[This article is originally published in searchengineland.com written by Barry Schwartz - Uploaded by AIRS Member: Alex Gray]

Google is now showing both videos and recipe data within the image search results. This is something Google was testing earlier this year and now seems to have deployed it on mobile search.

Aaron Bradley posted on Google+ that this seems to be derived from newly supported schema around your images. Specifically, you can now mark up your video and recipe content so it is accessible in image search.

The revised video schema page on Google added this line:

Your video rich results can also display in image search on mobile devices, providing users with useful information about your video.

Aaron documented how this shows in the search results, and we were able to replicate this ourselves:

google image video watch 1499859346

google image video watch recipe 1499859346

To see this yourself, go to Google on your mobile phone, do a search for the keywords shown above, and click to the image results. Then click on some of the images, and you should see the details listed above.

Categorized in Search Engine

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz - Contributed by Member: Wushe Zhiyang

Google image search on desktop tests tiled image layout with titles and URLs beneath the snippets.

Google Image Search for desktop is testing a user interface and design that makes it more aligned with the mobile image search layout that launched back in March of this year. The desktop version in this test shows the tiled image layout in this white interface, it also shows the titles and URLs beneath each image search result snippet.

Here is a screenshot of the test, which I grabbed from a Google support forum

This brings it more in line with the mobile version of the image search results on Google. Here is a screenshot from my iPhone this morning:

Here is what the current design looks like, without the tiled design and titles and URLs:

Google is often testing new user interfaces, but it does make sense that it would align the desktop and mobile interfaces for image search.

Categorized in Search Engine

After making a deal with Getty Images, Google has revamped some of their image search features and user experience.

Google has removed the View Image button and the Search by Image feature when viewing an individual image within Google Image Search. Google announced this change on Twitter, saying:

Today we’re launching some changes on Google Images to help connect users and useful websites. This will include removing the View Image button. The Visit button remains, so users can see images in the context of the webpages they’re on.

The Search by Image button is also being removed. Reverse image search *still works* through the way most people use it, from the search bar of Google Images.

This seems to be in direct response to the concession Google made with Getty Images a few days ago around helping reduce copyright infringement through the popular search engine.

Here is how the feature looked before the change:

Here is what it will look like when this fully rolls out:

Also, notice how the “copyright” disclaimer is more visible within the search results.

Here is Google’s tweet:

Screenshot 2
 
Screenshot 3
Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Barry Schwartz
Categorized in Search Engine

The test was spotted on mobile over the weekend.

Google is running a new image test in search ads.

An image from the landing page appears to the right of the description area of the text ad. Sergey Alakov tweeted a screenshot of the ad test over the weekend.

View image on Twitter
 
Screenshot 1

A Google spokesperson told, “We’re always testing new ways to improve our experience for our advertisers and users, but don’t have anything specific to announce right now.”

Alakov is based in Toronto, Canada. I have not been able to replicate it, and it’s not clear how widespread the test is or what verticals are included besides automotive.

Google has gone through several iterations of testing images in search ads over the years. Currently, it is beta testing images in Sitelink extensions in a feature called Visual Sitelinks. Last year, Google launched large format mobile ads for automotive makers featuring a carousel of images of car models.

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Ginny Marvin

Categorized in Search Engine

Google says it aims to open up more data to show what's being searched around the world.

Google is adding new filters to its trends data, making it possible to see search trends beyond web search. Now, you can find real-time search trends on specific search terms within YouTube, News and Image searches, along with Google Shopping.

“We’re opening up more data to show what people in the world are looking for, as they’re looking for it,” writes Google on its The Keyword blog.

To see trends filtered by the specific search trends, first choose the search term you want to research. For example, if want to see search trends for Rihanna on YouTube, select Rihanna the singer on the Trends search bar.

From there, you can select to see search trends for “Rihanna” on Image search, News search, Google Shopping and YouTube search from the drop-down menu under Web Search.


Within each of the search trend filters, there is data for “Interest over time” and “Interest by region,” as well as a list of “Related topics” and “Related queries.

