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San Francisco, Google took action on nearly 90,000 user reports of spam in its Search in 2017 and has now asked more users to come forward and help the tech giant spot and squash spam.

According to Juan Felipe Rincon, Global Search Outreach Lead at Google, the automated Artificial Intelligence (AI)-based systems are constantly working to detect and block spam.

"Still, we always welcome hearing from you when something seems phishy. Reporting spam, malware, and other issues you find help us protect the site owner and other searchers from this abuse," Rincon said in a blog post.

"You can file a spam report, a phishing report or a malware report. You can also alert us to any issue with Google search by clicking on the 'Send feedback' link at the bottom of the search results page," he added.



Last year, Google sent over 45 million notifications to registered website owners, alerting them to possible problems with their websites which could affect their appearance in a search.

"Just as Gmail fights email spam and keeps it out of your inbox, our search spam fighting systems work to keep your search results clean," Rincon said.

In 2017, Google conducted over 250 webmaster meetups and office hours around the world reaching more than 220,000 website owners.

"Last year, we sent 6 million manual action messages to webmasters about practices we identified that were against our guidelines, along with information on how to resolve the issue," the Google executive said.

With AI-based systems, Google was able to detect and remove more than 80 percent of compromised sites from search results last year.

"We're also working closely with many providers of popular content management systems like WordPress and Joomla to help them fight spammers that abuse forums and comment sections," the blog post said.

Source: This article was published cio.economictimes.indiatimes.com

Published in Search Engine

Written By Rachel Summers

The Email was intended to make communication quicker and easier but sometimes it’s more of a hindrance than a help. We now spend too long at work checking emails, trying to find old emails, searching through relevant chains for the information you need or trying to delete old mail. It seems emails are put as a priority above too many other business activities.

Remember email is a tool to help not a priority. Here are ten tips to improve email management.

  1. Process Once a Day
  • In some businesses, you have to check email several times a day just to stay in the loop but you should only process them once a day. Try marking your calendar and setting your availability to busy to prevent interruptions.
  • Set aside a dedicate time in your daily life to process your emails. Prioritise the most important ones and then let the others go. Make a system that works for you, making sure you still acknowledge time-sensitive emails. Don’t let your email account run your life.
  1. Prioritize
  • The 80/20 rule is a great way of dealing with emails. “The 80/20 rule is the idea that twenty percent of inputs are responsible for eighty percent of outputs, meaning you should prioritize the twenty percent high-value emails which will lead to maximum output,” advises leading email marketing manager Angela Bradley, from the Australian Reviewer.
  • These prioritized emails should be replied to immediately, if not at least get back in less than three days. For the other eighty percent, you can allow yourself to take more time to reply if you do feel the need to engage with them.
  1. You Don’t Have to Reply to Everything
  • Don’t feel obliged to reply to every email, no reply can often say as much as writing out an email. If you spend your day replying to emails just to acknowledge you’ve received them it will take you away from the things that actually need doing. Only reply if the cost of replying doesn’t outweigh the benefits then it’s not worth worrying about. Especially when so many emails are sent out to more people than necessary or are impulsive and often not relevant to your work.
  • For those, you feel obliged to respond to create a folder for the lesser important emails that require responses. Set aside a day once every three days in a week to respond to these emails, it will take away the pressure to reply immediately and quell the fear of ignoring someone.
  1. You Don’t Have to Answer Everything Urgent
  • This may sound a little counterintuitive, but a lot of seemingly urgent emails resolve themselves without your assistance. Any urgent email about something going missing or not being able to get hold of a person are often resolved by themselves, wait an hour and see if you get a follow-up email. The follow-up email will declare if the situation has escalated or has been resolved.

  • This method also trains people to be more self-reliant and to have realistic expectations about how connected their colleagues can be to their inbox. This idea does require some common sense depending on which industry you work in, if you work in customer service and deal first hand with customers this will work differently.
  1. Use a Template
  • There is probably a trend to the things you respond to. Use a template if you find you are repeating yourself on a daily basis. Customize the template to fit the needs of the email and it could save you vital work hours.
  1. File into Categories
  • Folders, or labels for the gmail user, can be a great way to organize your mailbox. Use a relevant name system that works for you and sort them into a hierarchical structure. Remember just because you have folders and subfolders you don’t have to keep everything, don’t be afraid to delete messages you won’t ever need to look at again.
  • Prioritize, group, sort and file messages, this will make it easier to locate a specific email in the future. Create parent categories for broad subjects and then use subcategories related to more specific topics like a client or a work colleague’s correspondence.
  • Make sure you use obvious email subjects and put keywords in emails so they will be easy to relocate at a later date. Get help writing the best email subjects with UK Top Writers and Via Writing.
  1. Be Ruthless in unsubscribing
  • We’ve all been guilty in signing up to newsletters in the hope of getting a discount code, but these impulsive sign-ups can quickly clog up an inbox. If you find yourself repeatedly deleting this type of mail from your inbox it means you should probably unsubscribe immediately.
  • To quicken the unsubscribing process search your inbox for the term “Unsubscribe” and determine whose emails you continue to want and those you find useless.
  1. Send Less Emails
  • It may sound simple, but a golden rule of email management is if you send less you receive less. The less people you send the email to the less response you’re likely to get, so when you go to send that email think about who really needs to see this information.
  • If you want to send an email but do not really want a response use declarations not open ended questions. Questions will generate more emails, which will require you to give more attention to your inbox.
  1. Take It Offline
  • Email can be as destructive as it can be productive. Sometimes nuanced and often sensitive subjects can create inbox arguments. Words can easily be misconstrued and tone mistaken, and the outcome can be combustible. If you find yourself in an antagonistic discussion stop, take it offline. Pick up a phone or have a face-to-face interaction, it is likely to douse the flames before they become too heated. An aggressive chain email will not help any situation and will seriously damage work productivity.
  • Only write an email if it’s necessary and avoid using anything personal that could initiate conflict. If you are concerned your emails could be misunderstood use a writing service like Revieweal.
  1. Use Autoreply
  • The out of office message can have lots of alternative uses. Set it up to inform people you are minimalizing your email time, but put an emergency number or your assistant’s contact details for the sender to refer to. If you are receiving a high level of emails about one subject, maybe the time of a meeting or a certain piece of data, if it’s not highly confidential add this to an out of office message.
  • Like any regimes, there is no overnight results but the most critical step is sticking it for the long run. The keys tips to remember is not to let your inbox control you and to regular housekeeping to avoid being overwhelmed. At first, you may struggle but following these steps will, in the long run, simplify your life.

