fbpx

This week, researchers revealed that a strain of malware hit at least 1.3 million Android phones, stealing user data as part of a scheme to boost ad revenue. Called “Gooligan,” it got into those devices the way so many of these large-scale Android attacks do: through an app. Specifically, an app that people downloaded outside the comfortable confines of the Google Play Store.

For criminals, the malicious Android app business is booming. It’s easy for a hacker to dress software up to look novel, benign, or like the dopplegänger of a mainstream product, and then plant it in third-party app stores for careless browsers to find. Once downloaded, these apps may even seem normal (if a little janky) but they can spread ransomware or types of malware that exploit system vulnerabilities to steal data or take over a whole device. Don’t want this drama on your phone? The key to protecting yourself is staying away from sketchy app stores, and only downloading software from Google Play.

Android’s open-source status makes it easily accessible to developers, but also leaves the door open for malicious apps. (Apple’s App Store isn’t immune from this issue, but it’s much less severe.) Google carefully vets the products in Play to make sure they’re safe. Rotten apps do slip through on occasion, but the company is fairly quick at removing anything problematic. “Google Play automatically scans for potentially malicious apps as well as spammy accounts before they are published on the Google Play Store,” Google said in a statement to WIRED. “We also introduced a proactive app review process to catch policy offenders earlier in the process and rely on the community of users and developers to flag apps for additional review.” There’s usually no way to know whether third-party app vendors offer this (or any) type of oversight. And malicious apps aren’t a minor threat.

“We work three to four cases a week around apps that have been seeded within the secondary app store market that conduct a variety of attacks from stealing money to rooting a phone for information stealing purposes,” says Dan Wiley, the head of incident response at Check Point, the security firm that discovered Gooligan. “When you buy or download an app from the genuine store a number of controls are in place to detect the fake and hostile apps. When you get your apps from somewhere other than the official stores, well, instead of just not getting the real thing you could lose your money, lose your personal information.”

One problem confronting Android in particular is the broad range versions, and manufacturer-imposed “skins” on top of those versions, in the wild. Nearly half of current Android users are on devices running Android 4.4—which came out three years ago—or older. This puts devices at risk because hackers can continue to successfully exploit known Android bugs for years even though they have been patched in more recent firmware updates, a strategy malware (like Gooligan) often relies on.

The most important way to ensure that your apps are legitimate is to navigate to the Google Play Store first, then search for what you want and download it there instead of using a search engine (or email from a coworker you barely know) to find a random link that may or may not lead to a legitimate source. By intentionally going to the Play Store first, you give yourself the best chance of downloading safe apps. “I definitely recommend getting things from the official sources,” says James Bettke, a counter threat unit researcher at the security intelligence firm SecureWorks. “Think before you click. Google Play establishes trust. You can trust that that app is made by a certain vendor or individual. With a third-party store you don’t know what you’re getting.”

One exception may be Amazon Underground, an app store which the retail giant created to work in parallel with Google Play so that Amazon wouldn’t have to share revenue, and could experiment with non-traditional app business models. Though staying in Play is the safest option for now, reputable third-party stores are possible, they’re just rare, because vetting apps to ensure security requires significant investment.

That’s true today more than ever. As desktop browsing declines and more people spend time on their mobile screens, apps are an increasingly appealing and lucrative target for hackers. “More and more critical functions and transactions are being executed through the apps,” says Sam Rehan, chief technology officer at the mobile security firm Arxan. “At the rate that online transactions are growing, things will only get more intense.”

Besides, no bubble-bursting game is worth leaking your personal data or a stolen identity. And it’s not like you don’t have millions of safe apps to choose from.

Source : https://www.wired.com

Author : LILY HAY NEWMAN

Categorized in Science & Tech

The company also released a compilation of insights on Black Friday mobile and in-store shopping behaviors.

Google is integrating Store Visits data into more AdWords reporting ahead of the holiday shopping surge. The search giant also shared findings on mobile search trends and store traffic patterns from Black Friday weekend last year.

The Distance report, located under the Dimensions tab, shows store visits based on how far away someone was from a store location (as indicated by an advertiser’s location extensions) when they performed a search and clicked on an ad.

With store visits data available in the geographic and user location reports (located from the Settings tab > Locations tab > “View location reports”), advertisers can see what areas are driving the highest volume of store visits. Advertisers can drill down to the postal code level within these reports.

Having visibility into this data helps further close the online-to-offline loop and can be used to inform location targeting and bid adjustments for areas that are driving store visits.

Retailers with enough ad clicks and in-store traffic volume will see store visits data in Search campaign reports now, and it will be available for Shopping campaigns soon.

According to Google, on Thanksgiving Day last year, 59 percent of mobile shopping searches occurred before 6 p.m., when many stores opened their doors and in-store foot traffic started to pick up. On Black Friday, in-store foot traffic peaked between noon and 4 p.m. See the infographic below for more insights on Black Friday shopping.

infographic-google-black-friday-data 

Auhor:  Ginny Marvin

Source:  http://searchengineland.com/

Categorized in Search Engine

During the Google I/O on March 18, 2016, Google is expected to reveal its plan to access the Google Play Store from the chromebook. (Photo : YouTube/ CNET)

Google is finally rolling out the much needed Google Play Family Library feature that would allow families to share their paid apps, TV shows and movies inside their home for free.
Apple already has a Family Sharing feature for their iTunes app and content for several years now and the search engine giant has just recently unveiled a feature for their own Google Play Store. Members of a family can now share their content with each other without having to pay for it again or to give away their account details.

Google Play Family Library allows users to pay with their own credit card or from the main account provided they have access, The Verge has learned. It can work for up to six different accounts and across multiple devices as well.

The search engine giant is rolling out the new Google Play Family Library feature in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Mexico, Japan, Italy, Ireland, Germany, France, Canada, Brazil and Australia. Users inside the Family Library can also choose whether they would like to share a content with a specific account or not.

For instance, an adult themed movie could be shared with other adults in the family but not with the kids' account. Parents inside the Google Play Family Library will also have the option to approve first the purchases of their children, Forbes reported.

It could then give parents the much needed control over app purchases as kids can sometimes buy as much as thousands of dollars even without the consent of adults. It was a glaring problem as parents often just gave their tablets and smartphones to their children without locking their account purchase capabilities first.

Apps and content that have been bought with the Google Play Family Library will be allowed to be used or consumed in other Android and ChromeOS devices. It can even allow the content to be used in other iPhones and iPads provided that a Google account is used.

Google is now rolling out the new Google Paly Family Library feature across the said countries and regions. It is unclear whether the search engine giant will still release the feature into more areas in the future.

http://en.yibada.com/articles/145968/20160728/google-play-family-library-feature-sharing-paid-apps-content-finally.htm

Categorized in Search Engine

airs logo

Association of Internet Research Specialists is the world's leading community for the Internet Research Specialist and provide a Unified Platform that delivers, Education, Training and Certification for Online Research.

Get Exclusive Research Tips in Your Inbox

Receive Great tips via email, enter your email to Subscribe.

Follow Us on Social Media