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WHY YOU SHOULD CARE Because companies will soon be able to recognize your face.

As you may already be aware, we know a lot about you. Yes, you! We know whether you clicked here from Facebook or if you came via our home page. We will know how long you spend reading this article and what you click to read next. That information enables us to figure out what interests you, which may affect what shows up next time you visit our site. If OZY were as big a part of your life as Facebook or Google is — if not yet, then soon! — we would know so much about you that we could show you advertisements targeted to your every interest.

But what if we could recognize your face? If so, we might adjust our messages to you depending on whether you look happy or sad, distracted or engaged. We’d adjust if you were looking to the left of the screen, or to the right. We’re not watching you read us, at least not yet, but the capability might not be too far away.

Indeed, facial recognition technology is almost ready for the mainstream. “Computer vision” is “moving very fast” toward the creation of browsers of the visual world, says Ambarish Mitra, co-founder and CEO of Blippar, an app that scans and recognizes images and faces and then shows you search and social-network results on your screen, combining two of the tech world’s current favorite functionalities — machine learning and augmented reality (AR). The dream, so it seems, is to become like a real-time, image-based search engine, a face-based social network and Pokémon Go, all rolled into one. Blippar is not the only “facial network” out there. The Russian website FindFace generated controversy last year when its search-by-faces function was used to reveal the identities of porn actresses. And just as a website to connect college students created by a fresh-faced Mark Zuckerberg in his dorm room eventually revolutionized the news media and advertising industries, these technologies could change how companies market products — and a whole lot more — in untold ways.

“We’re producing a paradigm shift in thinking in marketing and advertising,” says Mitra. His superlatives aren’t entirely unjustified: The Blippar logo has appeared on 12 billion products in the past four years through the company’s marketing partnerships with more than 1,500 brands, including Heinz, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch. These “Blippable” products can be scanned in Blippar’s smartphone app, but rather than just linking to a webpage the way QR codes do, the phone displays interactive AR marketing features. “And why should I need to recognize an ugly square,” Mitra asks, referring to QR codes, “when I can recognize something on its own?”

WHAT [APPLE’S] SIRI IS TRYING TO BE FOR THE AUDIO WORLD, BLIPPAR IS TRYING TO BE FOR THE VISUAL WORLD.

Imagine scanning the face of a billboard model to see an AR version of you wearing the same necklace, or scanning the car in front of you through your screen to get information on where you can buy the same model at local dealerships. (If this sounds like something from Netflix’s dystopian satire Black Mirror, it is — check out the first episode of the third season.) And what about a future where you walk into a store that recognizes your face and then offers you bespoke deals based on the shopping habits you revealed during your previous visit? That’s possible, says Dr. Gary Wilcox, a leading expert on social media and advertising. Indeed, it’s only an extension of existing geolocated marketing techniques that ping deals to your phone when you’re near a certain brand’s store — or its competitor’s.

“There’s a history of advertising staying pretty close to technological developments,” says Wilcox. But as technologies have evolved from print to radio to TV to the internet, marketers have largely relied on trial and error to find the techniques that work best, so “some of these early ideas” for virtual and augmented reality ads “are kinda silly,” he says. For Mitra, one medium remains to be conquered — the visual world: “What a lot of CMOs do not understand is that the biggest [form of] media in the world is actually products themselves. … We will reach a stage where if someone is curious about something, that’s the exact point [where] advertisers will put a very contextual message.”

Somewhat ironically, the personalization of technology that enables marketers to know everything about you essentially brings us back to the pretechnology era of personalized commerce when you were friends with the local store manager, says Harikesh Nair, a professor of marketing at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. If you’re a little freaked out by the idea of companies recognizing your face, “the market will determine” how much of this intrusion society will accept, says Nair — humans will probably never be comfortable having medical, family or financial details digitally attached to their faces as they walk down the street, he thinks. But as far as he’s concerned, if it makes it easier for him to find a suit he likes, it’s all good. “I think we as a society have already implicitly accepted that trade-off,” he says.