Rachel Summers is a social media manager with seven years’ experience in the industry, working for big and small companies, including Best British Essays. Rachel, in their free time, advises small and start-up businesses on their social media campaigns.

Published in How to

Looking for an important file or message among endless emails in your inbox is no fun, especially if you need it right before a meeting starts. You’ve tried using the basic search box at the top of Gmail and found out that it didn’t help either. Don’t worry, we’ve rounded up 6 search operators that will help you sort through your inbox to get what you need in a jiffy.

1. Where did I put that file?

Looking for a file your colleagues sent you ages ago? Don’t remember the file’s specific name but you do recall some keywords? That’s a good start. Simply type a keyword after filename: to search for a particular file. For example, you can type filename: minutes to search for a file named meeting minutes. Don’t even remember a part of the name but know what type of file it is? Then you can also use the same search operator to search for a file type. For example, type filename: doc to search for document files.

2. CC or BCC

There are times when you want to narrow down the recipients: whether they are direct, carbon copy (cc), or blind carbon copy (bcc) receivers. The basic “To” search boxes are proven to be useless in this case. What you can do to be more specific is to type cc: or bcc: followed by the recipients’ names or email addresses. For example, instead of typing “anna” in the “To” search box, you can type cc: anna to look for email sent to Anna as a carbon copy (cc) only. Note that you won’t be able to find messages that you received on bcc.

3. Search by time period

You don’t have to remember the exact dates to be able to search for a specific email. With the search operators before: or after:, you can just type the period when the email is sent or received. Don’t forget to use the date format yyyy/mm/dd, otherwise, Gmail wouldn’t get it. By typing after: 2016/07/01before: 2016/07/15, Gmail will look for emails sent or received between July 1, 2016 and July 15, 2016.

4. Search for read, unread, or starred messages

You can search for messages that are read, unread, or starred by using is:read, is:unread, is:starred. By typing is:read is:starredfrom:Anna you are searching for messages from Anna that have been read and marked with a star. If you have more than one type of stars (or if you don’t, we suggest you learn how to manage your emails with Gmail’s stars option), you can type has:green-star to search for messages marked with that color.

5. Don’t ignore Spam or Trash

Whether using the simple search box or search operators suggested above, both ignore emails that are in Spam or Trash box. And from time to time, important emails can mistakably be thrown into Trash box for some unknown reasons. Use in:anywhere to look everywhere in your inbox, including those two places, to make sure that no important email has slipped through.

6. Look in the chat box too

We all hate it when our colleagues send important files or message via a chat box. That makes it difficult when searching for them later. But by typing is:chatfollowed by keywords or name of the person you’re communicating with, you can actually search for messages or files in the chat log. Next time you can tell your colleagues to send vital files or information via proper email instead. But if that still doesn’t work, now you know how to help yourself.

When it comes to managing and sorting through confidential emails in your inbox, no one can do it besides you. Yet there are still the matters of database management and security to take into consideration. Why not outsource those issues to us and enjoy a more carefree communication with your colleagues and customers? Call us today to see what our experts can do for you.

 Source: This article was published techadvisory.org

Published in How to

Click to viewIt's no surprise that the killer feature in Google's email offering, Gmail, is its search capability. Google's king of the web because it makes information on its billions of pages findable; likewise, Gmail makes the megabytes of messages that get pumped into your inbox every day manageable through laser-specific search. If you know how to construct the right query in Gmail, you can slice and dice your messages any way you see fit. Plug those queries into filters and Gmail will automatically process your mail for you as it arrives. Gmail's advanced search, filters and labels make it a god amongst insects in the world of web-based email, but it takes a little know-how to get it working for you.

Let's talk search

18s0etp8spopipng.png

From its inception, the Gmail philosophy has been "Search, don't sort." While that works for finding a specific message, it's not the best way to get organized with your email. There's a point at which sorting is essential, especially for those of us who deal with a lot of email. Luckily, searching and sorting are not mutually exclusive. Gmail came with filters and labels baked in, and a little extra-Gmail ingenuity gave us persistent search. Below I'll go into both in detail. 18s0etp8o9qm4png.png

Gmail has an extensive list of simple search operators, and a serious Gmailer should get to know and love most of them. However, there are two Gmail search tricks that aren't well-known (one isn't even documented) that, combined with the search operators, turn Gmail searches into something fierce: parentheses and curly brackets.

And/Or searches

When you construct a complicated query in Gmail, the search terms are all by default grouped with AND, meaning that every match to a search like to:adam subject:iPhone is both to me and has iPhone somewhere in the subject. The a Gmail documentation recommends using the OR operator when only one term needs to match. Our search might then become to:adam OR subject:iPhone meaning that every match is either addressed to me, has iPhone in the subject, or both. The problem with using OR is that complex queries tend to turn into endless strings of ORs, and they're just not all that manageable.

Instead, surround the disjunctive search terms with curly brackets {}. Searching Gmail with {to:adam subject:iPhone}will yield the same results as the OR search above while allowing you more room for tweaking the terms and saving you from typing an endless string of ORs. Everything inside the curly brackets is assumed to be linked with OR.

