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Tons of video search engines are out there to help you find the perfect video – or create your own. Here’s a list of the 10 best.

Video content is super popular today.

In fact, internet users spend an average of 6 hours and 48 minutes watching videos per week.

That’s a 59% increase since 2016!

What’s more, users spend on average 2.6x more time on pages with video than without.

So, why not spice up your blog with engaging, relevant videos?

The good news is there are tons of search engines you can use to find the perfect video to use in your blog or inspire you to create your own.

Here’s a list of the 10 best ones out there.

10 Video Search Engines You Should Use to Find Excellent Video Content

We all know about Google and YouTube, but have you ever heard of video search engines like Dailymotion and Metacafe?

These video search engines are gold when you learn to use them.

Read on below to find a mix of familiar and new video search engines.

1. Google

We can’t leave Google out, although everyone online knows about it. It’s just too big and popular to scratch from our list.

So, what’s special about Google videos?

You can search for practically any video on Google using the Videos search bar.

First, type in your keyword on Google.

google search

Then, click Videos.

google video

Voila! You get tons of videos based on the keyword you used. It’s that simple.

2. YouTube

YouTube is the second most-visited site in the world (next to Google).

And it’s no wonder, since over 500 hours of video are uploaded on YouTube per minute!

Here’s an example of a search on YouTube for “white strawberries.”

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If you’re feeling uninspired for your next video, head over to YouTube and type in a rare keyword.

Chances are, you’ll find a unique video on it.

3. Bing

If you’re like a ton of other people, you think of Bing as a search engine “living in the shadow of Google.”

 

But Bing isn’t inferior to Google, it’s just different.

For example, there’s its video platform.

Here are three amazing things you didn’t know about Bing videos:

  • They’re optimized for mobile usage.
  • They play directly from the website.
  • You can easily find paid video content.

Finding inspiring videos on Bing is super easy.

Simply type your keyword into the search engine and select Videos.

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4. Dailymotion

Dailymotion is a platform with millions of videos.

Right on its homepage, you can watch trending videos on the latest news, entertainment, music, and sports.

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Looking for something specific?

Head over to the search bar on the right-hand corner and type in your keyword.

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You can even create a personal library with all your favorite videos on the platform.

5. DuckDuckGo

If privacy is important to you and you don’t like the idea of everything you do online being recorded, you should use DuckDuckGo.

DuckDuckGo does three things for you:

  • Blocks trackers.
  • Allows you to search privately.
  • Gives you secure connections.

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Using the search engine is super easy because of its simple interface.

If you’re looking for videos, simply type in your keyword into the search field and click Videos.

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Another fun thing you can do is run a search based on different countries.

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You’ll be thrilled to find out that selecting a different country gives you different video results!

For example, here are the top videos for the keyword “content marketing” in the U.S.

duckduckgo-video-search-usa.png

Now, select another country. Say, Argentina. This is what you get.

duckduckgo-video-search-argentina.png

6. Yahoo

Remember Yahoo?

Well, considering Yahoo’s search engine market share is under 2% market globally, you aren’t alone if you don’t.

 

However, just like other search engines, Yahoo makes it super easy to browse through tons of videos.

What’s interesting is that although Bing powers Yahoo’s search results, you won’t get the same video results if you enter the same keyword on both platforms.

Let’s take a look.

Here’s “marketing tips” on Yahoo.

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And here’s “marketing tips” on Bing.

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Since searching both Yahoo and Bing will give you different results, they’re each worth trying if you want to find some hidden gems.

7. Metacafe

Metacafe is the place to go to find fun, unusual videos.
metacafe.png

It offers a ton of categories to choose from including art animation, comedy, entertainment, how-to, fashion, and more.

You can also search for popular or trending videos using the search bar at the top of the page.

If you’re suffering from a creative block and you need inspiration, Metacafe is an excellent video search engine to visit.

8. Ask

Ask once used to be a popular competitor to search engines like Google and Yahoo.

Today, it’s known as a question and answer site.

But you can still search for videos on Ask.

Simply type your keyword in the search box and click Videos.

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When you search for videos on Ask, you’ll get results straight from YouTube.