To be sure, Blippar isn’t the new Facebook or Google — at least not yet. “You would have to have a [new piece of] hardware that aids these sorts of applications,” says Dokyun Lee, a professor of business analytics at Carnegie Mellon University, insisting that people aren’t going to walk around viewing the entire world through smartphone cameras all the time. Facial-recognition software was banned from Google Glass because it was considered too creepy, and even then the product never made it to market. The future would certainly be more awkward than most sci-fi films suggest if we have to view everything — and everyone’s faces — through our phone screens.

But for the Blippar CEO, the Pokémon Go mania wasn’t some alienating dystopia; it was the start of an enlightened future. “Mark my words,” says Mitra, “computer vision and AR will go mainstream well before head-mounted devices take off, and it’s gonna happen through phones.” Just be sure to watch where you’re going when some irritating ad pops into your AR universe.

This article was  published in ozy.com by James Watkins

Categorized in Others

FACEBOOK FREEBIES: Social network is looking at ways to bring free internet to disaster zones

FACEBOOK has announced plans to bring free internet to the masses with this new Wi-Fi-supplying helicopter.

Facebook’s desire to bring internet, and its social network, to the world has just been taken up a notch.

Having already started trialling its high-flying internet drones that will bring wireless internet access to the developing world, the internet giant is now working on specialist internet supplying helicopters. 

The autonomous machines are for use closer to home, however, and will one day take to the skies above urban settings.

The small helicopters, known as Tether-tenna, will deliver free internet to areas where natural disasters have wiped out the existing infrastructure.

For them to function, some remaining fibre line functionality will still be needed, however, with the helicopter being tethered to a fibre line, creating a replacement internet tower of sorts.

“One of Facebook's goals is to not only connect communities, but to connect them when they need it most,” Facebook’s Yael Maguire wrote in an official blog post.

He added: “When completed, this technology will be able to be deployed immediately and operate for months at a time to bring back connectivity in case of an emergency - ensuring the local community can stay connected while the in-ground connectivity is under repair.”

The tethered helicopters will fly “a few hundred feet from the ground” and transmit a wireless signal to a broader area.

“When completed, this technology will be able to be deployed immediately and operate for months at a time to bring back connectivity in case of an emergency,” Maguire explained.

Despite making the announcement to coincide with its ongoing F8 developer conference, Facebook has warned that its internet bringing helicopters won’t be taking to skies above cities anytime soon.

“This is still in the early stages of development and lots of work is needed to ensure that it will be able operate autonomously for months at a time, but we're excited about the progress so far,” Maguire stated.

Facebook’s internet drones have been taken on their maiden test flights in recent months and will be flown above developing nations in the not too distant future.

Facebook introduce Facebook Stories

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Despite already having well over 1 billion users, Facebook believes that by bringing internet access to billions of new people, it can rapidly expand its active monthly user base.

It’s internet-supplying helicopters are just one way it is looking to do this.

Elsewhere, the social giant has updated a number of its services in recent weeks, with the core Facebook app echoing rival Snapchat by adding Facebook Stories.

These let you upload short picture and video clips that expire at the end of every day and are visible to all of your friends.

A knock-on affect of this new feature is that you can now .

This article was published in dailystar.co.uk by Luke Johnson

Categorized in Social

At this week's Facebook F8 conference in San Jose, Mark Zuckerberg doubled down on his crazy ambitious 10-year plan for the company, first revealed in April 2016.

Here's the current version of that roadmap, revealed by Zuckerberg this week: 

(Screenshot/Facebook) 
Basically, Zuckerberg's uses this roadmap to demonstrate Facebook's three-stage game plan in action: First, you take the time to develop a neat cutting-edge technology. Then you build a product based on it. Then you turn it into an ecosystem where developers and outside companies can use that technology to build their own businesses.

When Zuckerberg first announced this plan last year, it was big on vision, but short on specifics.

On Facebook's planet of 2026, the entire world has internet access — with many people likely getting it through Internet.org, Facebook's connectivity arm. Zuckerberg reiterated this week that the company is working on smart glasses that look like your normal everyday Warby Parkers. And underpinning all of this, Facebook is promising artificial intelligence good enough that we can talk to computers as easily as chatting with humans.

A world without screens

For science-fiction lovers, the world Facebook is starting to build is very cool and insanely ambitious. Instead of smartphones, tablets, TVs, or anything else with a screen, all our computing is projected straight into our eyes as we type with our brains.

