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YOU KNOW YOU shouldn’t click on that article. There’s no way the headline is going to live up to the promise. But the draw of finding out what happens next—crossing that curiosity gap—is just too much to resist. So you take the bait. And, sure enough, you’re disappointed.

Facebook wants to stop this from happening, and it’s turning to artificial intelligence to help. Earlier this month the company announced that it was tweaking its algorithms to cut down on “clickbait”—the ubiquitous plague of Internet content that over-promises and under-delivers. But it’s a big Internet out there, and plenty of other companies and sites that could benefit from tools that can separate quality news stories from fluff. Now Facebook is open sourcing software to help filter out all that Internet noise.

Facebook’s AI-driven text classification system, bag-of-tricks” approach that helps machines efficiently glean information from the order in which words appear. Another FastText tactic breaks down words into “subwords“—such as prefixes, suffixes and root words—to help computers more easily learn their meanings.

Beyond clickbait, Facebook suggests software developers could use FastText to help filter out spam. It could power search engines and autocomplete fields. Recommendation engines like the ones used by the likes of Amazon or Netflix could also benefit from a little artificial smarts that can get a better read on what you’re writing.

FastText is just the latest of several open source AI projects to come out of Facebook in recent years. The company has released AI algorithms, a tool for spotting bugs (in code), and designs for AI-optimized hardware. And it’s not the only tech giant doing this. Google released its AI framework TensorFlow, and companies from Microsoft and Baidu to Amazon and Yahoo have all given away the code for some of their own AI tech.

That may seem like an odd trend, given that each of these companies hopes to best the other with better tech, including AI. But artificial intelligence is still a budding field. The researchers creating these technologies within companies like Facebook and Google benefit from having their counterparts on the outside review their work and suggest changes. In a sense, open sourcing code offers the same potential benefit that publishing research in peer-reviewed journals does for scientists. In other words, Facebook is betting that giving away its AI tech will make for better software, because it too can benefit from the new ways others use it. And besides, more developers and researchers learning to use the software means more coders better prepared to work for Facebook in the future.

Source : http://www.wired.com/2016/08/wont-believe-facebook-giving-away-free-now/ 

Categorized in Social

FACIAL RECOGNITION MAKES

sense as a method for your computer to recognize you. After all, humans already use a powerful version of it to tell each other apart. But people can be fooled (disguises! twins!), so it’s no surprise that even as computer vision evolves, new attacks will trick facial recognition systems, too. Now researchers have demonstrated a particularly disturbing new method of stealing a face: one that’s based on 3-D rendering and some light Internet stalking.

Earlier this month at the Usenix security conference, security and computer vision specialists from the University of North Carolina presented a system that uses digital 3-D facial models based on publicly available photos and displayed with mobile virtual reality technology to defeat facial recognition systems. A VR-style face, rendered in three dimensions, gives the motion and depth cues that a security system is generally checking for. The researchers used a VR system shown on a smartphone’s screen for its accessibility and portability.

Their attack, which successfully spoofed four of the five systems they tried, is a reminder of the downside to authenticating your identity with biometrics. By and large your bodily features remain constant, so if your biometric data is compromised or publicly available, it’s at risk of being recorded and exploited. Faces plastered across the web on social media are especially vulnerable—look no further than the wealth of facial biometric data literally called Facebook.

facerecognition

Other groups have done similar research into defeating facial recognition systems, but unlike in previous studies, the UNC test models weren’t developed from photos the researchers took or ones that the study participants provided. The researchers instead went about collecting images of the 20 volunteers the way any Google stalker might—through image search engines, professional photos, and publicly available assets on social networks like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+. They found anywhere from three to 27 photos of each volunteer. “We could leverage online pictures of the [participants], which I think is kind of terrifying,” says True Price, a study author who works on computer vision at UNC. “You can’t always control your online presence or your online image.” Price points out that many of the study participants are computer science researchers themselves, and some make an active effort to protect their privacy online. Still, the group was able to find at least three photos of each of them.

The researchers tested their virtual reality face renders on five authentication systems—KeyLemon, Mobius, TrueKey, BioID, and 1D. All are available from consumer software vendors like the Google Play Store and the iTunes Store and can be used for things like protecting data and locking smartphones. To test the security systems, the researchers had the subjects program each one to detect their real faces. Then they showed 3-D renders of each subject to the systems to see if they would accept them. In addition to making face models from online photos, the researchers also took indoor head shots of each participant, rendered them for virtual reality, and tested these against the five systems. Using the control photos, the researchers were able to trick all five systems in every case they tested. Using the public web photos, the researchers were able to trick four of the systems with success rates from 55 percent up to 85 percent.

facerecognition-3

Face authentication systems have been proliferating in consumer products like laptops and smartphones—Google even announced this year that it’s planning to put a dedicated image processing chip into its smartphones to do image recognition. This could help improve Android’s facial authentication, which was easily spoofed when it launched in 2011 under the name “Face Unlock” and was later improved and renamed “Trusted Face.” Nonetheless, Googlewarns, “This is less secure than a PIN, pattern, or password. Someone who looks similar to you could unlock your phone.”