But again, you won’t get the same results as using the same keyword on YouTube.

9. Yandex

Yandex is the the Google of Russia.

It’s a massive search engine offering mail, maps, a browser, translation, images, and more.

Of course, Yandex also has a video search bar.
yandex-.png

10. Swisscows

Swisscows is a search engine that bills itself as “family-friendly.”

It also offers a unique promise to users: it doesn’t collect or store any user data.

Aside from music, images, and web content, Swisscows has a wide range of videos to choose from.

swisscows.png

How to Find Amazing Videos for Your Content

Yes, video is extremely popular today.

Internet users prefer watching video over reading long blocks of text.

In fact, 85% of U.S. internet users watch online video content each month.

But creating videos isn’t easy.

There are days when you simply lack inspiration and need a breath of fresh air to get your creative juices going.

When this happens, make sure to visit the top video search engines on the web.

 

[Source: This article was published in searchenginejournal.com By Julia McCoy - Uploaded by the Association Member: Issac Avila]

Categorized in Search Engine

The variables that drive performance for LSA extend beyond the prominence, relevance and proximity factors we have built strategies for.

We are in the midst of a transformation in local advertising. Google has a new form of trusted answers that are revealed through a unique and compelling sponsored ad unit. The advertisers that participate in this new layer of trust are proudly displayed next to a green, check-mark badge. This designation is quickly becoming the symbol of trust for Google users. 

Google is so confident in the consumer value of these answers that they put them atop their precious search result pages. When speaking to local businesses, Google states that they can “earn customers trust with the badge.” It tells them that the badge will give its users, “more confidence to book your services.”

 

It is increasingly important for local business owners who are eligible, to obtain the Google badge of trust. But the real value of the badge is the access it provides to Local Services Ads (LSA). This is Google’s local trust pack. It is a cost-per-call advertising inventory unit that acts unlike anything we have ever encountered as marketers.

Badges are earned within two distinct programs – Google Guaranteed and Google Screened. The more mature Google Guaranteed, now covers most Home Service categories, including appliance repair, carpenter, carpet cleaner, electrician, house cleaning, interior designer, landscaper, lawn care provider, mover, pest control technician, pet care provider, pet groomer,  plumber, roofer, tree service provider, water damage, window cleaner, window service provider and flooring, foundations, countertop, HVAC, and siding pros. The green check-mark for Google  Guaranteed providers signifies that Google has verified the business and backs the services booked.

This year, Google solidified the growth intentions behind its newly minted trust layer, with the launch of Google Screened for Professional Services providers. This program is for lawyers, financial planners, real estate agents, photographers, event planners, and tax specialists.The Google Screened badge means that it has verified the providers’ background and backs their expertise.

Over a series of articles, I will address the Google Guaranteed and Screened programs and explore the specifics of each. We will learn what it means to optimize LSA and take advantage of the badge. Here we look at the past and present conditions that underscore Google’s revolutionary new trust layer. 

Part 1: The Past

To truly understand the local trust pack, it is important to start with Google My Business (GMB). Launched in 2014, GMB is the quintessential free marketing tool for local businesses. It enables them to manage their business presence across Google. It was positioned as the ‘businesses’ best friend and the place to keep business content fresh, post deals, share high-quality photos and videos and respond to customers. 

But, as Google knows all too well, leadership begets scrutiny and spam and in January 2016, the Google Local team found itself having to respond publicly to a NY Times Article entitled “Fake Online Locksmiths May Be Out to Pick Your Pocket, Too.” The article directly implicated Google Local results and the ease of how unsavory people game them to commit fraud. 

The public may have been talking about locksmiths now, but what about all the other “pros” that Google was sending into peoples’ homes? By 2016, Google was being held to account for the safety of its users’ post-search, in their own homes.

 

 

It is no coincidence that months prior to the Times article, Google announced that it was testing Home Service Ads in beta in the San Francisco area for, you guessed it… locksmiths, but also plumbers, cleaners, and handymen. 

Trust would be built on the back of what was called Advanced Verification standards that Google states:

 “In order to prevent fraudulent businesses from advertising on Google using false identities, Google Ads and Local Services advertisers in certain verticals will be required to complete Advanced Verification.” 