A mixed-reality world is exciting for society and for Facebook shareholders. But it also opens the door to some crazy future scenarios, where Facebook, or some other tech company, intermediates everything you see, hear, and, maybe even, think. And as we ponder the implications of that kind of future, consider how fast we've already progressed on Zuckerberg's timeline.

facebook mark zuckerberg smart glasses
(Mark Zuckerberg promises that, oneGetty) 

We're now one year closer to Facebook's vision for 2026. And things are slowly, but surely, starting to come together, as the social network's plans for virtual and augmented reality, universal internet connectivity, and artificial intelligence start to slowly move from fantasy into reality.

In fact, Michael Abrash, the chief scientist of Facebook-owned Oculus Research, said this week that we could be just 5 years away from a point where augmented reality glasses become good enough to go mainstream. And Facebook is now developing technology that lets you "type" with your brain, meaning you'd type, point, and click by literally thinking at your smart glasses. Facebook is giving us a glimpse of this with the Camera Effects platform, making your phone into an AR device.

Fries with that?

The potential here is tremendous. Remember that Facebook's mission is all about sharing, and this kind of virtual, ubiquitous "teleportation" and interaction is an immensely powerful means to that end.

This week, Oculus unveiled "Facebook Spaces," a "social VR" app that lets denizens of virtual reality hang out with each other, even if some people are in the real world and some people have a headset strapped on. It's slightly creepy, but it's a sign of the way that Facebook sees you and your friends spending time together in the future. (Facebook Spaces, which lets you hang out with your friends virtually.Facebook) 

Facebook Spaces
And if you're wearing those glasses, there's no guarantee that the person who's taking your McDonald's order is a human, after all. Imagine a virtual avatar sitting at the cash register, projected straight into your eyeballs, and taking your order. With Facebook announcing its plans to revamp its Messenger platform with AI features that also make it more business-friendly, the virtual fast-food cashier is not such a far-fetched scenario.
 
 
Sure, Facebook Messenger chatbots have struggled to gain widespread acceptance since they were introduced a year ago. But as demonstrated with Microsoft's Xiaoice and even the Tay disaster, we're inching towards more human-like systems that you can just talk to. And if Facebook's crazy plan to let you "hear" with your skin plays out, they can talk to you while you're wearing those glasses. And again, you'll be able to reply with just a thought.
 
Regina Dugan F8
(Regina Dugan unveiled Facebook's mind reading ambitions on Wednesday.Facebook)
 
If we're all living in this kind of semi-virtual world, it makes Facebook key to every interaction, and crucially, every financial transaction we conduct in that sphere. It could make the company a lot of money, certainly.
 
 
So yes, while it's still at least a decade off, this is all happening, little bit by little bit. But with Facebook facing fresh questions every day for its role in our personal lives and our political elections, it's also important to remember that much of this gives the social network — as well as companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft which all pursuing the same ends — unprecedented control over our conceptions of reality. It's time to ask these questions now, and not later.
 
This article was published in  finance.yahoo.com by Matt Weinberger
Categorized in Others

Facebook is responding to the challenge from Snap in the classic way that tech companies try to face new competitors — by duplicating every core feature that made Snap popular, and then trying to crush it with distribution and marketing.

According to a story published Tuesday in The Information (subscription required), Facebook created a "Teens Team" to figure out how to grab teenagers back from Snapchat, and has been up front about its tactics within the company: The internal mantra among some groups is "don't be too proud to copy."

Unfortunately for Facebook, the track record for this strategy is poor.

Flash back to the early 2000s, when Microsoft was the undisputed king of the tech industry, with two unassailable monopolies — operating systems and productivity apps for personal computers.

It faced a lot of competitors, but the one that scared it the most was Google, which was in a completely different business.

Google didn't start by creating alternatives to Windows and Office, although it did so later. Instead, it created a suite of online services — first search, followed by email and maps — that threatened the entire purpose of a personal computer. Why rely on Microsoft software running locally when you could get so much done with web apps?

Microsoft's response? Trying to build the exact same service that made Google famous — a search engine, first known as MSN Search, later rebranded to Bing.