Facial authentication spoofing attacks can use 2-D photos, videos, or in this case, 3-D face replicas (virtual reality renders, 3-D printed masks) to trick a system. For the UNC researchers, the most challenging part of executing their 3-D replica attack was working with the limited image resources they could find for each person online. Available photos were often low resolution and didn’t always depict people’s full faces. To create digital replicas, the group used the photos to identify “landmarks” of each person’s face, fit these to a 3-D render, and then used the best quality photo (factoring in things like resolution, lighting, and pose) to combine data about the texture of the face with the 3-D shape. The system also needed to extrapolate realistic texture for parts of the face that weren’t visible in the original photo. “Obtaining an accurately shaped face we found was not terribly difficult, but then retexturing the faces to look like the victims’ was a little trickier and we were trying solve problems with different illuminations,” Price says

If a face model didn’t succeed at fooling a system, the researchers would try using texture data from a different photo. The last step for each face render was correcting the eyes so they appeared to look directly into the camera for authentication. At this point, the faces were ready to be animated as needed for “liveness clues” like blinking, smiling, and raising eyebrows—basically authentication system checks intended to confirm that a face is alive.
facerecognition-2

In the “cat-and-mouse game” of face authenticators and attacks against them, there are definitely ways systems can improve to defend against these attacks. One example is scanning faces for human infrared signals, which wouldn’t be reproduced in a VR system. “It is now well known that face biometrics are easy to spoof compared to other major biometric modalities, namely fingerprints and irises,” says Anil Jain, a biometrics researcher at Michigan State University. He adds, though, that, “While 3-D face models may visually look similar to the person’s face that is being spoofed, they may not be of sufficiently high quality to get authenticated by a state of the art face matcher.”

The UNC researchers agree that it would be possible to defend against their attack. The question is how quickly consumer face authentication systems will evolve to keep up with new methods of spoofing. Ultimately, these systems will probably need to incorporate hardware and sensors beyond just mobile cameras or web cams, and that might be challenging to implement on mobile devices where hardware space is very limited. “Some vendors—most notably Microsoft with its Windows Hello software—already have commercial solutions that leverage alternative hardware,” UNC’s Price says. “However, there is always a cost-benefit to adding hardware, and hardware vendors will need to decide whether there is enough demand from and benefit for consumers to add specialized components like IR cameras or structured light projectors.

Biometric authenticators have the potential to be extremely powerful security mechanisms, but they’re threatened when would-be attackers gain easy access to personal data. In the Office of Personnel Management breach last year, for instance, hackers stole data for 5.6 million people’s fingerprints. Those markers will be in the wild for the rest of the victims’ lives. That data breach debacle, and the UNC researchers’ study, captures the troubling nature of biometric authentication: When your fingerprint–or faceprint–leaks into the ether, there’s no password reset button that can change it.

Source : https://www.wired.com/2016/08/hackers-trick-facial-recognition-logins-photos-facebook-thanks-zuck/#slide-2

Categorized in Internet Privacy

Facebook doesn’t have an easy-to-use advanced search engine, so one guy built his own. “Search Is Back” lets you use familiar drop-down menus to find people by city, relationship status, school, first name, and more. Plus you can search for photos, events, posts, and other stuff.

What’s special here is that you don’t need to know Facebook’s complicated Graph Search terms like “Friends of Friends named Sarah who went to Stanford and work at Google”. Search Is Back turns your simple menu selections into the proper URL and sends you to the search results page on Facebook’s official site with no extra login required.

Unfortunately, the product usually only works for people in the US who have received the Graph Search rollout. One thing that helps is adjusting your Facebook language setting to US English if you don’t use that already.

Some examples of what you could use Search Is Back to search for include:

screen-shot-2015-12-01-at-3-04-30-pm

  • What people from your home town are single and live in your current city
  • Who your friends of friends are at a company with a job you’re applying for
  • Which friends live in a city you’re visiting
  • Who that person on Tinder is who says their name is Sam/Samantha, lives in San Francisco, and went to UCLA
  • Who that person you met at a party was that was friends with your buddy Dan and works at Google
  • You can also use it to find photos, events, Likes, and posts, such as:
  • All the photos tagged with two particular people (not that you’d stalk your ex)
  • Events happening tonight that your friends are invited to, so you can find something to do
  • Posts from friends about London, so you can get recommendations for a vacation
  • Friends in your city that Like a certain musician, so you can find people to go to the concert with

 

Search Is Back was built by Michael Morgenstern, a filmmaker from San Francisco who was fed up with how hard it was to search Facebook.

Facebook declined my request for comment regarding Search Is Back. However, a close reading of its Platform Policies shows Facebook doesn’t technically prohibit how the site works.

The social network made a big deal of its Graph Search feature for finding specific things back in 2013, but using sentences instead of traditional keywords confused people. In fact, Facebook VP of Search Tom Stocky told me in October that “the interaction model for search with these natural language phrases was not right for a mass audience.”

facebook-seacrh

So then Facebook launched full-text post search, but that made Graph Searching even tougher since Facebook would confuse sentences for keywords. Facebook does have some advanced search features, but they’re split up and buried in weird places like the Find Friends tool and the sidebar options of old-school pre-Graph searches.

Morgenstern tells me “it sucked” how Facebook screwed up search. So he “did a lot of poking around” to find out what Facebook URLs did what, and since Search Is Back doesn’t use Facebook’s API, it might be harder to shut down.