By this time, post-transactional activity was very fertile ground for Google. Its reviews and ratings features have historically relied on its consumers to qualify their experiences with local businesses. In fact, these post-transactional signals have become a foundation of local search ranking. 

Now, consumer reviews were no longer enough. The meaning of trust for Google’s local results was expanded to encapsulate the security and well-being of its searchers through the transactional environment itself. As the story unfolds, we begin to see that Google’s move to instill new signals of trust into its result sets, requires a momentous effort and an entirely different set of rules. 

Part 2: The Present

To qualify for the coveted Google Guaranteed or Screened badge, the service pros undergo personal background checks and provide corporate documentation, proof of insurance, certifications, licenses and other credentials, depending upon industry. This process can take weeks, even months, as Google depends upon third-parties throughout the application process. 

If this vetting process sounds familiar, then you are probably familiar with mature vertical search providers, like Home Advisor or even Thumbtack (a Google Ventures investment). The badge is so trust-oriented that if a consumer is unsatisfied with a service pro’s work, Google may refund the amount paid for the service – the “Guaranteed.” They cap lifetime coverage for claims at $2,000 USD.

It is exciting for a business owner to obtain the Google badge of trust. But it’s the access to LSA that gets the phone ringing. Most local search marketers unknowingly stand on the cusp of what will be their biggest challenge to date in working with Local Services Ads. These ads look and act differently than other search-based products or strategies. On the surface, the inventory is unpredictable and temperamental. Below the surface it is formulaic and strict.

The LSA algorithm, which drives the cost-per-call market, has significant advertiser dependencies. A click on the ad unit itself resolves to a new type of Google landing page called the LSA profile. The rules governing the trust layer display are predicated on a very shallow “job category” to “job type” to a keyword-based ontology. The LSA algorithm is rooted in GMB and local rank principles. But, what makes LSA so unique is its use of methods such as hours of operations, answer rate, conversation quality, booked transactions, archived calls, customer reviews, and other advertiser feedback loops to calculate ad serving rules. Google may represent its trustworthiness for a business by a badge, but it represents trust for an advertiser through ad serving. 

For five years, Local Services Ads have been slowly, but consistently launching atop Google search results for local queries in key home services categories. The pace of the roll-out is now speeding up as the once obscure and mysterious program is coming out of the dark and into the light for users and advertisers alike. In 2020, as Guaranteed results became much more prevalent across home pro queries, Google made profound news by quietly announcing Google Screened for Professional Services categories.

The reality is that despite all the potential, many local businesses simply won’t qualify for the Guaranteed or Screened programs. Even if they do, many do not have the basic faculty to interact with the advanced functioning of the call-based advertising inventory. In the months and years ahead, many marketers and advertisers will grow very frustrated, give up, wait and watch. 

This is not a test. That started for Google in 2015. A monetized trust layer, unlike anything we have seen in local advertising, has form and function on Google search results. The variables that drive the performance for LSA extend well beyond the prominence, relevance, and proximity factors that we as local marketers have built strategies and careers around.  A new era has arrived in local search. 

In the articles to follow, we will unpack Google Guaranteed and Screened, including the approval processes, the LSA algorithm, the cost-per-call pricing model, and the LSA/GMB Profiles. 

 

Stay tuned…

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Justin Sanger - Uploaded by the Association Member: Carol R. Venuti] 

Categorized in Search Engine

Searching online has many educational benefits. For instance, one study found students who used advanced online search strategies also had higher grades at university.

But spending more time online does not guarantee better online skills. Instead, a student’s ability to successfully search online increases with guidance and explicit instruction.

Young people tend to assume they are already competent searchers. Their teachers and parents often assume this too. This assumption, and the misguided belief that searching always results in learning, means much classroom practice focuses on searching to learn, rarely on learning to search.

Many teachers don’t explictly teach students how to search online. Instead, students often teach themselves and are reluctant to ask for assistance. This does not result in students obtaining the skills they need.