Eleven years later, Bing is a small minority player in search, with less than 10 percent market share on the desktop and less than 1 percent in mobile, according to NetMarketShare. Google dominates with almost 80 percent share on the desktop and well over 90 percent in mobile. "Google" has become a verb. Nobody "Bings" anything.

Bolstered by the massive margins in search advertising, Google has moved farther and farther into Microsoft's core territory, adding a massively successful mobile operating system (Android), web browser (Chrome), online productivity apps (Google for Work) and an increasingly robust cloud computing business. It also surpassed Microsoft in market cap for the first time in 2012 and remains ahead today.

Google faced its own Bing moment in 2011,

 when it faced a challenge from then-upstart Facebook. The social network didn't threaten Google by building a better search engine. It did so by creating an entirely different online service, based around social networking and real identities, that drew people's attention away from search and other Google properties. As people spent more and more time on Facebook, advertisers followed.

Google's response? To launch a competing social network based on real identities called Google+. It was just as successful as Bing — which is to say, not successful at all.

Facebook may still win. After all, Microsoft used this playbook very effectively in the 1990s to eliminate the threat posed by Netscape Navigator — it built a better browser, then shipped it with Windows. It dominated web browsing for almost a decade (until Google came along with Chrome and Apple's iPhone introduced the concept of effective mobile web browsing).

But Microsoft in the 1990s had an effective monopoly on personal computing platforms with Windows. If you wanted to go online, you had to go out of your way not to use Windows. The same is not true for Facebook — there are many ways to communicate and share information in real time with friends, including text messaging platforms like SMS and Apple's iMessage, and competing social networks like Twitter and — yes — Snapchat.

Facebook will have to do more to regain teens' attention than simply duplicating every feature that made Snapchat popular.

Source : cnbc.com

Categorized in Search Engine

It’s fair to say that social media has taken over the internet in the last decade. For most people, the bulk of their internet usage involves Facebook. With the ability to simply plug in and view the timelines of all of your friends’ lives, it’s not hard to see why it is so addictive.

Whether sites like Facebook are ultimately a good or bad thing for society is up for debate, but one thing can be said for certain: There is money to be made there. If you have products or services to sell, it is best to make sure that your brand is visible in areas where your audience is present.

There are many ways to make money with Facebook. Let’s take a look at a few of the easier ways to get started:

The group post + Email opt-in method

One of the most basic methods of making money on Facebook is a twist on the whole “landing page” method of internet marketing. You can create a simple landing page that provides a valuable offer. For example, let’s say you’re in the pets niche, so you offer to send people a free book on how to groom their cat in exchange for their signing up for your email list. While the original offer is free, this increases the likelihood that your prospects will be willing to buy your products or services.

Next, make a Facebook profile (or use your existing one). Join all of the category-related groups that you can find on Facebook and post your landing page on there, telling people that they can get something free for signing up. Obviously, you must do this in a way that isn’t spammy, otherwise, your efforts will backfire.

Once th"]ey sign up, you can send them niche-related affiliate offers periodically and make money from that. If you already have your product or service, you can promote that. You can also alternatively just post your affiliate link to relevant products in the groups, but this is more likely to get you banned.

Networking: The slow method

If you already have a business going, you can make more money by simply networking on Facebook. This is a “slow and steady” approach that can provide significant results over time. The key is to focus on having conversations with potential customers that don’t focus on selling.

Use your platform to position yourself as a resource. Answer common questions that your customers have. Use your expertise to provide value. When you position yourself effectively, people will feel more comfortable with spending their money with your business.

For example, if you own a company that builds fancy custom bicycles, you might join cycling-related groups. Give useful information and answer people’s questions. Once you have built a good reputation, then casually mention that you make custom bicycles. If people ask about a certain kind of bike, mention that you make them and give a bit of information.

Before you know it, people will be coming to you when they need your product or service.

Note: Facebook isn't the only way to network. Every business needs a website, and it doesn't take much to get online. Wix offers hundreds of gorgeous templates to choose from. 

Use paid ads to boost your business

If you have some capital, then buying paid ads or boosting your promotional posts on your business Facebook page can go a long way. This is an art in and of itself, but with enough experimentation, you can get tons of sales or opt-ins if your ads are targeted enough.