Like a true hacker, Morgenstern just wanted to play around with what was possible on the web that won’t work with mobile apps. He says “We’re moving towards an app ecosystem where it’s not possible to build things like Search Is Back because all these apps are walled gardens. So in the dying days of open HTML web, it’s imperative to build these tools and customize what people give us.”

 

Facebook might find a way to shut down Search Is Back, but until then, it’s a free and privacy-safe way to find anything on Facebook with a simple set of boxes.

Source : https://techcrunch.com/2015/12/02/facebook-advanced-search/ 

Categorized in Science & Tech

The State of Facebook Advertising

Social media has become the pillar of the online experience. With over 1.55 billion monthly active users, hundreds of millions of people are interacting and engaging on Facebook. For Facebook advertisers, this represents a huge pool of potential customers. Read our report to understand current Facebook trends based on the Marin Global Online Advertising Index.
Get the report today.

Social media is the Swiss Army Knife of businesses in the 21st century. We use social media to drive our branding efforts, connect with customers, generate new leads, gain insights into buying habits, manage reputation, and bolster our digital footprint.

But, while social media is an essential part of modern business, many companies still aren’t getting the full potential from their digital efforts. As Social Media Examiner’s 2016 Social Media Marketing Industry Report reveals:

  • 92% of marketers don’t know which social media management tactics are most effective.
  • 90% of marketers don’t know the best way to connect with customers.
  • 86% of marketers don’t know how to measure the ROI from their social media marketing.
  • 86% of marketers don’t know how to use social media to find their target audience.
  • 86% of marketers don’t know which tools will help them manage social media.

So what’s the problem? Simply put, most B2B and B2C businesses lack an effective strategy for social media management.

socail-media-marketing

In this post, I’m going to walk you through the most important social media “Dos” and “Don’ts.” At the end of this article, I’ve also included a table that recaps my main points. Feel free to print it out and use it as a reminder whenever you need to get your social media strategy back on track.

Do…

1) Have a Strategy

The single most important part of social media management happens long before you ever sign up for Facebook or publish your first Tweet. Each social media marketing campaign should start with clearly outlined goals and a battle plan that will help you achieve those goals.

Here’s the secret of a good strategy: for a strategy to be effective, it must be as specific as possible.

For example, Social Media Strategy breaks down tactics for dealing with seven of the most popular platforms, and each one is specific in its aims (e.g. increasing Facebook followers by 10% each month, increasing Twitter followers by 5% each month, etc). They refine their strategies further by listing tone/style guidelines, posting strategies, engagement strategies and strategies to find new followers.

Typical start-up social media management strategies will look a little different. These strategies revolve around assessing your strengths and weaknesses as a company, and finding opportunities to turn your early customers into brand evangelists.

Of course, your perfect strategy won’t be a carbon copy of some other company’s goals. When building your social media management strategy make sure you set realistic goals that will have a meaningful impact on your business.

2) Choose the Best Platforms

How’s your Facebook outreach going? What about Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+? Do you have a YouTube account? What about Pinterest, Instagram, and Tumblr? And lest we forget, Reddit.

With so many social media platforms to choose from, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed if you don’t stay organized. The worst part is that you overlooking one platform might mean missing out on a huge potential market.

According to Christina Baldassarre’s research, the best platforms for engagement currently are Facebook, Google+, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Snapchat, Tumblr, Twitter, and YouTube—but you should also consider other platforms where your audience may live.

3) Use the Right Tools

Keeping up with social media is an impossible task for us mere mortals. Fortunately, there’s some handy software options to help you manage and monitor all of your social media accounts from one central hub. Here are some of the best options:

  • BuzzBundle: (disclaimer: my software) We developed BuzzBundle to be the ultimate social media management tool. Not only does it connect with all the biggest social media platforms, but it helps you monitor blogs, forums, and Q&A sites, too. Best of all, BuzzBundle analytics give you the insights you need to reach new customers, boost your SEO campaign, and find key influencers in your industry.
  • Hootsuite: Hootsuite connects you to over 35 social networks. Like BuzzBundle, Hootsuite lets you find out what your customers are saying about your brand and easily manage your outreach thanks to a central hub for all of your social media management.
  • Buffer: Social media is Buffer’s specialty. Buffer lets you post photos, videos, and posts to the most popular social media sites. It also lets you craft posts in advance and publishes them later for maximum exposure.
  • Sprout Social: Sprout Social’s platform lets you manage your social messages through a single-stream inbox. You can schedule, publish, and post content to your favorite social media sites and then get valuable insights on how audiences engage with your content.
  • Social Studio: Salesforce’s offering helps you engage with your customers by keeping you connected to over 650 million different sources. With this software, you can listen in on conversations surrounding your brand, engage with your audience, and post to all the important platforms.

4) Track the Metrics That Matter

If you don’t know whether or not your social media outreach is impacting your business, then what’s the point? When you’ve defined a goal for your social media campaign, the only way to tell if it succeeded is to gather corresponding metrics.

Here are some metrics that might indicate success:

  • If your goal was to get to expand your reach, measure engagement and new followers.
  • If your goal was to grow brand awareness, measure shares and influencers mentioning your brand.
  • If your goal was to get more sales, measure referrals, CTR, and conversions.
  • The tools listed above will give you a lot of insights into the metrics you need to measure the success of your campaign.