 

For six years, I studied how young Australians use search engines. Both school students and home-schoolers (the nation’s fastest growing educational cohort) showed some traits of online searching that aren’t beneficial. For instance, both groups spent greater time on irrelevant websites than relevant ones and regularly quit searches before finding their desired information.

Here are three things young people should keep in mind to get the full benefits of searching online.

1. Search for more than just isolated facts

Young people should explore, synthesise and question information on the internet, rather than just locating one thing and moving on.

Search engines offer endless educational opportunities but many students typically only search for isolated facts. This means they are no better off than they were 40 years ago with a print encyclopedia.

It’s important for searchers to use different keywords and queries, multiple sites and search tabs (such as news and images).

Part of my (as yet unpublished) PhD research involved observing young people and their parents using a search engine for 20 minutes. In one (typical) observation, a home-school family type “How many endangered Sumatran Tigers are there” into Google. They enter a single website where they read a single sentence.

The parent writes this “answer” down and they begin the next (unrelated) topic – growing seeds.

The student could have learnt much more had they also searched for

  • where Sumatra is
  • why the tigers are endangered
  • how people can help them.

I searched Google using the key words “Sumatran tigers” in quotation marks instead. The returned results offered me the ability to view National Geographic footage of the tigers and to chat live with an expert from the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) about them.

Clicking the “news” tab with this same query provided current media stories, including on two tigers coming to an Australian wildlife park and on the effect of palm oil on the species. Small changes to search techniques can make a big difference to the educational benefits made available online.

2. Slow down

All too often we presume search can be a fast process. The home-school families in my study spent 90 seconds or less, on average, viewing each website and searched a new topic every four minutes.

Searching so quickly can mean students don’t write effective search queries or get the information they need. They may also not have enough time to consider search results and evaluate websites for accuracy and relevance.

My research confirmed young searchers frequently click on only the most prominent links and first websites returned, possibly trying to save time. This is problematic given the commercial environment where such positions can be bought and given children tend to take the accuracy of everything online for granted.

Fast search is not always problematic. Quickly locating facts means students can spend time on more challenging educational follow-up tasks – like analysing or categorising the facts. But this is only true if they first persist until they find the right information.

3. You’re in charge of the search, not Google

Young searchers frequently rely on search tools like Google’s “Did you mean” function.

While students feel confident as searchers, my PhD research found they were more confident in Google itself. One year eight student explained: “I’m used to Google making the changes to look for me”.

Such attitudes can mean students dismiss relevant keywords by automatically agreeing with the (sometimes incorrect) auto-correct or going on irrelevant tangents unknowingly.

Teaching students to choose websites based on domain name extensions can also help ensure they are in charge, not the search engine. The easily purchasable “.com”, for example, denotes a commercial site while information on websites with a “.gov”(government) or “.edu” (education) domain name extension better assure quality information.

Search engines have great potential to provide new educational benefits, but we should be cautious of presuming this potential is actually a guarantee.

 

[Source: This article was published in theconversation.com By Misha Ketchell - Uploaded by the Association Member: Jeremy Frink]

Categorized in Internet Search

Google has launched a new update in its Search Term report data explanations. Users are reporting that they are witnessing some not clear warning in their accounts alert section. If you click on the option of Learn More then you will be redirected on a Google support article about Search Terms. The article about search terms was present there for a long time. Although, users are now reporting that they are also witnessing a warning which is placed underneath the article. There is no explanation on the warning by the concerned authorities of Google. They also have launched a special statement but it is unclear as to why the warning is appearing.

 

As per the statement made by Google, they have updated their privacy and maintain changes in their Search Term reports. The statement clearly stated that the Search Term Report will only include terms that a significant number of users searched for. Although, the statement does not shed any light on the warning which has been witnessed by the users. The statement launched by the concerned authorities also said that they are always investing in new and effective ways to share insights on topics. In this statement, it is clearly said that Google takes care of the advertisers so that they can make crucial business decisions.

Paid search managers are not taking the decision very sportingly. Managers will now have fewer controls over their accounts and very less relative information from Google. Some of the researchers also shared that people were getting money on clicks for a query totally irrelevant from the webpage. Many of the managers have also stated that this change is inevitable. They just have to adapt their website according to the new rules. Last week also some managers were reportedly facing issues in the Ad creative section.