Making money on Facebook requires some creativity and some patience when learning the ropes, but it can pay off big in the long run since you will have a huge audience.

Source : komando.com

Categorized in How to
WHY IT MATTERS TO YOU

Spaces sheds light on Facebook's vision of the future of social media, which involves interacting with your friends in a virtual environment.

Facebook unveiled its new Spaces virtual reality platform at the F8 conference in San Jose, California, on Tuesday. The project aims to take the social experience one step further, providing Facebook users with virtual environments where they can interact with their friends.

Inside Spaces, users are represented by an avatar, which can be customized. You can even choose a photograph of yourself that you like, and Facebook will pick an option that resembles you.

The experience is built around interacting with up to three friends, but there’s more to do than simply talk to one another and gawp at each other’s avatars. Users will be able to share 360-degree video content, draw with virtual markers, and, inevitably, take selfies.

Facebook users who haven’t invested in a VR headset aren’t going to be left out of Spaces entirely. You can receive a standard video call from a group of users taking part in a Spaces session, and get a window into their virtual world, avatars and all.

Spaces demonstrates why Facebook purchased Oculus for $2 billion in 2014. While much of the VR content that’s hit the scene has been akin to traditional video games, it’s clear that the social media giant sees the technology’s potential to underpin a different kind of social media.

What’s unclear is whether users will latch onto what Spaces has to offer. The footage shown at the event made it look like an amusing diversion — but not the kind of thing that warrants spending upwards of $1,000 on a compatible headset and a sufficiently powerful PC.

Anyone with an Oculus Rift headset and an Oculus Touch controller can now try out the experience. The beta version of the app is available now from the Oculus Store for free. More information, including recommended specs, is available via the Oculus website.

Source : digitaltrends.com

Categorized in Social

 

YouTube might be getting a lot more social and conversational in the near future.

TechCrunch reports the Google-owned video platform is currently testing a new in-app messaging feature on iOS and Android that will allow users to exchange clips, texts and links without ever having to leave the app.

But there’s one catch: The functionality is solely available in Canada for the time being. Google product manager Shimrit Ben Yair told Canada’s Financial Post the decision to run trials on Canadian soil has to do with the fact that it’s the country that shares videos more than anyone else in the world.

The messaging platform is pretty straightforward and has no specific video-centric features. Still, the move towards in-app messaging could have much larger implications for the future of YouTube.

A few months back, Google toyed around with the idea of giving certain channels the option to send direct messages to their audience. It also briefly tested with in-app messaging last year in May.

As our own Justin Pot remarked back then, the move was likely aimed at encouraging creators and fans to interact more on YouTube itself, rather than resorting to other platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Reddit.

While it’s unclear whether Google has any plans to roll out the feature to all users in the future, the experiment is a strong indication that the company hasn’t quite given up on turning YouTube into more of a social network.

In case you want to sneak a peek at YouTube’s new messaging feature, get one of your Canadian friends to add you to a conversation – that should give you an early preview.

Check out the video below to get a better idea of how the messaging platform looks like.

{youtube}feBF_IY-HI8{/youtube}

Source : thenextweb.com

 

Categorized in Social

(Natural News) Mark Zuckerberg and his team of social engineers are hoping to push the Facebook platform one step closer to singularity by developing new ways to invade the human mind in order to spy on people’s thoughts. According to reports, the social media giant is tasking a team of neuroscientists with developing a so-called “brain-computer interface” that will supposedly allow users to talk to each other telepathically, while also allowing Facebook to intercept this flow of communication for around-the-clock monitoring.

Known conspicuously as the “Building 8,” or B8, team, the crew working on the project is using advanced neuroscience and electrical engineering to build a platform whereby it will one day be possible for Facebook to use artificial intelligence to map the thoughts and movements of users’ brain in order to exploit them. The technology will have the ability to “capture a thought,” to quote the words of Zuckerberg, who explained how it will all work at a question and answer session he attended back in 2016.