Source: This article was published searchengineland.com By Amy Gesenhues

Categorized in Search Engine

The web is teeming with images, and a lot of them are not what they seem. Reverse image search makes it easier to spot the fake images, and the fake people who are using someone else's profile photos.

Reverse image search involves choosing an image and using a search engine to find the same image on other web sites. It's a feature I use almost every day, and I'm confident that more people would do it if they knew what they were missing.

Reverse image search is both simple and free, thanks to services such as TinEye - which pioneered the field - and Google Image Search. Both offer browser extensions so all you have to do is right-click any online image and choose reverse image search from the drop-down menu. There are several other services, including meta-services like Image Raider, which will "search by image on Google, Bing, and Yandex" with up to 20 images at a time. However, Google and TinEye cover most people's needs most of the time.

So why would you use reverse image search? Reasons vary, but usually it's either to authenticate an image, by finding its source, or track its use across the web.

Tracking image use

If you have a website, publish brochures or press releases, or post copyright photographs online, you can assume that your images are going to be re-used. Reverse image search tells you where and when. After that, you can decide whether a re-use is legal and appropriate, and whether or not to take action.

Searching for publicity and advertising images will show you how much traction your press release or blog post got, and you may well find coverage that text searches have missed - perhaps in foreign languages.

You may also find your images re-used in contexts you're not happy about, such as illustrating stories about a rival company's products. If so, you can make sure they are correctly captioned and credited. Just remember that you can't complain about images that you don't actually own.

You may find some websites using your bandwidth by linking to the image on your web site rather than theirs. In that case, I've seen people replace the original photo with a less appropriate one that has the same filename.

You may also find copyright photos that you did not license for re-use. If so, you can get them taken down, or send them an invoice.

Either way, reverse image search surfaces a lot of valuable information that you couldn't easily find in any other way.

Authenticating images

When you see an image in your email or on the web, you don't really know how old it is, or where it originated. Reverse image search helps you to find out.

For example, suppose you are thinking about publishing a picture online or in print. Are you sure the supplier owns it? Is it genuine or has it been doctored? How old is it? How often has it been used before? How much is it really worth?

There are many thousands of cases where a quick reverse image search has, or would have, avoided major mistakes. Sometimes an image is claimed to show a particular event, but it was actually taken earlier, at a different event. This happens quite a lot with tweeted images and sometimes even with news stories. It might be a simple mistake by a picture agency, or it might be an attempt at deception.

Who is in the picture? In some cases, I've found, it's not the person it's said to show. Sometimes picture agencies get their captions wrong, and sometimes there are several different people with the same name. Checking the same image on several web pages usually solves both problems.

Has the image been doctored? Reverse image searches usually bring up numerous images that appear to look the same, but on closer examination, they're different. Sometimes a face may have been swapped, or something may have been removed from or added to the picture. Don't think this doesn't happen: whole websites are devoted to doctoring images, often for humorous or political reasons.

Sometimes pictures have been flipped (laterally reversed): it's an option worth trying when reverse image searches you don't find the matching images you'd expect. In the pre-web era, I once took flak for publishing a flipped photo of a famous guitarist. Dozens of fans spotted what I hadn't: that he appeared to be playing his guitar the wrong way round.

For these and similar reasons, reverse image searching is now a critical skill for mainstream publications, especially news organisations. And now you can do it in a couple of seconds, it makes sense for less critical uses, too.

Authenticating people

I also do reverse image searches on profile photos on social networking sites such as LinkedIn and Twitter. It's naive to assume everybody is who they claim to be. What appears to be an attractive young woman making friends with colleagues on LinkedIn might be a hacker fishing for information.

Surprisingly often, I find would-be contacts have stolen their profile photo from another Facebook or PhotoBucket user, or I find the same photos are being used to advertise escort services. Scammers often use photos of long-forgotten film actors and writers as well.

One day, reverse image search could save you from being scammed or conned.