5) Engage and Post Regularly

Last but not least, the point of a social network is to socialize. Share great content regularly to give your followers something to share and get excited about. Don’t forget to engage with their content too—follow the industry leaders in your niche and try to give more than you receive.

To make sure you keep up with social media, consider setting a schedule for yourself. Even ten minutes spent sharing and engaging every day goes a long way toward boosting your web presence.

Don’t…

1) Try to Please Everyone

One of the most important parts of your strategy is to understand your audience. If you try to please everyone, you’ll wind up offering nothing unique, and nobody will be satisfied.

On the other hand, if you know your audience and understand their pain points, you can tailor your services to solve their specific problems. Do that better than any of your competitors and you’ll have a loyal following in no time.

2) Delete Negative Reviews

When you see every mention of your brand, it can be tempting to purge negative experiences from the web. Resist that urge. Instead, reach out to people who leave a negative review—ask how you can improve their experience and work hard to regain their trust. Doing this may not only salvage a sour situation, but it will also show other potential leads how far you’re willing to go for your customers.

3) Lose Your Personal Touch

Automation may be the only way to keep up with all bustling social spheres, but that’s no excuse to lose the human element in your brand. That means posting new content for every demographic, no matter where they fall in your sales funnel. Keep your messaging personal, targeted, and bursting with your brand’s unique personality.

On this note, make sure that your outreach always feels organic. Don’t make the mistake of befriending every follower and spamming inane posts. On the flip side, don’t be a recluse who only posts and promotes their own content. Instead, share content you truly love and connect with people whose insights you value.

4) Become Complacent

Finding your audience on all the bustling social media platforms and watching them respond with gusto every time you post new content isn’t enough. The best social media strategists plan ahead—and they’re always experimenting.

The truth is that social media management is never done. There’s always a better way to reach your target audience, a new platform waiting to be discovered, and more avenues for you to engage with your customers. Stay ahead of the curve and never let your current strategy be “good enough.”

5) Neglect Your Audience

Disengaging is one of the worst social media sins. Don’t neglect one network in favor of another or leave comments and questions from a genuinely engaged audience unanswered. If you do need to go on a hiatus for whatever reason use social media to inform your followers—they’ll value the communication.

Final Thoughts

The days of long customer support phone calls and endless waiting periods on hold are (mostly) done. These days, your customers rely on the internet to learn about your business and connect with you. So don’t let this opportunity go to waste—find out who your audience is what they’re saying about your brand.

To recap, here are the top “dos” and “don’ts” when it comes to social media management:

soacil-media-roles

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/top-dos-donts-effective-social-media-management/169626/

For years, Yahoo has been criticized for failing to understand what it really is.

Is it a search engine? A web portal? A news site? An advertising tech company? All of the above?

Well, based on how Yahoo describes its competition in itslatest quarterly filing, it looks like Yahoo still has no clue what it really wants to be.

Here's what it says:

"We face significant competition from online search engines, sites offering integrated internet products and services, social media and networking sites, e-commerce sites, companies providing analytics, monetization and marketing tools for mobile and desktop developers, and digital, broadcast and print media.

In a number of international markets, especially those in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Latin America, we face substantial competition from local Internet service providers and other entities that offer search, communications, and other commercial services."

What does that mean? It means Yahoo's competing in all of these areas one way or another:

- Online search

- Internet services, like email

- Social media

- E-commerce

- Data analytics

- Marketing and advertising technology

- Messaging

- Media

For a company that generates about $5 billion a year, that's a lot of different areas to be in. Yahoo's scattershot approach is also pretty interesting when you compare the language to how other companies describe their competition.

Here's what Google says:

"We have many competitors in different industries, including general purpose search engines and information services, vertical search engines and e-commerce websites, social networks, providers of online products and services, other forms of advertising and online advertising platforms and networks, other operating systems, and wireless mobile device companies...Our competitors are constantly developing innovations in search, online advertising, wireless mobile devices, operating systems, and many other web-based products and services."

Here's Facebook:

"We face significant competition in every aspect of our business, including from companies that provide tools to facilitate communication and the sharing of information, companies that enable marketers to display advertising and companies that provide development platforms for applications developers."

Here's Twitter:

"Although we have developed a global platform for public self-expression and conversation in real time, we face strong competition in our business. We compete against many companies to attract and engage users, including companies which have greater financial resources and substantially larger user bases, such as Facebook (including Instagram and WhatsApp), Google, LinkedIn, Microsoft and Yahoo, which offer a variety of Internet and mobile device-based products, services and content."

And Amazon:

"Our businesses are rapidly evolving and intensely competitive, and we have many competitors in different industries, including retail, e-commerce services, digital content and electronic devices, and web and infrastructure computing services."

At least Yahoo is now under a restructuring plan that will narrow its focus to three platforms (search, email, Tumblr) and four content verticals (news, finance, sports, and lifestyle), as well as its Gemini and Brightroll ad offerings. And with its sale to Verizon, it's likely Yahoo will be a much more focused company. Still, it's an interesting reminder that spreading a company's resources too thinly across many different areas often don't work.