Similarly, search terms surrounded by parentheses () group every item with an AND. Granted, AND is the default for search terms, but parentheses can still come in very handy when things get complicated. For example:

{to:(This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) subject:Quicksilver}

This query will match all emails that are addressed to both This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or that contain Quicksilver in the subject. Before I got into brackets I'd have probably written this query as(to:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) OR subject:Quicksilver which isn't terrible, but becomes more and more complicated as search terms grow.

Now that you understand how to construct complex queries for Gmail using brackets and parentheses, how can you put them to good use?

Persistent search 

 18s0etr7n07g0png.png

Since it's not worth your time to create complicated search queries every time you want to find a group of emails, especially if it's a search you're going to make often, you'll want to create persistent searches.

Using either the a Better Gmail Firefox extension with persistent searches enabled, you can create and save persistent searches in Gmail that work like Gmail labels, except that they're dynamic. That makes persistent searches more like Smart Folders; labels, on the other hand, are more like traditional folders. For example, when persistent search is first enabled (whether with Greasemonkey or Better Gmail), it comes with several saved searches already built in, like the TODO search, which submits the following search query:

to:me {in:inbox is:unread}

Clicking on the saved TODO search will give you a dynamic list of emails addressed to you that are

Click to viewIt's no surprise that the killer feature in Google's email offering, Gmail, is its search capability. Google's king of the web because it makes information on its billions of pages findable; likewise, Gmail makes the megabytes of messages that get pumped into your inbox every day manageable through laser-specific search. If you know how to construct the right query in Gmail, you can slice and dice your messages any way you see fit. Plug those queries into filters and Gmail will automatically process your mail for you as it arrives. Gmail's advanced search, filters and labels make it a god amongst insects in the world of web-based email, but it takes a little know-how to get it working for you.

Filters and building large queries

 18s0etr7rtppcpng.png

Filters come in handy when you want to perform certain actions on email when it arrives—actions like archiving, forwarding, and labeling.* If you're planning to set up complex filters, the first thing you should do is expand Gmail's filter input,** turning it from a one-line input box to a textarea. That way you can add line breaks to your queries to help keep them much better organized.

 Since Gmail search operators work in filters, you can forego the other filter inputs and push your query into the Has the words field (or not, depending on which you prefer). To give you an example of why this sort of multi-line input is useful, I'll show you a filter I use to label and archive all of my Lifehacker tips email so that my inbox only shows email from my fellow editors and bosses across the Gawker media network.

-from:{ *@lifehacker.com *@gawker.com *@gizmodo.com *@defamer.com *@wonkette.com *@idolator.com *@fleshbot.com *@kotaku.com *@deadspin.com *@gridskipper.com *@consumerist.com *@valleywag.com *@jezebel.com }

As you can see, this query uses the hyphen -, which negates the content of the following curly bracketed section. In my example, any email that does notmatch one of these handles (i.e., any email not sent from A or B or C...) gets archived and labeled "Lifehacker Tips." If I decide a contact has earned inbox status, I can just add their email to the end of the list (luckily Gmail doesn't remove the line breaks so the query retains its friendly format when I need to edit it).

This particular filtering technique may not be practical if you don't receive hundreds of email a day like we do at Lifehacker, but it's a great way to keep your inbox streamlined to only the most important messages, and it illustrates how much easier it is to understand and organize the search in expanded form with brackets than in one long line connected with OR. Handy, right?

So how do I use this?

How you put these tips to use is completely dependent on your needs. If you have never had any trouble building a filter or persistent search that does exactly what you need, then you probably won't need the parentheses and curly brackets. On the other hand, if you've had problems getting just the right query, those two tools combined with the rest of Gmail's search operators can get you nearly any result you need.

The examples above are intended to provide a framework for understanding how to construct complex filters and persistent searches in Gmail, but if you've already put together your own killer filters and searches, please share them with the class in the comments.

*Remember, the label, in, and is search operators will not work in filters because filters are only applied to emails when they arrive. These operators should be reserved for your [persistent] searches.

** While I don't know of a useful way to expand the regular search input boxes to textareas, enabling multi-line input box pasting should let you construct your more complex queries in a text editor and then copy-and-paste them to the Gmail search box.
Source: This article was published lifehacker.com
Published in Search Engine

Gmail’s a Google product, so of course, it has powerful search features. But some of Gmail’s search features are hidden and don’t appear in the Search Options pane. Learn Gmail’s search tricks to master your massive inbox.

You can also create filters from any search you can perform. Filters automatically perform actions on incoming emails, such as deleting them, applying a label, or forwarding them to another email address.

Basic Search Features

Instead of just typing a search query in the search box, click the down arrow to reveal more search options.

The search options dialog exposes many of Gmail’s basic search operators. But there are some search options that don’t appear in this dialog.

You can skip this dialog for basic searches. Perform a search with the search options dialog and you’ll see the search operator you’ll need in the future. For example, if you type howtogeek.com into the search box, you’ll see the following search appear in the search box:

from:(howtogeek.com)

Useful search operators you can access from the basic dialog include:

  • to: – Search for messages sent to a specific address.
  • from: – Search for messages sent from a specific address
  • subject: – Search the subject field.
  • label: – Search within a specific label.
  • has:attachment – Search only for messages that have attachments
  • is:chat – Search only chats.
  • in:anywhere – Also search for messages in the spam and trash. By default, Gmail’s search ignores messages in the spam and trash.

Constructing Searches

To put together more complicated searches, you’ll need to know the basics.

  • ( ) – Brackets allow you to group search terms. For example, searching for subject:(how geek) would only return messages with the words “how” and “geek” in their subject field. If you search for subject:how geek, you’d get messages with “how” in their subject and “geek” anywhere in the message.
  • OR – OR, which must be in capital letters, allows you to search for one term or another. For example, subject:(how OR geek) would return messages with the word “how” or the word “geek” in their titles. You can also combine other terms with the OR. For example, from:howtogeek.com OR has:attachment would search for messages that are either from howtogeek.com or have attachments.
  • “ “ – Quotes allow you to search for an exact phrase, just like in Google. Searching for “exact phrase” only returns messages that contain the exact phrase. You can combine this with other operators. For example, subject:”exact phrase” only returns messages that have “exact phrase” in their subject field.
  •  – The hyphen, or minus sign, allows to search for messages that don’t contain a specific term. For example, search for -from:howtogeek.com and you’ll only see messages that aren’t from howtogeek.com.

