed of that meetup group’s updates. But you can’t get RSS feeds for areas or searches.

You can subscribe to emails on Meetup about groups you’ve joined, and to be alerted to new groups which may be of interest. New groups being set up is of course often a news story in itself, and an excuse to contact the organiser to interview them about it.

Eventbrite tends to be used for less regular events but also bigger ones. Again you can search by location and get a calendar of forthcoming events (remember to sort by date, not relevance).eventbrite birmingham events

Each event on Eventbrite has an organiser. Click on their profile to see more events. Sadly Eventbrite doesn’t seem to have any RSS feeds but there does appear to be a workaround using Zapier.

Lanyrd, which is owned by Eventbrite, is useful for finding conferences. You can search by keyword, and you can also try to find the URL for particular locations. This tends to begin withlanyrd.com/places/ followed by a place name, for example lanyrd.com/places/liverpool.

lanyrd events in Birmingham

Usefully, places on Lanyrd do have their own RSS feed, so you can receive updates on all events in that location on an RSS reader. You can also add them directly to your calendar. Both options are in the right hand column.The site also has a speaker directory, useful for finding experts in a particular field.

Your own specialist or local search engine

If you need to regularly search within a particular group of sites, consider setting up a personalised search engine using Google Custom Search.For example: you might make a list of local public body websites such as those for all local hospitals, the police and fire services, and local authority.

Reddit

Chances are that Reddit has a number of forums related to the area you’re interested in. For example there are two Birmingham subreddits (r/brum and r/Birmingham) but also subreddits for local football teams and universities. All will have RSS feeds that can be added to an RSS reader.

Using Facebook lists to create multiple newsfeed channels

Most people know about Twitter lists, but fewer people know you can create lists in Facebook.

Like Twitter lists, these can be useful for following a specific group of people (for example those in a particular industry, organisation or area) and ensuring you can check those updates regularly: remember that most updates from your connections are never shown in your news feed, so this is a way of taking control.

facebook-friends-lists

Remember to bookmark your friends list once you’ve created it, as otherwise you’ll still have to access it through the Friends menu in Facebook.

Finding people on Facebook based on location or employer

Now, how do you find those people to add to your Facebook lists? If you go to Facebook’s friend requests page you will see a series of search boxes on the right hand side. These allow you to search for people by various criteria, but the most useful are where they live now and their current employer. Look for people who live and work in relevant areas.

facebook friends search boxes

Finding useful pages and groups for journalists on Facebook: Graph Search

How do you find relevant pages and groups on Facebook? Facebook’s Graph Search allows you to identify groups and pages liked or joined by people who live in a particular area, or who have liked or joined other pages or groups.

That sounds complicated as a sentence, so here’s a picture which should be a lot clearer:

Pages liked by people who live in Birmingham

To do this you need to conduct a search in Facebook using a particular sentence structure.

If you type pages liked by people who live in and then start typing a location, Facebook should start to suggest locations that it recognises. Choose the one you mean and Facebook should show your pages that match.

By default results are shown across all types of results (people, groups, pages). So make sure  that you switch to the Pages tab to see all the results.

Another phrase is pages liked by people who like followed by the name of a page. Again, start typing that name and then select one that Facebook suggests.

pages liked by people who like Aston Villa

To find groups use the phrase Groups joined by people who joined, followed by the name of a relevant group. You can also use Groups joined by people who liked, followed by the name of a relevant page, or Groups joined by people who live in followed by a location.

People joined by people who joined Birmingham Freshers 2016

LinkedIn for journalists

LinkedIn has a number of useful features for journalists. One of these is the ability to search specifically for companies. First, make sure you select Companies from the drop-down menu to the left of the search box, then press enter (don’t type any criteria):

Select the Companies option from the drop down menu

 

You’ll get some initial search results for all companies on LinkedIn. You can now filter those results further by using the Location option on the left. Click + Add and start typing your location until the right one appears to select.

linkedin-company-search-by-location

Use the Companies filter and set the Location filter to get companies near you

It is generally not good practice to send contact requests to individuals on LinkedIn unless you know them. However, as you do build your personal contacts it is useful to add them on LinkedIn because you can choose to receive updates when your contacts are mentioned online:

LinkedIn: Connections in the news

Instagram

It’s easy to underestimate Instagram, but many people find it easier or more natural to use than text-based social networks. It may be the first place that someone shares a newsworthy image or experience.

Obviously the primary way of navigating Instagram is through hashtags. These can be searched on the app, but you can also browse them online by adding your tag to the end of the URLinstagram.com/explore/tags/ e.g. instagram.com/explore/tags/manchester

 

A second way of finding useful accounts, however, is geotagging. A much higher proportion of instagram updates are geotagged compared to posts on other social media platforms.Worldcam allows you to find updates – and therefore users – by location.

instagram-search

Snapchat

Snapchat is another social platform which is being used by an increasingly broader range of people, including politicians and celebrities. I’ve written previously about 5 techniques for finding people on Snapchat here.

Twitter search: snapchat followed by the list name

Twitter

I’ve probably written more about finding people on Twitter, and managing Twitter feeds, than any other social platform. Here are a selection of previous posts covering that:

Source : https://onlinejournalismblog.com

Categorized in Search Techniques

92%Ninety-two percent of retailers are investing in social media marketing.

Retailers are boosting their social media ad budgets, and Facebook has become the social vehicle of choice, according to a new survey on digital marketing from the National Retail Federation and Forrester.

The Shop.org State of Retailing Online 2016: Marketing and Merchandising report found the following:

- Ninety-two percent of retailers are investing in social media marketing to some degree, second only to email.

- Seventy-six percent of retail executives said they plan to more on social media over the next year, more than any other marketing tactic. Specifically, 71 percent of retailers say they will shell out more for paid Facebook posts and ads, and 37 percent plan to boost spending on Instagram.

- Other forms of digital marketing aren’t being neglected: 53 percent are increasing their search engine optimization budgets, and 52 percent will splurge on search engine marketing.

- Retailers find social media marketing more effective than paid search. In particular, Facebook and Instagram ads seem to be paying off: 68 percent of retailers surveyed said that they were seeing greater conversion from paid Facebook ads, and 40 percent were reaping increased rewards from Facebook-owned Instagram. After that: Pinterest, YouTube, and Twitter.

 

- Mobile remains important: 66 percent of retailers said they would spend more on mobile marketing, but most are not investing in new technologies like beacons. But execs want their materials optimized for phone browsers, as an average of 45 percent of emails are opened on smartphones, versus 41 percent on desktop devices.

- Fifty-five percent of retailers surveyed are ramping up their online merchandising budgets, and 44 percent are allocating more staff to web merchandising.

Source : http://www.jckonline.com

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