In essence, the technology will give Facebook the ability to enter the human brain and extrapolate whatever is going on there, taking this information “in its ideal and perfect form in your head and shar[ing] that with the world,” Zuckerberg says. “The B8 team will apply DARPA-style breakthrough development at the intersection of ambitious science and product development,” reads a jobs announcement posted by Facebook about what the new project will entail. “It will operate on aggressive, fixed timelines, with extensive use of partnerships in universities, small and large businesses.”

Using Facebook contributes to the enslavement of humanity by machines

In an attempt to merge humans with machines, this latest Facebook endeavor is an absolute privacy and security nightmare that threatens to allow near-unlimited access into the human brain by advanced computer systems. Much like how Amazon’s “Alexa” can listen to speech and follow commands, Facebook’s B8 project will be able to listen to and track a person’s thoughts.

An alarming ramification of such a prospect is the idea that Facebook, potentially working in lockstep with government spying programs like those at the National Security Agency (NSA), might gain access to the private thoughts of individuals who would rather keep such information to themselves. Facebook’s attempts to create a more “realistic and immersive” experience with its products could end up creating a thought prison of epic proportions. 

Whether such technology ever comes to fruition remains to be seen, but this certainly wouldn’t be the first time that Facebook as pushed the limits of spying and control — nor is it the first time that emerging Facebook technology has had such nefarious underpinnings.

Facebook officials claim that users who are to become targets of active government monitoring or surveillance will be notified in advance, suggesting that anyone who has not received such a notice likely has nothing to worry about in terms of spying. But a statement released by Facebook’s security chief Alex Stamos about the company’s policy on this infers that only government “attacks” will be subject to such notification, and what exactly constitutes an attack?

“While we have always taken steps to secure accounts that we believe to have been compromised, we decided to show this additional warning if we have a strong suspicion that an attack could be government-sponsored,” Stamos says. “We do this because these types of attacks tend to be more advanced and dangerous than others, and we strongly encourage affected people to take the actions necessary to secure all of their online accounts.”

Stay informed on the abuse of technology to enslave humanity at GLITCH.news.

Sources:

Source : naturalnews.com

Categorized in Science & Tech

Two billion photos find their way onto Facebook’s family of apps every single day and the company is racing to understand them and their moving counterparts with the hope of increasing engagement. And while machine learning is undoubtedly the map to the treasure, Facebook and its competitors are still trying to work out how to deal with the spoils once they find them.

Facebook AI Similarity Search (FAISS), released as an open-source library last month, began as an internal research project to address bottlenecks slowing the process of identifying similar content once a user’s preferences are understood. Under the leadership of Yann LeCun, Facebook’s AI Research (FAIR) lab is making it possible for everyone to more quickly relate needles within a haystack.

On its own, training a machine learning model is already an incredibly intensive computational process. But a funny thing happens when machine learning models comb over videos, pictures and text — new information gets created! FAISS is able to efficiently search across billions of dimensions of data to identify similar content.

In an interview with TechCrunch, Jeff Johnson, one of the three FAIR researchers working on the project, emphasized that FAISS isn’t so much a fundamental AI advancement as it is a fundamental AI-enabling technique.

Imagine you wanted to perform object recognition on a public video that a user shared to understand its contents so you could serve up a relevant ad. First you’d have to train and run that algorithm on the video, coming up with a bunch of new data.

From that, let’s say you discover that your target user is a big fan of trucks, the outdoors and adventure. This is helpful, but it’s still hard to say what advertisement you should display — a rugged tent? An ATV? A Ford F-150?

To figure this out, you would want to create a vector representation of the video you analyzed and compare it to your corpus of advertisements with the intent of finding the most similar video. This process would require a similarity search, whereby vectors are compared in multi-dimensional space.

In this representation of a similarity search, the blue vector is the query. The distance between the “arrows” reflects their relative similarity.

In real life, the property of being an adventurous outdoorsy fan of trucks could constitute hundreds or even thousands of dimensions of information. Multiply this by the number of different videos you’re searching across and you can see why the library you implement for similarity search is important.

“At Facebook we have massive amounts of computing power and data and the question is how we can best take advantage of that by combining old and new techniques,” posited Johnson.

Facebook reports that implementing k-nearest neighbor across GPUs resulted in an 8.5x improvement in processing time. Within the previously explained vector space, nearest neighbor algorithms let us identify the most closely related vectors.