Hidden Search Tricks

You can access many search operators from the search options dialog, but some are hidden. Here’s a list of the hidden ones:

  • list: – The list: operator allows you to search for messages on a mailing list. For example, list:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. would return all messages on the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. mailing list.
  • filename: – The filename: operator lets you search for a specific file attachment. For example, file:example.pdf would return emails with a file named example.pdf attached.
  • is:important, label:important – If you use Gmail’s priority inbox, you can use the is:important or label:important operators to search only important or unimportant emails.
  • has:yellow-starhas:red-starhas:green-check, etc. – If you use different types of stars (see the Stars section on Gmail’s general settings pane), you can search for messages with a specific type of star.

Saving a Filter

Create a filter to automatically perform actions when a message matches a specific search.

To create a filter, click the down arrow again, then click the “Create filter with this search” option.

Select an action and click the “Create filter” button.

You can manage your filters from the Filters pane on Gmail’s settings page.

 Source: This article was published howtogeek.com By Chris Hoffman

Published in How to

Specific answers for specific needs.

When most of us have a question we want to research online, we run to Google for the answer. But it's not the only search engine out there. Venture off the beaten path, and you can find more specialized sites—like the self-proclaimed "computational search engine" Wolfram Alpha or the privacy-conscious DuckDuckGo—that will help you track down exactly what you're looking for. While the well-trained algorithms of Google or even Bing might be the best choice in some situations, to find what you're seeking more quickly, it helps to know which search engine is best for which task.

General interest, personal updates, and games: Google

Let's go ahead and talk about the elephant in the article: When it comes to general searches, Google crushes the competition. It has an extremely well-trained algorithm and offers the largest index of pages—a search for "Mars planet," for example, brings up 5.7 million Google results as opposed to 99,800 Bing ones. That means this search behemoth is still more likely to turn up an obscure blog post, forum message, or online document than any of its rivals, which makes it ideal for researching computer error messages or specialized scientific topics.

On top of its general-interest search chops, Google is great for looking up highly specialized information...about you. Because of the search engine ties in with its other services, such as Gmail and Google Photos, it can pull up your personal data while you're signed into your account. Search for "my flights" or "my trips," and Google will pull details from your booking confirmation emails. On a less fun note, type in "my bills," and Google will sort through your email reminders, using them to show you any upcoming payments you need to make. As for images, try looking up "my photos of Sydney" (replacing the Australian city with your latest vacation destination), or search for photos based on time and date with "my photos from last week or "my photos from July 2014."

Finally, Google makes a great search engine if you're searching for a distraction—specifically a browser-based game. For example, look up "Atari Breakout," switch to the Images tab, and use the cursor keys to control the ensuing action. Similarly, try entering "solitaire," "pac-man," or "tic tac toe" to bring up basic versions of those titles. In addition to games, Google incorporates apps that do serve a purpose: Type "flip a coin" or "roll a die" to do just that, or input "stopwatch," "timer," or "calculator" to display the relevant utilities on screen. Then operate these mini-apps right from their Google results pages.

Images and videos: Bing

Although Bing aims to compete with Google in general search results, one of its real advantages lies in its image and video search abilities. On these results pages, Bing has more filtering options, a better display interface, and excellent suggestions for related searches.

When you're hunting for a video, the results page displays clips in a well-formatted grid rather than a list, making it easier to quickly browse through thumbnails. Bing also triggers an auto-preview feature whenever you hover the mouse cursor over a clip.

As for images, Bing provides extra methods for filtering your results, methods that Google doesn't offer. For example, if you're looking for a particular person, you can focus on only pictures that show faces. It also lets you apply a larger set of image-rights filters.

Images that are free to reuse: Flickr

While Bing lets you filter images based on their rights—how non-owners are allowed to use them—it can't beat the free-image search power of Flickr. Specifically, you can limit your image search to images that photographers have released under Creative Commons licenses, which allow you to repost their work for free, albeit with certain restrictions.

To get started, enter what you're looking for—let's say "cats" for this example—and click Search. Right away, you can adjust the order in which pictures appear by clicking the Relevant drop-down list on the right: Flickr lets you sort pictures by relevance, date, or the "interesting" filter, which elevates pictures that have drawn more activity, such as comments, views, and likes. You can further narrow down your options by color, depth of field, or pattern.

Even once you've limited your list to images you like, not all of them will be free to use. However, images released under Creative Commons often are, although the exact rules governing their use do depend on the specific type of CC license. To see the license under which an image has been released, click the copyright symbol on the lower-right of its photo page. And to filter by license, click the Any license drop-down menu on the left of the search page and limit your results to images released under Creative Commons.

Science and media data: Wolfram Alpha

Wolfram Alpha focuses on answering more technical science and math queries. For example, you can balance a chemical equation with a search like "Al + O2 -> Al2O3," look up properties of compounds with "flash point methane, butane, octane," and answer earth science questions like "seismic travel times from San Francisco to Las Vegas." It's equally adept with math equations: Try "circle, diameter=2," to find the properties of that shape, or test out a more complicated figure like "annulus, inner radius=2, outer radius=5." Draw graphs from "plot sin x cos y" to "plot 3x2-2xy+y2=1" and fill out sequences by typing the first few figures: "1, 2, 4, 8, ..."

But while Wolfram Alpha started with math, it has expanded its scope to provide data on literature, music, movie, and TV shows. Hit it with queries like "how many words in Hamlet?" to answer all your technical questions. You can also compare two items, such as "Hamlet vs Macbeth," to see how their publication dates, lengths, number of characters mentioned, and other data stack up. You can also compare stats about movies and TV shows in a similar way. Even natural language searches—such as "movies starring Al Pacino and Robert De Niro" or "movies with the longest running time"—are fair game.