Source : http://www.businessinsider.com/yahoo-still-has-no-idea-what-it-is-2016-8

Categorized in Search Engine

The State of Facebook Advertising

Social media has become the pillar of the online experience. With over 1.55 billion monthly active users, hundreds of millions of people are interacting and engaging on Facebook. For Facebook advertisers, this represents a huge pool of potential customers. Read our report to understand current Facebook trends based on the Marin Global Online Advertising Index.

Get the report today.

In addition to making sure you never miss posts from friends and family, Facebook wants to make sure you never miss another ad.

The social network has announced plans to make life harder for ad blockers that let desktop users view Facebook without seeing irrelevant advertising.

Goodbye, Ad Blockers

Facebook has revealed a change that will use new technology to make ad blocking software less effective. Facebook is changing how it loads advertising onto its desktop site to make its harder for ad blockers to detect their ad units.

“Some ad blocking companies accept money in exchange for showing ads that they previously blocked – a practice that is at best confusing to people and that reduces the funding needed to support the journalism and other free services that we enjoy on the web,” Facebook wrote in a blog post. “Facebook is one of those free services, and ads support our mission of giving people the power to share and making the world more open and connected.”

This change won’t impact mobile, which accounted for 84 percent of Facebook’s $6.2 billion in advertising revenue in Q2.

New Advertising Controls For Users

What about users who want an ad-free experience on Facebook? Well, Facebook doesn’t want that. But the company says it will give users “more control” over the ads they see.

“If you don’t want to see ads about a certain interest like travel or cats, you can remove the interest from your ad preferences,” Facebook said. “We also heard that people want to be able to stop seeing ads from businesses or organizations who have added them to their customer lists, and so we are adding tools that allow people to do this.”

Estimates of how many people actually use ad blockers varies by country and by which company is putting out their own report. But most estimates land somewhere between a quarter and a third of Internet users. Facebook didn’t indicate how many of its users use ad blockers.

What do you think of Facebook’s move to block ad blockers?

Source : https://www.searchenginejournal.com/facebook-stops-ad-blockers/170494/

Categorized in Social

Facebook plans to be more than a place for socializing and aims to magnetize news stories and public debates that are usually associated with Twitter.

Thanks to the continuous work on its natural language Graph Search, Facebook now registers 2 billion searches per day, filtering through its 2.5 trillion posts.

The increase in searches over the social media platform is significant, seeing how in July 2015 Facebook counted 1.5 billion searches per day. For comparison, in September 2012, the platform had 1 billion searches per day. A 33 percent surge in searches over nine months is something all social media can learn from.

Full post search seems to have given Facebook an edge over Twitter. Facebook recruited 60 million users during the last quarter, which makes Twitter's 3 million unimpressive by comparison. Facebook has the power of big numbers, with a total number of 1.71 billion global users. It simply has more voices, despite many of them being not as responsive or opinionated as Twitter users.

 

But it looks like the trend is already shifting.

At the recent earnings call, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, pointed out that users no longer use the search function merely to find high school acquaintances, but to get in touch with people's opinions on various topics.

What is more, a growing number of users rely on the search function to scoop up businesses and various interests, which moves the focus of the search from just people to a wider array of topics.

What Facebook discretely suggests is that its users now talk more about things that matter to them on the platform, as their words can find their way to those interested. The powerful search engine and huge user base also make it a good idea for businesses to be more active in the social media environment. Traditionally, Twitter has been the master of talking space, but Facebook is coming up from behind since it launched its public post search in 2015.

At the earnings call, Facebook's CEO was asked about his strategy for turning searches into revenue.

Zuckerberg says that there are three stages to the strategy: first, a "consumer user case" is required. Second, Facebook will tweak things so that clients naturally interact with the businesses. Third, providing tools for businesses to reach more people should boost Facebook's profits.

The company's helm underlined that paid search ads are not in the books for now, but he acknowledges that "a reasonable amount of behavior [...] could be monetizable." Facebook is also looking into banking on its WhatsApp and Messenger apps, and insiders familiar with the matter point out that various ideas are still being tested.

Another way the company plans to increase its revenue is by tapping into the potential of Live Video. Facebook wants to make the feature interesting and even signed deals with celebrities to create their own videos. However, the feature is not yet bringing in revenue, as the company is currently focusing on delivering high quality content.

According to the recent earnings report, Facebook's revenue in the quarter was of $6.44 billion, with $2.05 billion profit, most of which comes directly from mobile advertising.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/171702/20160728/twitter-watch-out-facebook-now-counts-2-billion-searches-per-day.htm

Categorized in Others

Facebook's goal is to connect with everyone, yes every single person in the world. Not just that, but Facebook wants to connect to everyone at all times, in every waking moment. Facebook envisions a future where you will always be engaging with some part of the Facebook ecosystem, whether it's on its mega social platform at Facebook, using it's search engine, messaging a business associate or communicating on video or via a virtual reality environment.

But first lets talk business.

"I often talk about how when we develop new products we think about it in three phases, said Zuckerberg. "First, building a consumer use case. Then, second, making it so that people can organically interact with businesses. And then third, on top of that, once there's a large volume of people interacting with businesses, give businesses tools to reach more people and pay. And that's ultimately the business opportunity."