More efficient similarity search opens up possibilities for recommendation engines and personal assistants alike. Facebook M, its own intelligent assistant, relies on having humans in the loop to assist users. Facebook considers “M” to be a test bed to experiment with the relationship between humans and AI. LeCun noted that there are a number of domains within M where FAISS could be useful.

“An intelligent virtual assistant looking for an answer would need to look through a very long list,” LeCun explained to me. “Finding nearest neighbors is a very important functionality.”

Improved similarity search could support memory networks to help keep track of context and basic factual knowledge, LeCun continued. Short-term memory contrasts with learned skills like finding the optimal solution to a puzzle. In the future, a machine might be able to watch a video or read a story and then answer critical follow-up questions about it.

More broadly, FAISS could support more dynamic content on the platform. LeCun noted that news and memes change every day and better methods of searching content could drive better user experiences.

Two billion new photos a day presents Facebook with a billion and a half opportunities to better understand its users. Each and every fleeting chance at boosting engagement is dependent on being able to quickly and accurately sift through content and that means more than just tethering GPUs.

Source : techcrunch.com

Categorized in Social

SAN FRANCISCO — When Steve Wozniak co-founded Apple with Steve Jobs in 1976, the two Steves assumed it would last forever.

Woz still believes that's true. In fact, he's convinced Apple, Google and Facebook will be bigger in 2075, the theme of next weekend's Silicon Valley Comic Con (SVCC), “The Future of Humanity: Where Will We Be in 2075?”

The three-day conference, which Wozniak helped create last year, explores the intersection of pop culture and technology. This year's guests includes the 30th anniversary cast reunion of Star Trek: The Next Generation, actors William Shatner and John Cusack, former astronaut Buzz Aldrin and renowned architect Greg Lynn.

SVCC is expected to draw 75,000 to 100,000 from April 21-23 to downtown San Jose. In addition to a start-up village and space exploration zone, its exhibit floor showcases entertainment companies, comic book vendors, and technology exhibits for virtual reality, robotics and smart devices. Panels and film presentations will weigh in on flying cars, aliens, Mars, the implantation of computers into brains and other space-age stuff, show organizers say.

Wozniak is no stranger to predictions. In 1982, he said portable laptops would emerge. And he has strong opinions on how we'll live in 58 years.

"Apple will be around a long time, like IBM (which was founded in 1911)," Wozniak said in an interview on Friday. "Look at Apple's cash ($246.1 billion, as of the end of its last fiscal quarter). It can invest in anything. It would be ridiculous to not expect them to be around (in 2075). The same goes for Google and Facebook."

Woz shared some other predictions on what type of planet we can expect in 2075:

— New cities. Deserts could be ideal locations for cities of the future, designed and built from scratch, according to Wozniak. There, housing problems will not exist and people will shuttle among domed structures. Special wearable suits will allow people to venture outside, he said.

— The influence of artificial intelligence. Within all cities, AI will be ubiquitous, Wozniak says. Like a scene straight from the movie Minority Report, consumers will interact with smart walls and other surfaces to shop, communicate and be entertained. Medical devices will enable self-diagnosis and doctor-free prescriptions, he says. "The question will be ethical, on whether we can eliminate the need for physicians," he says.

Mars covered in clouds viewed by the Hubble Space Telescope,Mars covered in clouds viewed by the Hubble Space Telescope, May 2016. (Photo: NASA / HUBBLE / HANDOUT, EPA)
 — Mars colony. Woz is convinced a colony will exist on the Red Planet. Echoing the sentiments of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, whose Blue Origin start-up has designs on traveling to Mars, Wozniak envisions Earth zoned for residential use and Mars for heavy industry.

— Extraterrestrials. With apologies to those who believe in aliens, Wozniak says there is a "random chance" that Earthlings will communicate with another race. "It's worth trying," he says, "but I don't have high hopes."

The trick with predicting the future, Wozniak readily acknowledges, is that it changes so quickly. "Who could have foreseen the rise of an Uber a decade ago?' he says, before pausing.

"She has more power in her hand than Superman," Wozniak, broadly smiling, says, pointing at a colleague's iPhone. "To make such strides in computing... It shows you how exciting the future can be."

Source : usatoday.com

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