Of course, the computational search engine manages to add technical information to the mix: Run a query like "first episode of Friends," and Wolfram Alpha will tell you not only when that episode aired, but also how many days ago that date fell and what its sunrise and sunset times were.

Wolfram Alpha

See if Wolfram Alpha can solve your science, math, and media problems.

Wolfram Alpha

Job listings: LinkedIn

Don't neglect the search engines built into the sites you visit every day—these will often lead you to information that's only accessible to users who have signed into the site. In other words, a public search from Google or Bing won't be able to scrape this data.

LinkedIn makes a good example. Next time you go job hunting, start your search by signing into your account. Then click on the search box at the top of the page and choose Jobs. Hit All filters to see all the ways you can limit your results, including by experience level and industry. Limit them further by entering a job title and location in the fields at the top. Finally, click Search, and you're on your way.

Looking for potential new connections on LinkedIn is just as straightforward. Click in the box at the top, choose People, and click All filters. Now you can browse by name, title, location, company, industry, and more. Review the tick boxes on the right to filter for people you know directly (click 1st) or people connected to your existing contacts (click 2nd or 3rd+).

Private questions: DuckDuckGo

There's one big problem with search engines: The companies behind them keep track of what you're looking for. If you'd prefer to keep your browsing history private, then you need DuckDuckGo. It doesn't keep records of your searches, won't feed you personalized results, and refuses to provide fodder for targeted ads. DuckDuckGo also preserves your privacy as you browse elsewhere—so a search for "smartphones" won't cause an endless series of phone advertisements to begin appearing as you bounce around other sites. It's almost as if you never ran that search.

Beyond its focus on privacy, DuckDuckGo acts as a fast and comprehensive search engine, letting you hunt for images and videos as well as websites. It also enables you to restrict results by country or by publication date. Finally, you can search individual sites through the DuckDuckGo interface using a tool it calls Bangs: Try entering "!amazon shoes" or "!Wikipedia apollo missions" into the search bar to see how they work.

There are two types of searches that really benefit from DuckDuckGo's enhanced privacy. First, there's the secret inquiries that you really don't want Google keeping track of (particularly if you share a computer with others). When you decide to look up that weird rash that you don't want anyone to know about, do it on DuckDuckGo. Second, you should use the privacy-conscious search if you're searching for a product but don't want to receive ads about it for the rest of your life.

Source: This article was published popsci.com By David Nield

Published in Search Engine

Gmail supports a plethora of search operators to help you instantly find that elusive email message buried in your mailbox. You have size search – like larger_than:5mb – to find the big messages in your account. File search – like has:attachment filename:doc – will locate email messages that contain file attachments of specific types. This graphic illustrates all the known search operators that work both on Gmail and Google Inbox.

Date Search in Gmail

Date search in Gmail helps you locate emails sent or received in a specific period. Here are some examples:

  • newer_than:7d from:me – Emails sent in the last 7 days
  • after:2016/12/01 to:me – Emails received in the month of December 2016

Specify Time Modifiers in Gmail Search

Gmail also supports time-based searches allowing you to find emails in the specific hour, minute or second. For instance, you can limit your Gmail search to emails that were received between Dec 10 8:15 PM and Dec 10, 2016 8:45 PM.

To get started, convert the date and time to Epoch time and then use the timestamp with the standard after or before search operator of Gmail.

For instance, the Epoch time for Dec 10, 2016 8:15 PM is 1481381100 and the Epoch time for Dec 10, 2016 8:45 PM is 1481382900. Use the search query after:1481381100 before:1481382900 and you’ll get a list of all emails received during that 30-minute period.

Epoch time is the number of seconds that have elapsed since January 1, 1970 (UTC). Use the Epoch converter to represent a human readable date and time in Epoch and use that timestamp with the before or after search operator of Gmail to find that elusive email.

Source: This article was published labnol.org By Amit Agarwal

Published in Search Engine

A Google engineer has revealed that despite Gmail being introduced ten years ago, the vast majority of email account users are still not using one of Gmail’s best features. Speaking at the recent Enigma 2018 security conference, Grzegorz Milka, a software engineer for the tech giant, said that only ten percent of users – just 1 in 10 people – are bothering to turn on two-factor authentication.

This is a staggeringly low figure when one considers a few important things: Firstly, email accounts are the center of a digital web. When people forget passwords for third-party services – such as social media, online shopping, and digital payment accounts – it is often their Gmail account that serves as the recovery point.

In addition, research has revealed that people in the US are still not using password managers. This likely means that they are choosing easy passwords and similar passwords across various platforms. In fact, according to Pew Research Center, only 12 percent of Americans use a password manager – a very similar percentile to those using Gmail two factor (implying that it is the same security-conscious few).

Hacking Explosion

In recent years, hacking tools and hacks by “script kiddies” have been massively on the rise, leading to a global explosion in the number of attacks that are occurring. Furthermore, recent times have seen a number of serious cases involving huge amounts of hacked passwords being sold on the darknet.

On one occasion, over 25 million Gmail and Yahoo accounts were being sold online. Another report claimed that 200 million Yahoo accounts had appeared for sale on deep web marketplaces.

With so much publicity surrounding these monumental hacks, it seems ludicrous that people aren’t using two-factor auth. After all, it is the only thing that will protect a Gmail account from instant penetration should a hacker either acquire or brute-force an account’s password.

Not Compulsory

So, why isn’t Google forcing consumers to use two-factor authentication? Sadly, it would appear that Google fears losing consumers who literally can’t cope – or more likely don’t want to cope – with having to use the elevated security feature. Google’s software engineer implied that a large proportion of consumers are apathetic about digital security:

“The answer is usability. It’s about how many people would we drive out if we force them to use additional security.”