During the earnings call yesterday, Mark Zuckerberg opened the curtain into Facebook's plans, strategies and dreams for the future. He first provided the latest metrics illustrating Facebook's continued success, 1.7 billion people now use Facebook every month, and 1.1 billion people use it every day. He said that Facebook revenue grew by 59% year-over year to $6.4 billion, and advertising revenue was up 63% to $6.2 billion.

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook said that Q2 ad revenue grew 63% and mobile ad revenue hit $5.2 billion, up 81% year-over-year, and was approximately 84% of total ad revenue. Facebook is now truly a mobile app rather than a desktop experience for the vast majority of its users.

Zuckerberg said that they continue to see excellent growth and over the past year Facebook has added over 200 million people using Facebook on a monthly basis. Time spent per person increased double digit percentages year-over-year across Facebook, Instagram and Messenger. And that doesn't even include WhatsApp yet.

Facebook is still growing rapidly and that's because it has continued to evolve. It's evolution has happened because of increased bandwidth, technological advancements, acquisitions of new platforms like WhatsApp and Instagram and most importantly continuing to be on the cutting edge of what people want in a social network. All of this while simultaneously building a successful business model that pays for this evolution.

What's really interesting however, is how Zuckerberg sees Facebook transforming in the future. "Our results show our progress as we work to make the world more open and connected across our three-, five- and ten-year horizons," he said. "Over the next three years we are focused on continuing to build our community and help people share more of what matters to them. The next five years are about building our newer products into full ecosystems with developers and businesses. And over the next ten years we are working to build new technologies to help everyone connect in new ways."

Facebook is seeking to be the world's business platform, not just the peoples. More on this below in the Search section on a Facebook future where it is competing with LinkedIn.

"We're excited to announce that we now have 60 million monthly active business Pages on Facebook," said Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg. "We also continue to grow the number of active advertisers on our platform. This shows that both our free and paid products are providing value to marketers of all sizes around the world. We continue to focus on our three priorities — capitalizing on the shift to mobile, growing the number of marketers using our ad products, and making our ads more relevant and effective."

Trust me, this is just the beginning of Facebook's morphing into both a personal and business platform in the future.

The Future of Facebook is Video

Facebook used to be mostly text and over the years they changed to be photo centric, with many people using Facebook as their family photo album. People still do that but Zuckerberg envisions a huge change coming. "We see a world that is video first, with video at the heart of all of our apps and services."

"Over the past six months we have been particularly focused on Live video. Live represents a new way to share what's happening in more immediate and creative ways," Zuckerberg said. "This quarter Candace Payne's Chewbacca mask video was viewed almost 160 million times. Live is also changing the way we see politics, as news organizations and delegates go Live from the Republican and Democratic conventions. And we have seen in Minnesota and Dallas how Live can shine a light on important moments as they happen."

At Fortune‘s Most Powerful Women International Summit in London, Nicola Mendelsohn, VP EMEA at Facebook, predicted that the Facebook newsfeed will be all video in 5 years. "It will definitely be mobile. It will probably be all video," Mendelsohn said. "I just think if we look, we already are seeing a year on year decline in text. We're seeing a massive increase as I've said on both pictures and video. So yeah, if I was having a bet, I would say video, video, video."

"When you think about what's happening on video on our platform we're really excited by the production and consumption of video and we're seeing the full range from people posting the things in their personal lives; the power of what a mobile phone can produce and distribute now is pretty incredible when you compare it to just a few years ago to some of the most sophisticated content producers in the world producing for us," added Sandberg.

Facebook Focuses on Search

Facebook is moving into the search space aggressively, definitely to help it compete with Twitter and perhaps even Google in the future. Facebook launched true keyword search in late 2014 that allows users to search not just profile names or just your friends posts, but also everyone's public posts. And, if you didn't know, all postings default at public, which means that anyone can search for your posts.

The first goal for Facebook with search is to become more like Twitter, where people post their thoughts, feelings and most importantly news reports, especially the on-the-scene kind. When the next plane lands in the Hudson, Facebook wants the survivor standing on the wing to use their platform to post about this breaking news, not Twitter. More precisely, Facebook wants you to use Facebook Live to stream your personalized live news coverage.

"We're making good progress on core services within the Facebook app, like Search," Zuckerberg stated. "A growing way people use search is to find what people are saying about a topic across the more than 2.5 trillion posts in our network. Now, people are doing more than 2 billion searches a day, between looking up people, businesses and other things that they care about. Continuous, steady improvement to services like search are an important part of helping people connect and realizing our mission."

He also said this in minimizing their true plans, in my opinion.

So I'd say we're around the second phase of that in search now. We have a pretty big navigational use case where people look up people and pages and groups that they want to get to and look at and search. One of the big growing use cases that we're investing a lot in is looking up the content in the ecosystem and that is an area that we're very excited about which helps people find more content.

But certainly there's a reasonable amount of behavior in there which is looking for things that over time could be monetizeable or commercial intense and at some point we will probably want to work on that but we're still in the phase of just making it easier for people to find all the content they want and connect with businesses organically.

But what's their next goal? Facebook has certainly focused on the business use of their platform as they continue to look for monetization opportunities. My guess is that Facebook will seek to compete with LinkedIn as the business platform of record.