[Source: This article was published in flipweb.org By Abhishek - Uploaded by the Association Member: Dana W. Jimenez]

Categorized in Search Engine

Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff.

Stock photos have become a homestead of content creation, but finding the right image can be a hassle — and sometimes a legal liability.

Well, you’ll be delighted to know Google has updated Image Search to make it easier to discover free-to-use images — and how to license the ones you can’t use for free.

Here’s how to take advantage of the new changes:

  • Search for the image you want as you normally would, then head to the Images section.
  • Click on “Tools” to expand the filter menu.
  • Under “Usage Rights,” you’ll find the option to sort images by their license — Creative Commons or commercial use.
  • That’s it.

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One nifty addition is that Google now surfaces information on how you can obtain the rights for a licensed image directly in the description.

If you don’t tick off any of the “Usage Rights” options, Google will simply show all images that fit your search criteria. Images that lack licensing data will be marked with a warning, noting “images may be subject to copyright.”

It’s worth noting Google only highlights licensing details for images if a creator or a publisher has already provided this information, so your best bet to avoid unknowingly using a copyrighted pic is to filter out photos lacking this information.

If you can’t find the right image on Google, you can always try trawling through copyrights-free stock photo sites. We’ve put together a shortlist of some of our favorite options here. Those won’t match the sheer volume and diversity of choice Google offers, but the quality tends to be consistently higher.

 

[Source: This article was published in thenextweb.com By MIX - Uploaded by the Association Member: Martin Grossner]

Categorized in Search Engine

Apple plans to introduce its own search engine, to compete with Google. There are a number of indicators suggesting that the Cupertino-based tech giant company may be planning for its own search engine.

Every year Google spends billions of dollars to maintain as the default search engine for all Apple devices such as the iPhone, MacBooks, and the iPad on its Safari browser. This means the search results would be collected from Google while you check on the web Safari. Although users may adjust the search settings by default.

It seems, though, that this arrangement will come to an end, as Apple plans to develop its own web-based search engine to compete with Google. according to marketing insights by Coywolf,  Extending the searches for Siri and Spotlight searches in iOS 14 beta, increase crawling from AppleBot’s and substantial changes to About AppleBot support reveal that Apple is soon ready to introduce.

 

Apple Might Be Working On its Own Search Engine to Take on Google

In the UK, Apple was forced by the regulator to remove Google as the default search engine for Safari. Coywolf has claimed government constraints and a controversial relationship with Google provide the technology giant with a chance to introduce it’s own. In addition, because Apple is still the world’s leading company, even the billions of dollars Google pays, but Apple does not want them.oneplus-n-1.jpg

There are many indicators to confirm a switch –from search engineer job ads to its spotlight search bypassing Google search using iOS 14 beta, according to an online report. All of these factors tend to believe that the giant tech will eventually develop its own search engine. Yet not sure but maybe the search engine of Apple will look and function quite differently than current engines because the company prefers to do things differently in the past. The company has a great deal to gain by developing its own search engine.

A number of website developers have seen Apple’s apple Bot activity in its website logs. In general, Applebot is a web crawler, which means that it scans the web to determine how search results would be ranked. This depends on a number of factors such as relevance and user involvement. The latest action of Applebot thus constitutes a major indication of Apple’s intentions to enter the search engine market.

A recent report by MacRumors supports this observation and indicates that Applebot has recently been even more involved than normal. Jon Henshaw, Coywolf’s founder, is one of the developers who has been noticing Applebot a lot in his website logs.

 [Source: This article was published in phoneworld.com.pk By Sehrish Kayani - Uploaded by the Association Member: Deborah Tannen]

Categorized in News & Politics

A new study has shown that although they may protect your personal data, independent search engines display a lot more misinformation related to vaccines than internet giants, such as Google.

In 2019, the World Health Organization (Geneva, Switzerland) listed vaccine hesitancy as one of the top 10 threats to global health. The internet plays a huge role in this rise in negative attitudes towards vaccinations as misinformation continues to be published and widely spread, with many taking what they read online as fact.