According to Google, over 10 percent of people claim to have trouble entering the four-digit authentication number that arrives via text or an authentication tool. This seems barmy, and, as far as I’m concerned, points to the real problem – laziness and generally bad education surrounding the vital necessity of this feature.

Should you be Using Two Factor Auth?

The answer to this question is yes. Your Gmail account isn’t secure until you enable two-factor authentication. It doesn’t matter whether you choose an SMS message, an authentication app, or a physical token like YubiKey (the most secure method) – but please do it now!

Doing so will stop anybody from being able to access your email account with the password alone. In practical terms, this means that a hacker will need your password and your phone itself to hack your account. Remember, hackers are likely located in a far-off location, possibly even overseas. So worrying that you might lose your phone – or that it might get stolen by a hacker – just isn’t a sensible reason to abstain. What’s more, two-factor auth is not difficult to set up and costs nothing.

Admittedly, if you do lose your phone you won’t be able to access your email account – because you won’t be able to receive the text code. This might put some users off, but it shouldn’t. The reality is that Google has systems in place just in case this happens.

That means you can disable access to the email account, revoke passwords for the email account, gain access to the email account yourself using a variety of methods (backup codes or a trusted computer), and turn off two-factor auth until you have got a new phone/sim card from your carrier.

What is Google Doing To Protect Users?

Luckily for consumers, awareness of low uptake levels for two-factor auth is making Google work harder to protect people. According to Google, hackers tend to behave in similar ways when they gain access to a victim’s account.

Firstly, they disable notifications. Next, they may drop in a filter to hide their activity. With this done, they tend to search for personal account information, intimate photos, bitcoin wallet correspondence, and other sensitive email data. If Google detects this kind of activity it will shut down the account temporarily to protect its owner.

In addition, last November Google published a detailed study explaining how hackers penetrate accounts and what consumers can do to protect themselves. Due to that study, Google is much more closely monitoring login location radius. This means people are being asked much more regularly to confirm a login was them. Again, in extreme cases, accounts are being frozen. Google believes it has already used the findings from its study to prevent hackers from penetrating 67 million Google accounts.

Despite these efforts, the fact remains that the best person to protect your email account is you. So please consider enabling two-factor auth, and tell your loved ones to do it too!

 Source: This article was published bestvpn.com By Ray Walsh

Published in Internet Privacy

Including Clever Search Operators

If you're good at collecting emails, the Archive button in Gmail is really helpful. Fortunately, most of these archived emails are never to be seen or searched again. But others we need to get back to later. Using easy search and clever operators, Gmail lets you find emails precisely and fast.

Usually, the big search field that runs across Gmail's top border works. Sometimes, however, the number of emails returned is just too large.

Maybe you can add a further term or the name of the sender? That's possible but do it wisely. Using some clever search operators, you can narrow your search significantly and precisely. You can search in the Subject line only, for example, or combine that with a date range, a particular sender, and exclude all messages with attachments.

Search Mail in Gmail

To find messages in Gmail:

  • Type search terms in Gmail's search field.
  • Hit Enter or click the magnifying glass button.

Gmail Search Options

To specify some search criteria for narrowing results in your Gmail search:

  • Click the Show search options down arrow in the Gmail search field.
  • Search senders' email addresses and names using the From field.
  • Search direct (To: field) recipients' names and addresses using the To field.
  • Search email subjects using the Subject field.
  • Search emails' body text using the Has the words field.
    • Search for a phrase with quotation marks.
    • Search for emails that contain one word (or phrase) or another, use "OR".
      '"shepherd macaroni"' (excluding the outer quotation marks) finds all emails that contain the phrase "shepherd macaroni", for instance;
      'shepherd macaroni' (again excluding the quotation marks) finds all emails that contain both words, but not necessarily in that form;'shepherd OR macaroni' (without the quotation marks), finally, finds all emails that contain either "shepherd" or "macaroni" (or both).
  • Search for emails that do not contain certain words in their text using the Doesn't have fielded.
  • Make sure Has attachment is checked to find only emails that contain attached files.
  • Search emails' sent date using the Date within fields.
  • Click the Search Mail button below the search fields.
    • You can now narrow your search further in the main search field using the operators below.
    • Of course, multiple search options can be combined to find, say, emails from a certain sender that contain attachments and were sent during the past year.

    Gmail Search Operators

    In the Search Mail field, you can use the following operators:

    • subject: - Search the Subject line.
      Example: "subject:bahamas" finds all messages with "Bahamas" in the Subject.
    • from: - Search Gmail for sender name and email address. Partial addresses are okay.
      Examples: "from:heinz" finds all messages from "heinz@example.com", but also all messages from "This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it."; "from:me" finds all messages sent by yourself (using any address set up for use in Gmail).
    • to: - Search the To line for names and addresses.
      Example: "to:quertyuiop@gmail.com" finds all messages sent directly (not via Cc: or Bcc:) to quertyuiop@gmail.com.
    • cc: - Search recipients in the Cc field.
      Example: "cc:quertyuiop@gmail.com" finds all messages that were sent to quertyuiop@gmail.com as a carbon copy.
    • bcc: - Search Gmail for addresses and names in the Bcc field. Note this only works with emails you sent to Bcc recipients from Gmail.
      Example: "bcc:heinz" finds all messages that you sent with, for example, "hein@example.com" in the Bcc field.
    • label: - Search Gmail for messages assigned a label. (Replace whitespace characters in label names with hyphens.)
      Example: "label:toodoo-doll" finds all messages labeled "toodoo doll".
    • has:userlabels - Search Gmail for emails that have any labels except those used by default (i.e. not including labels such as "inbox", "trash" and "spam" but including Smart Labels).
    • has:nouserlabels - Search for messages that have not been labeled with any labels except those that Gmail uses by default.
    • is:starred - Search Gmail for messages that are starred.
    • Further stars:
      • has:yellow-star - Search Gmail for messages with a yellow star.
      • has:red-star - Search Gmail for messages with a red star.
      • has:orange-star - Search Gmail for messages with an orange star.
      • has:green-star - Search Gmail for messages with a green star.
      • has:blue-star - Search Gmail for messages with a blue star.
      • has:purple-star - Search Gmail for messages with a purple star.
      • has:yellow-bang - Search Gmail for messages with a yellow exclamation mark.
      • has:red-bang - Search Gmail for messages with a red exclamation mark.
      • has:purple-question - Search Gmail for messages with a purple question mark.
      • has:orange-guillemet - Search Gmail for messages with two orange forward arrows.
      • has:blue-info - Search Gmail for messages with a blue i.
    • is:unread - Search Gmail for new and unread messages.
    • is:read - Search Gmail for messages that have already been opened.
    • is:important - Search Gmail for messages that are marked important for Priority Inbox.
    • has:attachment - Search Gmail for messages that have files attached to them.
    • filename: - Search within file names of attachments. You can also search for file name extensions to restrict your search to certain file types.
      Example: "filename:.doc" finds all messages with word processing attachments.
    • is:buzz - Search Gmail for Google Buzz posts.
    • is:chat - Search Gmail for chat logs.
    • in: - Search in a standard "folder". You can search in DraftsInboxChatsSentSpamTrash and anywhere (for everything, including Spam and Trash).
      Example: "in:drafts" finds all messages in your Drafts folder.
    • circle: - Search mail sent to you from people in the given Google+ circle. (Use quotation marks to specify Google+ circles that include a whitespace in their name; escape quotation marks in the name with a backslash (\) immediately preceding each quotation mark.)
      Example: 'circle:"my \"sailing\" circle" turns up all emails from people in your 'my "sailing" circle" Google+ circle.
    • has:circle - Search Gmail for messages from somebody in any of your Google+ circles.
    • after: - Search for messages sent on or after a date. The date must be given in YYYY/MM/DD format.
      Example: "after:2005/05/05" finds all messages sent or received on or after (i.e. including) May 5, 2005.
    • before: - Search Gmail for messages sent before a date.
      Example: "before:2005/05/05" finds all messages sent or received on May 4, 2005 and earlier.
    • larger: (or larger_than:) - Search for emails exceeding the given size. (Specify the size in bytes without suffix or using "k" for kilobytes (as 1,000 bytes) and "m" for megabytes (as 1,000,000 bytes.)
      Example: "larger_than:200k" finds all messages that exceed 200,000 bytes in size.
    • size: - Search for messages exceeding the given size in bytes.
      Example: "size:500000" finds emails bigger than 500,000 bytes or half a megabyte.
    • smaller: (or smaller_than:) - Search for messages smaller than the specified size. (Specify the size in bytes (no suffix) or using "k" for 1,000 bytes and "m" for 1,000,000 bytes.)
    • deliveredto: - Search Gmail for email with a certain email address in a "Delivered-To:" header line.
      Example: "deliveredto:me@example.com" finds messages that have "me@example.com" in a "Delivered-To: header, because it has been forwarded from that address, for example.
    • rfc822msgid: - Search for the message with the — just about certainly unique — message ID. Gmail will not search for messages that refer to the message ID (replies, for example). Example: "rfc822msgid:wW28fb6uf@mail.example.com" finds the message with "wW28fb6uf@mail.example.com" in the "Message-ID:" header field.

    How to Combine Operators and Search Terms

    Operators and search terms can be combined with the following modifiers:

    • By default, Gmail combines terms with (an invisible) "AND".
      Examples: "shepherd macaroni" finds all messages that contain both "shepherd" and "macaroni"; "before:2005/05/05 AND after:2005/05/04" finds all messages sent or received on May 4, 2005.
    • "" - Search for a phrase. Case does not matter.
      Examples: "shepherd's macaroni" finds all messages containing the phrase "shepherd's macaroni"; 'subject:"shepherd's macaroni' finds all messages that have "shepherd's macaroni" in the Subject field.
    • + - Search for a term exactly as typed.
      Example: "+shepherds" finds all emails that contain "shepherds", but not those containing just "shepherd" or "shehperds" alone.
    • OR - Search Gmail for messages containing at least one of two terms or expressions.
      Examples: "shepherd OR macaroni" finds messages that contain either "shepherd" or "macaroni" or both; "from:heinz or label:toodoo-doll" finds messages that either come from a sender that contains "email.guide" or appear under the label "toodoo doll".
    • - - Search Gmail for messages that do not contain a term or expression.
      Examples: "-macaroni" finds all messages that do not contain the word "macaroni"; "shepherd -macaroni" finds all messages that contain the word "shepherd" but not "macaroni"; 'subject:"shepherd's macaroni" -from:heinz' finds all messages with "shepherd's macaroni" in the subject that were not sent from an email address or name containing "heinz".
    • () - Group search terms or expressions.
      Examples: "subject:(shepherd macaroni)" finds messages that have both "shepherd" and "macaroni" somewhere in the Subject line (but not necessarily as a phrase); "from:heinz (subject:(shepherd OR macaroni) OR label:toodoo-doll)" finds all messages from a sender who has "email.guide" in their name that either have "shepherd" or "macaroni" (or both) in the Subject line or appear under the label "toodoo doll".

    Historical Gmail Search Operators

    Gmail once included support for the following search operates that, sadly, no longer work:

    • lang: - Search Gmail for messages in a particular language. (Specify the language in English; "Chinese" worked, but "中文", "Putonghua" or "Mandarin" do not, for example.)
      Example: "lang:French" returned all emails that contain at least un peu de Français.

    Saved Searches

    You can also bookmark Gmail searches easily for later repetition.

    Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Heinz Tschabitscher

    Published in How to

    No matter how popular and easy to use an email platform like Gmail may be, having to actually go ahead and manage email on a day-to-day basis can be a daunting, dreadful task. Using extra email management tools that work with Gmail may not make you fall in love with email, but it will certainly help take some of the headache out of it by giving you back some of your precious time and energy.