Over the last few years LinkedIn has certainly moved from a glorified directory of business professionals to a platform for business related news, conversation and connection. Facebook has the platform but would need to figure out how to easily separate family life from business life, which could be done rather easily. With Microsoft buying LinkedIn, Facebook will be highly motivated to compete.

Next up for Facebook Search would be to compete with Google. Why... you ask? Because Google has a market cap of $520 billion, with the majority of that credited to its search business, whileFacebook has a market cap of $362 billion. More importantly, it's about revenue and profit. In 2015, Google had $75 billion in revenue and $16 billion in net income while Facebook had $17 billion in revenue and $3.6 billion in net income.

Google tried to compete with Facebook with Google+ and it failed miserably, but that's because it's harder to get people to change their social habits than it is their search habits. You don't need your friends to use Facebook Search in order for you to find it useful, but you definitely need your friends to move to a new social platform to make it work for you. That was Google's dilemma, but it won't be Facebook's.

"Since it refocused on keywords, Facebook is now seeing 2 billion searches per day of its 2.5 trillion posts," stated TechCrunch writer Josh Constine. "That’s compared to 1.5 billion searches per day in July 2015, and 1 billion in September 2012. That’s a 33% climb in just 9 months."

That's lets than half a reported 3.5 billion searches per day on Google. The difference is that Google's searches are monitizable, while Facebook searches, not so much. However, this must scare the heck out of Google because it shows how ingrained people are to use Facebook for search. Therefore, over time I predict that Facebook will add web indexing to it's search engine. They already have 3.5 billion searches, why not open up search to everything and in the process open up a huge monetization opportunity.

One other prediction, Facebook will disconnect its search app from just Facebook.com, just like they did Messenger. Then, voilà, Facebook is competing with Google.

Making Instagram Stronger

Instagram was purchased by Facebook for $1 billion while it was just getting off the ground. It is now center to its plans on connecting with everyone in the world on a constant always on basis. That's why Instagram is so important to Facebook, it has a foothold with younger people and its active user base is not a clone of Facebook's, so it expands the corporate Facebook's universe of connectivity and engagement.

"Over the next five years we are working hard to build ecosystems around some of our newer products," said Zuckerberg. "Instagram now has more than 500 million monthly actives, with more than 300 million daily. Now we’re working to make the experience more engaging."

He said that when Instagram, despite user pushback, began to rank its feed in order to improve the experience, that they are already seeing a "positive impact" with people spending more time and share more content within the platform.

As always, business is important to Zuckerberg as well. "We’ve also introduced our advertising tools on Instagram and we’re seeing marketers engage with people in creative and innovative ways."

Messaging with Messenger & WhatsApp

"In the two years since we separated Messenger from the main Facebook app -- which was a controversial decision at the time -- we've improved performance and given people new ways to express themselves," commented Zuckerberg. "Now, for the first time, more than 1 billion people are using Messenger every month."

Facebook sees a huge opportunity with messaging because it moves them closer to their goal of connecting everyone on a constant always on basis. That's why they paid $22 billion for WhatsApp, which is a service that barely had a business model.

"I’m also happy with the updates we're making to WhatsApp -- which also has a community of more than 1 billion people," said Zuckerberg. "This quarter we launched new desktop apps and end-to-end encryption, and millions of people are using WhatsApp's voice calling features."

Facebook has big plans for messaging because not only does it help them bring even more people into Facebook's universe, but it moves them into the business space, where Facebook desperately wants to be, because that's where the money is.

"The scale we’ve achieved with our messaging services makes it clear that they are more than just a way to chat with friends," Zuckerberg noted. "That’s why we’re also making it easier for people to connect with groups and businesses as well. We are going to keep focusing on this over the next several years."

Facebook owned messaging has now taken over standard text messaging according to Zuckerberg.

"Between Messenger and WhatsApp I think we're around 60 billion messages a day which is something like three times more than the peak of global SMS traffic."

It's incredible to think that Facebook now owns the messaging space. Who would have thought that 3 years ago?

New Technologies

"I’m also excited about the early progress we’re making on our 10-year initiatives," said Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg during their recent earnings announcement. "We are investing in new technologies to give more people a voice -- including the 4 billion people around the world who aren’t yet online -- and helping more people take advantage of the opportunities that come with the internet."

Facebook is seeking to connect everyone in the world, regardless of any obstacle. It's a long term plan, but Facebook is on it.

"One of the biggest opportunities to grow our community is in developing countries where connectivity is less advanced than what we take for granted here at home," Zuckerberg said. "So over the past couple of years, we’ve began making steady improvements to our apps to make them work regardless of the device or connection people are using. We also built a light-weight version of our Android app, called Facebook Lite, that is tuned to work on 2G networks and is now used by more than 100 million people."

Virtual reality is another huge area of investment for Facebook, especially with their $2 billion purchase of Oculus. They see VR as an extension of connecting and sharing. Know one really knows the future of VR, but it will be deeply engrained in advertising in the future and since all of Facebook's revenue comes from advertising, they need to be in this space.

"We believe that virtual reality can help people share richer experiences and help everyone understand what’s going on around the world," said Zuckerberg. "It’s really early for us in VR but we’re hitting some important milestones. As of the second quarter more than 1 million people a month are using Oculus on mobile phones through our Gear VR 4partnership with Samsung."