Determined to fully evaluate the role of search engines in spreading this misinformation, an international research group conducted a study to monitor the amount of anti-vaccination resources returned in searches in different search engines.

 

Internet companies tracking and storing user’s personal data and monitoring their online behavior has left many internet users wary of internet giants and turning, instead, to independent search engines. The study, published in Frontiers in Medicine, focused on how the search engines’ approach to data privacy may impact the quality of scientific results.

“A recent report showed that (50%) of people in the UK would not take a Coronavirus vaccine if it was available. This is frightening – and this study perhaps gives some indication as to why this is happening,” remarked lead author Pietro Ghezzi (Brighton & Sussex Medical School, UK).

The researchers searched for the term “vaccines autism” in a variety of different search engines in English, Spanish, Italian and French. For each search the Chrome browser was cleared of cookies and previous search history. They then analyzed the first 30 results from all searches.

Vaccines being linked to autism is a concept inherited from a now discredited study published in 1998, linking the MMR vaccine to the development of autism. Despite the fact that countless studies have since been published since disproving the theory, the flawed findings are still shared as if fact by many.

The researchers discovered that alternative, independent search engines (Duckduckgo, Ecosia, Qwant, Swisscows, and Mojeek) and other commercial engines (Bing and Yahoo) display more anti-vaccination websites (10-53%) in the first 30 results than Google (0%).

Furthermore, some localized versions of Google (English-UK, Italian and Spanish) also returned up to 10% more anti-vaccination resources than the google.com (English-US).

“There are two main messages here,” Ghezzi summarized. “One is to the Internet giants, who are becoming more responsible in terms of avoiding misinformation, but need to build trust with users regarding privacy because of their use of personal data; and the other is to the alternative search engines, who could be responsible for spreading misinformation on vaccines, unless they become better in their role as information gatekeepers. This suggests that quality of the information provided, not just privacy, should be regulated.”

The researchers concluded that search engines should be developing tools to test search engines from the perspective of information quality, particularly with health-related webpages, before they can be deemed trustworthy providers of public health information.

[Source: This article was published in biotechniques.com - Uploaded by the Association Member: Eric Beaudoin]

Categorized in Internet Search

For many folks, Google is the front page of the internet. You don’t type Facebook.com into your browser. You just type “Facebook,” and then click the first Google result. Or you do a basic search by tapping in what you’re looking for.

But Google is way more powerful than that. You just have to learn a few of its secret code words, and then you can slice and dice your searches like a pro. No more wading through pages of results to find what you want. Use these tricks, and you’ll almost always get what you want on the first page. You can even ask Google to show you the weather.

Google search operators

These tips use Google’s search operators. These are commands that you add to your search terms in order to narrow the scope of the search. To use one, you just type your search as usual, then type the operator afterwards.

For instance, this is how you tell Google to limit your search to one particular website

 

Apple site:cultofmac.com

Type that into Google (or alternatives like DuckDuckGo), and it will search Cult of Mac for the term “Apple.”

For a complete list of Google’s search operators, check out Joshua Hardwicks’s comprehensive post on the subject at the Hrefs blog. For a sampling of the most useful operators, keep reading!

cache:

This one is great. If you click in the URL bar, and add cache: to the beginning of the URL and hit return, then Google will show you the most recent cached version of a site. This is super handy if a page is down due to excess traffic, or censorship, for example.

intitle:

Add intitle: to your search, and Google will search only the titles of web pages. Great to narrow down searches where you remember a few words from a title.

“search term in quotes”

This is a different kind of operator. If you put a word or words in quote, then Google will search for that exact phrase or word. This also works with ambiguous words, where Google might be confused what you actually mean. It’s also a good way to search for known misspellings.

OR

Type OR or | between terms, and Google will search for either of those terms. This is a rear way to combine search results from two parallel searches. For instance, dock iPhone OR iPad will return a search of both iPad docks and iPhone docks.

related:

This is an odd but very handy operator. You use it without an actual search term. So, if you type related:cultofmac.com, then Google will show you a list of sites which are related to this one. I like this when researching a subject I don’t know much about. If you find one good source, you can quickly discover more.