    Whether you use Gmail for personal or professional reasons, on the web or from a mobile device, all of the following tools may be of great benefit to you. Take a look to see which ones catch your eye.

    Inbox by Gmail

    Inbox by Gmail is basically a must-have if you regularly check your messages from your mobile device. Google took everything it new about how its users were using Gmail and came up with a brand new, super intuitive, highly visual email platform that simplifies and speeds up email.

    Group incoming email messages in bundles for better organization, see highlights at a glance with card-like visuals, set reminders for tasks that need to be done later and "snooze" email messages so you can take care of them tomorrow, next week, or whenever you want. More »

    Boomerang for Gmail

    Boomerang
    Photo © drmakkoy / Getty Images

    Ever wish you could write an email now, but send it later? Instead of doing exactly that – leaving it as a draft and then trying to remember to send it at a specific time – just use Boomerang. Free users can schedule up to 10 emails per month (and more if you post about Boomerang on social media).

    When you write a new email in Gmail with Boomerang installed, you can press the new "Send Later" button that appears next to the regular "Send" button, which allows you to quickly pick a time to send (tomorrow morning, tomorrow afternoon, etc.) or the opportunity to set an exact date and time to send it. More »

    Unroll.me

    Mailbox
    Photo © erhui1979 / Getty Images

    Subscribe to too many email newsletters? Unroll.me not only allows you to unsubscribe from them in bulk, but also lets you create your own "rollup" of email newsletters, which brings you a daily digest of all the newsletter subscriptions you actually want to keep.

    Unroll.me also has a nifty iOS app you can use to manage all your email subscriptions while you're on the go. If there's a particular subscription you want to keep in your inbox, just send it to your "Keep" section so Unroll.me doesn't touch it. More »

    Rapportive

    Profile
    Photo © runeer / Getty Images

    Do you communicate with a lot of new people via Gmail? If you do, sometimes it can feel eerily robotic when you don't know who's on the other end of the screen. Rapportive is one tool that offers a solution by connecting to LinkedIn so it can automatically match profiles based on the email address you're communicating with.

    So when you send or receive a new message, you'll see a short LinkedIn profile summary in the righthand side of Gmail featuring their profile photo, location, current employer and more — but only if they have filled out that information on LinkedIn and have their account associated with that email address. It's potentially a nice way to put a face to an email message. More »

    SaneBox

    Folder
    Photo © erhui1979 / Getty Images

    Similar to Unroll.me, SaneBox is another Gmail tool that can help automate your organization of incoming messages. Instead of creating filters and folders yourself, SaneBox will analyze all of your messages and activity to understand which emails are important to you before moving all of the unimportant emails to a new folder called "SaneLater."

    You can also move unimportant messages that still show up in your inbox to your SaneLater folder, and if something that gets filed into your SaneLater folder becomes important again, you can move it out of there. Even though SaneLater takes the manual work out of organization, you still have full control for those messages you need to specifically put somewhere. More »

    LeadCooker

    Email
    Photo R?stem G?RLER / Getty Images

    When it comes to online marketing, it's no question that email is still massively important. Many email marketers send messages all at once to hundreds or thousands of email addresses with the click of a button using third-partyemail marketing platforms like MailChimp or Aweber. The downside to this is that it's not very personal and can easily end up as spam.

    LeadCooker can help you strike a balance between emailing lots of people and keeping it more personal. You still get a lot of the features of traditional email marketing platforms like automated follow-ups and tracking, but recipients won't see an unsubscribe link and your messages come straight from your Gmail address. Plans start at $1 per 100 emails with LeadCooker. More »

    Sortd for Gmail

    Stack of Papers
    Photo © CSA-Archive / Getty Images

    Sortd is an amazing tool that completely transforms the look of your Gmail account into something that looks and functions much more like a to-do list. With a UI that's as simple and as intuitive to use as Gmail itself, the aim of Sortd is to offer people who struggle to stay on top of email a better way to stay organized.

    Sortd is the first "smart skin" for Gmail that divides your inbox into four main columns, with options to customize things the way you want. There are also apps available for both iOS and Android. Since it's currently in beta, the tool is totally free for now, so check it out while you can before pricing is put in place! More »

    Giphy for Gmail

    Animated GIF
    Image made with Canva.com

    Giphy is a popular search engine for GIFs. While you can certainly go straight to Giphy.com to search for a GIF to embed in a new Gmail message, a much easier and more convenient way to do it is by installing the Giphy for Gmail Chrome extension.

    If you love using GIFs in Gmail, this is a must-have to help you save more time and compose your messages more efficiently. The reviews of this extension are pretty good overall, although some reviewers have expressed concern about bugs. The Giphy team seems to update the extension every so often, so if it doesn't work for you straight away, consider trying it again when a new version is available. More »

    Ugly Email

    Eye
    Photo © ilyast / Getty Images

    More email senders are now using tracking tools so they can get to know more about you without you even knowing it. They can typically see when you open their emails, if you clicked on any links inside, where you're opening/clicking from, and what device you're using. If you really value your privacy, you may want to consider taking advantage of Ugly Email to help you easily identify which Gmail messages that you receive are being tracked.

    Ugly Email, which is a Chrome Extension, simply puts a little "evil eye" icon in front of the subject field of every tracked email. When you see that little evil eye, you can decide whether you want to open it, trash it, or maybe create a filter for future emails from that sender. More »

    SignEasy for Gmail

    Signature
    Photo © carduus / Getty Images

    Receiving documents as attachment in Gmail that need to be filled out and signed can be a real pain to work with. SignEasy simplifies the whole process by allowing you to easily fill out forms and sign documents without ever leaving your Gmail account.

    A SignEasy option appears when you click to view the attachment in your browser. Once you've filled out the fields that need completion, the updated document is attached in the same email thread. More »

    Source: This article was published lifewire.com By Elise Moreau

    Published in Others
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