Zuckerberg also commented on the potential revenue importance of their investment in VR:

"More than 300 apps are already available at the Oculus store for Gear VR, we’ve filled all of our pre-orders for Oculus Rift and we are seeing increasing demand from retail as stores plan for the holidays. While it’s still early for augmented reality, we're doing AR research and are seeing lightweight versions of AR technology today in mobile apps like MSQRD."

Facebook is Just Getting Started

"So that’s a recap of the progress we’re making in our 10 year plan," said Zuckerberg. "We have a saying at Facebook that our journey is only 1% done -- and while I'm happy with our progress, we have a lot more work to do to grow our community and connect the whole world. That means making big investments and taking risks -- focusing not just on what Facebook is, but on what it can be."

http://www.webpronews.com/facebooks-future-video-search-messaging-vr-2016-07/

Categorized in Search Engine

Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) wants to be a popular place to search for mentions of current news, in order, to get more public chatter, which normally is done on Twitter, says a report from TechCrunch. The social networking site though stumbled with its natural language Graph Search, refocused on keywords and is now seeing 2bn searches per day of its 2.5 trillion posts. In comparison, it was 1bn in September 2012 and 1.5bn searches per day in July 2015 – a 33% jump in just 9 months.

Facebook Inc. (NASDAQ:FB)

Facebook wants to rule chatting space

On the recent earning’s call, the Chief Executive – Mark Zuckerberg – said, “The growing way that people use search is to find what people are saying about a topic across more that 2.5 trillion posts. Now people are doing more than 2 billion searches a day between looking up people, businesses, and other things they care about.”

What the co-founder did not say, but certainly indicated was that the social network thinks the people should talk about things on its site because their words will find new audiences thanks to its massive user base and powerful search engine, the report says. This chatting space is actually ruled by Twitter, but since launching public post search last year, Facebook Inc(NASDAQ:FB) has been attempting to dominate the space.

Through paid search ads, the social media giant could open up new monetization opportunities if it can keep generating more search queries. However, the CEO cautioned that it was not going to happen overnight.

How it plans to do it?

Initially, Facebook’s search engine primarily focused in assisting the user find people they had met in real life and add them as friends. Then in 2013, the social network touted its semantic Graph Search engine as the third pillar of its service alongside the profile and feed. The users were, however, confused by the complex search queries required.

Eventually, the tech giant retreated the Graph Search, and released the true keyword search in late 2014 to allow users find posts by them or their friends. Later, the firm expanded that to include all 2 trillion posts on the social media.

For Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB), it was a huge turning point because it pitted its search engine finally against Twitter. The main aim of the social network is to underline why people should talk more on its network. For this, the social media giant built a special sports chatter feature called Stadium, and also focused on Facebook Live for citizen journalism.

Zuckerberg, on being asked about monetizing commercial searches, did hint of keeping the search business model for later. Even though this announcement was about search, its Twitter who should be concerned not Google.

On Wednesday, Facebook shares closed up 1.75% at $123.34. Year to date, the stock is up over 16% while in the last one-year, it is up over 27%.

http://learnbonds.com/130381/facebook-battles-twitter/

Categorized in Others

Big changes are coming to Facebook Live. The social network will let broadcasts run for up to four hours – or even continuously in some cases. Plus, you can now hide reactions and comments, view livestreams in full-screen, and restrict who sees your broadcast.

Here’s a quick roundup of all the changes coming to Facebook Live that marketers need to know.

1. 4 Hour Live Streams

Since Facebook Live launched, livestreams have been limited to 90 minutes. Now Facebook is more than doubling that.

Yes, broadcasters are now restricted to a mere four hours for users when broadcasting via the Facebook app or using the Live API.

2. Hide Reactions & Comments

Don’t want to see comments and reactions while you’re broadcasting or watching? Facebook will now let you hide both in a video-only mode.

All you have to do is swipe right to hide comments and reactions. Swipe left to bring them back.

In theory, this will help reduce distractions and help keep viewers focused on the broadcast.

3. Full-Screen Live

One significant change that is more geared toward viewers than broadcasters is that viewers can now watch broadcasts in full-screen mode, rather than as a square we’ve become used to over the past several months.

Although Android users will have to wait for full-screen mode until summer, iOS users can enjoy this new feature right away. Full-screen will work with both landscape and portrait viewing when fully rolled out.

4. Continuous Live

Want to go live indefinitely on Facebook? Now you can.

Continuous live video was actually added a couple months ago, but this one slipped under the radar of many marketers. “Some great use cases for continuous live include live feeds of aquariums, museums, and zoos,” according to Facebook.

The catch with continuous live? Your followers won’t receive a notification that you’re live. Also, once you end broadcasting, it’s gone forever. Your followers have to literally watch it when it’s live – there’s no rewinding or reliving it.

5. Geogating

Want only men to watch your livestream? Or people who are located in certain places?

New audience restrictions, what Facebook calls “geogating,” were added to the Live API at the same time as continuous streaming. Now you can target or exclude people by:

Location – country, state, city, or ZIP code.
Age – you can specify a minimum and maximum age.
Gender

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/facebook-live-update/169111/

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