Quick hits

And finally, a few quick tricks. Try any of the following to get info about a specific thing:

movie:

map:

stocks:

weather:

 [Source: This article was published in cultofmac.com By CHARLIE SORREL - Uploaded by the Association Member: Clara Johnson]

Categorized in Internet Search

Google is bringing a new feature to its popular search engine. Its system will have a ‘Fact Check’ label on its image search results to verify the visual content, starting from today.

The Fact Check label can be found on the image thumbnails in the image search category and will search as a verification effort in Search and news. According to a statement from Google, “Photos and videos are an incredible way to help people understand what’s going on in the world. But the power of visual media has its pitfalls⁠—especially when there are questions surrounding the origin, authenticity, or context of an image.”

 

In other words, the new feature arrives to help people differentiate between authentic searches and unknown and possibly misleading sources. These labels will also help users make informed decisions regarding the content that they wish to see. Google also shared an example of this through its official Twitter handle. Say, someone, search Google Images for a shark swimming down the street in Houston, a fact check label will be attached below it, verifying the content.

Google SearchLiaison
 Is that image of a shark swimming down a street in Houston real? Google Images now has "Fact Check" labels to help inform you in some cases like this (no, it was not real). Our post today explains more about how & when fact checks appear in Google Images: blog.google/products/searc

EbIVJlCU4AAonJG (1).jpg

If a user clicks on the image to expand it, the fact checked search result will also display a preview of the image alongside a short summary of the information contained within the webpage and where the image is featured. Notably, these fact checks are present only on independent, authoritative sources and it is currently unknown what criteria a publisher needs in order to receive to also fall under this category. An algorithm determines trustable sources and offers the label.

[Source: This article was published in gizmochina.com By Sean - Uploaded by the Association Member: Edna Thomas]

Categorized in Search Engine

Search Console Insights uses both Search Console and Google Analytics data in one view

After being under the radar for a couple of months, Google has confirmed the new Google Search Console Insights. Search Console Insights is a new view of your data specifically “tailored for content creators and publishers,” Google said. It can help content creators understand how audiences discover their site’s content and what resonates with their audiences.

Search Console Insights uses both Search Console and Google Analytics data in one view. Google announced the beta today on Twitter, saying, “Today we’re starting to roll out a new experience to beta testers: Search Console Insights. It’s a way to provide content creators with the data they need to make informed decisions and improve their content.”

 

Access Search Console Insights. If you’re participating in the closed beta, you can access Google Search Console Insights for some of the profiles you manage in Google Search Console at https://search.google.com/search-console/insights/about. There, you can learn more about this reporting tool and click on Open Search Console Insights to potentially access the report.

What it looks like. Here is a screenshot provided by Google:

img src="https://searchengineland.com/figz/wp-content/seloads/2020/08/google-search-console-beta-insights-378x600.jpg" alt="" data-lazy-srcset="https://searchengineland.com/figz/wp-content/seloads/2020/08/google-search-console-beta-insights-378x600.jpg 378w,

I uploaded a full-sized, but blurred out, screenshot over here.

What Search Console Insights tells you. Google said Search Console Insights can help content creators and publishers answer questions about their site’s content, such as:

  1. What are your best performing pieces of content?
  2. How are your new pieces of content performing?
  3. How do people discover your content across the web?
  4. What are your site’s top and trending queries on Google Search?
  5. What other sites and articles link to your site’s content and did you get any new links?

Can’t access Search Console Insights? If you do not have access to Google Search Console Insights, do not worry. It is still in beta and even though Google has publicly announced it, it is not yet available to everyone.

“It is a closed beta that is currently only available to a group of users that have already received an official email from us for a specific site. We hope to open it for more users and to allow the beta group users to add more sites to it over time — stay tuned for more news and updates about this in the future,” Google said.

Why we care. As we said before, “Having certain Google Analytics data in Search Console can offer a big convenience and also help you see your data in new ways.” This Search Console Insights dashboard gives you more views of your content performance since it now blends both Google Analytics and Google Search Console data into one.

[Source: This article was published in searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by the Association Member: Mercedes J. Steinman]

Categorized in Search Engine
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