If that's not a good reason to use it, I don't know what is.

Note: I'll explain the pros and cons of using Google and TinEye in my next post, Reverse image searching made easy...

http://www.zdnet.com/article/heres-why-you-and-your-business-should-use-reverse-image-search/

Categorized in Search Engine

TinEye and Google Image Search are both good for doing reverse image searches, and the two websites are different enough to be complementary. But there are other options including browser extensions and smartphone apps....

There are lots of reasons for using reverse image search - see my earlier post, Here's why you and your business should use reverse image search - and quite a few ways to do it. The main ones are the TinEye and Google Image Search websites, both of which are free. Depending on your location, needs and personal preferences, you might also want to try Baidu, Yandex, Bing Image Match, Image Raider or some other service.

But if you're new to reverse image searching, I suggest you start with TinEye and Google. I use both, because they are different enough to complement one another. TinEye has better features. Google Image Search generally has a bigger, fresher database, though it doesn't find all the images that TinEye knows about.

Basically, TineEye has the smart guys while Google has the web crawlers.

TinEye wins mainly on sorting features. You can order TinEye's results by newest first or oldest first, by size, by the best match, or by the most changed. I'm often trying to find the oldest version posted, to authenticate a particular photograph.

TinEye's results often show a variety of closely related images, because some versions have been edited or adapted. Sometimes you find your searched-for picture is a small part of a larger image, which is very useful: you can switch to searching for the whole thing. TinEye is also good at finding versions of images that haven't had logos added, which is another step closer to the original.

The main drawback with TinEye is that some of the search results are a couple of years old, and when you follow the link, either the image or the page or even the whole website has disappeared. In such cases, I use the TinEye result to run a Google Image search.

Google Image Search finds web pages rather than images. If you're doing a reverse image search, it's usually more useful to look for the link that says "Find other sizes of this image" and click on "All sizes".

By default, Google displays the most exact matches in descending order of size, and the links to the sources are hidden until you click an image. You can try to make it work more like TinEye by selecting "Visually similar" from the drop-down menu, but this includes images that have nothing at all to do with the original. For most purposes, this is a waste of time.

Worse, Google can't sort images by date. As with text searches, you get options such as "Past week" and "Custom range", but these are tedious to use, and don't seem very reliable.

However, Google does some very good things that TinEye doesn't. The key features are search by type (Face, Photo, Line drawing etc) and search by usage rights. It's very useful to be able to search for images that are "labelled for reuse with modification" or "labelled for non-commercial reuse" or whatever. Handled with care, this could be a money-saver.

With a bit of experiment, some combination of TinEye and Google Image Search should meet most of your needs. If not, there are other options.

I generally use the browser extensions for TinEye and Google. These perform a reverse image search when you right-click an online image and select "search [service] with this image" or something similar. This is quicker than uploading an image from a hard drive or pasting in a web link, though you can do those things too.

Browser extensions include Google's Search by Image for Google (Chrome, Firefox), TinEye Reverse Image Search (Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari, Internet Explorer), and Bing Image Match (Chrome). Third-party options include Google Reverse Image Search (Firefox, not written by Google), Search Image by Bing (Firefox, not written by Microsoft) and Who stole my pictures? (Firefox). You may be able to find more. I haven't tried all of them.

Apple iPhone users can do reverse image searches with apps such as Veracity and Microsoft's official Bing app. There's also a Search By Image app for Android. Of course, you can also use Google Image Search in the Chrome browser on a smartphone. Press and hold the image, and when the box appears, touch "Search Google for this image".

Finally, there's a useful image search engine for Reddit, called Karma Decay. If you use Reddit, you will know that some amusing images are reposted on a regular basis. Karma Decay finds them all.

This is more useful than it sounds. Redditors comment on most of these images, and their comments often include links to sources and sometimes explanations. If you are, like me, trying to authenticate images, these links and comments can save quite a lot of work.

http://www.zdnet.com/article/reverse-image-searching-made-easy/

Categorized in Search Engine

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